Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 26303
View Maryam Monsef Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Maryam Monsef Profile
2020-12-04 10:03 [p.2957]
Expand
moved that Bill C-7, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying), be read the third time and passed.
propose que le projet de loi C-7, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (aide médicale à mourir), soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-12-04 10:03 [p.2957]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to add my voice to the debate on Bill C-7, an act to amend the Criminal Code with respect to medical assistance in dying.
I want to start by reminding all members that this is important legislation. We as parliamentarians have a court-imposed deadline of December 18 to pass this legislation. This legislation would help prevent the suffering of Canadians. Even there were no court-imposed deadline, we would have a moral obligation to see it passed.
I am really disappointed, to be frank, to see my colleagues across the aisle delaying the bill, increasing the chances that the government misses the court-imposed deadline and prolongs the suffering of Canadians in denying them the autonomy to choose medical assistance in dying.
I am very disheartened to see members of the Conservative Party of Canada continue their delay tactics to slow this legislation. I saw it at the justice committee and we are seeing it again now. We know that the majority of Canadians believe that MAID is a basic human right. More than 300,000 people participated in consultations earlier this year.
The Quebec Superior Court's deadline is now two weeks away as of today. Conservatives are now trying to undermine the urgency of the situation. They are ignoring the very real consequences that their inaction could have on those who are suffering in this country. I think it is also important to remind members where the content of this legislation came from and the process the government went through in January in developing this legislation.
Bill C-7 was informed by the Truchon decision itself, Canadian and international reports, the experience of existing international regimes, and the government's consultations on MAID held in January and February of this year.
I had the opportunity to participate in some of these round tables that were hosted across the country including in my home of Toronto, where I am speaking from, and in Winnipeg. In these consultations, our team spoke with 125 stakeholders including regulatory bodies, legal experts, doctors, nurse practitioners, representatives of the disability community, and indigenous persons and their representatives. They shared their experiences and insights into MAID and its implementation in Canada over the last four years.
In order to get a broader public perspective, the government also hosted an online public survey. It received over 300,000 responses from people across the country. The summary of the consultations was released in March as a “what we heard” report. Our government did its homework in the creation of this legislation.
I would like to take the time to explain to all hon. colleagues what Bill C-7 proposes to change in our MAID regime so that we all start from the same common understanding of the legislation before us.
There are four main aspects to the bill. The first aspect concerns eligibility criteria and these changes are fairly straightforward. The eligibility criterion requiring a reasonably foreseeable natural death would be repealed. As I have already described, this change would in effect adopt the outcome of the Truchon decision for the whole of Canada.
This eligibility criterion makes Canada's current end-of-life regime available only when a practitioner can determine with confidence that a temporal connection to death exists, with some flexibility. In Truchon, the Quebec Superior Court told us that this criterion violated the charter rights of people whose death was not reasonably foreseeable, people like Mr. Truchon and Ms. Gladu.
To avoid prolonging the suffering of the applicants and other Canadians in similar situations, our government decided to accept the decision and amend the act for all of Canada.
The legislation would continue to require a voluntary request and informed consent from a person with decision-making capacity. These cornerstones of autonomy would ensure that MAID could be safely provided to Canadians who deem it to be the solution to their suffering, while guarding against persons being pressured into seeking MAID. We trust that individuals know best for themselves when they can no longer endure suffering, regardless of whether their natural death is reasonably foreseeable. We are committed to respecting this very personal choice of Canadians.
The second aspect of the bill is the safeguards. The bill would use the criterion of reasonably foreseeable natural death to create a two-track system. Those whose death is reasonably foreseeable would continue to benefit from the current safeguards with two changes. First, the 10-day reflection period would be repealed and a person would only need one independent witness to sign a MAID request instead of two. That independent witness would be someone who is paid to provide health and personal care services to the person requesting MAID. These changes are intended to alleviate barriers to access and to reduce suffering.
We heard from medical practitioners that these did not serve as safeguards, but only unnecessarily prolonged suffering for individuals who had made up their mind. It also created issues of accessing MAID in rural and remote areas.
Those people whose death is not reasonably foreseeable would benefit from an enhanced set of safeguards. In addition to those safeguards required where death is reasonably foreseeable, practitioners would have to assess a person's MAID request over a minimum assessment period of 90 days. If neither of those two MAID assessors has expertise in the condition that is causing the person's suffering, they would have to consult a practitioner who does. That is pursuant to the amendment that was helpfully proposed by the NDP member for Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke at committee. The person requesting MAID must be informed of the means available to relieve their suffering, including mental health and disability support services, and be offered consultations with professionals who provide those services. Both practitioners have to discuss those means of relieving suffering with the person and be of the view that the person has seriously considered those means.
In terms of the broad approach to the bill, the third aspect of Bill C-7 is that of the limited change around advance consent. This one is unrelated to changes in eligibility criteria, but instead seeks to address an unfair situation that arises when a person is approved for MAID but loses decision-making capacity and cannot consent to the MAID procedure immediately before it would be provided, despite the request having been approved and the procedure already planned. Members probably know the reason for this amendment best through the story of Audrey Parker, the Canadian woman whose case we heard so much about a bit more than a year ago who had to schedule her MAID procedure earlier than she would have wanted, out of fear of losing decision-making capacity before her preferred date to receive MAID.
In my view, Bill C-7 takes the right approach by proposing to allow the waiver of final consent only in cases where the person's death is reasonably foreseeable and only when he or she has already been found eligible for medical assistance in dying and is waiting for the procedure to take place, but risks losing the capacity to provide final consent.
According to practitioners and people like Audrey Parker, this is exactly the kind of situation that forces people to make a cruel choice if they risk losing their capacity to give consent before receiving medical assistance in dying. That is the one, very specific scenario this bill proposes to address, since it presents the least amount of uncertainty in terms of patients' autonomous choices and the least ethical and practical complexity.
I know this is an important issue for Canadians, and I am committed to working with all parliamentarians to begin the parliamentary review of the medical assistance in dying regime as soon as possible after Bill C-7 has made its way through the parliamentary process. I have no doubt that the issue of advance requests will be an important part of that review.
The fourth and final category of amendments that the bill proposes targets the monitoring regime. The changes would allow the collection of information in a wider range of circumstances, including information about preliminary assessments that might be undertaken before a request is put in writing. Consultations will take place before these regulations are amended. An amendment at committee based on an amendment proposed by the hon. member for Nanaimo—Ladysmith of the Green Party would require that the Minister of Health consult with the minister responsible for the status of persons with disabilities in carrying out their reporting obligations; again, another helpful amendment that was proposed at the committee stage.
Medical assistance in dying has always been a very difficult issue that generates a variety of opinions on all sides of the issue. It strikes deeply to all Canadians' personal morals and sensibilities. We understand this. As such, it requires different interests to be considered. I firmly believe that Bill C-7 does exactly that. The law will continue to require informed consent and a voluntary request made by a person with decision-making capacity, while also creating a more robust set of safeguards where the person's natural death is not reasonably foreseeable. These safeguards require significant attention to be paid to all of the alternatives that might help alleviate suffering on the part of a person whose death is not reasonably foreseeable. We believe such a regime can work safely by guarding against overt and subtle pressures to seek MAID, while providing autonomy to a greater number of Canadians to make this important choice for themselves.
I would like to return for a moment to the topic of safeguards, specifically when it comes to those whose death is not reasonably foreseeable. It is very important to remind members of this House what these safeguards are and why we believe that they are adequate.
This legislation proposes a distinct set of procedural safeguards that are tailored to the risks associated with assistance in dying for persons whose death is not reasonably foreseeable. Ending the lives of those whose suffering is based on their experience of their quality of life is different from offering a peaceful death when the dying process would otherwise be painful or prolonged, or would erode a person's sense of their own dignity. Bill C-7 therefore proposes a more robust set of safeguards where natural death is not reasonably foreseeable. Safeguards for those whose death is not reasonably foreseeable would be built around the existing safeguards, but contain enhancements over the previous Bill C-14, which was passed in the 42nd Parliament. Importantly, the medical assessments of a person's eligibility must span at least 90 days.
I mentioned this earlier, but I want to emphasize, as there appeared to be some confusion around this at the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, and elsewhere. This period of 90 days is not a waiting period or a reflection period. This is not a requirement that the person wait 90 days after they are approved. Rather, it is a stipulation that practitioners must, over at least a period of three full months, fully explore the person's medical condition and the nature and causes of their suffering, and work with them to identify reasonable treatment or other support options they must discuss with the person. The person seeking MAID is not required to undergo any treatments. It would be an intrusion into the individual's autonomy to force them into any sort of treatment, but as we embark on this new expansion of the MAID regime, we believe we can collectively move forward safely, if we can be satisfied that available options have been brought to the person's attention and given serious consideration.
All of these safeguards reflect the irreversible nature of ending someone's life and the very serious nature of medical assistance in dying, which needs to continue to be strictly regulated, especially given the broadening of the regime. As stated by the Canadian Medical Association, which welcomed our government's staged approach, the proposed MAID amendments are “a prudent step forward”. Bill C-7 proposes to further support individual autonomy while also protecting vulnerable persons and ensuring that careful consideration will be given to those challenging issues. For these reasons, among others, I strongly encourage members of this House to support this legislation and to support its passage through this House and Parliament to meet the court deadline of December 18.
I also want to remind members of the upcoming parliamentary review. Through the course of the consultations, and then through the committee process, we did hear of a number of issues that need to be reviewed and addressed, but need more thorough study than could be done in the time required to meet the court-imposed deadline. Parliament will have ample time to review all of these issues, and I think it is important that we do so, but we need to get this legislation passed as well.
Bill C-14, from the previous Parliament, called for Parliament to conduct a review and specifically mentions the state of palliative care. We expect this review will also include important issues such as mature minors, mental illness as the sole underlying condition and advance requests. By no means would I expect this to be a closed list, either. This is a broad issue and we would hope to hear from many Canadians on a wide variety of subjects relating to MAID. Having heard from many witnesses and spoken to many Canadians on Bill C-7, I know there are diverse views on this issue. They are all difficult issues, and I look forward to the parliamentary review and hearing from many more Canadians on the subject and seeing what the review has to say.
As I said at the beginning of my speech, I am very disappointed and concerned by my colleagues across the way and their lack of respect for the court deadline imposed on us by the Superior Court of Quebec to pass this legislation. I believe we have an obligation as parliamentarians to do everything we can to try to meet the deadline of the court. Canadians want this legislation. Quebeckers want this legislation. I am really unclear on why my colleagues across the way are showing disrespect for the will not only of the court, but of all Canadians. They have been slowing and delaying debate unnecessarily, and I am very concerned by what this says about how much they value the rule of law and the will of Canadians.
I want to thank my colleagues who serve with me on the justice committee for their work on helping us in a smooth and efficient committee process on this legislation. I look forward to this House giving the same consideration to the legislation. Again, I want to emphasize to my colleagues the importance of moving quickly. I look forward to continuing the debate on Bill C-7, but also to its ultimate passage in time for Parliament to meet the court-imposed obligation.
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux d'ajouter ma voix aux discussions sur le projet de loi C-7, Loi modifiant le Code criminel en ce qui a trait à l'aide médicale à mourir.
Je tiens d'abord à rappeler à tous les députés qu'il s'agit d'une mesure législative importante. En tant que parlementaires, nous devons adopter le projet de loi avant la date limite imposée par la cour, soit le 18 décembre. Ce projet de loi contribuera à épargner des souffrances aux Canadiens. Même sans date limite imposée par la cour, nous aurions l'obligation morale d'adopter ce projet de loi.
Bien franchement, je suis très déçu de voir mes collègues d'en face retarder son adoption, augmentant ainsi le risque que le gouvernement ne respecte pas l'échéance fixée par la cour et qu'il prolonge les souffrances des Canadiens en leur refusant l'autonomie de choisir l'aide médicale à mourir.
Je suis consterné de voir les députés du Parti conservateur poursuivre leurs tactiques d'obstruction pour ralentir l'étude du projet de loi. J'ai été témoin de ce comportement au comité de la justice, et nous l'observons encore maintenant. Nous savons que la majorité des Canadiens croient que l'aide médicale à mourir est un droit fondamental de la personne. Plus de 300 000 personnes ont participé aux consultations qui se sont tenues plus tôt cette année.
Nous sommes aujourd'hui à deux semaines de la date limite imposée par la Cour supérieure du Québec. Les conservateurs essaient maintenant de minimiser l'urgence de la situation. Ils font peu de cas des conséquences très réelles que pourrait avoir leur inaction sur ceux qui souffrent dans ce pays. Je crois qu'il est en outre très important de rappeler aux députés l'origine du contenu de ce projet de loi et le processus d'élaboration de cette mesure législative auquel a pris part le gouvernement en janvier.
L'élaboration du projet de loi C-7 a été guidée par la décision Truchon, les rapports canadiens et internationaux disponibles, l'expérience des régimes internationaux existants, et les consultations sur l'aide médicale à mourir menées par le gouvernement en janvier et en février derniers.
J'ai eu l'occasion de participer à certaines de ces tables rondes qui ont été organisées dans tout le pays, notamment chez moi, à Toronto — d'où je m'exprime aujourd'hui —, et à Winnipeg. Lors de ces consultations, notre équipe s'est entretenue avec 125 intervenants, notamment des organismes de réglementation, des juristes, des médecins, des infirmières praticiennes, des représentants de la communauté des personnes handicapées, ainsi que des autochtones et leurs représentants. Ils ont partagé leurs expériences et leurs points de vue sur le programme d'aide médicale à mourir et sa mise en œuvre au Canada au cours des quatre dernières années.
Afin d'obtenir une perspective publique plus large, le gouvernement a également organisé une enquête publique en ligne. Elle a permis à plus de 300 000 personnes de s'exprimer à l'échelle du pays. Le résumé des consultations a été publié en mars sous la forme d'un rapport intitulé « Ce que nous avons entendu ». Le gouvernement a ainsi fait ses devoirs en présentant ce projet de loi.
Je souhaite prendre le temps d'expliquer à tous les députés les modifications que le projet de loi C-7 propose d'apporter au régime d'aide médicale à mourir afin de m'assurer que nous ayons tous une compréhension commune de la mesure législative dont nous sommes saisis.
Le projet de loi comporte quatre aspects principaux. Le premier aspect concerne les critères d'admissibilité, et ces changements sont assez simples. Le critère d'admissibilité qui a trait à la mort naturelle raisonnablement prévisible serait abrogé. Comme je l'ai déjà décrit, cette modification adopterait en fait le résultat de la décision Truchon pour l'ensemble du Canada.
Ce critère d'admissibilité fait du régime actuel au Canada un régime de fin de vie accessible uniquement lorsqu'un praticien peut établir avec confiance un lien temporel avec la mort, sous réserve d'une certaine souplesse. La Cour supérieure du Québec dans l'affaire Truchon nous a dit que ce critère violait les droits garantis par la Charte aux personnes dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible, comme M. Truchon et Mme Gladu.
Pour éviter de prolonger les souffrances des demandeurs et d'autres Canadiens dans une situation similaire, notre gouvernement a décidé d'accepter cette décision et de modifier la Loi pour l'ensemble du Canada.
Dans le projet de loi, on exige toujours une demande volontaire et un consentement éclairé de la part d'une personne qui est apte à prendre des décisions. Le fait que ces éléments fondamentaux de l'autonomie doivent être présents nous assure d'offrir l'aide médicale à mourir en toute sûreté aux Canadiens qui la considèrent comme la solution à leurs souffrances tout en évitant que l'on presse quiconque d'y recourir. Nous sommes d'avis qu'une personne est la mieux placée pour déterminer qu'elle ne peut plus endurer ses propres souffrances, que sa mort naturelle soit raisonnablement prévisible ou non. Nous nous engageons à respecter ce choix très personnel des Canadiens.
