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Results: 1 - 15 of 4775
View Louise Chabot Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Welcome to the witnesses. I am pleased that we were able to meet again so quickly.
My first question is for Ms. McGee.
Thank you for your testimony. You talked about the issues of homelessness and social housing. You have this particular organization in Alberta, but I think these are important concerns in every province. They were important before the pandemic, but they have become even more pressing during the pandemic. Earlier, you said that you are a leader.
If I understood correctly, you said that community organizations sometimes see confusion between levels of government. You believe that we should let organizations govern because they are able to better understand the needs of the community. As we have seen, ecosystems in every province have a role to play in meeting the demand when it comes to both homelessness and social housing.
Don't you think that agencies and provinces should be allowed to lead and that the federal government should support them with funding?
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View Louise Chabot Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you for your answer.
That said, often, thanks to the coordination efforts in the provinces, each of the communities is able to see what the best means and solutions are, depending on the ecosystem. Sometimes, attempts are made to impose uniform policies across the country, but that may not be the solution. I understand your answer and I respect it.
Let me ask you a second question, which is simple. In the event of a second wave of the pandemic, given what we have been through, what would your apprehensions be? What would have to be done?
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View Louise Chabot Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you.
Mr. Taylor, you talked a lot about mortgages. One of your recommendations is to extend the deferral period for mortgage payments by at least six months. Could you tell me how you came up with your assessment of the required period? Do you know how many Canadians have asked for this deferral?
Furthermore, are you not concerned that, when interest rates are very low, household debt is high? Actually, household mortgages can account for as much as three-quarters of a household's debt.
How can your proposal be reconciled with the fact that 8.6 million unemployed men and women in Quebec have asked for emergency assistance? Don't you see a danger there?
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View Louise Chabot Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mrs. Corriveau, I applaud you and FRAPRU. Thank you for being here and for your testimony.
I am very familiar with your organization in Quebec. The claims you are making today are in line with those you have been making for years.
Please tell me if my figures are accurate. I believe you said that, in July 2020 alone, 350 households were without housing. That would be the highest number since 2003. Also, if the community organizations did a count, it might be higher. If this is accurate, it does confirm that there is a shortage of what we may call social housing. A distinction could be made between community-based housing, low-income housing and affordable housing, but let's say there is a shortage of social housing. This is something you have been working on for years.
Other speakers have talked about the national housing strategy. As you know, an agreement was signed between the federal government and all the provinces except Quebec. For Quebec, the amount over the last three years could be between $1.4 billion and $1.7 billion, which is not insignificant.
In your opinion, if the money had been transferred unconditionally to Quebec, what difference would it have made to the dynamic?
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View Louise Chabot Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mrs. Corriveau, given what we currently know and the solutions you are proposing, what concerns or apprehensions would you have about a second wave that remains possible but that we do not want? What do we have to do in order to prepare for that situation?
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View Louise Chabot Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mrs. Corriveau.
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 10:46
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Mr. Chair, first, I want to check with you to see if you are able to see raised hands, because as soon as you opened the meeting, I clicked on the Raise Hand button, but you do not seem to have seen it. If you do not see raised hands, I will continue waving, because that might be more effective.
Anyway, back to the meeting. I have a number of comments.
First, I would like to comment on the amendment. Deciding to deal with motions and possible reports on an ad-hoc basis, when we agreed from the outset to have only one report, is an indication of the trouble we are in right now. If we are to continue down this road and have reports on specific issues, I would like them to be considered interim reports, so that we can keep discussing the issue of Tibet, for instance, and not have everything finalized with the motions we are passing today.
We may have put the cart before the horse, as they say. Since the community expects us to echo what the president of the Tibetan administration is saying, we are in a situation where we are almost forced to pass this motion, and I am uneasy with us being in a situation like that today. The motion makes sense, but I would not want it to stop us from going deeper into the problematic issue of Tibet.
That is why I will at least support the motion of which Mr. Harris has given us notice and which suggests that we will continue to discuss and reflect on the Tibet situation. However, once again I would caution us against the temptation to come up at any moment with motions that put the committee in an uncomfortable position, keep us from getting to the bottom of things and, more importantly, keep us from making the connections we need to make between various issues.
