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Results: 1 - 30 of 99
View Luc Desilets Profile
BQ (QC)
Ms. O'Brien, drawing on your international or North American knowledge in this area, do you have any examples of countries that may not be meeting the demand but are at least trending toward a balance? If so, how are they doing it?
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Sheila O'Brien
View Sheila O'Brien Profile
Sheila O'Brien
2021-06-07 17:30
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Unfortunately, the demand is out there everywhere, so I don't have any solution to that particular problem.
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View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2021-06-03 12:46
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Thank you, Madam Chair.
Ms. Illingworth, I'd like to get your comments on the victims of crimes committed abroad. Are Canadians and Quebeckers who are victims of a crime committed abroad also covered by the programs established under the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights?
Furthermore, do Canadians and Quebeckers who are themselves abroad and who are victims of a crime benefit from some protection or services under the bill of rights?
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Heidi Illingworth
View Heidi Illingworth Profile
Heidi Illingworth
2021-06-03 12:47
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Thank you for that.
The Canadian Victims Bill of Rights only applies to crimes committed in Canada, so Canadians and Quebeckers who are victimized when they are travelling or living outside of the country do not fall under this bill because it applies to our justice system in the context of our criminal justice system. However, there is a funding program through the Department of Justice that allows victims to access some emergency financial assistance when they've been victimized abroad, outside of Canada.
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View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2021-06-03 12:48
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In your opinion, Ms. Illingworth, is that satisfactory as it is, or is that the kind of thing that should be changed?
Do you think the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights should include a provision for people who are victims of crimes committed abroad?
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Heidi Illingworth
View Heidi Illingworth Profile
Heidi Illingworth
2021-06-03 12:48
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This is a tough question because it's difficult for Canada to.... Canada can't give rights to people in other criminal justice contexts, so I think that is why it wasn't included.
What we suggested in our progress report to address this issue is that if we amend the bill to guarantee support services to all victims of crime, that would allow people who are victimized outside of Canada to, when they come back home, be able to seek support through services that are on the ground in the community in which they live, or federal services or what have you. It would ensure that people can get support when they're at home and are aware that they can get funding to travel back to participate in criminal justice processes abroad as well.
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View Marie-France Lalonde Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Marie-France Lalonde Profile
2021-05-28 14:19
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Thank you very much for taking the time to meet with us today.
Thank you for your patience with the technology.
I want to say thank you for the great work Audeamus is doing to help our veterans and, as well, the first responders and war correspondents.
Having seen and heard some of the coverage of your team's work, I appreciate the evidence-based and holistic approach you take when it comes to providing assistance to veterans in need. I was very impressed to know that it's run by and for injured veterans. I'm also very impressed by your resilience and certainly your quick action in the repositioning to continue to train our dogs.
My question is this. I believe and I understand that you have also worked internationally, specifically with Germany, to develop service dog programs for veterans in other countries. I understand that Germany doesn't yet have specific policies on service dogs. Is there anything that you feel they, or possibly any other country, have done differently that could help us with our Canadian veterans?
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Peter Holt
View Peter Holt Profile
Peter Holt
2021-05-28 14:20
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Once again I'll go to Chris. Chris has worked with Germany and Ukraine. There are other countries that have valued our approach to doing things. I'll let Chris speak to that, because he's been there.
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Christopher Lohnes
View Christopher Lohnes Profile
Christopher Lohnes
2021-05-28 14:20
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I've been working since 2015 with an organization that's based out of Canada—Hero's Companion—led by Kalyna Kardash. We went to build a service dog program in Ukraine, but the culture there is extremely different so we morphed it into a therapy dog program, with the therapy dogs doing many service dog types of tasks with the veterans. When we first started there, we weren't allowed on any hospital grounds. There is now an MOU with three leading hospitals in Ukraine for treatment there.
On my third visit to Ukraine in 2017, we stopped off in Germany. Through a contact with one of our researchers in B.C., we were able to meet with the head psychiatrist for injured veterans in Germany. We started a dialogue with them and opened the door for them to gain information from us to help with their program. We're still working on building a relationship with them.