Les mesures de sauvegarde constituent un autre aspect du projet de loi. On y utilise le critère de la mort naturelle raisonnablement prévisible pour créer un système à deux voies. Ceux dont la mort est raisonnablement prévisible verront s'appliquer les mesures de sauvegarde existantes, auxquelles deux modifications sont apportées. Tout d'abord, la période de réflexion de 10 jours est abrogée. De plus, une personne n'a besoin que d'un témoin indépendant, et non plus deux, pour signer la demande d'aide médicale à mourir. Ce témoin indépendant est une personne rémunérée pour offrir des services de santé et de soins personnels à la personne qui fait la demande d'aide médicale à mourir. Ces modifications visent à réduire les obstacles à l'accès et à abréger les souffrances.
Les médecins nous ont dit que les mesures de sauvegarde existantes ne faisaient que prolonger inutilement les souffrances des personnes qui avaient déjà pris leur décision. Elles compliquent également l'accès à l'aide médicale à mourir dans les régions rurales et éloignées.
Des mesures de sauvegarde améliorées s'appliqueront aux personnes dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. En plus des mesures de sauvegarde pour les cas où la mort est raisonnablement prévisible, il est prévu que les médecins évalueront la demande d'aide médicale à mourir d'un patient sur une période d'au moins 90 jours. Si aucun des deux évaluateurs de la demande d'aide médicale à mourir n'est un spécialiste de la maladie qui cause les souffrances de la personne, un spécialiste doit être consulté. Cela est conforme à un amendement proposé par le député néo-démocrate d'Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke en comité. La personne qui demande l'aide médicale à mourir doit être informée des moyens disponibles pour alléger ses souffrances, y compris des soins de santé mentale et des services de soutien aux personnes handicapées. On doit aussi l'inviter à consulter des professionnels qui offrent ces services. Les deux praticiens doivent discuter des moyens disponibles pour atténuer les souffrances avec le patient et être d'avis que celui-ci les a envisagés sérieusement.
En ce qui a trait à l'approche générale du projet de loi C-7, le troisième changement proposé vise à modifier légèrement le consentement préalable. Cette modification n'est pas liée aux changements des critères d'admissibilité; elle vise plutôt à remédier à une situation injuste qui se produit lorsqu'une demande d'aide médicale à mourir est approuvée, mais que le demandeur perd sa capacité de prendre une décision et ne peut plus consentir à la procédure relative à l'aide médicale à mourir immédiatement avant qu'elle soit administrée, malgré le fait que la demande a été approuvée et que la procédure est déjà prévue. Comme les députés le savent probablement, la raison d'être de cette modification s'explique le mieux par l'histoire d'Audrey Parker, la Canadienne dont nous avons tant entendu parler il y a un peu plus d'un an. Elle a été obligée de demander à recevoir l'aide médicale à mourir plus tôt qu'elle ne l'aurait souhaité par crainte de perdre sa capacité à prendre une décision avant la date à laquelle elle aurait préféré recourir à la procédure.
Je suis d'avis que le projet de loi C-7 adopte la bonne approche en proposant d'autoriser la renonciation au consentement final uniquement lorsque la mort de la personne est raisonnablement prévisible et uniquement lorsque la personne a déjà été jugée admissible à l'aide médicale à mourir et qu'elle attend que la procédure ait lieu, mais risque de perdre la capacité de fournir un consentement final.
C'est dans cette situation que les praticiens et des personnes comme Audrey Parker ont indiqué qu'il peut y avoir un choix cruel à faire si la personne risque de perdre sa capacité de donner son consentement avant de recevoir l'aide médicale à mourir. C'est le seul scénario bien précis que le projet de loi propose d'aborder, car c'est celui qui présente le moins d'incertitude en termes de choix autonomes du patient et le moins de complexité éthique et pratique.
Je sais qu'il s'agit d'une question importante pour les Canadiens, et je m'engage à travailler avec tous les parlementaires pour entamer l'examen parlementaire du régime de l'aide médicale à mourir dès que possible après que le projet de loi C-7 aura franchi toutes les étapes du processus parlementaire. Je n'ai aucun doute que la question des demandes préalables constituera un élément important de cet examen.
La quatrième et dernière catégorie de modifications que le projet de loi propose porte sur le régime de surveillance. Les modifications permettraient de recueillir des informations dans un plus grand nombre de circonstances, y compris des informations sur les évaluations préliminaires qui pourraient être effectuées avant qu'une demande ne soit présentée par écrit. Des consultations seront menées avant que ces règlements soient modifiés. Un amendement au comité, qui est basé sur un amendement proposé par le député de Nanaimo—Ladysmith du Parti vert, exigerait que le ministre de la Santé, dans l'exercice de ses obligations en matière de déclaration, consulte le ministre responsable de la condition des personnes handicapées. Il s'agit d'un autre amendement utile qui a été proposé à l'étape de l'étude en comité.
L'aide médicale à mourir a toujours été un sujet très délicat et elle suscite un large éventail d'opinions, que l'on soit pour ou contre. Elle touche profondément la moralité et la sensibilité de toute la population canadienne. Nous le comprenons. C'est la raison pour laquelle il faut tenir compte des divers aspects de la question. Je suis convaincu que le projet de loiC-7 atteint exactement ce but. En vertu de la loi, le consentement libre et éclairé demeurera obligatoire, de même que la demande volontaire formulée par une personne apte à prendre une décision. Il y aurait aussi une série de mesures de sauvegarde plus strictes pour les cas où la mort de la personne n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. Ces mesures de sauvegarde reposent sur la nécessité d'envisager toutes les options qui existent pour alléger les souffrances de la personne dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. Nous croyons que ce processus peut fonctionner de manière sûre en protégeant les personnes vulnérables contre les pressions, subtiles ou non, pour recourir à l'aide médicale à mourir, tout en donnant à un plus grand nombre de personnes l'autonomie de prendre cette importante décision pour elles-mêmes.
J'aimerais revenir sur les mesures de sauvegarde, plus précisément pour les personnes dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. Il est très important que les députés sachent ce qu'elles sont et pourquoi nous estimons qu'elles sont appropriées.
La mesure législative propose une série distincte de garanties procédurales adaptées aux risques associés à l'aide médicale à mourir pour les personnes dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. Mettre fin à la vie d'une personne dont les souffrances reposent sur sa perception de sa qualité de vie est différent d'offrir une mort paisible à quelqu'un dont la mort serait autrement douloureuse ou lente ou porterait atteinte à sa dignité. Par conséquent, le projet de loi C-7 propose une série de mesures de sauvegarde rigoureuses dans les cas où la mort naturelle n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible. Les mesures de sauvegarde pour ceux dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible reposeraient sur les mesures actuelles, mais elles comprendraient des améliorations par rapport à l'ancien projet de loi C-14, qui a été adopté lors de la 42e législature. Surtout, les évaluations médicales qui servent à déterminer l'admissibilité d'une personne doivent durer au moins 90 jours.
Je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, mais je tiens à insister sur ce point parce qu'il semblait régner une certaine confusion à ce chapitre au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne et ailleurs. La période de 90 jours n'est ni une période d'attente ni une période de réflexion. Une personne qui a reçu son approbation n'a pas l'obligation d'attendre 90 jours. Les praticiens sont plutôt tenus, sur une période d'au moins trois mois, d'examiner soigneusement l'état de santé de la personne ainsi que la nature et les causes de ses souffrances et de collaborer avec elle pour trouver un traitement raisonnable ou d'autres options de soutien, dont ils devront discuter avec elle. La personne qui demande l'aide médicale à mourir n'est pas tenue de suivre un quelconque traitement. On porterait atteinte à l'autonomie d'une personne en l'obligeant à suivre un traitement. Toutefois, alors que nous entreprenons ce nouvel élargissement du régime d'aide médicale à mourir, nous croyons que nous pouvons avancer ensemble de façon sécuritaire si nous sommes convaincus que toutes les options disponibles ont été examinées soigneusement et présentées aux personnes qui demandent l'aide médicale à mourir.
Toutes ces mesures de sauvegarde tiennent compte du fait que la mort est irréversible et du caractère gravissime de l'aide médicale à mourir, qui doit continuer d'être strictement encadrée, surtout maintenant que les critères sont assouplis. Comme le disait l'Association médicale canadienne, les modifications proposées au régime d'aide médicale à mourir constituent « une avancée prudente ». Le projet de loi C-7 propose d'accorder un poids accru à l'autonomie personnelle tout en protégeant les personnes vulnérables et en tenant compte des difficultés bien réelles. Pour tous ces motifs, et bien d'autres encore, j'invite fortement les députés à appuyer la mesure législative à l'étude afin qu'elle puisse être adoptée par la Chambre et le Parlement d'ici la date fixée par les tribunaux, c'est-à-dire le 18 décembre.
Je rappelle également aux députés qu'il y a un examen parlementaire qui s'en vient. Tout au long des consultations et de l'étude menée par le comité, nous avons pris note d'un certain nombre d'éléments qui, oui, doivent être pris en considération, mais qui ont besoin d'être étudiés plus en profondeur, ce qui n'est pas possible à l'intérieur des délais impartis par les tribunaux. Le Parlement aura tout le temps voulu pour bien étudier ces éléments — une démarche que j'estime tout à fait essentielle —, mais cela ne change rien au fait qu'il doit aussi adopter la mesure législative à l'étude.
Le projet de loi C-14, qui date de la législature précédente, prévoit que le Parlement doit procéder à un tel examen et précise que les soins palliatifs doivent en faire partie. Nous nous attendons à ce que plusieurs autres sujets de premier plan y soient aussi abordés, comme les mineurs matures, la maladie mentale comme seul problème de santé invoqué et les demandes anticipées. J'insiste en passant sur le fait que cette liste est loin d'être exhaustive. Ce dossier est aussi vaste que complexe, et nous voulons entendre le point de vue de nombreux Canadiens sur le plus vaste éventail possible de sujets liés à l'aide médicale à mourir. Après avoir entendu ce que les témoins et de nombreux Canadiens avaient à dire à propos du projet de loi C-7, je sais que les opinions sont très variées. J'admets qu'il s'agit de questions difficiles, mais je suis impatient de connaître les résultats de l'examen parlementaire à venir et d'entendre le point de vue de nombreux autres Canadiens.
Comme je l'ai dit au début de mon discours, je trouve très décevant et très préoccupant que les députés d'en face montrent aussi peu de respect pour l'échéance que nous a imposée la Cour supérieure du Québec pour l'adoption de cette mesure législative. En tant que parlementaires, nous avons l'obligation de faire tout notre possible pour respecter l'échéance fixée par la cour, je crois. Les Canadiens souhaitent voir ce projet de loi adopté, les Québécois aussi. Je ne comprends vraiment pas pourquoi les députés d'en face montrent aussi peu de respect non seulement pour la volonté de la cour, mais aussi pour celle de tous les Canadiens. Ils retardent et ralentissent le débat sans raison, ce qui donne une bien piètre impression de la valeur qu'ils accordent à la primauté du droit et à la volonté des Canadiens.
Je remercie les députés qui siègent comme moi au comité de la justice d'avoir contribué au travail harmonieux et efficace du comité dans ce dossier. J'ai hâte que la Chambre en fasse autant. Je tiens à rappeler aux députés, une fois de plus, qu'il faut agir rapidement. Il me tarde de continuer le débat sur le projet de loi C-7 et de voir le Parlement l'adopter avant l'échéance imposée par la cour.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2020-12-04 10:18 [p.2959]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I do want to point out that not one of the amendments that were proposed by our Conservative party at committee was adopted. We proposed those amendments in good faith, and we proposed them with the support of the persons with disabilities community. Krista Carr, executive vice-president of Inclusion Canada, a group that represents persons with disabilities, said that Bill C-7 represents the “worst nightmare” for persons with disabilities.
I want to ask my hon. friend why they did not listen to the persons with disabilities community and why he is talking about delays, when it was his government that prorogued the House and caused Bill C-7 to have to have a complete restart.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à préciser qu'aucun des amendements que le Parti conservateur a proposés au comité n'ont été adoptés. Nous avons proposé ces amendements de bonne foi et avec l'appui de personnes handicapées. Krista Carr, vice-présidente à la direction d'Inclusion Canada, un groupe qui représente les personnes handicapées, a dit du projet de loi C-7 qu'il est le « pire cauchemar » des personnes handicapées.
J'aimerais demander à mon collègue pourquoi le gouvernement n'a pas écouté les personnes handicapées et pourquoi le député parle de retards, alors que c'est le gouvernement qui a prorogé le Parlement, nous obligeant ainsi à reprendre du début l'étude du projet de loi C-7.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-12-04 10:19 [p.2959]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for his contributions in committee, and I will answer his questions.
The Conservative Party amendments that were proposed undercut the heart of what the bill is about, which is ensuring that there is a compassionate response to medical assistance in dying and that a person's autonomy is protected.
With respect to persons with disabilities, we had extensive consultations with persons with disabilities. We heard that there is heterogeneity among that community. We heard from Senator Petitclerc, who indicated the exact same thing. She and former minister Steven Fletcher of the Conservative Party, both themselves persons with disabilities, indicated that it is not for certain groups to speak on behalf of the entirety of persons with disabilities.
Madame Gladu and Monsieur Truchon were themselves persons with disabilities. The court found, in the Truchon case, that in order to protect their autonomy and their competence, the bill must be revised, which is why it is being revised to ensure that the competence of all people, including persons with disabilities, is respected.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député d'en face de ses contributions au comité, et je vais répondre à ses questions.
Les amendements proposés par le Parti conservateur allaient à l'encontre de l'objet du projet de loi, qui est d'adopter une approche compatissante en matière d'aide médicale à mourir et de protéger l'autonomie de la personne.
En ce qui concerne les personnes handicapées, nous avons mené de vastes consultations auprès de ces personnes. Nous avons constaté que les avis diffèrent au sein de ce groupe. C'est d'ailleurs ce qu'a fait valoir la sénatrice Petitclerc. Cette sénatrice et l'ancien ministre conservateur Steven Fletcher, qui ont eux-mêmes un handicap, ont dit qu'il n'appartenait pas à certains groupes de parler au nom de toutes les personnes handicapées.
Mme Gladu et M. Truchon étaient des personnes handicapées. Dans le cas de M. Truchon, la cour a conclu que, pour protéger l'autonomie et l'aptitude de la personne, la loi doit être révisée, et c'est donc ce que nous faisons afin de respecter l'aptitude de toutes les personnes, y compris les personnes handicapées.
Collapse
View Yves Perron Profile
BQ (QC)
View Yves Perron Profile
2020-12-04 10:20 [p.2960]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is a bit sad to hear this morning's debate. On one hand, some people are saying that the opposition parties are holding up the process, and there is in fact one opposition party that is purposely delaying it, which I think is shameful. On the other hand, other members are saying that the Liberals prorogued Parliament for five weeks for no reason other than to cover up a scandal. Both sides are right. I am letting them know that this morning.
I think that citizens expect more when we are debating legislation as important and fundamental as this, the law on medical assistance in dying. People who are suffering terribly have had to fight for many years in court. This bill seems reasonable to me, and I think it should be passed quickly.
Could my Liberal Party colleague reassure the Conservative members about the safeguards included in the bill to ensure that we can trust the professionals who are on the ground and who are able to judge the situations? We need to trust our own people.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un peu triste d'entendre les débats ce matin. D'un côté, certains disent que les partis de l'opposition retardent le processus. En effet, il y a un parti de l'opposition qui le retarde volontairement, et je trouve cela déplorable. De l'autre côté, on répond que ce sont les libéraux qui ont prorogé la Chambre pendant cinq semaines sans raison, pour camoufler un scandale. En effet, dans les deux cas, ils ont raison. Je leur apprends cela ce matin.
Par contre, je pense que les citoyens s'attendent à autre chose quand il s'agit d'un débat sur une loi aussi importante et fondamentale que la loi sur l'aide médicale à mourir. Des gens qui souffrent atrocement ont dû se battre pendant de longues années devant les tribunaux. Ce projet de loi me semble raisonnable, et il doit être adopté rapidement.
Mon collègue du Parti libéral pourrait-il rassurer les députés du Parti conservateur quant aux processus de sécurité inclus dans le projet de loi pour qu'on puisse faire confiance aux professionnels qui sont sur le terrain et qui sont capables de juger des situations? Il faut aussi faire confiance aux nôtres.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-12-04 10:21 [p.2960]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for his question, and I am pleased that the Bloc Québécois is supporting this bill.
