Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 1652
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
2019-06-06 11:52 [p.28675]
Expand
moved that Bill C-101, An Act to amend the Customs Tariff and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
propose que le projet de loi C-101, Loi modifiant le Tarif des douanes et la Loi sur le Tribunal canadien du commerce extérieur, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
Collapse
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
2019-06-05 16:40 [p.28594]
Expand
moved that Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures, as amended, be concurred in at report stage with further amendments.
propose que le projet de loi C-97, Loi portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 19 mars 2019 et mettant en œuvre d’autres mesures, modifié, soit agréé à l’étape du rapport avec d’autres amendements.
Collapse
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
2019-06-05 16:49 [p.28596]
Expand
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-101, An Act to amend the Customs Tariff and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act.
demande à présenter le projet de loi C-101, Loi modifiant le Tarif des douanes et la Loi sur le Tribunal canadien du commerce extérieur.
Collapse
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
2019-06-05 17:10 [p.28599]
Expand
moved that Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures be read the third time and passed.
propose que le projet de loi C-97, Loi portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 19 mars 2019 et mettant en œuvre d'autres mesures, soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2019-06-04 12:52 [p.28483]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, again, not to sound narcissistic, but if we are going to talk, there should be people here to listen.
We are here today to debate the government's bill, which would implement the main measures of the budget. Budgets are highly technical and theoretical, but this gives us a chance to really dig deep.
My first observation is about the budget, as introduced by the minister, election promises and the format of the bill, which is 370 pages long and covers many topics that have nothing to do with the budget. This is called an omnibus bill.
I will remind members that four years ago, back in 2015, the Liberals made a promise. During the election campaign, they made several promises to Canadians in order to get elected. These promises were scrapped, however. The fourth paragraph on page 30 of their election platform states the following:
We will not resort to legislative tricks to avoid scrutiny.
[The former prime minister] has used prorogation to avoid difficult political circumstances. We will not.
[The former prime minister] has also used omnibus bills to prevent Parliament from properly reviewing and debating his proposals.
This is exactly what we are debating today. Today we are debating an omnibus bill into which the government inserted measures that have nothing to do with the budget. Four years ago, the Liberals promised not to do this, but they did it anyway.
Must I remind the House that, at around the same time last year, we were all here studying the previous budget implementation bill? The government had slipped in a dozen or so pages of legal provisions to allow companies facing prosecution for corruption, among other charges, to sign separate agreements. These provisions were not properly debated by parliamentarians. The Senate asked the minister to testify, but he refused.
That is what gave rise to the SNC-Lavalin scandal. Last year's bill included a process to allow for separate trials or agreements. That led to the director of public prosecutions' decision to proceed to trial on September 4. Ten days later, the former attorney general agreed to this proposal, and that is when partisan politics seeped into the legal process. That is what later led the former attorney general and the former president of the Treasury Board to be booted out of the Liberal caucus for having stood up and told Canadians the truth.
I am talking about this sad episode in Canadian democracy precisely because what we have before us today is a government that was elected under false promises, a government that promised the moon and sought to be pure as the driven snow but, in the end, did not keep its promises. That is essentially it. We have an omnibus bill.
Now let us talk about what is really going on with this bill, the government's budget implementation bill. What is the deal with this budget? Once again, we must not forget that the Liberals got themselves elected on the basis of budget promises they most certainly did not keep. The last paragraph on page 76 of the Liberal Party platform mentions the planning framework, the budgeting framework. It says right there in black and white:
With the Liberal plan, the federal government will have a modest short-term deficit of less than $10 billion in each of the next two fiscal years....
The platform also stated that the deficit would decline in the third year and that Canada would return to a balanced budget in 2019-20.
That was the promise that got the Liberals elected. Their bold but not-so-brilliant idea was to make a solemn pledge to run small deficits and eliminate the deficit entirely in 2019-20. That deadline has arrived, and what happened? Those modest deficits ballooned into three big deficits in excess of $70 billion. This is 2019-20, the year they were supposed to get rid of the deficit, but instead, this year's deficit is $19.8 billion.
Twice now I have asked the Minister of Tourism and the Liberal member for Surrey-Centre, if I remember correctly, to tell me the amount of this year’s deficit. They can never come up with the simple and yet very serious figure of $19.8 billion. How can we trust these people who get elected by promising, hand on heart, that they will generate only small deficits and zero deficit in 2019, when they generated three large deficits plus a huge one on the year they were meant to deliver a zero deficit?
What the Liberals fail to understand is that a deficit is a bill that our children and grandchildren will have to pay. A deficit today is a tax tomorrow. It will have to be paid sooner or later. Why did this happen? Because we are living beyond our means.
I would like to remind the House that, historically speaking, deficits are permitted under special conditions. You will remember that we ran deficits during the war. We had to defeat the Nazi menace. We will soon be celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Normandy landings on June 6. It was not until Prime Minister Louis Saint-Laurent that fiscal balance was restored, and I am not just saying that because I happen to represent the riding of Louis-Saint-Laurent.
It was in the early 1970s, under the Liberal government led by Pierre Elliott Trudeau, the current Prime Minister’s father, that we began running deficits in times of prosperity.
It was unfortunate for the Canadian economy. Indeed, fast forward 50 years and the son of the prime minister who ran deficits in times of growth is doing exactly the same thing, running four huge deficits in a period of rapid global economic expansion.