The relationship in Ukraine is extremely strong. We have 25 handlers in that country and they're having very good results there.
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View Len Webber Profile
CPC (AB)
View Len Webber Profile
2021-05-27 12:49
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Okay. Thank you, Mr. Lawrence.
Thank you, everyone.
I apologize if these questions were already asked. My Internet is quite shaky here today. It dropped a couple of times.
Madam Hogan, you noted that other jurisdictions, such as the U.S. and the U.K., provided their employees with more comprehensive guidance when rolling out their new agile approaches in procurement. How do you know this? Is it part of the scope of your audit to look at other jurisdictions?
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Karen Hogan
View Karen Hogan Profile
Karen Hogan
2021-05-27 12:50
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When we can, we always try to compare and discuss with other jurisdictions or other areas across the government.
If the member would like, I could ask Joanna if she perhaps wants to elaborate on exactly how we went about doing that.
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Joanna Murphy
View Joanna Murphy Profile
Joanna Murphy
2021-05-27 12:50
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Yes, it's exactly as the Auditor General said. We like to look at leaders in this space and see what they are doing. As mentioned in paragraph 1.45, we did look at, for example, the State of California. They had introduced agile processes in their technology procurement. That's one example. We also talked to individuals within the U.K. Cabinet Office and to a few other states, such as Florida, which we didn't mention here.
It's in our interest to look at and see what others are doing so that Canada can learn from that.
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View Len Webber Profile
CPC (AB)
View Len Webber Profile
CPC (AB)
View Len Webber Profile
2021-05-27 12:51
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Great.
I guess I will ask Mr. Matthews, Mr. Glover and others that question. What are you doing to reach out to other jurisdictions around the world to gain knowledge and perhaps better improve your systems?
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Bill Matthews
View Bill Matthews Profile
Bill Matthews
2021-05-27 12:52
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We have a few other countries that we regularly partner with. The U.S. and the U.K. are two of the most common. We are now looking at other jurisdictions, as we look to augment our training and our documentation, to see if there are things we can borrow from to better improve that. I think with the creation of the centre of expertise as well as the playbook, yes, we have more to do, but I believe we're well under way.
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Paul Glover
View Paul Glover Profile
Paul Glover
2021-05-27 12:52
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Madam Chair, we have been talking to the U.S. and the U.K., but more recently we find that our interventions and our outreach are more successful when we are more targeted. We've actually gone, for example, on NextGen, to states and provinces that have reformed their pay systems. On that expert advisory committee on NextGen that I spoke about earlier, we have members from private companies too, meaning private companies in Canada. We have a province and we are looking to engage a number of leaders from the U.S. at the state level who have made the transition.
On agile governance, more broadly through DM Core we were recently talking to Australia and New Zealand on their experiences. Rather than the broad generalities, which in the early days were very helpful, we're now microtargeted on projects, on the nature of them and on who has been best in class on those. They are more than happy to come and share their experiences with us. We have found that very helpful.
We also work a lot with Gartner, and I know people are curious about that. They really take market intelligence globally, and they can help you with benchmarking and point you to the market leaders, in what they call their magic quadrant, who you should be engaging with, or who, with their global practice, they've seen be very successful. We also employ them to help point us in the right direction.
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View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Keenan, the Auditor General invited you to look at what other countries are doing to improve rail safety in Canada.
Did you contact the Auditor General to find out exactly what she wanted you to see outside? Do you intend to do that?
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Michael Keenan
View Michael Keenan Profile
Michael Keenan
2021-05-06 12:18
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Yes. Officials from Transport Canada and the Office of the Auditor General have had some interesting conversations about best practices to guide our efforts to put in place a system to measure the effectiveness of rail safety management systems.
Mike, I'll turn it to you. Could you elaborate on that? You're the one who had those conversations.