With regard to the judgment of professionals on the ground, whether it be doctors or nurses, we know that they treat people and assess their autonomy and their informed consent. Bill C-7 gives these professionals more leeway to exercise their judgment.
What I mean by that is that in cases where death is not reasonably foreseeable, there is a waiting period of at least 90 days during which all aspects of the person's situation must be assessed. There has to be an opportunity to treat the person. All tools and options must be provided. As a result—
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de sa question, et je me réjouis de la position du Bloc québécois, qui appuie ce projet de loi.
Pour ce qui est du jugement des professionnels sur le terrain, que ce soit les médecins ou les infirmières, nous savons que ces professionnels traitent ces personnes et évaluent leur autonomie et leur consentement éclairé. Le projet de loi C-7 accorde plus de place à leur indépendance de jugement.
Ce que je veux dire par là, c'est que, dans le contexte où une mort naturelle n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible, il y a une période d'attente d'au moins 90 jours, au cours de laquelle il faut évaluer tous les aspects de la situation d'une personne. Il faut donner l'occasion de soigner une personne, il faut fournir les outils et toutes les options. Ainsi...
Collapse
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2020-12-04 10:22 [p.2960]
Expand
We will continue with questions and comments.
The hon. member for Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke.
Nous allons poursuivre les questions et commentaires.
L'honorable député d’Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke a la parole.
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2020-12-04 10:22 [p.2960]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Parkdale—High Park for his speech today and for his diligent work on Bill C-7.
I want to return to this question of timing that we have been kicking around in the questions here today. I have to say that COVID was partially responsible for the delay, but certainly the Liberal government's prorogation was a bigger cause for the delay in dealing with the bill.
I would ask the hon. member to return to the question he touched on a moment ago, which is this: What are the consequences for Quebec and for the rest of the country if we do not meet this deadline in Quebec, because Bill C-7 does provide some safeguards to implement the court decision?
Monsieur le Président, je souhaite remercier le député de Parkdale—High Park de son discours d'aujourd'hui et de son travail diligent sur le projet de loi C-7.
Je voudrais revenir sur la question du temps qui a été soulevée dans les questions aujourd'hui. Je dois dire que la COVID est en partie responsable du retard, mais la prorogation par le gouvernement libéral a certainement été une cause plus importante du retard dans le traitement du projet de loi.
J'aimerais que le député revienne à la question abordée il y a un instant. Le projet de loi C-7 prévoit certaines mesures de sauvegarde pour donner suite à la décision de la Cour supérieure du Québec. Quelles sont les conséquences pour le Québec et pour le reste du pays si nous ne respectons pas la date limite imposée par la Cour?
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-12-04 10:23 [p.2960]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, that is an excellent question and, again, I thank the member for Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke for his contributions at committee and throughout this Parliament.
The consequences of not meeting the court-imposed deadline of December 18, in effect, would be that rather than a statute being the law of the land in Quebec, we would have the Truchon decision being the law of the land in Quebec, which means that there would be no safeguards whatsoever for those persons who are not at the end of life, whose death is not reasonably foreseeable, from accessing MAID.
If all parliamentarians agree, all 338 of us, that some safeguards are required, notwithstanding the disputes about safeguards, I would urge Canadians, as represented by these parliamentarians, to work expeditiously to ensure that safeguards are in place for persons who are not at the end of life but seek to avail themselves of medical assistance in dying.
Monsieur le Président, c'est une excellente question et, encore une fois, je remercie le député d'Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke de ses contributions au comité et tout au long de la présente législature.
Si nous dépassons la date limite imposée par la Cour, soit le 18 décembre prochain, il n'y aura pas de loi en vigueur au Québec; ce sera la décision Truchon qui aura force de loi. Par conséquent, en ce qui concerne l'aide médicale à mourir, il n'y aura aucune mesure de sauvegarde pour les personnes qui ne sont pas en fin de vie, dont la mort n'est pas raisonnablement prévisible.
Si l'ensemble des 338 parlementaires conviennent que des mesures de sauvegarde sont nécessaires, même si on ne s'entend pas sur le genre de mesures de sauvegarde, j'exhorte les Canadiens, représentés par ces parlementaires, à travailler rapidement afin de mettre en place des mesures de sauvegarde pour les personnes qui ne sont pas en fin de vie, mais qui souhaitent recevoir l'aide médicale à mourir.
Collapse
View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
View René Arseneault Profile
2020-12-04 10:24 [p.2960]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice.
When it comes to the concept of reasonably foreseeable death, how do we now reconcile the Truchon ruling with the Supreme Court of Canada ruling in Carter?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Justice.
En ce qui concerne le concept de mort raisonnablement prévisible, comment peut-on maintenant réconcilier l'affaire Truchon et l'arrêt Carter de la Cour suprême du Canada?
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-12-04 10:24 [p.2960]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague the parliamentary secretary for his very good question.
What we know is that in Truchon, the judge assessed the criteria in Carter and applied them to the situation of these two people who were living with disabilities but whose death was not reasonably foreseeable.
According to the judge, denying access to medical assistance in dying to persons in that situation was unconstitutional in that it constituted a violation of the rights guaranteed under sections 7 and 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
That is what prompted us to introduce legislation that responds to what we have heard from more than 300,000 people.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue le secrétaire parlementaire de sa très bonne question.
Ce qu'on peut comprendre, c'est que, lors de l'affaire Truchon, la juge a évalué les critères de l'arrêt Carter et les a appliqués à la situation de ces deux personnes ayant un handicap, mais dont la mort n'était pas raisonnablement prévisible.
Selon la juge, le fait d'avoir éliminé de l'accès à l'aide médicale à mourir ce type de personne n'était pas constitutionnel sous prétexte que c'était une violation des droits garantis par les articles 7 et 15 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés.
C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons agi en proposant une loi qui répond à ce que nous avons entendu de la part de plus de 300 000 personnes.
Collapse
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
View Garnett Genuis Profile
2020-12-04 10:25 [p.2961]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the member has pointed out that there are different opinions among people with disabilities and that is true in every community, of course. We both know that, for instance, in the Muslim community there are some people who express views about issues that the vast majority of that community find offensive. I think, generally speaking, government should listen to the representative organs of those communities, not cherry-pick one or two individuals it finds who may have a point of view that is not in keeping what the majority is saying. When all of the representative organizations who represent people with disabilities are raising big concerns, I think the government should take that seriously.
Just on the issue of timing, can the member acknowledge the fact that the Conservatives wanted the House to be able to sit in May and June. In addition to the issue of prorogation, the Liberal government chose not to allow the House to sit and consider legislation in May and June when it could have.
Monsieur le Président, le député a fait valoir que différentes personnes handicapées ont différentes opinions; c'est bien sûr le cas dans toutes les communautés. Par exemple, nous savons que, dans la communauté musulmane, certaines personnes expriment sur certaines questions des opinions que la grande majorité des membres de cette communauté trouvent offensantes. Je pense qu'en général le gouvernement devrait écouter les organisations qui représentent ces communautés au lieu de choisir ici et là l'opinion des quelques personnes qui ne sont pas d'accord avec la majorité. Lorsque toutes les organisations œuvrant auprès des personnes handicapées soulèvent de graves préoccupations, je pense que le gouvernement devrait les prendre au sérieux.
Rapidement, sur la question du temps, le député peut-il reconnaître que les conservateurs voulaient que la Chambre siège en mai et en juin? En plus de la prorogation, le gouvernement libéral a choisi de ne pas permettre à la Chambre de siéger pour étudier les mesures législatives en mai et en juin, alors qu'elle aurait pu le faire.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-12-04 10:26 [p.2961]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would respond to the member in a twofold manner.
The first point is that I think it is erroneous and misconstruing the positions at stake that we somehow, on this side of the House, are cherry-picking perspectives on any aspect of this bill. The consultations that we heard were vast and extensive from 125 experts and 300,000 individual Canadians. That is the first point. With respect to the views articulated by persons with disabilities, I would reiterate that the litigation that has prompted this legislative response was brought by persons with disabilities. Clearly persons with disabilities are seeking the same level of competence and autonomy that is available to able-bodied Canadians.
On the last point with respect to the timing, I am referring to what has transpired over the last four to six weeks, in terms of the committee process and now the House parliamentary process. Members are entitled to voice their views. Members are entitled to voice the views of their constituents. That is what a democracy is about. However, prolonging the suffering of Canadians is not in any of our interests and that is exactly what will transpire if the December 18 deadline is missed.
Monsieur le Président, je fournirai au député une réponse en deux volets.
D'abord, je crois qu'il est erroné d'affirmer que, de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous choisissons les perspectives qui nous intéressent relativement à ce projet de loi. Nous avons mené de vastes consultations auprès de 125 experts et 300 000 Canadiens. Voilà pour le premier volet. En ce qui concerne les points de vue exprimés par des personnes handicapées, je répète que le litige à l'origine de cette mesure législative a été soumis par des personnes handicapées. À l'évidence, les personnes handicapées cherchent à bénéficier du même degré de compétence et d'autonomie que les Canadiens non handicapés.
En ce qui concerne la question du temps, je pense notamment à ce qui est ressorti au cours des quatre à six dernières semaines dans le cadre des travaux du comité et de la Chambre. Les députés peuvent exprimer leur point de vue, de même que celui des résidants de leur circonscription. C'est l'essence même de la démocratie. Cependant, il serait contraire à nos intérêts de prolonger la souffrance de certains Canadiens, et c'est exactement ce qui arrivera si l'échéance du 18 décembre n'est pas respectée.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-12-04 10:28 [p.2961]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to begin by thanking the parliamentary secretary for his speech and complimenting him on the quality of his efforts and his French.
Now, just because his French is good, it does not mean I agree with what he is saying, especially on the decisions his government has made.
We all know that this is a very sensitive topic and that there is no room for partisanship. As members of the House, every one of us here has to work diligently on this.
However, since this issue is literally about life or death, would it not have been better to have the Supreme Court of Canada as the court to rule definitively on this issue, to avoid any legal misunderstanding that might come up with this legislation?
Monsieur le Président, d'abord, je tiens à remercier le secrétaire parlementaire de son discours et à souligner également à grands traits la qualité de ses efforts et de son français.
Maintenant, ce n'est pas parce qu'il parle bien français que je suis d'accord sur ce qu'il dit, et particulièrement sur les décisions que son gouvernement a prises.
On sait tous que cet enjeu est très délicat, qu'il ne permet aucune partisanerie et que, tous autant que nous sommes ici à la Chambre des communes, nous avons un travail diligent à faire.
Par contre, puisque c'est un enjeu qui est littéralement de vie ou de mort, n'aurait-il pas été préférable que la cour ayant à se prononcer définitivement sur cette question soit la Cour suprême du Canada, pour éviter tout malentendu judiciaire qui risque d'éclore avec cette loi??
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-12-04 10:28 [p.2961]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague across the aisle for his question and his work in this Parliament and the previous one.
This question has been raised a number of times. A government's job is to analyze a well-articulated, well-researched, thorough decision. It is not necessary to appeal a decision all the way to the end.
There are times when the government must take the lead, evaluate a decision and seize the opportunity to spare Canadians pointless suffering and pain by introducing a legislative response to a decision. This is one of those times. We think this is the best way to go.
As a government, we made this decision to avoid appealing the case to the Supreme Court, which could have taken another two, three or four years and prolonged people's suffering.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de l'autre côté de sa question et de ses efforts dans ce Parlement et dans l'ancien Parlement.
Cette question a été soulevée à plusieurs reprises. Le travail d'un gouvernement est d'analyser un jugement qui est bien articulé, recherché et rigoureux. Il n'est pas nécessaire de porter un jugement en appel jusqu'à la dernière étape.
Quand il est nécessaire de prendre le leadership, d'évaluer un jugement et de saisir l'occasion d'éliminer ou d'éviter des souffrances et des douleurs inutiles aux Canadiens en proposant une réponse législative à un jugement, il faut le prendre. Nous pensons que c'est la meilleure décision.
En tant que gouvernement, nous avons pris cette décision pour éviter qu'un appel soit interjeté devant la Cour suprême, ce qui aurait pu durer deux, trois ou quatre ans de plus et prolonger les souffrances des gens.
Collapse
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2020-12-04 10:29 [p.2961]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am thankful for this time to speak on this incredibly important issue to all Canadians.
As I was leading into this speech, I reflected back on the debates on Bill C-14. On May 3, 2016, the House was debating the creation of an euthanasia and assisted suicide bill. At the time I spoke in the evening on May 3, I mentioned how this would probably be, in my career as a politician, a member of Parliament, having at that time served eight years and now in my 13th year, perhaps the most important speech that I would ever make.
When I look back on that speech today, I think I was wrong. I think perhaps this is the more important speech because at that time Parliament was faced with a court deadline as well to put into place legislation for euthanasia and assisted suicide. Like many countries around the world that have these bills, going back to the first legislation in the Netherlands in 2002 until today, I have seen the progression of what has happened in these countries as an example of what will happen on the slippery slope of this legislation.
I should say as well, as I did in 2016, I come at this with a very biased approach and that is because I am the father of a 34-year-old intellectually disabled son. My son was brain damaged at age two. He suffered irreversible damage that has caused him to lead a life with his parents as his caregivers his entire life. When the people and organizations that represent persons with disabilities speak, and they have spoken loudly, to the particular changes and amendments that the government is bringing forward in Bill C-7, they have said this is the worst possible scenario.
I interpret that from my lens as a parent in terms of protection for my son. Frankly, it causes me to reflect on what we are currently experiencing: the COVID-19 crisis. Just about every piece of communication that I receive, email, text, telephone call, whatever, usually starts with a sentence where that person says to me or I say to them, “I hope your family is safe”. Generally speaking, the salutation at the end of those communications is, “Stay safe”. I believe all parliamentarians have probably experienced the exact same thing.
One of the concerns of the disability community is this. What will happen to our children in their latter lives when we are no longer with them, when we can no longer care for and protect them? Therefore, the theme of my speech today is “Stay safe, my son”.
Let us look at the evolution of these laws across the world. I will read a few recent headlines that I found through my research coming into this today. “'What kind of society do you want to live in?': Inside the country where Down syndrome is disappearing”. This headline is from the BBC on October 14, “Netherlands backs euthanasia for terminally ill children under-12”.
Let me read a couple of excerpts from this article, which are fairly poignant considering today's discussion. The article begins, “The Dutch government has approved plans to allow euthanasia for terminally ill children aged between one and 12." Of the current law, it goes on to mention, “It is also legal for babies up to a year old [to be euthanized] with parental consent.
I could go on with more headlines, but I choose not to because I think members get the point. The point is this: Where do we stop? With Bill C-14 in its original form, the preamble said it all, which was, and I am sure the committee heard this, that there are many in society who say this bill does not go far enough and does not satisfy those who want wide open death-upon-request euthanasia laws. When we look at this, we must look at it from both sides, because both sides of this issue require our compassion.
I have spent time with three significant people in my life at the end of their lives. One is my mother, who was in extreme pain for a long period of time. I held held her hand upon her death. I also watched a very good friend deteriorate from age 39 to age 41 before his death. As well, lately, a very good friend, who is choosing to end her life early, and who I had quite a frank conversation with out of total respect. All of them had been, or are in, the final stages of a terminal illness.
Compassion must go to people who are in situations that are unbearable. Fortunately, there are other alternatives. I happen to live in Brantford, Ontario, and we have one of the finest palliative care units in all of the country. People come to study it and look at it. They come to see it as an alternative. If we were to focus on something going forward that a government could do, but that it would perhaps not see as a priority, it could be to give people the resources to make a choice.
Let me get back to this discussion of the most vulnerable. They are persons with disabilities, and to name a few, they are autistic children, autistic adults and persons with brain damage, like my son. These are not mental illnesses, by the way. Some of these are genetic, such as Down Syndrome. There are some who have met a person with Down Syndrome who just lights up their life because of their complete innocence and their complete love, not only for others, but also for their own lives. There are many others who the disability community speaks for.