I truly have a great deal of respect and esteem for the Minister of Finance, as I do for all those who run for election and offer their services to Canadians and who, proud of their personal experience, wish to put it to good use. The Minister of Finance had a stellar career on Bay Street. We might even call him a Bay Street baron for having administered his family’s fortune so well. When he was head of the family company, Morneau Shepell, he never ran deficits.
When he was in the private sector, the Minister of Finance never ran a deficit, but since he moved to the public sector, since he has been using taxpayer money, since he has been using money that belongs to Canadian workers, he has been running back-to-back deficits.
How many have there been? There have been one, two, three, four budgets, and there have been one, two, three, four deficits. Four out of four, that is the grand slam of mismanaged public funds, while, in the private sector, he was a model money manager, an example to be followed.
To say the least, he is now neither a model or an example to be followed. Generating deficits during periods of economic growth is the ultimate heresy. No serious economist will tell you that this is a good time to generate a deficit. Quite the contrary, when the economic cycle picks up, it is time to put money aside.
They were very lucky. When they were elected, they took over the G7 country with the best economic track record. When we were in power, we were so intent on serious and rigorous management that we were the first G7 country to recover from the great crisis of 2008-12. That was thanks to the informed and rigorous management of the late Hon. Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, and Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper. These people inherited the best economic situation among the G7 nations, as well as a $2.5 billion budget surplus, which will not be the case in five months if Canadians choose us to form the next government.
Worse still, in the past four years, they have taken advantage of the sensational global economic growth and, of course, the economic strength of the United States, which has been experiencing growth for several years. What did they do with it? They made a huge mess of things, and the monstrous deficits they have been running these past four years will be handed down to our children and grandchildren to pay in the future.
That is why we are strongly opposed to this bill, which flies in the face of two election promises: to do away with omnibus bills, and to only run small deficits before balancing the budget in 2019.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à le redire à tous: il ne s'agit pas de narcissisme. Or tant qu'à parler, autant que des gens nous écoutent.
Nous sommes donc réunis pour parler du projet de loi déposé par le gouvernement. Le projet de loi vise à mettre en vigueur les principales mesures du budget. La question du budget est très technique et théorique, mais cela nous permet d'aller au fond des choses.
Comme première observation, nous allons parler du budget, tel que déposé par le ministre, et des engagements électoraux, mais également de la forme même du projet de loi, qui comprend 370 pages et qui aborde beaucoup de sujets qui n'ont pas de rapport avec le budget. On appelle cela un projet de loi omnibus.
À cet effet, je tiens à rappeler l'engagement pris par les libéraux en 2015, soit il y a quatre ans. Lors de la campagne électorale, ils ont fait plusieurs promesses aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes, dans le but de se faire élire. Toutefois, ces promesses ont été jetées à la poubelle. Au paragraphe 6 de la page 32 de leur programme électoral, on peut lire ceci:
Nous n’userons pas de subterfuges législatifs pour nous soustraire à l’examen du Parlement.
[L'ancien premier ministre] a eu recours à la prorogation pour échapper à certaines situations périlleuses, chose que nous ne ferons pas.
[L'ancien premier ministre] s'est également servi des projets de loi omnibus pour empêcher les parlementaires d'étudier ses propositions et d'en débattre convenablement.
C'est exactement la raison pour laquelle nous sommes réunis ici. Nous sommes réunis ici pour parler d'un projet de loi omnibus dans lequel le gouvernement a inséré des éléments qui n'ont rien à voir avec le budget. Il y a quatre ans, les libéraux ont dit qu'ils ne le feraient pas, mais ils l'ont fait.
Dois-je rappeler que l'année dernière, à peu près à pareille date, nous étions réunis pour étudier le projet de loi qui mettait en vigueur les normes budgétaires du budget précédent? Le gouvernement avait inséré dans le projet de loi une dizaine de pages concernant les affaires judiciaires, afin de permettre aux entreprises qui sont sujettes à des poursuites concernant des cas de corruption, entre autres, de conclure des ententes à part. Ces éléments n'ont pas pu être abordés convenablement par les parlementaires. Le Sénat avait demandé au ministre de comparaître, mais on a refusé.
D'ailleurs, c'est ce qui a donné naissance au scandale SNC-Lavalin. En effet, le projet de loi de l'année dernière comprenait la façon de faire pour permettre un procès ou une entente à part. Cela a conduit à la décision de la directrice des poursuites pénales d'intenter un procès, le 4 septembre. Dix jours plus tard, l'ancienne procureure générale a accepté cette proposition, et c'est alors que le manège politique partisan s'est infiltré dans le processus judiciaire. C'est ce qui a conduit, plus tard, au départ de l'ex-procureure générale et de l'ex-présidente du Conseil du Trésor, qui ont été boutées hors du caucus libéral pour s'être tenues debout et avoir donné l'heure juste aux Canadiens.
Si je rappelle ce triste épisode de la démocratie canadienne, c'est parce que, ce dont il est question ici, c'est d'un gouvernement qui s'est fait élire sous de fausses promesses, qui a promis mer et monde, qui voulait être plus blanc que blanc et qui, finalement, n'a pas tenu ses promesses. Voilà pour la forme. C'est un projet de loi omnibus.
