Committee
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 2 of 2
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair.
I move:
That the following regularly scheduled meetings of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health be programmed as follows:
On June 4, 2021 the committee undertake one more three-hour meeting regarding Patented Medicine Prices Review Board guidelines, that each political party represented on the Committee be given leave to invite two witnesses of their choosing to provide testimony on the topic for this meeting, and that upon the completion of this meeting, the analysts of the committee be directed to commence the development of a draft report based on witness testimony and written submissions received by the committee on this subject to date;
On June 7, 2021 that the Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel, the Clerk of the Privy Council Office, Canada’s Privacy Commissioner and Canada’s Information Commissioner be invited for the duration of a two-hour meeting to discuss issues related to, but not limited to, the production of documents regarding the October 26 House of Commons motion, and that the total time allotted for opening statements be limited to five minutes for each witness up to a maximum of 20 minutes in total to ensure adequate time for questions to be posed by committee members;
For the first hour on the meetings scheduled for June 11, 14, 18 and 21, 2021, each political party represented on the committee be given leave to invite one witness of their choosing to discuss issues related to, but not limited to, the federal government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and that the total time allotted for opening statements be limited to five minutes by witnesses to ensure adequate time for questions to be posed by committee members;
For the second hour on the meetings scheduled for June 11, 14, 18 and 21, 2021 the deputy minister of Health Canada, the deputy minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, the deputy minister of Public Services and Procurement, the president of the Public Health Agency of Canada, the chief public health officer of Canada, the vice-president of logistics and operations for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the head of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization, be invited to discuss issues related to, but not limited to, the federal government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, that the Minister of Health be in attendance for at least one of these meetings, that the meeting that the Minister of Health is in attendance be held on a Friday, be three hours in length, that the minister and officials be in attendance for two consecutive hours, and that the total time allotted for opening statements by officials (and the minister) during this portion of the meeting be limited to five minutes by witnesses up to a maximum of 20 minutes in total to ensure adequate time for questions to be posed by committee members.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je propose:
Que les réunions régulières suivantes du Comité permanent de la santé de la Chambre des communes soient prévues comme suit:
Que le 4 juin 2021, le Comité tienne une autre réunion de trois heures sur les Lignes directrices du Conseil d’examen du prix des médicaments brevetés, que chaque parti politique représenté au Comité soit autorisé à inviter deux témoins de son choix à témoigner sur le sujet et qu’à l’issue de cette réunion, les analystes du Comité reçoivent l’ordre d’entreprendre l’élaboration d’un rapport préliminaire fondé sur les témoignages et les mémoires reçus par le Comité à ce jour sur le sujet;
Que, le 7 juin 2021 , le légiste et conseiller parlementaire, le greffier du Conseil privé, le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada et le commissaire à l’information du Canada soient invités à une réunion de deux heures pour discuter de questions liées, sans s’y limiter, à la production de documents concernant la motion du 26 octobre de la Chambre des communes, et que le temps total alloué aux déclarations d’ouverture soit limité à cinq minutes par témoin pour un maximum de 20 minutes afin de laisser suffisamment de temps aux membres du Comité pour poser des questions; 
Que, pour la première heure des réunions prévues pour les 11, 14, 18 et 21 juin 2021, chaque parti politique représenté au sein du comité soit autorisé à inviter un témoin de son choix pour discuter de questions liées à, sans pour autant s’y limiter, la réponse du gouvernement fédéral au rapport sur la COVID‑19, et que le temps total alloué aux déclarations d’ouverture soit limité à 5 minutes par témoin afin de laisser suffisamment de temps aux membres du comité pour poser des questions; 
Que, pour la deuxième heure des réunions prévues les 11, 14, 18 et 21 juin 2021, le sous-ministre de Santé Canada, le sous-ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la protection civile du Canada, le sous-ministre de Services publics et Approvisionnement, le président de l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada, l’administrateur en chef de la santé publique du Canada, le vice-président de Logistique et Opérations de l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada et le chef du Comité consultatif national de l’immunisation soient invités à discuter de questions liées à, sans pour autant s’y limiter, la réponse du gouvernement fédéral à la pandémie de la COVID-19, que la ministre de la Santé soit présente à au moins une de ces réunions, que la réunion à laquelle elle assiste ait lieu un vendredi et qu’elle dure trois heures, que la ministre et les responsables mentionnés soient présents pendant deux heures consécutives et que le temps total alloué aux déclarations d’ouverture soit limité à cinq minutes par témoin (incluant la ministre) pour un maximum de 20 minutes afin de laisser suffisamment de temps au comité pour poser des questions.