Bill C-7 undermines their precarious position. It takes and diminishes the few protections that existed in Bill C-14, and of course, this is what is being chosen, as per the votes up to this point, on this issue by the majority of members of Parliament.
To my son, I say, “Stay safe.” To the constituents of Charlottetown, I say, “Stay safe.” To the constituents with disabilities in Scarborough—Agincourt, I say, “Stay safe.” To all Canadians, I say, “Stay safe.”
The trajectory of where we are heading, and it is in that preamble to the legislation, is what is happening around the world. It is happening in society. People in legislatures are making the decisions for the rest of the country as to what the future will look like.
This is a critical moment. It was a critical moment back in 2016. Again, we are faced with a critical moment. The priority has become a deadline set by a court, instead of the fullness of all voices being heard.
The parliamentary secretary can articulate the numbers. He can articulate the fact that there were so many submissions and individuals we were able to listen to. At this point in time, the people who represent the vast number of persons with disabilities and their families in this country are dead against this legislation. Let us be clear about that. Let us not try to sugar-coat this. This is where we are today.
What kind of society do we want? Where this leads to, frankly, is one of those headlines. As we take away the protections for individuals with disabilities, as this law does, we eventually lead society into the normal course of accepting that assisted suicide and euthanasia are natural things. We move toward being a society that starts to look at individuals as either being healthy in society's mind, and living fulfilling lives, or beings one of those who have been brought into this world, or has had something happen to them in this world, that puts them in this very precarious situation.
Is life easy for persons with disabilities and their caregivers? In most cases, it is not easy. We can attest to that. We have three healthy children, as well as our special needs son with disabilities. Part of the richness of life is the fact that the child who many would see as imperfect is the one who brings the most joy to life. They are the ones we must protect at all costs.
Why do we not spend the time to get this legislation right and make it airtight so their lives are never at risk? I do not believe this legislation does immediately put them at risk. Some would say this legislation is quite to the contrary, but looking to five, 10, or 20 years from now, when most of us here will no longer be in Parliament, it will be a new group of elected representatives looking to make changes down the road.
Is there anything in the international experience to tell us that this is not a continual, gradual and incremental deterioration of the protections for those who are the most vulnerable?
The other point that needs to be made is that persons with disabilities are a minority in our country. Over the 13 years I have been in Parliament, more time has been spent on legislation, members' statements, just name it, than communications from government about protecting minorities. This is a vulnerable, if not the most vulnerable, minority in society. It is definitely in the top grouping of the most vulnerable.
Disability knows no boundaries. We are involved with groups of people, and I represent the Six Nations of the Grand River, the largest first nation in Canada. We are helping aboriginal individuals from Six Nations who have children with disabilities. They feel very strongly about the fact that the few protections that exist need to not only be kept in place, but also enhanced and made airtight for their children.
In those debates in 2016, the member for Calgary Nose Hill said in her opening statement that this is about, “the sanctity of human life” and “defining the morality of our country.” I could not agree more wholeheartedly with those words.
I will finish my remarks by saying, “Stay safe, my son.”
Monsieur le Président, je suis reconnaissant de pouvoir parler de cet enjeu crucial pour tous les Canadiens.
Alors que je m'apprêtais à commencer mon intervention, je me suis souvenu des débats sur le projet de loi C-14. Le 3 mai 2016, la Chambre débattait de la création d'un projet de loi sur l'euthanasie et sur l'aide au suicide. Lorsque j'ai pris la parole ce soir-là, j'ai mentionné que ce serait probablement le discours le plus important de ma carrière politique. À l'époque, j'étais député depuis huit ans; je siège maintenant ici depuis 13 ans.
Quand je repense à ce discours aujourd'hui, je crois que j'avais tort et que le discours que je m'apprête à prononcer est celui qui est le plus important. En mai 2016, comme maintenant, le Parlement devait faire adopter un projet de loi sur l'euthanasie et sur l'aide au suicide avant une date fixée par un tribunal. Depuis la promulgation de la première loi sur ces questions aux Pays-Bas en 2002, beaucoup d'autres pays ont adopté des lois semblables. J'ai vu ce qui s'est passé dans ces pays, et cela me donne un aperçu des dérapages que ces lois peuvent provoquer.
Je dois aussi, comme je l'ai fait en 2016, préciser que j'ai un point de vue bien tranché sur la question parce que mon fils de 34 ans a une déficience intellectuelle. Il a subi des lésions cérébrales alors qu'il avait 2 ans. En raison de ces dommages irréversibles, il a vécu toute sa vie avec des parents, qui sont ses aidants naturels. Lorsque les particuliers et les organismes qui représentent les personnes handicapées ont pris la parole — et ils se sont exprimés haut et fort — au sujet des modifications que le gouvernement propose dans le projet de loi C-7, ils ont affirmé qu'il n'y avait pas pire scénario.
Je reçois ces propos en tant que père qui veut protéger son fils. En toute honnêteté, ce débat m'amène à réfléchir à la situation actuelle, soit à la crise de la COVID-19. Peu importe le moyen de communication, que ce soit un courriel, un message texte, un appel téléphonique ou autre, l'échange commence presque toujours par la phrase suivante: « J'espère que votre famille va bien. » En général, ces échanges se concluent par un « soyez prudent ». J'ai l'impression que tous les parlementaires vivent probablement la même chose.
C'est l'une des inquiétudes de la communauté des personnes handicapées. Qu'arrivera-t-il à nos enfants lorsque nous ne serons plus là pour prendre soin d'eux et les protéger? Par conséquent, le thème de mon discours d'aujourd'hui est: « Sois prudent, mon fils ».
Jetons un coup d'oeil à la manière dont les lois sur la question ont évolué dans le monde. Je vais vous lire quelques gros titres parus récemment dans les médias sur lesquels je suis tombé en faisant ma recherche en vue du débat d'aujourd'hui. « À quel genre de société aspirons-nous? Le pays où la trisomie disparaît. » En voici un autre de la BBC, daté du 14 octobre: « Les Pays-Bas sont en faveur de l'euthanasie pour les enfants malades de moins de 12 ans, en phase terminale. »
Permettez-moi de vous lire quelques extraits de cet article, qui sont particulièrement émouvants dans le cadre de la discussion d'aujourd'hui. L'article commence en disant que « [l]e gouvernement néerlandais a approuvé des plans visant à autoriser l'euthanasie pour les enfants malades en phase terminale âgés d'un à douze ans. » Parlant de la loi en vigueur, l'article poursuit en disant que « [l'euthanasie] des bébés, jusqu'à un an, est aussi légale si les parents donnent leur consentement. »
Je pourrais vous lire encore bien des gros titres, mais je ne préfère pas. Les députés ont compris où je voulais en venir: la question qui se pose, c'est, où s'arrête-t-on? Dans la version initiale du projet de loi C-14, tout était dit dans le préambule, à savoir — et je suis certain que le comité a entendu ce genre de commentaires — que beaucoup, dans la société, pensent que ce projet de loi ne va pas assez loin et ne satisfait pas ceux qui veulent des lois donnant facilement accès à l'euthanasie sur demande. Dans le présent débat, il faut prendre en compte les deux positions, car elles méritent toutes deux notre compassion.
J'ai passé du temps avec trois personnes importantes dans ma vie alors qu'elles étaient en fin de vie. L'une était ma mère, qui a horriblement souffert, et ce, pendant longtemps. Je lui tenais la main lorsqu'elle a rendu l'âme. J'ai également regardé un très bon ami dépérir à partir de l'âge de 39 ans jusqu'à sa mort, à 41 ans. De plus, récemment, une très bonne amie à moi a choisi de mettre fin à ses jours prématurément. Par respect pour elle, j'ai eu une conversation plutôt franche avec elle. Toutes ces personnes étaient ou sont toujours en phase terminale.
Il faut faire preuve de compassion envers les personnes en situation intolérable. Heureusement, il existe d'autres solutions. Je vis à Brantford, en Ontario, qui compte l'une des meilleures unités de soins palliatifs au pays. Les gens viennent l'étudier et l'examiner. Ils finissent par comprendre qu'il s'agit d'une bonne solution de rechange. Si le gouvernement voulait vraiment aider, il pourrait donner aux gens les ressources voulues pour qu'ils puissent faire un choix. Or, ce n'est peut-être pas au nombre de ses priorités.
Je reviens aux membres les plus vulnérables de la société, lesquels comprennent notamment, les personnes en situation de handicap, les enfants et les adultes autistes ainsi que les personnes atteintes de lésions cérébrales, comme mon fils. Soit dit en passant, ces conditions ne sont pas des maladies mentales. Certaines sont génétiques, comme le syndrome de Down. Rencontrer un trisomique peut mettre du soleil dans notre vie, car il est merveilleux de voir sa parfaite innocence et son amour sans borne non seulement pour les autres, mais aussi pour sa propre vie. La communauté des personnes handicapées englobe bien des personnes différentes.
Le projet de loi C-7 aggrave la précarité de leur situation. Il élimine ou affaiblit le peu de mesures de sauvegarde qui, dans le projet de loi C-14, protégeaient ces personnes. Manifestement, si l'on se fie aux votes tenus jusqu'à présent, c'est ce que la majorité des députés choisit.
Je dis à mon fils « sois prudent ». Je dis aux habitants de Charlottetown « soyez prudents ». Je dis aux habitants de Scarborough-Agincourt ayant un handicap « soyez prudents ». Je dis à tous les Canadiens « soyez prudents ».
L'orientation que nous prenons — nous pouvons d'ailleurs le voir dans le préambule du projet de loi — correspond exactement avec ce qui se passe ailleurs dans le monde. Cela se passe dans la société. Les législateurs prennent les décisions au sujet de l'avenir du pays.
Nous sommes à un moment critique. C'était un moment critique en 2016 aussi, et nous voilà de nouveau à un moment critique. On se concentre sur une date limite fixée par la cour au lieu d'écouter tous les points de vue.
Le secrétaire parlementaire peut nous présenter les chiffres. Il a beau dire que le comité a reçu de nombreux mémoires et entendu de nombreux témoignages mais, en ce moment même, les représentants d'un grand nombre de personnes handicapées et leur famille au Canada s'opposent fermement au projet de loi. Disons les choses comme elles sont. Arrêtons de dorer la pilule. Voilà où nous en sommes aujourd'hui.
Quel genre de société voulons-nous? Honnêtement, cette mesure législative mène vers une situation où ces grands titres seront la réalité. À mesure que l'on retire les protections pour les personnes handicapées, comme le fait le projet de loi à l'étude, on se dirige vers une société où le suicide assisté et l'euthanasie font partie de la normalité. Nous nous dirigeons vers une société où il y a deux catégories d'individus: ceux qui sont en santé et en mesure de vivre une vie épanouie et ceux qui, de naissance ou de par les événements de la vie, se retrouvent dans une situation précaire.
Est-ce que la vie est facile pour les personnes handicapées et pour ceux qui prennent soin d'elles? Dans la plupart des cas, non, elle n'est pas facile. Nous le savons bien. Nous avons trois enfants en santé et un fils handicapé qui a des besoins particuliers. La beauté de la vie, c'est que les enfants que plusieurs considéreraient comme imparfaits sont ceux qui nous apportent le plus de joie. Ce sont eux qu'il faut protéger à tout prix.
Pourquoi ne prenons-nous pas le temps de trouver le bon équilibre dans ce projet de loi et de nous assurer de penser à tous les cas de figure pour que la vie de ces enfants ne soit jamais mise en danger? Je ne crois pas que le projet de loi actuel mette immédiatement leur vie en danger. Certains diront que c'est tout le contraire, mais si on pense à ce qui arrivera dans 5, 10 ou 20 ans, lorsque la plupart d'entre nous auront quitté le Parlement, les élus du moment songeront éventuellement à modifier la loi.
Existe-t-il des exemples à l'étranger qui montrent qu'il n'y aura pas d'effet d'effritement continu, graduel et croissant de la protection des plus vulnérables?
L'autre point qu'il faut faire valoir, c'est que les personnes ayant un handicap constituent une minorité dans notre pays. Au cours des 13 années que j'ai passées au Parlement, plus de temps a été consacré aux mesures législatives, aux déclarations des députés et à tout le reste qu'aux communications du gouvernement sur la protection des minorités. Or, il s'agit d'une minorité vulnérable, peut-être même la plus vulnérable de la société. Il ne fait aucun doute qu'elle figure parmi les groupes les plus vulnérables.
Les handicaps ne connaissent pas de frontières. Nous travaillons avec certains groupes. Pour ma part, je représente les Six Nations de la rivière Grand, la plus grande Première nation au Canada. Nous épaulons les Autochtones des Six Nations qui ont des enfants ayant un handicap. Ils croient fermement que les rares mesures de protection qui existent doivent non seulement demeurer en place, mais aussi être renforcées de façon à garantir une protection à toute épreuve pour leurs enfants.
Lors des débats qui se sont tenus en 2016 sur le sujet, la députée de Calgary Nose Hill avait affirmé dans sa déclaration préliminaire que cette question « traite du caractère sacré de la vie humaine » et qu'il s'agit « de définir la moralité de notre pays ». Je suis entièrement d'accord avec ses propos.
Je termine mes observations en disant: « Sois prudent, mon fils. »
Collapse
View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
View René Arseneault Profile
2020-12-04 10:47 [p.2963]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank our friend from Brantford—Brant for sharing his own experience.
I was one of the original members of the joint committee behind Bill C-14. Allow me to share a little background.
Bill C-14 was introduced in response to the unanimous ruling of the Supreme Court of Canada handed down in February 2014, when the Harper government was in power. The court gave the government 12 months to comply with the ruling. The Harper government, knowing that an election was coming in the spring of 2015, essentially did nothing. The Liberals won the 2015 election. We lost 10 precious months before cabinet was appointed as a result of the Conservative Party's inaction.
Politicians are often called upon to make decisions, and it is not always easy. The majority of members on our committee who opposed this bill said they were doing so to protect vulnerable people, which is something everyone wants to do.
Could my esteemed colleague tell us where in Bill C-14 or in Bill C-7, which we are debating today, it says that a minor with a head injury, cerebral palsy or Down's syndrome could request medical assistance in dying? I do not see that anywhere.
Monsieur le Président, je salue au passage notre ami de Brantford—Brant. Je le remercie de nous avoir fait part de son histoire personnelle.
J'ai fait partie des premiers membres du comité mixte qui a mené au projet de loi C-14. Voici un bref rappel historique.
Le projet de loi C-14 nous est venu d'une décision unanime de la Cour suprême du Canada qui a été rendue en février 2014, alors que le gouvernement Harper était au pouvoir. Elle avait donné 12 mois au gouvernement pour se conformer à la décision. Le gouvernement Harper, qui savait qu'une élection s'en venait au printemps 2015, n'a pratiquement rien fait. Les libéraux ont remporté l'élection de 2015. Avant les nominations du Cabinet, on a perdu 10 mois précieux, à cause de l'inaction du Parti conservateur.
Quand on se lance en politique, on doit souvent prendre des décisions, et ce n'est pas facile. Au sein de notre comité, la plupart de ceux qui s'opposaient à ce projet de loi venaient brandir la protection des personnes vulnérables, ce que tout le monde veut faire.
Mon collègue, pour qui j'ai beaucoup d'estime, peut-il nous dire où, dans le projet de loi C-14 ou dans le projet de loi C-7, dont il débat, on dit qu'une personne d'âge mineur souffrant d'un traumatisme crânien, de paralysie cérébrale ou du syndrome de Down peut demander l'aide médicale à mourir? Je ne vois cela nulle part.
Collapse
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2020-12-04 10:49 [p.2963]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I reflect back on a few comments made previously in debate by the parliamentary secretary, and in the question and answer period, which were that this is not a partisan issue. However, the only two people I have heard criticize a particular political party in this debate are the two members from the Liberal government side.
The member said the protections for persons with disabilities are in this legislation. He is wrong. That is why the disability community has spoken so loudly and broadly across this country, yet the government is not listening.