Maintenant, parlons de la réalité de ce projet de loi. Le gouvernement, au moyen de ce projet de loi, met en vigueur le budget. Qu'en est-il de ce budget? Souvenons-nous, encore une fois, que les libéraux se sont fait élire grâce à des engagements budgétaires qu'ils n'ont absolument pas tenus. Au dernier paragraphe de la page 84 du programme du Parti libéral, on parle du cadre de planification, soit du cadre de planification budgétaire. On peut y lire clairement:
Avec le plan libéral, le gouvernement fédéral enregistrera un modeste déficit à court terme de moins de 10 milliards de dollars au cours des deux prochains exercices financiers [...]
On indique aussi qu'un autre déficit, plus petit, sera engendré lors de la troisième année, ce qui permettra au Canada de revenir à l'équilibre budgétaire en 2019-2020.
C'est l'engagement sur la base duquel les libéraux se sont fait élire. La main sur le cœur, ils ont eu l'audace et la mauvaise idée de dire aux gens qu'ils allaient faire des déficits, mais des petits déficits, et qu'il n'y aurait aucun déficit en 2019-2020. Nous sommes maintenant rendus à l'échéance. Quel est le résultat? Les tout petits déficits sont devenus trois importants déficits de plus 70 milliards de dollars. Nous sommes en 2019-2020, ce qui devait être l'année du déficit zéro. Or c'est l'année du déficit de 19,8 milliards de dollars.
À deux reprises, j'ai demandé à des parlementaires libéraux, la ministre du Tourisme et le député de Surrey-Centre si mes souvenirs sont bons, de me donner le montant du déficit de cette année. Ils ne sont jamais capables de me donner le chiffre, pourtant très simple mais triste et lourd de conséquences, de 19,8 milliards de dollars. Comment peut-on faire confiance à ces gens qui se sont fait élire en s’engageant, la main sur le cœur, à faire de petits déficits et un déficit zéro en 2019, alors qu’ils ont fait trois gros déficits et un lourd déficit pour l’année du supposé déficit zéro.
Ce que les libéraux ne comprennent pas, c’est qu’un déficit est une facture qu’on envoie à nos enfants et à nos petits-enfants. Le déficit d’aujourd’hui, c’est une taxe qu’on renvoie à demain. Tôt ou tard, il va falloir la payer. Pourquoi fait-on cela? C’est parce qu’on vit au-dessus de nos moyens.
Je tiens à rappeler que, historiquement parlant, les déficits sont permis d’une certaine façon. On se rappellera que, lorsqu’on était en guerre, il y a eu des déficits. Il fallait bien exterminer l’ogre nazi. Nous allons d'ailleurs célébrer bientôt le rappel du 75e anniversaire du débarquement, le 6 juin. Il aura fallu le premier ministre Louis Saint-Laurent — je ne dis pas ça parce que je suis de la circonscription de Louis-Saint-Laurent, mais c'est quand même le cas — pour ramener l’équilibre budgétaire après la guerre.
Nous nous rappelons que c’est au début des années 1970, sous l’égide du gouvernement libéral de Pierre Elliott Trudeau, le père de l’actuel premier ministre, que l’on a commencé à inventer des déficits en pleine période de prospérité.
Ce fut un malheur pour l’économie canadienne car, cinquante ans plus tard, le fils du premier ministre Trudeau qui a généré des déficits en période de croissance a fait exactement la même chose, en générant quatre immenses déficits, alors que l’économie mondiale est en pleine croissance.
Je dis sincèrement que j’ai beaucoup de respect et d’estime pour le ministre des Finances, comme d’ailleurs pour tous celles et ceux qui se présentent aux élections et offrent leurs services à la population canadienne et qui, fiers de leur expérience personnelle, veulent la mettre à profit. Le ministre des Finances a fait une carrière fructueuse, éblouissante à Bay Street. On pourrait même le qualifier de baron de Bay Street, pour avoir si bien administré la fortune familiale qu’il a fait prospérer. D’ailleurs, quand il était à la tête de l’entreprise familiale, Morneau Shepell, il n’a jamais fait de déficit.
Quand il était au privé, le ministre des Finances n'a fait aucun déficit, mais depuis qu’il est au public, qu’il utilise l’argent des contribuables, qu’il se sert de l’argent des travailleurs canadiens, ce sont des déficits cumulatifs, l’un derrière l’autre.
Combien en a-t-il faits? Il y a eu un, deux, trois, quatre budgets, et il a fait un, deux, trois, quatre déficits. Quatre en quatre, c’est le Grand Chelem de la mauvaise gestion des fonds publics, alors que, au privé, il était un modèle et un exemple à suivre.
Le moins qu’on puisse dire, c’est qu’actuellement il ne peut servir ni de modèle ni d’exemple à suivre. En effet, faire des déficits alors qu’on est en période de croissance économique, c’est une hérésie fondamentale. Aucun économiste sérieux ne dira que c’est le temps de faire cela. Au contraire, quand le cycle économique reprend, c’est le temps de mettre de l’argent de côté.
Ils ont été très chanceux. Quand ils sont entrés au gouvernement, ils avaient entre les mains le meilleur pays du G7 sur le plan de l'économie. Quand nous étions au gouvernement, notre gestion a été tellement sérieuse et rigoureuse que nous avons été le premier pays du G7 à sortir la tête de la grande crise des années 2008-2012. C’était grâce à la gestion éclairée et rigoureuse de feu l’honorable Jim Flaherty, qui était en d’autres temps ministre des Finances, et du premier ministre conservateur M. Harper. Ces gens-là ont donc hérité de la meilleure situation économique des pays du G7, en plus d’un surplus budgétaire de 2,5 milliards de dollars, ce qui ne sera pas le cas dans cinq mois, si par bonheur les Canadiens décident que nous formerons le gouvernement.