Collapse
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair.
First, as vice-chair, I'd like to clarify some information that the chair provided.
The meeting we are currently undertaking as the Standing Committee on Health is happening during the middle of a pandemic that has caused many deaths in Canada and great economic burden on millions of Canadians. The meeting we're having is happening under the auspices of Standing Order 106(4). This is a procedural provision that allows members of the committee to call a meeting in order to consider business that might be of pressing urgency for the committee.
The notice that was provided to the committee, which precipitated this meeting, was done because of a very urgent situation that the country is facing right now. The fact is that many other countries around the world are receiving doses of what could arguably be described as the hottest commodity on the planet, the life-saving Pfizer vaccine. However, Canada is not, even though the government provided assurances to Canadians that this would be happening. This is something the government should have anticipated, given that it was briefed by the pharmaceutical company throughout the fall, and that production scale-ups happen when there's a new product.
The reason for this meeting is to hopefully move a motion to determine why Canada is not receiving these vaccines right now. Regardless of political stripe, I hope we can put aside our differences and agree that this is something that, at this present moment, the Standing Committee on Health should be investigating.
Why did we use Standing Order 106(4)? The chair asserts that there's nothing remarkable about this situation, that 45 days passed and that is the standard period of time that committees don't sit over the holidays, but this is exactly why 106(4) exists. I would argue that something remarkable has happened, and that is that dozens of people are dying in our country every day from a virus that could be prevented if people were administered the vaccine.
That characterization of bureaucracy and pedantry is standing in the way of the work of a parliamentary committee tasked with the mandate of health, during a pandemic. That it should somehow be unremarkable that it is not meeting is slightly problematic.
The second thing is that Parliament resumed on Monday. For those who are watching, and this might be inside baseball for people, our committee typically meets on Mondays and Fridays. There was no meeting called by the chair for this Monday. When I saw that last week, I was concerned. It meant that the committee would not have met for business today, which meant we wouldn't meet until Friday. We would have had a meeting called by the Liberals, and we probably wouldn't have had an opportunity to call the Minister of Health or the Minister of Procurement to talk about a vaccine shortage that is literally killing people and will be for some time to come in the future.
Canadians deserve better than that, and that's why we put this request forward. We need to put aside bureaucratic arguments about why the committee isn't meeting, and start meeting the needs of our constituents. That's what this committee is for, to actually hold the government to account on its decisions.
The chair has put forward a bunch of reasons why we should be editing this motion, and why it could fit under this motion or that motion. The reality is that the committee has the ability to change its mandate and its tasks as it sees fit, as the government often reminds us when we ask questions about committees in the House when the government manages to put things through that it finds beneficial.
In this situation, it's important to remind the chair that we are facing a monumental challenge in this country. We need answers on why we have a vaccine shortage and, more importantly, what the government is going to do to fix it. That's the only hope we can offer Canadians right now, and it's of the greatest significance. What we're discussing is probably the greatest thing that Parliament is doing right now. That's the gravity of this, and we need to do this.
I would be very uncomfortable going back to my constituents and reading a lot of wordy procedure as to why we couldn't invite the health minister or the Minister of Procurement, who is responsible for getting Canada the vaccine, to the health committee today.
I actually don't accept any of the rationale the chair tried to put forward with regard to how I should edit my motion. The motion I'm about to put forward is in the best interest of all Canadians. It still allows the Liberals to proceed with the meetings they've put forward. It gives the Liberals, actually, the opportunity to decide whether or not they want to proceed with a meeting that was agreed to in an entirely different context six weeks ago, before we were in a vaccine shortage that other countries aren't in right now. That's really going to be up to the Liberals. I'm going to work that into the wording of the motion.
Given the shortage, and given that we need answers for Canadians, I think it's important that we consider the motion as I put it forward in the letter. Canadians need to know when exactly they're going to be able to get a vaccine, and the provinces need to know when vaccines are going to arrive so that they can plan to deliver them.
Chair, should you rule it out of order, my instinct would be to challenge your ruling for all of the reasons I just gave you. We have to do this, and you know it. Every Canadian is depending on this committee to do this type of review. We have doctors on this committee. We need to get to the bottom of this, and we need a path forward.