Monsieur le Président, je repense à quelques commentaires formulés par le secrétaire parlementaire plus tôt dans le débat et pendant la période de questions et réponses. Il a souligné qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un enjeu partisan. Pourtant, les deux seules personnes que j'ai entendues critiquer un parti politique en particulier au cours du débat sont des députés libéraux.
Le député affirme que le projet de loi comprend des mesures visant à protéger les personnes ayant un handicap. Il se trompe. C'est pourquoi la communauté des personnes ayant un handicap s'y est opposée si vigoureusement et si massivement partout au pays. Mais le gouvernement fait la sourde oreille.
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2020-12-04 10:50 [p.2963]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Brantford—Brant for his speech today. He is a member for whom I have a great deal of respect.
One of the things that COVID and the debate on Bill C-7 have done is expose something that has been there for anyone to look at if they chose to. That is the way we treat people with disabilities. We have not organized our society in a way that allows people with disabilities to live to their fullest potential or to live in equality with the rest of Canadians.
Would the hon. member support a national program of income support for people with disabilities that would lift all people with disabilities out of poverty and take away those stark choices he has been talking about?
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à remercier le député de Brantford—Brant pour le discours qu'il a prononcé aujourd'hui. Il s'agit d'un collègue pour qui j'ai beaucoup de respect.
La pandémie de COVID-19 et le débat entourant le projet de loi C-7 ont permis de mettre en lumière une réalité qu'il nous incombe à tous de reconnaître. Il s'agit de la façon dont nous traitons les personnes handicapées. En effet, la société n'a pas été organisée de manière à permettre aux personnes handicapées de développer pleinement leur potentiel, ou de vivre sur un pied d'égalité avec le reste des Canadiens.
Le député serait-il prêt à appuyer un programme national d'aide financière destinée aux personnes handicapées, lequel permettrait de sortir toutes les personnes handicapées de la pauvreté, et d'éliminer les choix difficiles dont il a parlé?
Collapse
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2020-12-04 10:51 [p.2963]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I, too, have a great deal of respect for the member who is asking this question. It is a great question.
There are supports needed for all families and for support workers, as well as for individuals with disabilities who choose to live on their own. In many of the provinces, believe it or not, they are sufficient.
I totally agree with the member. We need to set, for society, a moral compass on this issue. The government cannot look at this Parliament as solving this problem. We must set a tone and a future that guarantees, air tight, that persons with disabilities will live fulfilling lives, and that we will treat them as they are: as one of the most vulnerable minorities in our society.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai moi aussi beaucoup de respect pour le député qui pose cette question. Il s'agit d'ailleurs d'une excellente question.
Il est important de mettre en place des mesures d'aide pour toutes les familles et les travailleurs de soutien, ainsi que pour les personnes handicapées qui choisissent de vivre seules. Dans de nombreuses provinces, qu'on le croie ou non, ces mesures de soutien sont suffisantes.
Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec le député. Nous devons établir, pour la société, des normes morales à l'égard de cet enjeu. Le gouvernement ne peut pas se contenter de laisser le Parlement régler ce problème. Nous devons donner le ton et assurer que, dans l'avenir, les personnes handicapées pourront mener une vie épanouie et que nous les traiterons pour ce qu'elles sont, soit l'une des minorités les plus vulnérables de la société.
Collapse
View Marilyn Gladu Profile
CPC (ON)
View Marilyn Gladu Profile
2020-12-04 10:52 [p.2963]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for illuminating, from the heart, what we have been talking about in this debate.
I know he mentioned that his riding has excellent palliative care, but the reality is that across Canada, 70% of people have no access to palliative care. The government unanimously supported my palliative care bill to put a framework in place to get consistent access. Now it has backed down on all its promises to put money behind it so that people would actually have a choice, as the Carter decision outlined.
Could the member describe how he sees the government's response on palliative care?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue d'avoir ainsi enrichi le débat actuel en s'exprimant du fond du cœur.
Je sais qu'il a mentionné que sa circonscription dispose d'excellents soins palliatifs, mais la réalité, c'est que 70 % des Canadiens n'ont pas accès à de tels soins. Le gouvernement a appuyé à l'unanimité mon projet de loi sur les soins palliatifs visant à mettre en place un cadre qui permettrait un accès uniforme à ces soins. Il est maintenant revenu sur toutes ses promesses de financer le cadre afin que les gens aient réellement un choix, comme l'a souligné la décision Carter.
Le député pourrait-il décrire comment il perçoit la réponse du gouvernement en matière de soins palliatifs?
Collapse
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2020-12-04 10:53 [p.2963]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague, first of all, for her work on this issue, and for her passion for those I know she has personally worked with as the member of Parliament for Sarnia—Lambton.
I wish I could bring all of Parliament to the palliative care facility in my community. It is, without question, one of the most brilliant and well-thought-out places in which a person can choose a path to the end of life with dignity, and can have family and the community participate. I have spent many hours at this facility as a member of Parliament, visiting members of my community who are in their last days. It is one of the most rewarding and wonderful experiences of life.
Death is part of life, and should be celebrated as someone comes toward the end. They may be in great pain—
Monsieur le Président, je remercie ma collègue de son travail dans ce dossier et de la fougue avec laquelle je sais qu'elle a défendu les personnes avec qui elle a travaillé personnellement en tant que députée de Sarnia—Lambton.
J'aimerais pouvoir amener tout le Parlement dans l'établissement de soins palliatifs de ma circonscription. C'est sans aucun doute l'un des endroits les plus brillants et bien conçus où une personne peut choisir de passer la fin de sa vie dans la dignité et où sa famille et la communauté peuvent participer. En tant que député, j'ai passé de nombreuses heures dans cet établissement à visiter des membres de ma communauté qui vivent leurs derniers jours. C'est l'une des expériences de la vie les plus enrichissantes et les plus merveilleuses.
La mort fait partie de la vie et devrait être célébrée lorsqu'une personne arrive à la fin de sa vie. Elle peut éprouver d'énormes souffrances...
Collapse
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2020-12-04 10:54 [p.2964]
Expand
We will continue with questions and comments. The hon. member for Fredericton.
Nous poursuivons les questions et les observations. La députée de Fredericton a la parole.
Collapse
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2020-12-04 10:54 [p.2964]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I encourage the member to continue his response here, if he wishes. I appreciate the personal contributions so much. It is so important for us to understand.
I was not here for the previous discussion around this bill, and here we are in a very difficult position again. I have studied it. I have consulted with my riding. I have consulted with many people who are accessing MAID, and with people in the disability community who have concerns.
I was very comfortable with where I landed in support of this bill. However, I come from a position of privilege. I want the member to be comfortable as a parent, and I want the member's son to be safe as well.
Is it the interpretation that the member is worried about: that people will see people with disabilities as experiencing suffering? The bill is focusing on someone who is in pain. I am just wondering, is the interpretation and the application of law for those in the disability community the concern? I just need to understand where the fears are really coming from.
Monsieur le Président, j'invite le député à poursuivre sa réponse ici, s'il le souhaite. Je suis contente de connaître son point de vue personnel, car c'est très important pour nous tous de bien comprendre l'enjeu.
Je n'avais pas encore été élue députée lors des discussions précédentes concernant ce projet de loi, et nous voici de nouveau, dans une position difficile. J'ai étudié la question. J'ai consulté les résidants de ma circonscription, de nombreuses personnes qui ont eu accès à l'aide médicale à mourir et des gens de la communauté des personnes handicapées qui ont des inquiétudes.
Je me sentais en confiance dans mon soutien du projet de loi. Cependant, je suis dans une situation privilégiée. Je veux que le député soit rassuré comme parent et je veux aussi que son fils soit protégé.
Le député s'inquiète-t-il de l'interprétation du projet de loi? Craint-il que les gens croient que les personnes handicapées vivent des souffrances? Le projet de loi vise les personnes qui éprouvent des souffrances physiques. Je me demande si c'est l'interprétation et l'application de la loi qui inquiètent les gens de la communauté des personnes handicapées. J'ai besoin de comprendre la source des inquiétudes.
Collapse
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2020-12-04 10:55 [p.2964]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that very personal question.
The fear comes from this. Parents and caregivers, and the community in general around persons with disabilities, know that there will come a time in their lives when that care may deteriorate, and society no longer values persons it interprets as being imperfect. If we look at the trajectory of euthanasia and assisted-suicide legislation around the world, that is indeed the direction it is going.
It is going in the direction of this. It may not be now, through this piece of legislation. Perhaps there may be good intent, and I hope there is, but eventually, we as legislators must decide there are lines we cannot cross. That is why I say, “Stay safe, my son,” because I will no longer be here to keep him safe, and that is the fear of most parents.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie la députée de sa question très personnelle.
Voici d'où vient l'inquiétude: les parents et les soignants ainsi que les gens en général qui côtoient les personnes handicapées savent que le jour pourrait venir où la qualité des soins qu'on leur prodigue diminuera et où la société n'accordera plus de valeur aux personnes qu'elle considère comme imparfaites. Si l'on examine l'évolution des lois sur l'euthanasie et sur le suicide assisté dans le monde, on voit que c'est en fait la direction dans laquelle ces lois s'orientent.
C'est dans cette direction que les lois évoluent. Ce ne sera peut-être pas tout de suite, comme conséquence du projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis. Il part peut-être d'une bonne intention — et je l'espère —, mais à un moment donné, nous, les législateurs, devons décider où tracer les lignes à ne pas franchir. Voilà pourquoi je dis, « Sois prudent, mon fils », car je ne serai plus là pour veiller sur lui. C'est la grande inquiétude de la plupart des parents.
Collapse
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2020-12-04 10:57 [p.2964]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I come at it from the very same position as my hon. colleague from Brantford—Brant. I am choking up. I know both sides of it. Right next door to me, my father-in-law is in palliative care. We have been looking after him for six months. I also have a 32-year-old daughter who lives with a cognitive disability, and we worry every day. We worry every day that they go outside. We worry every day, when I go to work, that somehow someone is going to take advantage of them, and that we will not be there to protect them.
I wonder if I could get my hon. colleague to expand a bit on the fear that parents have and the fact that we are not always there. There will come a day when we are not there, so we have to do everything in our power. I said in the last session that Bill C-14 was perhaps the most important piece of legislation in our lifetime and our generation, but as a parent of somebody with a disability this is so important.
I ask my colleague to expand a bit more on the fear that we have for our children.
Monsieur le Président, j'aborde cette question exactement comme le fait le député de Brantford—Brant. Je suis très ému. Je connais les deux côtés de la médaille. Mon beau-père, qui vit à côté de chez moi, reçoit des soins palliatifs. Nous prenons soin de lui depuis six mois. J'ai aussi une fille de 32 ans atteinte d'une déficience cognitive. Nous vivons dans l'inquiétude chaque jour. Nous nous inquiétons chaque fois qu'ils vont dehors. Chaque jour, quand je vais travailler, nous craignons que quelqu'un profite d'eux quand nous ne sommes pas là pour les protéger.
J'aimerais que le député nous parle davantage des inquiétudes des parents et du fait qu'ils ne sont pas toujours présents. Un jour viendra où nous ne serons pas là, et nous devons donc faire tout notre possible entretemps. J'ai dit pendant la dernière séance que le projet de loi C-14 était peut-être la mesure législative la plus importante de notre époque et de notre génération, mais pour quelqu'un qui, comme moi, a un enfant handicapé, le projet de loi à l'étude est aussi crucial.
Je demanderais au député de parler davantage des inquiétudes des parents pour leurs enfants.
Collapse
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
View Phil McColeman Profile
2020-12-04 10:58 [p.2964]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would elaborate more if I had the time, and I will personally elaborate more with my colleague.
However, we must come to grips with this. Society is not well equipped for this, frankly. The legislature is not equipped. We, as legislators, are not well equipped to set a course that protects the most vulnerable. I agree with protecting minorities. This applies to the most vulnerable. This bill, Bill C-7, would take away protections. That is why the disability community has spoken out.
I thank you, Mr. Speaker, for your time and indulgence.
Monsieur le Président, je me pencherais plus longuement sur cette question si j'en avais le temps, et j'en parlerai davantage avec le député en privé.
Cela dit, nous devons trouver des solutions. La société est mal outillée pour le faire, en toute franchise. La législature est aussi mal outillée. En tant que législateurs, nous ne sommes pas bien outillés pour tracer une voie qui protégera les personnes les plus vulnérables. Je sais qu'il faut protéger les minorités. L'enjeu, ici, touche les personnes les plus vulnérables. Le projet de loi C-7 éliminerait des protections. C'est ce que dénonce la communauté des personnes handicapées.
Monsieur le Président, merci pour votre temps et votre indulgence.
Collapse
View Francesco Sorbara Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Francesco Sorbara Profile
2020-12-04 10:59 [p.2964]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the holiday season is upon us and even if our gatherings will be small, or held virtually, to reduce the spread of COVID-19, I would like to wish Vaughan—Woodbridge residents and all Canadians a safe and peaceful Christmas spent with loved ones.
This time of year also provides an opportunity for giving. We know that recent months have been very difficult for many of us. Across the country, demand for food banks is soaring. Food banks help families, single mothers, seniors, and maybe even our colleagues or neighbours. Food insecurity is on the rise everywhere in Canada.
I invite my colleagues to support their local food banks and encourage our Vaughan community to donate, if possible, to our local Vaughan Food Bank. Each and every support item or dollar that Peter and the team receives assists those who need it most. Together, we can make a difference, as hunger takes no holidays.
Monsieur le Président, la période des Fêtes est à nos portes. Même si nos rassemblements se feront en mode réduit ou virtuel pour freiner la propagation de la COVID-19, je souhaite aux résidants de Vaughan—Woodbridge et à tous les autres Canadiens un Noël paisible et sûr en compagnie de leurs proches.
Cette période de l'année est aussi l'occasion de donner et nous savons que les derniers mois ont été très difficiles pour beaucoup d'entre nous. Partout au pays, nos centres communautaires d'alimentation constatent que les besoins augmentent. Ces centres viennent en aide aux familles, aux mères célibataires, aux personnes âgées et peut-être à nos collègues ou voisins. L'insécurité alimentaire est en hausse partout au Canada.
J'invite mes collègues à soutenir les banques alimentaires de leur région et j'encourage les gens de Vaughan à donner, s'ils le peuvent, à notre organisme local. Chaque bien et chaque dollar que Peter et son équipe reçoivent permet d'aider ceux qui en ont le plus besoin. Ensemble, nous pouvons améliorer les choses. Malheureusement, la faim ne prend jamais de vacances.
Collapse
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
2020-12-04 11:00 [p.2965]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Stephanie Thompson, who was recently named by the Women's Executive Network as one of the top 100 award winners in its most powerful women in Canada program.
Stephanie is an engineer at our local General Motors plant. As part of this award program, Stephanie was recognized within the CP skilled trades category, which highlights outstanding women who contribute immense value and demonstrate excellence in skilled trades, product or service innovation and community involvement. According to our local paper, the Niagara Falls Review, Stephanie is receiving this award for her significant contributions to inspire and empower girls and women by breaking down barriers in the science and technology sectors, and by creating learning opportunities specifically geared toward women.
I congratulate Stephanie on her incredible achievement. P.S.: She is really going to love living in Niagara Falls. I hope her upcoming move to our city goes well.
Monsieur le Président, je saisis cette occasion pour féliciter Stephanie Thompson, qui a récemment été nommée par le Réseau des femmes exécutives l'une des 100 femmes les plus influentes au Canada.
Mme Thompson est ingénieure à l'usine locale de General Motors. Son travail a été reconnu dans la catégorie des métiers spécialisés CP. Cette catégorie célèbre les femmes exceptionnelles qui font preuve d'excellence et qui apportent une contribution d'une valeur immense en ce qui concerne les métiers spécialisés, l'innovation dans les produits ou services et l'engagement communautaire. Selon le journal de la région, le Niagara Falls Review, Mme Thompson reçoit ce prix parce qu'elle contribue grandement à inspirer les filles et les femmes et à leur donner les moyens de réaliser leurs ambitions en éliminant les obstacles dans les secteurs des sciences et des technologies et en créant des occasions d'apprentissage adaptées aux femmes.