Pire encore, ils se sont servis de cette grande chance de la croissance économique sensationnelle que la planète entière a connue depuis quatre années et, très naturellement, de la force économique des États-Unis, qui est en pleine croissance depuis plusieurs années. Profitant de cette bonne fortune, qu’ont-ils fait? Ils ont complètement ruiné la situation et ont fait en sorte que les déficits majestueux et monstrueux qu’ils font depuis quatre années vont être envoyés à nos enfants et à nos petits-enfants pour qu’ils les paient plus tard.
C’est pourquoi nous nous opposons farouchement à ce projet de loi qui, dans un premier temps, bafoue la promesse électorale de ne pas présenter des projets de loi omnibus et, dans un deuxième temps, bafoue la promesse électorale de faire de petits déficits et de revenir à l'équilibre budgétaire en 2019.
Collapse
View Ahmed Hussen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Ahmed Hussen Profile
2019-05-14 10:18 [p.27725]
Expand
moved that the bill be read the third time and passed.
propose que le projet de loi soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
Collapse
View Harjit S. Sajjan Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Harjit S. Sajjan Profile
2019-04-10 16:00 [p.26944]
Expand
moved that Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
propose que le projet de loi C-97, Loi portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 19 mars 2019 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
Collapse
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
moved that Bill C-82, An Act to implement a multilateral convention to implement tax treaty related measures to prevent base erosion and profit shifting, be concurred in.
propose que le projet de loi C-82, Loi mettant en œuvre une convention multilatérale pour la mise en œuvre des mesures relatives aux conventions fiscales pour prévenir l'érosion de la base d'imposition et le transfert de bénéfices soit agréé.
Collapse
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
moved that the bill be read the third time and passed.
propose que le projet de loi soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
Collapse
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
View Cathy McLeod Profile
2019-04-01 14:50 [p.26519]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's staff said, “it's just a bit ironic that she wants an alternative justice process to be available in one sense, but not one for SNC.” It seems like the entire Liberal government has been seized with getting bribery charges dropped against SNC. As a little reminder, that included $30,000 for Gadhafi's son for prostitutes in Canada.
The finance minister believes that this company should get a special deal. I have a simple question: Will the Liberals let him come to the justice committee and explain to Canadians why?
Monsieur le Président, un membre de l'équipe du premier ministre a dit « C'est un peu ironique qu'elle veuille mettre en place un processus judiciaire parallèle, mais pas pour SNC. » On dirait que c'est tout le gouvernement libéral qui est chargé de faire retirer les accusations de corruption portées contre SNC. Petit rappel: cela comprend 30 000 $ en services de prostituées pour le fils de Kadhafi au Canada.
Le ministre des Finances pense que cette entreprise devrait bénéficier d'un accord spécial. Ma question est très simple: les libéraux vont-ils lui permettre de venir témoigner devant le comité de la justice pour en exposer les raisons aux Canadiens?
Collapse
View Bardish Chagger Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bardish Chagger Profile
2019-04-01 14:51 [p.26519]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we know that the justice committee studied this matter over five weeks, which is longer than most pieces of legislation are even studied at committee. We know that the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner is currently investigating this matter. We know that there is an ongoing court case. We know that when it comes to deferred prosecution agreements, this is a new tool that went through the House of Commons, was voted on and it is a legal measure that can be considered.
What is interesting is that we hear this sanctimony from the other side, but where was that member from the Conservative Party when it voted against measures for women and gender programs, when it voted against programs for seniors and when it voted against—
Monsieur le Président, le comité de la justice a étudié ce dossier pendant cinq semaines, une période plus longue que celles que les comités consacrent à la plupart des mesures législatives. Le commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique fait enquête. Il y a une cause devant les tribunaux. En ce qui concerne les accords de suspension des poursuites, il s'agit d'un nouvel outil qui a franchi toutes les étapes à la Chambre des communes, a fait l'objet d'un vote et constitue une mesure judiciaire pouvant être envisagée.
Les députés d'en face nous servent bien des discours moralisateurs, mais où était la députée du Parti conservateur quand celui-ci a voté contre des mesures de financement de programmes pour les femmes et l'égalité des genres, contre des programmes pour les aînés, contre...?
Collapse
View Jim Carr Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Jim Carr Profile
2019-03-20 15:18 [p.26184]
Expand
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-94, An Act respecting certain payments to be made out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
demande à présenter le projet de loi C-94, Loi visant certains paiements sur le Trésor.