With that, Chair, I move:
That the committee invite the Minister of Health, the Minister of Procurement and their officials to appear before the committee for no less than two hours each regarding all matters related to Canada’s COVID-19 vaccination strategy, and that this meeting occur no later than February 5, 2021;
That in accordance with a motion previously passed by the committee, the clerk of the committee be instructed to schedule the final agreed-upon fourth meeting regarding the Liberal-selected mental health theme of the COVID-19 study during the committee’s regularly scheduled meeting on February 1, 2021, unless the Liberal members of the committee elect to forgo this meeting in favour of beginning meetings on the next theme of the committee’s COVID-19 study;
That the committee select its next theme of the COVID-19 study in the agreed-upon manner set out in the original motion, with the next theme being selected by the Conservative members of the committee, with the Conservative members selecting the theme of all matters related to Canada’s COVID-19 vaccination strategy, and that the first meeting of this theme commence at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the committee after February 1, 2021, which is February 5, 2021, unless the Liberal members of the committee elect to forgo the last meeting in the prior theme per the option outlined above, and that parties shall submit witnesses to the clerk for these four meetings pertaining to vaccines no later than January 28, 2021 at 4 p.m. Eastern.
Again, to colleagues who are considering how to vote on this motion, every one of you has communities that are under lockdown right now. For those of you who are in Quebec, your community is under a curfew. Many of you have long-term care facilities in your riding. I know I have colleagues who have emailed me that they've had a variant go through their long-term care facility, and 40-plus people have died in recent days. Front-line health care workers are calling in tears, asking, “When am I getting my vaccine?” In some cases, some people have received one dose of the vaccine and are not sure when they're going to get the second. If it's delayed for a certain period of time, what does that mean for their health? Is it going to work? Provincial governments are telling the federal government that they can't deliver what they don't have.
There are times when we will fight on this committee. There are times when we are going to disagree on policy, but this motion is very reasonably laid out. It gives the Liberals the option of proceeding on Friday per the schedule we had before Christmas, before all of this happened. That's really up to the Liberal Party. I didn't want to fight you guys on that. It's up to you.
We give you the choice, but there is no situation in which the Liberals can argue that the Minister of Health and the Minister of Procurement should not be coming before the federal Standing Committee on Health within the next couple of weeks to answer these questions. Every day that we go without having them, without getting these details and just hearing more platitudes, is another day that people are getting infected, that health care workers have stress and anxiety and that we're under curfew or lockdown.
We have the foreign affairs minister floating the idea of the Emergencies Act. Our country needs to get this together. For those of you who haven't had a situation like this—or perhaps it's your first term in Parliament—this is real, and this is why this committee exists. It exists to get these types of answers. Should this motion pass, what it's saying is that we're going to start the next theme of the study either next week or on Friday, depending on what the Liberal Party wants to do.
It's up to you. Mental health is important. Vaccines are important. It's over to you guys.
Also, to get some answers, we're inviting to committee the ministers who are responsible for getting Canada's vaccines. How are we getting through this? I'll be very honest with you guys. I just had a devastatingly terrible panel on CTV National News with one of our Liberal colleagues, who was trying to suggest that Canada wouldn't make the target unless we were approving vaccine candidates that no other country has approved. He then had to walk that statement back. I'd like to have the ministers here to get to the bottom of that.
With deep respect and humbleness, I submit the motion as put forward in this Standing Order 106 notice. Chair, if you rule it out of order, I will be challenging you on that ruling, because I believe that you would be ruling it out of order based on pedantry, not on the Canadian public interest. I would encourage all of my colleagues to ensure that your ruling is overturned.
We need to have the ministers here and we need to get some answers from the pharmaceutical companies on vaccine supply, because we need a path forward. I would not feel comfortable as a vice-chair for the Standing Committee on Health, as a member of Parliament or as a Canadian if we were doing anything less. This is what we need to do over the next month as a committee: put differences aside and get to the bottom of this.
For those of you who are Liberal Party members, I have had moments where I have had to think about what is in the best interests of my constituents and not necessarily in the best interests of my political party. I would really encourage you to think about that in this moment.
There is no reason, no logical reason, why the Minister of Health and the Minister of Procurement should not be coming before the federal Standing Committee on Health at this moment in time. I'm hoping that we can dispense with this motion, we can support it, we can schedule things out and we can move forward with getting some answers and some hope for Canadians.
Thank you.
Merci, monsieur le président.