Je félicite Mme Thompson de cette incroyable distinction. En passant, elle adorera vivre à Niagara Falls. Je lui souhaite que son déménagement dans notre ville se passe bien.
Collapse
View Ali Ehsassi Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Ali Ehsassi Profile
2020-12-04 11:01 [p.2965]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as we approach the end of the year, I think it is incredibly important to emphasize that Canadians have displayed resilience day in and day out, providing us with profound glimmers of hope for the new year. Albeit exhausted, our health care professionals and front-line workers have proved to be heroes. Small business owners have spared no effort to pivot and meet their challenges head-on.
Drawing inspiration from Canadians, our government has risen to the occasion, whether through rapid financial support, assisting businesses, small and large, ensuring safety through public health measures or focusing on vaccine procurement. Even when the going got tough, our government strengthened its commitment to Canadians. That is why I have full faith that we will build back better. Make no mistake, we are still on the road to recovery, but it is critical that we get this right.
In that spirit, I would ask all members to refrain from partisan games around vaccines. We should all listen to the experts.
Monsieur le Président, comme la fin de l'année arrive à grands pas, j'estime qu'il est très important de souligner la résilience dont les Canadiens ont fait preuve, de jour en jour, laissant ainsi percevoir des lueurs d'espoir pour la nouvelle année. Malgré qu'ils soient épuisés, les professionnels de la santé et les travailleurs de première ligne ont prouvé qu'ils sont tous des héros. Les propriétaires des petites entreprises n'ont pas ménagé leurs efforts pour s'adapter aux nouvelles circonstances et relever tous les défis devant eux.
Inspiré par les Canadiens, le gouvernement s'est montré à la hauteur, que ce soit en instaurant rapidement des mesures de soutien financier, en appuyant les entreprises, les petites comme les grandes, en protégeant la sécurité de tous avec des mesures de santé publique ou en préparant l'approvisionnement en vaccins. Quand les choses se sont corsées, le gouvernement a raffermi son engagement à l'égard des Canadiens. Voilà pourquoi j'ai entièrement confiance que nous allons réussir à rebâtir en mieux. Qu'on me comprenne bien: nous sommes encore sur la voie du redressement, mais nous devons absolument agir de la bonne manière.
Dans cette optique, j'exhorte tous les députés à mettre la partisanerie de côté lorsqu'il est question des vaccins. Nous devrions tous nous en remettre aux avis des experts.
Collapse
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
View Leah Gazan Profile
2020-12-04 11:03 [p.2965]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, today I congratulate the work of all indigenous and grassroots leaders across these lands, faith groups, human rights advocates and thousands of people who fought for the adoption and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Bill C-15 is the result of decades of work by people who I walked side by side with. We wrote, gathered, rallied and published, fighting for human rights. These include Anna Collins, Grand Chief Wilton Littlechild, Dr. Ted Moses, Steve Heinrichs, Jennifer Preston, Jennifer Henry, Cathy Moore-Thiessen, Charlie Wright, Mary Ellen Turpel- Lafond, Tina Keeper, Denise Savoie, Paul Joffe, Ellen Gabriel, the member of Parliament for Scarborough—Rouge Park, my partner Romeo Saganash, who introduced Bill C-262, and so many others.
I look forward to this piece of legislation being passed to ensure that all indigenous people in Canada have their fundamental human rights upheld. It is always a good day for human rights.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à souligner le travail remarquable de tous les dirigeants locaux et autochtones de toutes les régions au pays, les groupes confessionnels, les défenseurs des droits de la personne et les milliers de personnes qui se sont battus pour l'adoption et la mise en œuvre de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
Le projet de loi C-15 est le fruit de décennies de dur labeur par des gens que j'ai côtoyés. Nous avons écrit et publié, nous nous sommes réunis et ralliés, nous nous sommes battus pour défendre les droits de la personne. Il y a, entre autres, Anna Collins, le grand chef Wilton Littlechild, Ted Moses, Steve Heinrichs, Jennifer Preston, Jennifer Henry, Cathy Moore-Thiessen, Charlie Wright, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, Tina Keeper, Denise Savoie, Paul Joffe, Ellen Gabriel, le député de Scarborough—Rouge Park, et mon partenaire, Romeo Saganash, qui avait présenté le projet de loi C-262.
J'ai très hâte que ce projet de loi soit adopté pour que soient respectés les droits fondamentaux de tous les Autochtones au Canada. C'est toujours le bon moment quand il s'agit de protéger les droits de la personne.
Collapse
View Pat Finnigan Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Pat Finnigan Profile
2020-12-04 11:04 [p.2965]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, today I would like to highlight the dedication and hard work of three nurses from my riding of Miramichi—Grand Lake. RNs Jacqueline Hare and Carolyn Sutherland, and LPN Jessica Marshall were all recognized by Horizon Health Network as recipients of the 2020 Award of Distinction in nursing.
Awarded posthumously, Ms. Hare was a recipient in the leadership category and was praised for her passion and dedication in client care, where she helped so many in her 30-plus year career.
Ms. Sutherland, an ER nurse, was honoured for her mentorship and ability to lead and guide staff in the chaotic environment of the emergency department.
Finally, as a nursing novice, Ms. Marshall was honoured for her sympathy, patience and dedication to her patients.
Now more than ever, we need to acknowledge and thank the hard-working health care professionals in our communities. I am very proud to have such wonderful nurses selflessly serving the Miramichi area. I congratulate all of them.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais aujourd'hui saluer le dévouement et le travail exceptionnel de trois infirmières de Miramichi—Grand Lake. Les infirmières autorisées Jacqueline Hare et Carolyn Sutherland ainsi que l'infirmière auxiliaire autorisée Jessica Marshall sont les lauréates de 2020 des Prix de distinction en soins infirmiers remis par le Réseau de santé Horizon.
Le prix dans la catégorie Leadership a été remis à titre posthume à Mme Hare, qui, en 30 ans et plus de carrière, s'est démarquée pour sa passion, son dévouement et son souci du service à la clientèle.
Mme Sutherland, qui travaille aux urgences, a été honorée pour ses qualités de mentore hors pair et sa capacité à guider et à diriger ses collègues dans les situations les plus chaotiques.
Enfin, la novice des trois, Mme Marshall, a été récompensée pour son empathie, sa patience et son dévouement pour les patients.
Maintenant plus que jamais, nous devons saluer le travail acharné des professionnels de la santé et leur exprimer notre reconnaissance. Je suis immensément fier de savoir que la région de Miramichi peut compter sur trois infirmières aussi extraordinaires et généreuses de leur temps. Félicitations à toutes les trois.
Collapse
View Michael Barrett Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I am rising today to bring a display of bravery of a very high order to the attention of the House.
On the evening of August 7 of this year, at the Newboro lock station in the Township of Rideau Lakes, lockmaster Dylan Carbino was taking a phone call when he noticed heat, fast-moving black smoke and calls of fire from a moored boat that had burst into flames.
Dylan immediately sprung into action, grabbed a fire extinguisher and called for the help of summer students Marina Clark and Alex Dow. At great risk to their own lives and wearing only shorts and short-sleeved shirts, the trio of Parks Canada employees fought the growing inferno and saved the lives of the two souls onboard and their dog.
This selfless act of bravery that these three young people undertook to save the lives of strangers without a moment of hesitation is as Canadian as it gets. That is why I have nominated these three heroes for the Governor General's Medal of Bravery.
I thank Dylan, Marina and Alex for their bravery. Our community is a better one because of it.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour attirer l'attention de la Chambre sur un acte de bravoure extraordinaire.
Le soir du 7 août dernier, au poste d'éclusage de Newboro, dans le canton de Rideau Lakes, le maître-éclusier Dylan Carbino répondait à un appel téléphonique quand il a remarqué de la fumée noire qui se déplaçait rapidement et des gens crier à partir d'un bateau amarré qui venait de prendre feu.
Dylan est aussitôt intervenu en s'emparant d'un extincteur et en appelant à l'aide les stagiaires Marina Clark et Alex Dow. Au péril de leur propre vie, le trio d'employés de Parcs Canada, qui n'étaient vêtus que d'un short et d'un chandail à manches courtes, a lutté contre le brasier qui s'intensifiait et a sauvé la vie des deux personnes à bord et de leur chien.
Il n'y a pas plus canadien que l'acte de bravoure altruiste que ces trois jeunes ont accompli sans la moindre hésitation pour sauver la vie d'étrangers. Voilà pourquoi j'ai mis en nomination ces trois héros pour la Médaille de la bravoure de la gouverneure générale.
Je remercie Dylan, Marina et Alex de leur bravoure. Notre région est meilleure grâce à elle.
Collapse
View Paul Lefebvre Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Paul Lefebvre Profile
2020-12-04 11:07 [p.2966]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by acknowledging that I am on Robinson-Huron treaty territory in the traditional lands of the Atikameksheng Anishinabe.
Access to clean and safe drinking water is a basic human right. Since 2015, this government has worked in partnership with first nations communities to end over 97 long-term drinking water advisories across Canada. We know there are many more to go.
Sadly, the fact that this government will not be able to meet its March 2021 deadline to end all boiled water advisories speaks more to the immense scale of the task than it does to the government's commitment to it.
On Wednesday, this government announced more than $1.5 billion in additional investments to accelerate our commitment to ensuring clean drinking water in first nations reserves.
In my riding, I want to thank Jordan Cheff and his group, “Cold Water for Clean Water”, who plunge every day into the frigid waters of Lake Nepahwin in solidarity with this cause. Their efforts are not going unnoticed.
We know that a lot of work remains, and the progress we have made shows our commitment to meet this important challenge. From day one, our work has been in partnership with first nations communities. It will remain so to ensure clean water for all.
Monsieur le Président, je veux commencer par souligner que je suis sur des territoires visés par le Traité Robinson-Huron, sur les terres ancestrales des Atikameksheng anishinabes.
L'accès à de l'eau potable est un droit de la personne fondamental. Depuis 2015, le gouvernement a travaillé en partenariat avec les communautés des Premières Nations pour lever plus de 97 avis à long terme de faire bouillir l'eau au Canada. Nous savons qu'il en reste encore beaucoup d'autres.
Malheureusement, le gouvernement ne sera pas en mesure de respecter l'échéance de mars 2021 pour lever tous les avis de faire bouillir l'eau. Cela témoigne de l'ampleur de la tâche et n'a rien avoir avec la détermination du gouvernement dans le dossier.
Mercredi dernier, le gouvernement a annoncé plus de 1,5 milliard de dollars d'investissements supplémentaires afin d'intensifier les efforts pour fournir de l'eau potable dans les réserves des Premières Nations.
Dans ma circonscription, je tiens à remercier Jordan Cheff et son groupe, Cold Water for Clean Water, qui plongent chaque jour dans les eaux glaciales du lac Nepahwin en signe d'appui à la cause. Leurs efforts ne passent pas inaperçus.
Nous savons qu'il reste beaucoup à faire, et les progrès que nous avons réalisés montrent notre détermination à relever cet important défi. Dès le premier jour, nous avons travaillé avec les communautés des Premières Nations et nous continuerons jusqu'à ce que tout le monde ait accès à de l'eau potable.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-12-04 11:07 [p.2966]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to take a moment to mention the UN's World Food Programme, which received a Nobel Peace Prize “for its efforts to combat hunger, for its contribution to bettering conditions for peace in conflict-affected areas and for acting as a driving force in its efforts to prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war and conflict.”
Canada was integral to creating this program, and I want to highlight the work of one of its founders, who grew up in Winnipeg North, Frank Shefrin.
Frank Shefrin grew up on Selkirk Avenue, graduated from St. John's High School and spent almost 40 years as a federal public servant. He dedicated 16 years to building the World Food Programme, serving as its chair.
This program has been called the greatest success story in the UN's system. Today we are continuing this proud tradition of supporting those who need it. From leading international aid to delivering an unprecedented $100-million investment to fight hunger at home during the pandemic, the Canadian government and people like Frank Shefrin have always stood up to say “no” to hunger.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais prendre un instant pour parler du Programme alimentaire mondial de l'ONU, qui a reçu le prix Nobel de la paix pour ses efforts de lutte contre la faim et d'amélioration des conditions de paix dans les zones de conflit, et pour avoir agi comme force motrice dans les efforts visant à empêcher l'utilisation de la faim comme arme de guerre et de conflit.
Le Canada a apporté une contribution essentielle à la création de ce programme, et je tiens à souligner le travail de l'un de ses fondateurs, qui a grandi dans Winnipeg-Nord, Frank Shefrin.
Ce diplômé de la St. John's High School qui a grandi sur l'avenue Selkirk a été fonctionnaire fédéral pendant près de 40 ans. Il s'est consacré pendant 16 ans à la mise sur pied du Programme alimentaire mondial, dont il a été le président.
Ce programme a été décrit comme la plus grande réussite de l'ONU. Aujourd'hui encore, nous poursuivons cette fière tradition en venant en aide à ceux qui en ont besoin. Que ce soit en étant un chef de file en matière d'aide internationale ou en faisant un investissement sans précédent de 100 millions de dollars pour lutter contre la faim au Canada pendant la pandémie, le gouvernement du Canada et les gens comme Frank Shefrin ont toujours lutté pour combattre la faim.
Collapse
View Angelo Iacono Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Angelo Iacono Profile
2020-12-04 11:09 [p.2966]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the pandemic has triggered a wave of solidarity in my community of Alfred-Pellan. Businesses, organizations and individuals have been working together to support those in need.
With the holidays around the corner, that wave has turned into a tsunami. Bold, creative and ingenious efforts have been made to ensure that everyone can celebrate the holidays with dignity. By organizing food drives, donating clothing and volunteering, the people of Laval have gone to great lengths to keep giving back to the vulnerable members of our community.
In this unusual holiday season, I want to sincerely thank all the people of Alfred-Pellan for selflessly giving back to those in need. You are showing that distance brings us together. You are showing the quiet strength of our community, and you are showing that we can get through this together.
Monsieur le Président, la pandémie a créé une vague de mobilisation et de solidarité dans ma communauté d'Alfred-Pellan. Entreprises, organismes et particuliers ont fait preuve d'entraide pour soutenir ceux dans le besoin.
Avec le temps des Fêtes à nos portes, cette vague de solidarité s'est transformée en tsunami. Audace, créativité et ingéniosité ont été au rendez-vous pour que chacun puisse célébrer les Fêtes dignement. Que ce soit à travers des collectes de denrées, des dons de vêtements ou du bénévolat, les Lavallois ont fait des pieds et des mains pour continuer de redonner aux membres vulnérables de notre communauté.
En ce temps des Fêtes hors du commun, je tiens à remercier chaleureusement les citoyens d'Alfred-Pellan qui redonnent sans compter à ceux dans le besoin. Vous démontrez que la distance nous rapproche. Vous démontrez la force tranquille de notre communauté et vous démontrez qu'ensemble, nous allons passer à travers.
Collapse
View Bernard Généreux Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, André Gagnon, known to his friends as Dédé, was born in Saint-Pacôme, in my riding. He started playing piano when he was five. He attended the Collège de Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière and pursued his musical studies at the Conservatoire de musique de Montréal.
André Gagnon maintained close relationships with his family, his friends, and the place he was from. Throughout his career, he accompanied many high-profile artists, including Claude Léveillée, Monique Leyrac, Renée Claude and many more. Mr. Gagnon was a prolific composer of music for TV series, movies, dance and theatre, including the theme songs for La Souris verte and Forges du Saint-Maurice. He was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.
Songs of his like Neiges, Comme au premier jour, Nelligan and Le Saint-Laurent are touchstones for our memories. Now and forever, our hearts will swell with pride whenever we hear his music reverberating from keyboards around the world. André Gagnon is a jewel in Kamouraska's crown, and he will live on in the concert hall that bears his name in La Pocatière.
My sincerest condolences to those mourning his loss.
Farewell, Mr. Gagnon.
Monsieur le Président, André Gagnon, Dédé pour les intimes, est né à Saint-Pacôme, dans ma circonscription. Il a commencé le piano dès l'âge de cinq ans. Élève du Collège de Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, il est allé parfaire son art au Conservatoire de musique de Montréal.