Collapse
View Bill Blair Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Bill Blair Profile
2019-02-21 10:11 [p.25594]
Expand
moved that Bill S-6, An Act to implement the Convention between Canada and the Republic of Madagascar for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
propose que le projet de loi S-6, Loi mettant en œuvre la Convention entre le Canada et la République de Madagascar en vue d’éviter les doubles impositions et de prévenir l’évasion fiscale en matière d’impôts sur le revenu, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
Collapse
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)

Question No. 2030--
Ms. Elizabeth May:
With respect to the Trans Mountain pipeline purchased by the government on August 31, 2018: (a) did the Minister of Natural Resources seek a cost-benefit analysis of acquiring the existing pipeline and of building an expansion; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, (i) when was the analysis sought, (ii) when was the finalized analysis received, (iii) in what format was the finalized analysis received, for instance as a briefing note, a memo, a report, etc.; and (c) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, what are the details of the analysis, including (i) name and credentials of the author or authors, (ii) date of publication, (iii) the WTI/WCS differential used in the calculations, (iv) the range in years from which data on Canada’s oil industry was captured and analyzed for the study, (v) the impact of an expanded pipeline on jobs in the Parkland refinery, (vi) the estimated number of construction jobs and of permanent jobs created by the expansion project, (vii) the projected construction costs of the pipeline expansion project, (viii) an assessment of the impacts of a tanker spill or pipeline leak on British Columbia’s tourism and fisheries industries, (ix) the government’s liability in the event of a spill or leak, broken down by recovery costs for marine, alluvial, and land-based ecologies (including but not limited to remediation, rehabilitation and restoration of sites and species, especially endangered species) and financial compensation for loss of livelihood and involuntary resettlement of human populations?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2031--
Mr. Matt Jeneroux:
With regard to infrastructure projects which were approved for funding by Infrastructure Canada since November 4, 2015: what are the details of all such projects, including (i) location, (ii) project title and description, (iii) amount of federal funding commitment, (iv) amount of federal funding delivered to date, (v) amount of provincial funding commitment, (vi) amount of local funding commitment, including name of municipality or local government, (vii) status of project, (viii) start date, (ix) completion date, or expected completion date?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2032--
Mr. Guy Lauzon:
With regard to cyberattacks on government departments and agencies since January 1, 2016, broken down by year: (a) how many attempted cyberattacks on government websites or servers were successfully blocked; (b) how many cyberattacks on government websites or servers were not successfully blocked; and (c) for each cyberattack in (b), what are the details, including (i) date, (ii) departments or agencies targeted, (iii) summary of incident, (iv) whether or not police were informed or charges were laid?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2033--
Mr. Richard Cannings:
With regard to the Elementary and Secondary Education Program offered by Indigenous Services Canada, broken down by province and territory: (a) how much funding was budgeted for the program for each fiscal year since 2014-15 to date; and (b) how much has been spent on the program for each fiscal year since 2014-15 to date?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2034--
Mr. Richard Cannings:
With regard to communication between the Office of the Prime Minister or the Office of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities and persons employed by or on the board of directors of Waterfront Toronto: what are all instances of communication from November 5, 2015, to date, broken down by (i) date, (ii) person in the Office of the Prime Minister or of the Minister, (iii) subject matter, (iv) persons with whom communication occurred and their titles, (v) method of communication?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2036--
Mr. Harold Albrecht:
With regard to the Canada Child Benefit: (a) how many recipients of the benefit (i) are permanent residents of Canada, (ii) are temporary residents of Canada, (iii) have received refugee status, (iv) have made asylum claims that have not yet been adjudicated; (b) what is the total amount of money that has been paid out to the recipients in (a)(iii); and (c) what is the total amount of money that has been paid out to the recipients in (a)(iv)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2042--
Ms. Michelle Rempel:
With respect to border crossings occurring at unofficial Canadian ports of entry between January 1, 2017, and October 30, 2018: (a) how many border crossers have had family members later present themselves at an official point of entry to claim asylum using the exemption in the Safe Third Country Agreement for family members; and (b) how many of the cases described in (a) are currently at the Immigration and Refugee Board?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2043--
Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:
With regard to applications for cannabis licences approved by Health Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency under the Cannabis Act and the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations: (a) how many licensed producers are structured within family trusts; (b) how many licensed producers have a criminal history; (c) what measures were taken to ensure there was no criminal history; (d) were the criminal histories of the parent companies of licensed producers analyzed; (e) how many licensed producers are associated with individuals with a criminal history; (f) how many parent companies of licensed producers are directly or indirectly associated with individuals and businesses with a criminal history; (g) how many licensed producers were reported by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; (h) are the parent companies of licensed producers required to obtain a security clearance, and if so, how many parent companies of licensed producers are there; (i) what are the sources of financing of licensed producers, broken down by jurisdiction; (j) what is the detailed ownership structure of each licensed producer; and (k) what specific measures did Health Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency take to identify the true beneficiaries of licensed producers?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2045--
Mr. François Choquette:
With respect to the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages: (a) to which branch of the government does the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages belong, according to the Official Languages Act; (b) before the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages, had the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages ever covered the expenses of the appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (c) if the answer to (b) is negative, why did the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages agree to pay the expenses for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (d) who precisely approached the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to have it sign and pay for a contract with Boyden for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (e) has Parliament ever authorized the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to pay for expenses incurred by the government; (f) if the answer to (e) is affirmative, what are the authorizations in question; (g) did Parliament have access to the services from Boyden for which the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages paid in relation to the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages; (h) if the answer to (g) is negative, why; (i) how, in detail, did the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages ensure that the money that it spent for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages was used for the appropriate purposes; (j) does the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages have all the details of how the money that it paid for the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages was spent; (k) has the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages ever authorized Boyden to subcontract services; and (l) what was the total amount that the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages was prepared to pay to cover expenses related to the most recent appointment process for the Commissioner of Official Languages?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2046--
Mr. Harold Albrecht:
With regard to the Correctional Service of Canada's Prison Needle Exchange Program: (a) what consultations were done with the Union of Canadian Correctional Officers prior to the pilot program launching; (b) on what dates did the consultations in (a) take place; (c) who was in attendance for the consultations in (a); (d) how many inmates are registered for the program; (e) how many needles have been given to inmates in the program; (f) what are the index offences of inmates registered for the program; (g) what plans, if any, exist to begin the program at other penitentiaries; (h) is an inmate's participation in the program noted in their correctional plan; (i) is an inmate's participation in the program disclosed to the Parole Board of Canada; (j) what safety measures, if any, have been put in place to protect correctional officers from needles that are now in circulation; (k) how many cases have been found of inmates not in the program being in possession of needles sourced to the program; (l) how many needles have been returned to administrators of the program; (m) how many needles have gone missing as a result of inmates losing or not returning them; (n) where does the government suspect that the remaining or missing needles are located; (o) how many inmates have been subject to disciplinary measures for either failing to return a prison exchange needle or being in violation of the program's regulations; and (p) what is the rate of inmate assaults on correctional officers since the program began?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2047--
Mr. Harold Albrecht:
With regard to infrastructure projects approved for funding by Infrastructure Canada since November 4, 2015, in the Waterloo region (defined as the ridings of Kitchener—Conestoga, Kitchener South—Hespeler, Kitchener Center, Waterloo, and Cambridge): what are the details of all such projects, including (i) location, (ii) project title and description, (iii) amount of federal funding commitment, (iv) amount of federal funding delivered to date, (v) amount of provincial funding commitment, (vi) amount of local funding commitment, including name of municipality or local government, (vii) status of project, (viii) start date, (ix) completion date or expected completion date?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2048--
Mrs. Alice Wong:
With regard to funding allocated in the Main Estimates 2018-19 under the Department of Employment and Social Development: (a) what are the details of funding for programs targeted at seniors, including (i) amount of funding allocated per program, (ii) name of program, (iii) summary of program; and (b) what are the details of all organizations which received funding to date through the allocations referenced in (a), including (i) name of organization, (ii) start and end date of funding, (iii) amount, (iv) description of programs or services for which funding is intended, (v) location (i.e. riding name)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2049--
Ms. Tracey Ramsey:
With regard to federal spending in the riding of Essex, for each fiscal year since 2015-16, inclusively: what are the details of all grants, contributions and loans to every organization, group, business or municipality, broken down by (i) name of the recipient, (ii) municipality of the recipient, (iii) date on which the funding was received, (iv) amount received, (v) department or agency that provided the funding, (vi) program under which the grant, contribution or loan was made, (vii) nature or purpose of the funding?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2050--
Ms. Tracey Ramsey:
With respect to the federal agency Invest in Canada and its board of directors: (a) what is, to date, the total amount of expenses of the Chair of the board and the members of the board, broken down by type of expenditure; (b) what are the details of implementing a national strategy to attract foreign direct investment to Canada; (c) how many new partnerships have been created, to date, with the departments or agencies of any government in Canada, the private sector in Canada, or other Canadian stakeholders interested in foreign direct investment; (d) how many activities, events, conferences and programs to promote Canada as a destination for investors have so far been created; (e) how much information has so far been collected, prepared and disseminated to assist foreign investors in supporting their foreign direct investment decisions in Canada; (f) how many services have been provided to foreign investors, to date, in respect of their current or potential investments in Canada; (g) who are the foreign investors that the agency has met, to date; (h) what are the suppliers outside of the federal public administration which the agency has used to date; (i) what, to date, are the providers of legal services outside the federal public administration on which the agency has relied; and (j) what are the filters and anti-conflict-of-interest requirements to which the members of the board are subject?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2051--
Ms. Tracey Ramsey:
With respect to the appointment process of the Chair and the members of the board of directors of the federal agency Invest in Canada: (a) did the President and any other member of the board disclose to the Deputy Minister any advice that, if adopted and executed by Invest in Canada, would provide them with a personal or professional financial gain, or bring one to a member of their immediate families or to any organization to which they are affiliated; (b) are the Chair or any other member of the board authorized to disclose to the members of other boards of directors (i) documentation, (ii) deliberations, (iii) records, (iv) advice obtained, (v) updates, (vi) commission data; (c) did the President or any other member of the board report an apparent conflict of interest; (d) did the Chair and any other member of the board object to a discussion or formulation of a recommendation that would conflict with their other interests; and (e) to what regulations, laws or policies relating to conflicts of interest and ethics are the President and any other member of the board subject?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2052--
Ms. Karine Trudel:
With regard to problematic issues related to the Phoenix pay system and the implementation of mixed pay teams in the 13 departments in June 2018: (a) what is the evolution of the cumulative backlog, broken down by department; (b) how many people were underpaid by the Phoenix pay system, in total and broken down by department; (c) how many employees experienced a total pay disruption, broken down by department; (d) of those employees in (c), broken down by department and sex, (i) how many did not receive any pay, (ii) how many had other errors related to pay; (e) what is the average error processing time, broken down by individual complaint; and (f) how many hours of overtime were required to address these issues, broken down by hours of work and costs incurred per pay period?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2053--
Mr. Pat Kelly:
With respect to applications for the disability tax credit (DTC) by persons with type one diabetes which were rejected after the changes in wording to the letter to physicians in 2017 and were reviewed after the same changes in wording were reversed: (a) how many applications were reviewed; (b) how many of the applications in (a) were approved upon review; (c) how many of the applications in (a) were rejected again upon review; (d) how many of the applicants in (b) were notified of the approval; (e) how many of the applicants in (c) were notified of the rejection; (f) how many of the applicants in (c) were not notified of the rejection; (g) how many of the applicants in (c) appealed the rejection; (h) how many of the applicants in (f) were eligible to appeal the rejection; (i) how many of the applicants in (h) passed the due date for appeals without knowing about the rejection of their applications; and (j) had all applicants in (b) successfully appealed the rejection of their applications, how much would the aggregate disability tax credit claims cost on an annual basis?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2054--
Mr. Jim Eglinski:
With regard to Canadian National Railway’s (CN) potential discontinuance of a portion of the Foothills Subdivision and Mountain Spur in Alberta: (a) what analysis has the government undertaken of the potential impacts of this discontinuance; (b) what plans does the government have in place to address and mitigate the impacts; (c) what is the government’s position with regard to accepting the line at a cost not higher than the net salvage value of the rail line; (d) what is the government’s estimate of the current net salvage value of this rail line; (e) is the government aware of any other plans by CN to discontinue any other portions of the rail line, and if so, what are these plans; and (f) does the government plan to include funding for the Foothills Subdivision and Mountain Spur and other similar cases in Budget 2019?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2056--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to federal contracts with SNC-Lavalin: (a) are there any contingency plans in place for the 148 existing contracts in the event that SNC-Lavalin becomes ineligible to receive government contracts; (b) has the government sent tenders, letters of intent, or requests for quotation to SNC-Lavalin since April 27, 2013; (c) if the answer to (b) is affirmative, on what occasions was this done and what were the projects in question; (d) for all contracts awarded to SNC-Lavalin since 2013, what were the successful bid amounts; (e) for all completed contracts awarded to SNC-Lavalin since 2013, what amount of money was actually disbursed for each contract; (f) for any contracts that were amended after being awarded since 2013, (i) what contracts were amended, (ii) for what reason were they amended; (g) in general, what is the process for approving amendments to contracts; (h) which buildings owned by the federal government does SNC-Lavalin currently maintain or manage; and (i) what incidents, broken down by category (e.g. critical, health and safety, security) and date, have occurred in government facilities maintained or operated by SNC-Lavalin, or in SNC-Lavalin facilities occupied by government departments?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2057--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regards to the Statutes of Canada, 2018, Chapter 16 (Cannabis Act), where Part 6, Section 93(2) of the Regulations state that "...cannabis may contain residues of a pest control product, its components or derivatives, if they do not exceed any maximum residue limit, in relation to cannabis, specified for the pest control product, its components or derivatives under section 9 or 10 of the Pest Control Products Act...": (a) has Health Canada defined a maximum residue limit for residual chemicals in recreational cannabis as a commodity; (b) if the answer to (a) is positive (i) what is the maximum residue limit, (ii) have the public databases on maximum residue limits been updated to reflect the maximum residue limit for recreational cannabis; (c) if the answer to (a) is negative, does Health Canada intend to define a maximum residue limit for residual chemicals in recreational cannabis; (d) if the answer to (c) is positive, when does Health Canada intend to publish the maximum residue limit for residual chemicals in recreational cannabis; and (e) if the answer to (c) is negative, will Part 6, Section 93(2) of the Regulations apply to recreational cannabis as a commodity?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2058--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regards to applications for visitor visas since January 1, 2016, broken down by calendar year: (a) what number of people from Pakistan have applied for a visitor visa; (b) for each applicant in (a), what number were identified as Christian on their passports; (c) for each applicant in (b), what number were granted visitor visas; (d) for each applicant in (c), what number of adult applicants had annual incomes of 252,000 Pakistani rupees (PKR), or 3,000 Canadian dollars, or less; (e) for each applicant in (d), what number of people claimed asylum in Canada; (f) for each applicant in (e), what number were granted asylum; and (g) for each response provided in (a) through (f), what is the breakdown by gender?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2059--
Mr. Bernard Généreux:
With regard to expenditures related to the 2018 G7 Summit in Charlevoix: (a) what is the total cost of all expenditures to date; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) vendor, (ii) description of goods or services, (iii) quantity, (iv) amount, (v) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2060--
Mr. Earl Dreeshen:
With regard to the “capability gap” in relation to military aircraft and fighter jets: what are the details of all briefing documents related to the matter since November 4, 2015, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) summary, (vi) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2061--
Mr. Alexander Nuttall:
With regard to Statistics Canada’s plan to harvest data from Canadians’ bank accounts: for each of the next five years, what is the projected revenue that the agency will receive as a result of selling information or statistics obtained as a result of the project?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2062--
Mr. Scott Duvall:
With regard to public consultations planned in Budget 2018 concerning retirement income security following the "Sears" case, between February 2018 and November 2, 2018, broken down by month: (a) did the Minister of Seniors conduct public consultations; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, which individuals and organizations did the Minister of Seniors consult; (c) what are the recommendations or conclusions of the persons and organizations consulted, broken down by person and organization consulted; (d) in which municipalities did these meetings take place; (e) in which electoral districts did these meetings take place; and (f) were the Members of Parliament representing the constituencies referred to in (e) invited to these meetings?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2063--