J'aimerais d'abord, dans mon rôle de vice-présidente, apporter certaines précisions quant aux informations fournies par notre président.
La séance qu'entreprend actuellement le Comité permanent de la santé survient au beau milieu d'une pandémie qui a entraîné de nombreux décès au Canada et imposé un fardeau financier considérable à des millions de Canadiens. Cette réunion se tient en vertu du paragraphe 106(4) du Règlement. Il s'agit d'une disposition d'ordre procédural qui permet aux membres d'un comité de convoquer une séance afin que le comité se penche sur une question qu'ils considèrent urgente.
L'avis à l'origine de la présente séance a été donné au Comité parce que nous nous retrouvons dans une situation d'extrême urgence au Canada. Ainsi, de nombreux pays du monde reçoivent actuellement des doses de ce qui est sans doute maintenant le bien le plus précieux sur la planète, soit le vaccin de Pfizer qui permet de sauver des vies. Le Canada n'en reçoit cependant aucune, même si le gouvernement avait assuré aux Canadiens que ce serait le cas. Le gouvernement aurait sans doute dû anticiper la situation actuelle à la lumière des informations que lui a transmises l'entreprise pharmaceutique pendant l'automne et vu qu'il est chose courante que l'on doive augmenter la production dans le cas d'un nouveau produit.
Cette séance vise donc à nous permettre de présenter une motion nous autorisant à nous pencher sur les raisons pour lesquelles le Canada ne reçoit pas actuellement ces doses de vaccin. J'ose espérer que nous pourrons mettre de côté nos différends et nos allégeances politiques pour convenir qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu auquel le Comité permanent de la santé doit s'intéresser sans tarder.
Pourquoi avons-nous invoqué le paragraphe 106(4) du Règlement? Notre président fait valoir qu'il n'y a rien de remarquable dans la situation actuelle et qu'il est chose courante que 45 jours s'écoulent ainsi entre les séances des comités en raison du congé des Fêtes, mais c'est justement la raison d'être du paragraphe 106(4). Je vous dirais pour ma part qu'il se produit actuellement quelque chose de remarquable avec ces dizaines de Canadiens qui meurent chaque jour, victimes d'un virus, alors que ces décès pourraient être évités si le vaccin était administré.
Une telle vision bureaucratique et complaisante de la situation empêche un comité parlementaire de remplir son mandat lié à la santé en plein coeur d'une pandémie. Je trouve un peu problématique que l'on puisse considérer qu'il n'est pas inhabituel que notre comité ne tienne pas de séance dans ces circonstances.
Par ailleurs, le Parlement a repris ses travaux en ce lundi matin. Je précise pour ceux qui nous regardent, car c'est sans doute une question de régie interne aux yeux de certains, que notre comité se réunit généralement les lundis et les vendredis. La présidence n'a convoqué aucune séance pour ce lundi-ci. Cela n'a pas manqué de me préoccuper lorsque je m'en suis rendu compte la semaine dernière. Ainsi, nous ne nous serions pas réunis pour traiter de nos affaires courantes aujourd'hui et notre première séance n'aurait eu lieu que vendredi. Nous aurions alors tenu la séance convoquée par les libéraux, si bien qu'il ne nous aurait sans doute pas été possible de faire comparaître la ministre de la Santé ou la ministre de l'Approvisionnement pour discuter d'une pénurie de vaccins qui coûte littéralement la vie à des gens et qui nous affectera pendant un bon moment encore.
Les Canadiens méritent mieux que cela, et c'est ce qui nous a incités à formuler cette requête. Nous devons mettre de côté les arguments d'inspiration bureaucratique quant aux raisons pour lesquelles notre comité ne se réunit pas et nous mettre résolument au travail pour répondre aux besoins de nos commettants et commettantes. Notre comité existe justement pour demander des comptes au gouvernement relativement aux décisions qu'il prend.
Notre président nous a exposé différentes raisons pouvant nous inciter à amender cette motion en nous indiquant comment elle pourrait s'inscrire dans les paramètres de telle ou telle autre motion. Dans les faits, il est possible pour le Comité de modifier son mandat et ses tâches lorsqu'il le juge approprié, comme le gouvernement nous le rappelle souvent en réponse à nos questions au sujet des comités à la Chambre en cherchant le moyen de présenter les choses à son avantage.