André Gagnon a toujours été près de sa famille, de ses proches et de sa région natale. Durant sa carrière, il a accompagné de nombreux artistes de renom comme Claude Léveillée, Monique Leyrac, Renée Claude et bien d'autres. Créateur prolifique de musique de séries télévisées, de films, de danse et de théâtre, M. Gagnon a composé entre autres les thèmes de La Souris verte et des Forges du Saint-Maurice. Il a été nommé officier de l'Ordre du Canada.
Neiges, Comme au premier jour, Nelligan, Le Saint-Laurent, ses chansons ont bercé nos souvenirs et, encore aujourd'hui et pour longtemps, feront frissonner notre fierté sur tous les claviers du monde entier. Dans son écrin du Kamouraska, André Gagnon vivra toujours dans la salle de spectacle qui porte son nom à La Pocatière.
À tous ceux qu'il laisse dans le deuil, j'offre mes plus sincères condoléances.
Adieu, monsieur Gagnon.
Collapse
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2020-12-04 11:11 [p.2967]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canada has lost a remarkable man, a veteran, a rancher, a man of faith and a survivor. After living an extraordinary life, Winston Churchill Parker died on November 16 at the age of 102.
Winston was a proud Albertan, who proudly served his country in the World War II. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force and was a gunner on a Wellington bomber. On his 13th mission over Europe, he was shot down and spent three years as prisoner of war.
Winston endured the Long March and then returned home to his beloved ranch near Millarville.
Winston was always known to ride a good horse, raise great cattle and for his quick wit, but most important, Winston was revered for the countless hours he dedicated to community organizations. I always enjoyed our afternoon chat and I enjoyed his stories, which were immortalized in his biography, fittingly called Saddles and Service.
Winston was a brave man who lived his life with perseverance, and he left a lasting legacy for all of us. He epitomized what it meant to be a western gentleman. I thank him for everything he has done.
Monsieur le Président, le Canada a perdu un homme remarquable, un ancien combattant, un éleveur, un homme de foi et un survivant. Après une existence formidable, Winston Churchill Parker est décédé le 16 novembre à l'âge de 102 ans.
Winston était un Albertain, qui a fièrement servi son pays au cours de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Au sein de l'Aviation royale du Canada, il est mitrailleur à bord d'un bombardier Wellington. Lors de sa 13e mission en Europe, son avion est abattu et il est prisonnier de guerre pendant trois ans.
Après avoir vécu la longue marche, Winston rentre chez lui dans son ranch bien-aimé, près de Millarville.
Winston a toujours été connu pour les bons chevaux qu'il montait, le bon bétail qu'il élevait et son esprit vif, mais, surtout, on le vénérait pour les innombrables heures qu'il consacrait aux organismes communautaires. J'ai toujours pris plaisir à nos conversations en après-midi et à ses histoires, qui ont été immortalisées dans sa biographie intitulée, comme il se doit, Saddles and Service.
Winston était un homme courageux, qui a vécu sa vie avec persévérance. Il laisse un héritage durable pour nous tous. Il était l'exemple parfait du gentleman de l'Ouest. Je le remercie pour tout ce qu'il a fait.
Collapse
View Marilyn Gladu Profile
CPC (ON)
View Marilyn Gladu Profile
2020-12-04 11:12 [p.2967]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canadians who are waiting for a COVID-19 vaccine are disappointed with the Liberal government. While the U.K. and the U.S. will start vaccinating people this month, most Canadians will not have access to a vaccine until late next year.
Questions have been asked of the Prime Minister about where the plan for vaccine distribution is, how many each province and territory are getting, how the logistics will work to keep the vaccines frozen in rural locations and on reserve, who the first in line will be and why the government did not negotiate manufacturing here in Canada. No answers have been provided. Canadians need to see a real plan.
Every day in Canada 80 people die from COVID-19. A delay of nine months to get the vaccine could mean that more than 20,000 more Canadians will die while we wait.
The Liberal government has fumbled on vaccines, and that has deadly consequences. When will we see a real plan?
Monsieur le Président, les Canadiens qui attendent d'être vaccinés contre la COVID-19 sont déçus du gouvernement libéral. Tandis que le Royaume-Uni et les États-Unis commenceront à vacciner leur population ce mois-ci, la plupart des Canadiens n'auront pas accès à un vaccin avant la fin de l'année prochaine.
On a demandé au premier ministre où est le plan de distribution des vaccins, combien de doses chaque province et territoire recevront, comment on conservera les vaccins dans des congélateurs dans les régions rurales et les réserves, qui se fera vacciner en premier et pourquoi le gouvernement n'a pas négocié des contrats permettant la fabrication de vaccins au Canada. Le premier ministre n'a pas répondu à ces questions. Les Canadiens ont besoin d'un plan concret.
Chaque jour au Canada, 80 personnes succombent à la COVID-19. Une attente de neuf mois pour obtenir des vaccins pourrait entraîner la mort de plus de 20 000 Canadiens.
Le gouvernement libéral a mal géré le dossier des vaccins, alors que c'est une question de vie ou de mort. Quand présentera-t-il un plan concret?
Collapse
View Niki Ashton Profile
NDP (MB)
View Niki Ashton Profile
2020-12-04 11:13 [p.2967]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, people are scared. The second wave of COVID-19 is ravaging communities. Nowhere is this more the case than in indigenous communities. Shamattawa in Manitoba has a test positivity rate of 50%. Now is the time for leadership.
I commend the many first nations, Métis and Inuit leaders. I acknowledge the engagement of the federal ministers, but things are getting worse by the hour. We need a decisive response.
Cruelly, just as there is hope with a vaccine, we are seeing a shocking abdication of leadership by the Premier of Manitoba. Indigenous people in our country should be among the first to receive the vaccine. He has made divisive statements. He refuses to acknowledge first nations people in Manitoba are Manitobans. He has refused to commit to providing the vaccines they need and deserve.
My message for the premier is that this is no time for division.
My message for the Prime Minister is that it is time to act decisively on behalf of first nations to ensure they are not the targets of this divisive agenda. Lives are at stake.
Monsieur le Président, les gens ont peur. La deuxième vague de COVID-19 ravage des collectivités. C'est particulièrement vrai dans les communautés autochtones. Par exemple, la Première Nation de Shamattawa affiche un taux de positivité de 50 % au test de la COVID. Nous avons besoin de leadership maintenant.
Je tiens à féliciter les nombreux les dirigeants métis, inuits et des Premières Nations. Je salue les ministres fédéraux de leur engagement dans ce dossier, mais la situation s'aggrave d'heure en heure. Nous avons besoin d'une intervention décisive.
Cruellement, au moment même où il y a de l'espoir pour un vaccin, le premier ministre du Manitoba décide d'abdiquer tout leadership. C'est scandaleux. Les Autochtones devraient être parmi les premiers Canadiens à recevoir le vaccin. Le premier ministre manitobain a fait des déclarations controversées. II refuse de reconnaître les membres des Premières Nations de la province comme des Manitobains. Il a aussi refusé de s'engager à leur fournir les vaccins dont ils ont besoin et qu'ils méritent.
Je tiens à lui dire que l'heure n'est pas à la division.
Quant au premier ministre fédéral, je veux lui dire que le moment est venu de prendre des mesures décisives pour que les Premières Nations ne soient plus la cible de tentatives de division. Des vies sont en jeu.
Collapse
View Caroline Desbiens Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the great Quebec pianist André Gagnon passed away yesterday.
He was a truly monumental figure in the music world and a prolific composer who brought pianos to life all around the world from Montreal to Japan. He was a recipient of 16 ADISQ Félix awards, and his album Neiges spent 24 weeks in the top 10, selling 700,000 copies.
He was a big fan of Émile Nelligan and would go on to compose the famous opera Nelligan by Michel Tremblay, as well as TV show scores. He collaborated with Ferland, Léveillée, Julien, Dufresne, Plamondon and so many others. His melodies live on in each of us.
Beyond his profound contribution to our identity, he was a generous, light-hearted man who brought people together. We used to go to the same dentist, and he once gave up his appointment for me so that I could have a crown put in. He told me, “A singer needs her smile. I just need my fingers to make the piano smile.”
André “Dédé” Gagnon, we will miss those big smiles from your fingers. On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I offer my deepest condolences to his loved ones and to all of Quebec.
Monsieur le Président, le grand pianiste québécois André Gagnon nous a quittés hier.
Véritable monument de la musique, notre prolifique compositeur a magnifié les pianos de toute la planète, de Montréal jusqu'au Japon. Récipiendaire de 16 trophées Félix au Gala de l'ADISQ, son album Neiges tient le top 10 du Billboard pendant 24 semaines et 700 000 exemplaires sont vendus.
Passionné d'Émile Nelligan, il sera compositeur du célèbre opéra Nelligan de Michel Tremblay et de séries télévisées. Collaborateur des Ferland, Léveillée, Julien, Dufresne, Plamondon et tellement d'autres, ses mélodies habitent en chacun de nous.
Au-delà de la grande richesse identitaire qu'il nous a léguée, on se rappellera qu'il était généreux, rassembleur et enjoué. À un certain moment, nous avions le même dentiste, lui et moi, et un jour, il m'a cédé son rendez-vous pour me permettre une pose de couronne. Il m'avait alors dit: « Une chanteuse a besoin de son sourire; moi, ce sont mes doigts qui sourient sur le piano. ».
André « Dédé » Gagnon, le grand sourire de tes doigts va terriblement nous manquer. En mon nom et au nom du Bloc québécois, j'offre mes plus sincères condoléances à ses proches et à tout le Québec.
Collapse
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
View David Sweet Profile
2020-12-04 11:15 [p.2967]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday afternoon, Jude Strickland was walking home from school when he was hit by a truck. It is with a heavy heart that I inform the House that young Jude passed away. He was only 11 years old.
As a father who has also suffered a tragic loss of a child, I cannot express in words the pain, emptiness and anguish of this moment for Jude's parents, Jamie and Vanessa, and Jude's three brothers. I know their extended family, friends and church community have joined in their sorrow and are wrapping them in love.
In true Hamilton fashion, we have seen an outpouring of support from our residents, including an ongoing GoFundMe campaign to support the Strickland family.
Let this be a reminder to all of us who drive a car, pickup or SUV to take extra caution on the roads to keep our children safe. No parent should have to endure this kind of tragedy.
On behalf of the House of Commons, the residents of Flamborough—Glanbrook and the broader city of Hamilton, I offer our deepest condolences to the Strickland family. May Christ watch over them and give them peace and comfort in this painful time.
Monsieur le Président, en rentrant de l'école, mardi après-midi, Jude Strickland est frappé par un camion. C'est avec beaucoup de chagrin que j'informe la Chambre que le petit Jude est décédé. Il n'avait que 11 ans.
Ayant moi-même perdu un enfant de manière tragique, je sais à quel point les mots nous manquent pour exprimer la douleur, le vide et l'angoisse que l'on ressent. Voilà ce que vivent les parents de Jude, Jamie et Vanessa, ainsi que ses trois frères. Dans leur peine, ils peuvent compter sur leur famille, leurs amis et leur communauté paroissiale qui sont de tout cœur avec eux et les entourent de leur amour.
Fidèles à leurs habitudes, nos résidants manifestent un appui extraordinaire à l'endroit de la famille Strickland, ayant même lancé une campagne GoFundMe pour lui venir en aide.
Si nous conduisons une voiture, un camion ou un VUS, saisissons cette occasion pour nous rappeler de redoubler de vigilance sur les routes afin de veiller à la sécurité de nos enfants. Aucun parent ne devrait avoir à endurer ce genre de tragédie.
Au nom de la Chambre des communes, des résidants de Flamborough-Glanbrook et de la ville de Hamilton, je présente mes plus sincères condoléances à la famille Strickland. Que le Christ veille sur eux et leur procure paix et réconfort en cette période difficile.
Collapse
View Tony Van Bynen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Tony Van Bynen Profile
2020-12-04 11:17 [p.2968]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, last week, the Newmarket Chamber of Commerce held its 31st annual Business Excellence Awards to recognize the many achievements and the important contributions that small businesses have made to our community. This year, they have shown exceptional resilience by adapting to these new times while continuing to support generously those who are in need.
Today, I would like to congratulate all of the nominees and of course this year's winners: Nature's Emporium, the Red Thread Brewing Company, the Best Western Voyageur Place Hotel, NewMakeIt, Benson Kearley IFG, CPG Aerospace, Optimum Pharmacy, Abuse Hurts, Eyes on Stonehaven, RC Design and Needham Promotions.
Small businesses are the backbone of our local economy, but to that I will add they are the heart of our communities. Once again, congratulations to all.
Monsieur le Président, la semaine dernière, la chambre de commerce de Newmarket a tenu sa 31e édition annuelle des prix d'excellence en affaires en vue de souligner les nombreuses réalisations des petites entreprises et leurs importantes contributions à la collectivité. Cette année, elles ont fait preuve d'une résilience sans pareil en s'adaptant à la nouvelle réalité que nous vivons tout en continuant d'appuyer généreusement les personnes dans le besoin.
Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais féliciter tous les candidats et, bien sûr, les gagnants de cette année: Nature's Emporium, la Red Thread Brewing Company, l'hôtel Best Western Voyageur Place, NewMakeIt, Benson Kearley IFG, CPG Aerospace, la pharmacie Optimum, Abuse Hurts, Eyes on Stonehaven, RC Design et Needham Promotions.
Les petites entreprises constituent l'épine dorsale de l'économie locale et elles sont aussi le cœur des collectivités. Encore une fois, félicitations à tous.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-12-04 11:18 [p.2968]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, in just a few days, the British people will have direct access to the vaccine. By Christmas, Americans and Germans will be vaccinated, but not Canadians, because this government made some bad decisions.
Many will recall when the Prime Minister said a few days ago that Canada was not at the top of the list because we do not produce vaccines. Is that so?
Can the Prime Minister explain why Pfizer is distributing vaccines in England today that were produced in Belgium?
Monsieur le Président, dans quelques jours, des Britanniques auront accès directement au vaccin. D'ici Noël, des Américains et des Allemands seront vaccinés, mais pas les Canadiens, parce que ce gouvernement n'a pas fait les bons choix.
On se rappelle qu'il y a quelques jours, le premier ministre nous disait que notre pays n'était pas en tête de liste parce que nous ne produisons pas de vaccins. Ah oui?
Est-ce que le premier ministre pourrait nous expliquer pourquoi Pfizer distribue aujourd'hui en Angleterre des vaccins qui sont produits en Belgique?
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Patty Hajdu Profile
2020-12-04 11:19 [p.2968]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as scientists around the world do important work on a vaccine for COVID-19, we are ensuring that Canadians will be able to be vaccinated when the time comes.
We secured different types of vaccines and hundreds of millions of doses to keep Canadians safe and well served. Some clinical trials have published promising results and seem to be progressing quickly.
We will continue to work with all our partners to ensure that Canadians will have access to a vaccine when it becomes available.
Monsieur le Président, alors que les scientifiques du monde entier font un travail important pour trouver un vaccin contre la COVID-19, nous nous assurons que les Canadiens pourront se faire vacciner le moment venu.
C'est pourquoi nous nous sommes assurés de faire l'acquisition de différents types de vaccins et de centaines de millions de doses afin que les Canadiens soient en sécurité et bien servis. Quelques études cliniques ont publié des résultats prometteurs et semblent progresser rapidement.
Nous allons continuer de travailler avec tous nos partenaires pour nous assurer que les Canadiens auront accès au vaccin lorsqu'il sera disponible.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-12-04 11:19 [p.2968]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to once again thank and commend the minister for answering in French. However, just because she is speaking French does not mean that I agree with her, because the government is talking out of both sides of its mouth.
Let us remember that, on August 31, a news release issued by the Prime Minister stated that vaccination would begin in November. It is now December 4.
Also on August 31, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry said it would happen starting this fall. I know there are a few days left before winter starts, but it does not look like this will happen by then.
Will the government be clear and tell Canadians directly when they will be able to get vaccinated?