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Michael DeJong
View Michael DeJong Profile
Michael DeJong
2021-05-06 12:19
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Very quickly, we've actually done follow-up with our U.S. counterparts as well as with our U.K. and European Union counterparts to look into potential indicators for how we can improve our measurements of the oversight regime, including by potentially leveraging some best practices from the U.S. as well as our Canadian Energy Regulator in terms of potential performance indicators.
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View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2021-05-03 16:07
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Thank you so much, Chair, and thanks so much to all of you for this presentation.
I'd like to say right off the top that I want to thank the Veterans Affairs staff in the Kirkland Lake office for the the incredible work they do. They do really important work for veterans and, to me, their professionalism and their dedication are very inspiring.
I would also like to say that I think we're in a very difficult time right now because of COVID, which has really interrupted many of the efforts of Legions and of commemorations. I think we have to really be aware of that and try to bring this back when we're coming out of COVID.
I'd like to say first off that having been at the 75th anniversary of the battle of Italy, and also in Normandy, I was incredibly moved by the welcome we received and the way the events were handled. I was at the dedication of the bridge in Caen in commemoration of Captain George Gilbert Reynolds. The response of people in Caen when they saw that we were there to commemorate a Canadian was incredibly emotional. People really felt that connection.
The reality is that we're not going to have very many more trips with the veterans, if any at all, because of their age. How do you see us maintaining these connections that we've established in the Netherlands, Holland, Belgium and Italy—connections that we've built up over the years with these visits with the veterans? How do we maintain those connections?
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Rick Christopher
View Rick Christopher Profile
Rick Christopher
2021-05-03 16:09
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First, I'll say that it was very disappointing, I think, to veterans who were slated to go to the Netherlands 75th pilgrimage. It was very disappointing to staff, who had done a lot of work and were very much looking forward to this. I will say that for this I still have some hope, maybe not for this year, but for the following year, understanding that people are getting older and have challenges.
We're there at the invitation of these groups, and certainly in terms of current discussions they're obviously taken up with other issues right now in these countries, but as we go forward, as Paul mentioned earlier, we're continuing to make sure we're not disengaging from or failing to commemorate the more traditional veterans. We will continue to have smaller visits, I think, to some of these areas, making sure we're engaging at the grassroots level with these organizations, because they are hosting us and we want to make sure we have strong ties to a number of these countries and a number of these organizations in these countries. We want to make sure we're maintaining those.
As we shift to veterans commemorations around the world, we will include Europe, for instance, and we will still commemorate the First World War and the Second World War, just in a different way.
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View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2021-05-03 16:10
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Thank you for that.
Something one of the local Italian guides said when we were at Cassino struck me. He works with the Americans when they're there, and with the New Zealanders, the Australians and the Brits. He said that what really struck him about Canadian commemoration events is that we very much include our young people, and he thought that was really a unique and important thing for Canada.
How do we maintain these trips so that young people can see that and can be there as our goodwill ambassadors and come back with a greater understanding of the sacrifice?
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Rick Christopher
View Rick Christopher Profile
Rick Christopher
2021-05-03 16:11
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Absolutely, one of the things we're focusing on is youth engagement. One of the ways we used to do that was to have youth guides at the Vimy memorial. They were really our youth ambassadors. We have them doing other commemorative activities right now, but we want to make sure we continue to engage the youth and include them in all our commemoration activities, whether they be visits on a smaller scale or even some of the virtual things that we're doing. They've done some fantastic work for us instead of going to Vimy as guides this past year.
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View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you so much, Chair.
Thank you for the work you're doing. I can't stress enough how important I see this being, and I really look forward to the changes. I had the amazing experience of travelling over to France for the celebration of the Battle of Amiens and Canada's 100 days, and the amazing work that our armed forces did during World War I to turn the tide. That experience was life-changing. You know, this generation is so much involved in digital platforms that I don't believe it will necessarily do what we hope it will do, to some degree, although of course I understand the need.
I'm just wondering if there's been a sense of possibly incorporating current veterans and their families into that opportunity to go to experience what I experienced. Members of Parliament go. Bureaucrats go. Those who suffered through those wars have been, but we're losing that cohort. To give them and their families a sense of what they have contributed to, based on the foundations of our armed forces, would be something to consider going forward, when we will be back to being able to travel.