Dans le contexte actuel, il est important de rappeler à notre président que notre pays est confronté à un défi gigantesque. Nous devons savoir pourquoi nous devons composer avec une pénurie de vaccins et, ce qui est plus crucial encore, ce que fait le gouvernement pour y remédier. C'est absolument primordial, car c'est le seul espoir que nous pouvons offrir aux Canadiens dans l'état actuel des choses. C'est sans doute l'élément le plus significatif du travail actuel du Parlement. La situation est grave, et nous devons agir.
Je serais très mal à l'aise de devoir me présenter devant mes électeurs pour leur faire lecture de longs textes procéduraux leur expliquant les raisons pour lesquelles il nous était impossible d'inviter la ministre de la Santé ou la ministre de l'Approvisionnement, qui est responsable de la livraison de vaccins au Canada, à comparaître aujourd'hui devant le Comité de la santé.
En fait, je n'accepte aucun des arguments que le président a essayé de faire valoir concernant des modifications à apporter à ma motion. La motion que je m'apprête à présenter sert bien les intérêts de tous les Canadiens. Elle permet toujours aux libéraux de tenir les réunions qu'ils ont proposées. En fait, elle leur donne l'occasion de décider s'ils veulent tenir une réunion sur laquelle nous nous étions entendues dans un contexte complètement différent, il y a six semaines, avant que nous nous trouvions dans une situation où le Canada manque de vaccins, contrairement à d'autres pays. Ce sera vraiment aux libéraux de décider. Je vais reprendre cela dans le libellé de la motion.
Compte tenu du manque de vaccins, et étant donné qu'il nous faut obtenir des réponses pour les Canadiens, je pense qu'il est important que nous examinions la motion telle que je l'ai présentée dans la lettre. Les Canadiens ont besoin de savoir à quel moment exactement ils pourront recevoir un vaccin, et les provinces ont besoin de savoir quand les vaccins arriveront pour qu'elles puissent planifier leur distribution.
Monsieur le président, si vous deviez déclarer la motion irrecevable, mon instinct me pousserait à contester votre décision pour toutes les raisons que je viens de vous donner. Nous devons le faire, et vous le savez. Chaque Canadien compte sur ce comité pour qu'il fasse ce type d'examen. Il y a des médecins au sein de ce comité. Nous devons aller au fond des choses, et nous avons besoin d'une voie à suivre.
Cela dit, monsieur le président, je propose:
Que le Comité invite la ministre de la Santé, la ministre de l'Approvisionnement et leurs fonctionnaires à se présenter devant le Comité pendant au moins deux heures, chacun, pour discuter de toutes les questions liées à la stratégie de vaccination contre la COVID-19 au Canada, et que cette réunion ait lieu, au plus tard, le 5 février 2021;
Que, conformément à une motion adoptée antérieurement par le Comité, le greffier du Comité soit chargé de fixer la quatrième réunion finale convenue concernant le thème de la santé mentale, choisi par les libéraux, dans le cadre de l'étude sur la COVID-19 au cours de la réunion habituelle du Comité, prévue le 1er février 2021, à moins que les députés libéraux du Comité décident de renoncer à cette réunion en faveur du début des réunions sur le prochain thème de l'étude sur la COVID-19 du Comité;
Que le Comité choisisse son prochain thème d'étude sur la COVID-19 de la manière convenue dans la motion initiale, le prochain thème étant choisi par les députés conservateurs siégeant sur le Comité, les députés conservateurs choisissant le thème de toutes les questions liées à la stratégie de vaccination contre la COVID-19 au Canada et que la première réunion sur ce thème commence à la prochaine réunion régulière du Comité, après le 1er février 2021, soit le 5 février 2021, à moins que les députés libéraux siégeant sur le Comité ne choisissent de renoncer à la dernière réunion sur le thème précédent selon l'option décrite ci-haut, et que les diverses parties soumettent, au greffier, des témoins pour ces quatre réunions concernant les vaccins, au plus tard, le 28 janvier 2021 à 16 h (HNE).
Encore une fois, je veux dire à mes collègues qui se demandent s'ils appuieront la motion que dans leurs circonscriptions respectives, des communautés sont actuellement en confinement. Pour ceux d'entre vous qui sont au Québec, un couvre-feu y a été instauré. Il y a des établissements de soins de longue durée dans bon nombre de vos circonscriptions. Je sais que des collègues m'ont envoyé des courriels m'informant qu'un variant s'est propagé dans leur établissement de soins de longue durée et que plus de 40 personnes sont décédées ces derniers jours. Des travailleurs de la santé de première ligne appellent en pleurant et demandant à quel moment ils recevront leur vaccin. Dans certains cas, les personnes ont reçu une dose du vaccin et ne savent pas quand elles recevront la seconde dose. Si la livraison de vaccins est retardée pendant un certain temps, qu'est-ce que cela signifie pour leur santé? Est-ce que cela va fonctionner? Les gouvernements provinciaux disent au gouvernement fédéral qu'ils ne peuvent pas fournir ce qu'ils n'ont pas reçu.