Monsieur le Président, à nouveau, je tiens à remercier et à féliciter la ministre pour sa réponse en français. Cependant, ce n'est pas parce qu'elle parle en français que je suis d'accord avec elle, parce que ce gouvernement a dit une chose et son contraire.
Souvenons-nous: le 31 août, un communiqué du premier ministre affirmait que la vaccination aurait lieu à partir de novembre. Nous sommes rendus au 4 décembre.
Aussi, le 31 août toujours, le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et de l'Industrie a dit que cela allait se faire cet automne. Je reconnais qu'il reste encore quelques jours à l'automne, mais on n'est pas parti pour ça.
Est-ce que le gouvernement pourrait être clair et dire directement aux Canadiens quand nous aurons droit au vaccin?
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Patty Hajdu Profile
2020-12-04 11:20 [p.2968]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we are working hard to ensure that Canadians can get vaccinated when the time comes.
Once we have a vaccine in Canada, we will work with the provinces and territories to create a distribution plan so that Canadians can get vaccinated. Our approach has always been based on science and facts, and that will not change.
We will work in collaboration with experts like the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and other public health experts to ensure that Canadians are protected from COVID-19.
Monsieur le Président, nous travaillons fort pour nous assurer que les Canadiens pourront se faire vacciner le moment venu.
Une fois que nous aurons un vaccin au Canada, nous travaillerons avec les provinces et les territoires pour créer un plan de distribution afin que les Canadiens puissent se faire vacciner. Notre approche a toujours été éclairée par la science et les faits, et rien ne va changer.
En collaboration avec des experts comme le Comité consultatif national de l'immunisation et d'autres experts en santé publique, nous veillerons à ce que les Canadiens soient à l'abri de la COVID-19.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-12-04 11:21 [p.2968]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, General Dany Fortin deployed the vaccine preparedness plan yesterday.
We saw what a real leader looks like. We saw someone leading properly. We saw someone who knows what he is doing. He is a member of the military. He is a real general, not someone playing general, as we have seen all too often in this place.
Yes, Canadians have confidence in their army, but for an army to be effective, it must have ammunition. In this case, the vaccines are the ammunition.
When will Canadians be able to get the vaccine?
Monsieur le Président, hier, le général Dany Fortin a déployé le plan de préparation pour les vaccins.
Là, on a vu ce que c'était, un vrai chef. Là, on a vu quelqu'un qui dirige correctement. Là, on a vu quelqu'un qui sait où il s'en va. Ça, c'est un militaire. Ça, c'est un vrai général, pas un général d'opérette comme il y en a trop souvent ici.
Oui, les Canadiens ont confiance en leur armée, mais pour qu'une armée soit efficace, ça prend des munitions. Dans le cas présent, les munitions, ce sont les vaccins.
Quand les Canadiens auront-ils droit au vaccin?
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Patty Hajdu Profile
2020-12-04 11:21 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, a real leader is the Prime Minister, who has been putting together a plan with all of our departments, including the Canadian Armed Forces. I want to thank Major-General Dany Fortin and the military folks who have been working with the Public Health Agency of Canada for several months. They are making sure we have the skills we need embedded in the Public Health Agency of Canada so we can support the provinces and territories to immunize people.
Let us be clear: The provinces and territories have expertise in immunizing people. They do so every year, with 16 million influenza vaccines this year. This will be no different. We will be there to support them in that job.
Monsieur le Président, le premier ministre est un véritable leader. Il a su élaborer un plan avec le concours de tous les ministères, y compris les Forces armées canadiennes. Je veux remercier le major-général Dany Fortin et les militaires qui collaborent avec l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada depuis quelques mois. Ces personnes s'assurent que l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada dispose des compétences requises afin de soutenir les provinces et les territoires pour immuniser la population.
Soyons clairs: les provinces et les territoires ont l'expertise nécessaire pour immuniser la population. Ils le font chaque année et ils le feront encore cette année en injectant 16 millions de doses de vaccins contre la grippe. Ce ne sera pas différent cette fois-ci. Nous les appuierons dans leur tâche.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2020-12-04 11:22 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we have nowhere near enough rapid tests to isolate infections and protect our seniors. Now, with no real plan, the government is also failing our seniors on vaccines. Seniors are tired. They want their lives back. They have already missed out on birthdays and family gatherings, and now the Prime Minister wants them to miss Christmas too.
What next thing does the Prime Minister want our seniors to miss?
Monsieur le Président, nous sommes loin d'avoir assez de tests rapides pour isoler les personnes infectées et pour protéger les aînés. Sans véritable plan, le gouvernement laisse maintenant tomber les aînés en ne leur fournissant pas les vaccins dont ils ont besoin. Les aînés en ont assez. Ils veulent retrouver la vie qu'ils avaient avant. Ils ont déjà raté des anniversaires et des fêtes de famille, et maintenant, le premier ministre leur demande de rater aussi Noël.
Quels autres événements le premier ministre demande-t-il aux aînés de rater?
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Patty Hajdu Profile
2020-12-04 11:23 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, first, let me thank Canadians who are making extraordinary efforts and sacrifices to protect each other. It is Canadians who are working together to get us through this time. It is small business owners adapting and changing the way they do business so they can support their workers. We are there with them, with wage subsidies, subsidies for people who have lost their jobs, supports for seniors, supports for long-term care and supports for the provinces and territories to care for people in long-term care homes.
We have distributed over 7.2 million rapid tests to the provinces and territories to date, and we are there to help them in implementing their use.
Monsieur le Président, je veux d'abord remercier les Canadiens qui font des sacrifices incroyables pour se protéger les uns les autres. Je veux parler des Canadiens qui se serrent les coudes pour traverser la pandémie. Je veux parler des petits entrepreneurs qui font leurs affaires autrement afin de pouvoir soutenir leurs employés. Nous les appuyons en leur fournissant une subvention salariale. Nous offrons aussi de l'aide à ceux qui ont perdu leur emploi, aux aînés, aux établissements de soins de longue durée ainsi qu'aux provinces et aux territoires, qui doivent s'occuper des personnes dans ces établissements.
À ce jour, nous avons distribué plus de 7,2 millions de tests rapides aux provinces et aux territoires, et nous les aidons à les utiliser.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2020-12-04 11:23 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am sorry, but that answer is not good enough. Our seniors have been isolated and separated from their loved ones for not weeks but months. They need to know that there is a real plan to navigate through this pandemic, but this Liberal government refuses to be up front and honest with them. It refuses to offer these seniors the hope that comes with a plan. They deserve better.
Will the minister finally offer seniors the clarity they deserve and tell them when they can expect to have access to a vaccine?
Monsieur le Président, je suis désolée, mais cela ne suffit pas. Nos personnes âgées ont vécu dans l'isolement et ont été séparées de leurs proches non pas pendant des semaines, mais des mois. Ils ont besoin de savoir qu'il y a un vrai plan pour traverser cette pandémie, mais le gouvernement libéral refuse d'être franc et honnête avec elles. Il refuse d'offrir à ces personnes âgées l'espoir qui va de pair avec un plan. Elles méritent mieux que ça.
La ministre va-t-elle enfin dire aux personnes âgées les choses telles qu'elles sont — elles le méritent bien — et leur indiquer quand elles peuvent s'attendre à avoir un vaccin?
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Patty Hajdu Profile
2020-12-04 11:23 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, every step of the way we have been there to support seniors, particularly in long-term care homes, where we used the Canadian Armed Forces to help support the provinces and territories that are struggling to care for seniors under their care.
We are going to be there for seniors in long-term care every step of the way. We have committed, through our fall economic statement, $1 billion to ensure that there are national standards. No matter where one lives, people deserve to age in dignity.
We have been there for the provinces and territories, and we will continue to be there so they can deliver on their health care responsibilities.
Monsieur le Président, nous avons été aux côtés des personnes âgées à toutes les étapes, en particulier dans les établissements de soins de longue durée. En effet, nous avons fait appel aux Forces armées canadiennes pour aider les provinces et les territoires qui avaient du mal à s'occuper des personnes âgées dont ils avaient la charge.
Le temps qu'il le faut, nous resterons aux côtés des personnes âgées qui se trouvent dans des établissements de soins de longue durée. Nous nous sommes engagés, dans notre énoncé économique de l'automne, à consacrer 1 milliard de dollars à la mise en place de normes nationales. Quel que soit l'endroit où ils vivent, les gens méritent de vieillir dans la dignité.
Nous avons été là pour les provinces et les territoires, et nous continuerons à être là pour qu'ils puissent s'acquitter de leurs responsabilités en matière de soins de santé.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2020-12-04 11:24 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, everyone, including the entire Quebec National Assembly, the House of Commons, all the provincial premiers, and the people of Quebec and of Canada, agrees that a sustainable and, above all, unconditional increase to health transfers is needed to combat the pandemic.
We are in a health crisis. Our long-term care homes are the battleground, and the care workers are the soldiers. Only the Liberal Party of Canada does not understand this.
When will they realize that this is a health crisis and that their job is to increase health transfers?
Monsieur le Président, l'Assemblée nationale, à l'unanimité, la Chambre des communes, les premiers ministres de toutes les provinces, la population du Québec et du Canada, tout le monde est d'accord pour augmenter durablement, et surtout sans condition, les transferts en santé pour lutter contre la pandémie.
On vit une crise sanitaire, le combat a lieu dans nos centres de soins et c'est le personnel soignant qui se bat. Il y a juste le Parti libéral du Canada qui ne s'est pas encore réveillé.
Quand est-ce qu'ils vont comprendre qu'on vit une crise sanitaire et que leur travail, c'est d'augmenter les transferts en santé?
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Patty Hajdu Profile
2020-12-04 11:25 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, every step of the way we have been supporting the provinces and territories, not just with equipment, tests and other kinds of guidance, but also with billions of dollars. In fact, $24 billion to date has been spent to support the provinces and territories with their health response to this pandemic. We have purchased personal protective equipment. We have purchased testing. We have helped them every step of the way to deliver on their health care responsibilities. We will continue to be there for the people of Quebec.
Monsieur le Président, à chaque étape, nous avons soutenu les provinces et les territoires, non seulement en leur fournissant de l'équipement, des tests et des directives, mais aussi en leur offrant des milliards de dollars. En fait, 24 milliards de dollars ont été dépensés jusqu'à présent pour aider les provinces et les territoires à faire face à cette pandémie. Nous avons acheté des équipements de protection individuelle. Nous avons acheté des tests. À chaque étape, nous étions là pour les aider à s'acquitter de leurs responsabilités en matière de soins de santé. Nous continuerons à être là pour la population du Québec.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2020-12-04 11:25 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, there is a health crisis going on. The government must help the health care system by increasing health transfers. Everyone understands this except the Liberal Party of Canada.
On December 10, there will be a meeting with all the first ministers. All the premiers will be asking for an increase in the transfers. The Liberals will have no allies at this meeting or among the public. Sometimes, when everyone agrees on something except one person, that person should have the humility to ask themselves if they are in the wrong.
When will they increase the transfers?
Monsieur le Président, c'est une crise de la santé, il faut aider le réseau de la santé, en augmentant les transferts en santé. Tout le monde a compris cela, sauf le Parti libéral du Canada.
Le 10 décembre prochain, il va y avoir une rencontre de tous les premiers ministres. Tous les premiers ministres vont demander une hausse des transferts. Les libéraux n'auront aucun allié à cette rencontre ni parmi la population. Des fois, quand tout le monde s'entend sur quelque chose sauf soi-même, on devrait avoir l'humilité de se demander si on n'est pas soi-même dans l'erreur.
Quand est-ce qu'ils vont augmenter les transferts?
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Patty Hajdu Profile
2020-12-04 11:26 [p.2969]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, in addition to billions of dollars transferred to the provinces and territories, we have been there for Quebec, whether it is through additional supports, people in long-term care homes receiving support from the Canadian military and the Red Cross, which the federal government is paying for, or making sure that people have access to rapid tests, which the federal government is paying for.
We will continue to be there for Quebec. This is not a time to pick a fight. This is a time to work together.
Monsieur le Président, en plus des milliards de dollars en transferts aux provinces et aux territoires, nous avons soutenu le Québec, que ce soit par des mesures d'aide supplémentaires, l'envoi de militaires et de personnel de la Croix-Rouge dans des établissements de soins de longue durée, aux frais du fédéral, ou la distribution de tests rapides payés par le fédéral.
Nous allons continuer d'être là pour le Québec. L'heure n'est pas à la confrontation. L'heure est à la collaboration.
Collapse
View Don Davies Profile
NDP (BC)
View Don Davies Profile
2020-12-04 11:27 [p.2970]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, only the most tone-deaf government would say it stands with seniors by letting the standards get so bad it had to send the army in.
Canadians are eagerly awaiting a safe, effective COVID vaccine so that they can see their loved ones and return to their daily lives without worrying about spreading the virus. Yesterday, Pfizer confirmed it will be distributing half the amount of vaccine doses it had originally proposed, citing supply chain issues. We heard from the government that Canadians are getting four million doses of Pfizer vaccine before March. Is that still the plan?
Will the minister explain what Pfizer's supply problems mean for Canadians?
Monsieur le Président, seul le plus déconnecté des gouvernements peut affirmer qu'il veut prendre soin des aînés et en même temps laisser la situation se dégrader à un point tel qu'il faille envoyer l'armée en renfort.
Les Canadiens attendent avec impatience l'arrivée d'un vaccin sûr et efficace contre la COVID afin de pouvoir visiter leurs proches et de revenir à une vie normale sans craindre de propager le virus. Hier, Pfizer a confirmé qu'elle distribuerait seulement la moitié des doses de vaccin prévues à l'origine en raison de problèmes dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Le gouvernement a affirmé que les Canadiens recevraient quatre millions de doses du vaccin de Pfizer d'ici mars. Est-ce toujours ce qui est prévu?
La ministre est-elle en mesure d'expliquer quelles seront les conséquences des problèmes d'approvisionnement de Pfizer pour les Canadiens?
Collapse
View Steven MacKinnon Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven MacKinnon Profile
2020-12-04 11:27 [p.2970]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we have been consistent in communicating our delivery window in Q1 of 2021. Given the number of variables and the novelty of the process, we are still communicating a delivery window in Q1 of 2021. We do not anticipate any impact on delivery of the Pfizer vaccine to Canada, which is expected to begin in the first quarter of 2021 as planned.
Monsieur le Président, nous avons toujours parlé d'une fenêtre de distribution au premier trimestre de 2021. Compte tenu du nombre d'inconnus et de la nouveauté du processus, nous gardons cette fenêtre de distribution pour le premier trimestre de 2021. Nous ne nous attendons pas à ce qu'il y ait des conséquences pour la livraison des vaccins de Pfizer au Canada, qui devrait commencer au premier trimestre de 2021, comme prévu.
Collapse
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jenny Kwan Profile
2020-12-04 11:27 [p.2970]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canadians are rightly worried by the Pfizer news and the government owes them answers. Talking about a diverse portfolio of vaccines will not change the fact that Canada is way behind other countries. The U.K. has already approved a vaccine. In the U.S., the vaccine is being stockpiled on American soil while it awaits approval. Other countries, like Germany, India, China, Brazil, the U.S. and the U.K., are all producing vaccines in their own countries to ensure fast delivery. None of that is happening in Canada.
Why did the Liberals let Canada fall so behind these other countries?
Monsieur le Président, les Canadiens sont préoccupés par la nouvelle concernant Pfizer, et avec raison. Le gouvernement leur doit des réponses. Parler de la commande d'un éventail diversifié de vaccins ne change rien au fait que le Canada accuse un énorme retard par rapport aux autres pays. Le Royaume-Uni a déjà homologué un vaccin. Aux États-Unis, des doses de vaccin sont entreposées en sol américain en attendant l'homologation. L'Allemagne, l'Inde, la Chine, le Brésil, les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni produisent tous un vaccin sur leur propre territoire pour faciliter une distribution rapide. Le Canada ne fait rien de cela.
Pourquoi les libéraux ont-ils laissé le Canada accuser un si grand retard par rapport à ces autres pays?
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 26303 | Page: 1 of 439

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data