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Paul Thomson
View Paul Thomson Profile
Paul Thomson
2021-05-03 16:16
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If I can jump in, Mr. Chair, it's a great point. We always need to continue to be innovative and look for ways to involve families.
One thing I'll highlight—and I think MP Angus will remember this—is that when we did our trip to Normandy we'd do burials. If we located remains and could identify the remains of a fallen soldier, we would invite the family to come with us and participate in the burial over there, and participate in our whole delegation. We did that, and we want to do more of those kinds of things. Your point is well taken, and we are continuing to look at ways to involve the families, not only in our ceremonies but also in our delegations.
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View Rachel Blaney Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, everyone. I apologize for missing your presentation.
I heard Mr. Casey's question and I really couldn't agree more. We're hearing and seeing a lot more interaction in community events.
I know COVID has changed it, but this past Remembrance Day we had a small event and I was absolutely amazed to see how many of our veterans came, from the Second World War and the Korean War. Some of them were very elderly, but they were still there. It was hard for our cadets to not be able to go and help them walk closer. I appreciate how these opportunities for us to remember are really challenged during this time.
At the last committee meeting, we heard from Caitlin Bailey, the executive director of the Vimy Foundation. She talked about the concern she had around overseas commemorations—that mentality of “if it's out of sight, it's out of mind”—and making sure Canada is proactive in providing sustainable funding for the maintenance of memorials.
I wonder if you could give us a bit of an update and tell us if VAC is committed to ensuring that sustainable funding is there for the maintenance and upkeep of overseas commemorations, which I know we all agree are so important for us in our international reputation.
I will leave it to you to decide who should answer.
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Rick Christopher
View Rick Christopher Profile
Rick Christopher
2021-05-03 16:31
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Mr. Chair, I can start.
I absolutely agree, and as you can imagine, there are a number of challenges with having sites overseas. We have 14 sites. Two of them are national historic sites.
There are a number of organizations that we work with on a regular basis. Some of them do approach us on an ongoing basis for additional funding, whether that be for maintenance or interpretation. Some of these are ad hoc and some of them are more ongoing. For instance, if we look at the Juno Beach Centre, which is run by a non-governmental organization, we have an ongoing relationship in terms of funding for them.
For some of the others, though, such as if you're talking about the Vimy Foundation, we partner with them and provide funding, really to enhance the experience for people who are either interested in Vimy or visiting Vimy.
Maybe Paul can talk a bit about some of the ongoing projects we have with them.
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Paul Thomson
View Paul Thomson Profile
Paul Thomson
2021-05-03 16:32
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Very quickly, yes, the Juno Beach Centre and Vimy Foundation are very key and important partners for us in the work we do. We are working on a policy around third parties and how to deal with that ongoing asset management issue that we have, but we are working very well with both of them.
Even on the content development side, we've done some wonderful things with the Vimy Foundation recently that they're working on in terms of exhibits and content for Vimy, and the same with the Juno Beach Centre. They're very much aligned with our strategic plan and looking for opportunities for their own respective organizations to work with that.
I know that's not part of your question, but I want to flag that the relationship is good with both of those key groups and that we are working on a third party policy to put some parameters around how that ongoing asset management issue is going to look and feel going forward.
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Steven Clark
View Steven Clark Profile
Steven Clark
2021-05-03 17:20
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That is so important. In advance of last year's remembrance period, we asked all of our provincial commands to gather information from their branches about what they were doing and how they were remembering. We put all that information on our website. We shared it through what's called an “all-branch email communication”, so that we all knew what everybody was doing.
There are so many good ideas, and we need to share them. Nobody wants to keep them close to their chest. They want to share what they are doing. This is a great opportunity to do that.
We've also reached out to our fraternal international partners, the Royal British Legion and the Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association, to find out exactly what they are doing. We can share organizationally what others are doing when faced with a similar situation. We can give branches ideas.
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