Next, I would like to talk about Ms. Alleslev's proposal. I have heard Mr. Harris's arguments and those put forward by Liberal colleagues so far. My initial reaction was to say that having to improve a motion thrown at us on the fly in the middle of a committee meeting, rather than discussing it amongst ourselves, is an indication of the trouble we are in right now.
I would therefore ask you to avoid this type of manoeuvre in the future, as we can clearly see the trouble it puts us in.
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 10:56
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Mr. Chair, I have nothing more to add to what I have already had the chance to say.
I will therefore be in favour of this motion as amended. However, I would once again caution us against the temptation to make motions unannounced when we agreed to have a full comprehensive report so that we can make connections between the various issues.
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 11:07
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I totally agree with what Mr. Harris just said. Given what I said a few moments ago about Tibet, I should oppose this motion, which runs counter to the idea that we should have a single, holistic and comprehensive report on the entire situation. However, we have heard a lot of testimony leading us to make recommendations quickly to the Government of Canada, on immigration, for example, and we cannot wait until the end of our study. That's why I am in favour.
However, I reiterate that it is only an interim report, in my opinion. I hope that we will have the opportunity to make the necessary connections between the situation in Hong Kong and other situations, in Taiwan, for example, in the comprehensive report.
I will be supporting this motion for the reason I have just stated, and for that reason alone, because certain things can be done quickly to help activists who want to leave Hong Kong. That is the only reason I feel it is necessary to adopt an interim report on the situation in Hong Kong.
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 11:14
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
In light of what I had the chance to explain a few moments ago, I am obviously in favour of this motion. It actually will allow us to go deeper into the problematic issue of Tibet, so that we can include it in our comprehensive report.
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 12:05
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I thank the witnesses for contributing to the committee's work with their most insightful comments.
I will follow up on my colleagues' questions about the international coalition.
Mr. Medeiros, you are wholeheartedly calling for a kind of solidarity among the Western democracies to influence decisions in Beijing, particularly between the United States, Canada and a number of other Western democracies.
However, under the Trump administration, we see the United States blowing hot and cold with China, sometimes showing its teeth and at other times clearing the air. John Bolton, former national security advisor to the Trump administration, even revealed recently that Donald Trump had asked the Chinese authorities to help him win the election by purchasing products in certain states that are key to the election.
Under the circumstances, is it even possible to form a coalition like that with the United States? For example, how are the Taiwanese to feel, because they may well be a bargaining chip, so to speak, in the U.S. authorities' political calculations?
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 12:10
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Thank you, Mr. Medeiros.
On the issue of sanctions, you co-wrote an article with Michael Green in which you say that sanctions are more likely to harm the Hong Kong economy than the Beijing economy. I would like to seize on that idea of yours to ask Ms. Ong this next question.
You mentioned that Xi Jinping's power is on somewhat shaky ground right now. Could international sanctions reassert Xi Jinping's authority over the Chinese or, on the contrary, undermine his credibility with his own people?
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 12:39
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I am going to make a quick comment. We heard the views of Mr. Medeiros and Ms. Ong on the possible impact of sanctions in reaction to the adoption of the national security law.
Because we will eventually be called upon to make proposals to the Canadian government, I would like Mr. Cheung's point of view on the utility of sanctions and what kind of sanctions should be introduced to have a marginally positive impact.
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 12:40
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Mr. Medeiros and Ms. Ong, would you like to respond to what Mr. Cheung said?
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View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Stéphane Bergeron Profile
2020-08-17 13:31
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I would also like to thank the witnesses for once again providing extremely topical insight to inform our reflections on the current situation in China, particularly in Hong Kong.
I would like to give Mr. Chatigny some time to share his extensive experience in immigration matters.
After the events in Tiananmen Square, Canada worked to encourage activists to leave. We are now facing a number of hurdles. The first one is obviously the current pandemic. As a result of the pandemic, Canada has suspended most of its operations related to visas, settlement and so on. I would say that the second hurdle is the fact that the Chinese authorities are threatening to prevent activists from leaving. The third possible hurdle is that not everyone in Hong Kong will necessarily be able to afford to leave the area and come to Canada.
Based on your experience, through our committee, what would you recommend the Canadian government do to make it possible for activists to leave, given the various obstacles?
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