Il y a des moments où nous ne nous entendrons pas au sein de ce comité. Il y a des moments où nous aurons des opinions divergentes sur des politiques, mais cette motion est présentée de manière très raisonnable. Elle donne aux libéraux la possibilité de procéder vendredi selon le calendrier que nous avions avant Noël, avant que tout cela n'arrive. Cela dépend vraiment du Parti libéral. Je ne voulais pas me battre contre vous sur ce point. C'est à vous de décider.
Nous vous donnons le choix, mais en aucun cas les libéraux ne peuvent dire que la ministre de la Santé et la ministre de l'Approvisionnement ne devraient pas témoigner devant le Comité permanent de la santé d'ici deux ou trois semaines pour répondre à ces questions. Chaque jour qui passe sans qu'elles ne comparaissent, sans que nous obtenions l'information, chaque jour qui passe au cours duquel nous entendons seulement des platitudes, est un jour de plus durant lequel des gens contractent la COVID, les travailleurs de la santé sont stressés et anxieux et nous sommes soumis à un couvre-feu ou confinés.
Le ministre des Affaires étrangères laisse planer l'idée de recourir à la Loi sur les mesures d'urgence. Notre pays doit agir. Pour ceux d'entre vous qui n'ont jamais connu une telle situation — ou peut-être il s'agit de votre premier mandat au Parlement —, voilà ce qui se passe, et voilà pourquoi ce comité existe. Il existe pour obtenir ce type de réponses. Si la motion devait être adoptée, ce qu'elle indique, c'est que nous allons commencer à examiner le prochain thème de l'étude la semaine prochaine ou vendredi, en fonction de ce que le Parti libéral veut faire.
C'est à vous de décider. La santé mentale et importante, les vaccins sont importants. À vous de jouer.
De plus, afin d'obtenir des réponses, nous invitons à comparaître devant notre comité les ministres qui sont responsables de l'obtention de vaccins pour le Canada. Comment allons-nous nous en sortir? Je serai très honnête avec vous. Je viens de participer à un panel vraiment terrible sur CTV avec un de nos collègues libéraux, qui laissait entendre que le Canada n'atteindrait pas la cible à moins que nous approuvions des candidats-vaccins qu'aucun autre pays n'a approuvés. Il a ensuite dû revenir sur cette déclaration. J'aimerais que les ministres viennent témoigner pour aller au fond des choses.
Avec le plus grand respect et une grande humilité, je soumets la motion présentée dans cet avis donné conformément à l'article 106 du Règlement. Monsieur le président, si vous la jugez irrecevable, je contesterai votre décision, car je pense que vous la jugeriez irrecevable par complaisance, et non pas pour l'intérêt des Canadiens. J'encouragerais tous mes collègues à faire en sorte que votre décision soit annulée.
Il faut que les ministres témoignent devant notre comité, et nous devons obtenir des réponses des compagnies pharmaceutiques au sujet de l'approvisionnement en vaccins, car nous avons besoin d'une voie à suivre. En tant que vice-présidente du Comité permanent de la santé, députée et Canadienne, je ne me sentirais pas à l'aise si nous faisions moins que cela. C'est ce que notre comité doit faire au cours du mois prochain: mettre les différences de côté et aller au fond des choses.
Je veux dire à ceux d'entre vous qui sont des députés libéraux qu'il y a eu des moments où j'ai dû penser à ce qui était dans l'intérêt de mes électeurs et pas nécessairement dans celui de mon parti politique. Je vous encourage vivement à y réfléchir en ce moment.
Il n'y a aucune raison, aucune raison logique, pour laquelle la ministre de la Santé et la ministre de l'Approvisionnement ne devraient pas témoigner devant le Comité permanent de la santé à ce moment-ci. J'espère que nous pourrons appuyer la motion, établir un calendrier, puis obtenir des réponses et donner de l'espoir aux Canadiens.
Merci.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 2 of 2

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data