Mr. Don Davies:
With regard to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada's May 14, 2018, decision to suspend the processing of permanent resident visas for adoptive children from Japan: (a) who made the decision; (b) what was the rationale for the decision; (c) what evidence was provided to support the decision; (d) have officials from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada communicated with the State Department of the United States with respect to the decision; (e) have officials from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada communicated with the British Columbia Director of Adoption with respect to the decision; (f) why did Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada approve visas for the Japan-born adoptive children of five families from British Columbia in June 2018 despite the suspension on adoptions from Japan; (g) what are the specific questions on which Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada is seeking clarification from the government of Japan; (h) what were the responses, if any, that the government received from Japan; (i) what concerns, if any, does the government have with the Japan adoption program; and (j) has there been a change in policy with regard to adoption from non-Hague countries?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2064--
Mr. Don Davies:
With regard to the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS), broken down by fiscal year 2016-17 and 2017-18: (a) what was the budget for the FTCS; (b) how much of that budget was spent within the fiscal year; (c) how much was spent on each component of the FTCS, specifically, (i) mass media, (ii) policy and regulatory development, (iii) research, (iv) surveillance, (v) enforcement, (vi) grants and contributions, (vii) programs for Indigenous Canadians; (d) were any other activities not listed in (c) funded by the FTCS and, if so, how much was spent on each of these activities; and (e) was part of the budget reallocated for purposes other than tobacco control and, if so, how much was reallocated?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2066--
Mr. Charlie Angus:
With regard to the federal agency Invest in Canada: (a) what is the remuneration range for its Board of Directors; (b) what are the details of all travel expenses incurred by Invest in Canada since its inception, including for each expenditure the (i) traveller, (ii) purpose, (iii) dates, (iv) air fare, (v) other transportation, (vi) accommodation, (vii) meals and incidentals, (viii) other, (ix) total; (c) what are the details of all hospitality expenses incurred by Invest in Canada, including for each expenditure the (i) individual, (ii) location and vendor, (iii) total, (iv) description, (v) date, (vi) number of attendees, including government employees and guests; (d) will the agency’s travel and hospitality expenditures be subject to proactive disclosure and, if not, why; and (e) since Invest in Canada’s inception, what are the details of the contracts awarded, including (i) date of contract, (ii) value of contract, (iii) vendor name, (iv) file number, (v) description of services provided?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2067--
Mr. Kelly McCauley:
With regard to Environment and Climate Change Canada’s YouTube channel since November 4, 2015: (a) how many full-time equivalents manage the channel; (b) what are the titles and corresponding pay scales of the full-time equivalents who manage the channel; (c) how much has been spent on overtime pay for the full-time equivalents who manage the channel; (d) how much has been spent on developing content for the channel, and how much is earmarked to be spent for the remainder of the 2018-19 fiscal year; (e) how much has been spent on promoting content for the channel, and how much is earmarked to be spent for the remainder of the 2018-19 fiscal year; (f) is there a cross-platform promotion plan to share content from the channel to other digital media platforms; (g) are the costs associated with the plan described in (f) included in the YouTube budget, or do they fall within the budget of the other platforms; (h) what are the digital media platforms used to promote or share the Minister’s YouTube content; (i) what is the monthly expenditure on the channel, broken down by month; (j) what is the cost associated with each video on the channel; and (k) what is the annual expenditure on the channel, broken down by year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2068--
Mr. Kelly McCauley:
With regard to Government of Canada electric vehicles: (a) how many electric vehicles does the government have in the greater Ottawa area; (b) of the vehicles in (a) what are the makes, models, and years for each of those vehicles; (c) when were these vehicles purchased, broken down by amount purchased per month; (d) how many charging stations does the government have in the Ottawa area; (e) of the charging stations in (d), when were they installed; (f) to date, what is the cost of the installation of charging stations; and (g) what is the kw/h used at the charging stations by month since they have been installed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2069--
Mr. Kelly McCauley:
With regard to the government's Mandate Letter Tracker tool: (a) what is the methodology in determining the current status of a commitment; (b) what metrics are used to differentiate between a commitment which has “made progress” and those that have “made progress toward ongoing goal”; (c) what metrics are used to determine if a commitment is “facing challenges”; (d) which department is responsible for the mandate letter tracker; (e) how many full-time equivalents monitor and maintain the mandate letter tracker; and (f) of the FTE’s in (e) what are their employment classifications?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2073--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to the business activities of the Royal Canadian Mint (the Mint) for the fiscal years 2015, 2016, and 2017: (a) what was the total revenue received from the Mint's numismatic business activities for each year; (b) what was the total revenue received from the Mint's bullion products and services function for each year; (c) what were the total profits earned from the Mint's numismatic business activities for each year; (d) what were the total profits earned from the Mint's bullion products and services function for each year; (e) what countries did the Mint provide numismatic products to in each year, broken down by the percentage of business activity in each country; (f) what countries did the Mint provide bullion products to in each year, broken down by percentage of business activity in each country; (g) what was the total value of bullion products sold by the Mint to Canadian customers for each year; (h) what are the names of the Canadian distributors and customers that the Mint sold bullion products to in each year, broken down by the value of bullion products sold to them; (i) what was the total value of numismatic products sold to Canadian distributors and customers for each year; (j) what are the names of the Canadian distributors and customers that the Mint sold numismatic products to in each year, broken down by the value of numismatic products sold to them; (k) what was the total value of bullion products sold by the Mint to American distributors and customers for each year; (l) what are the names of the American distributors and customers that the Mint sold bullion products to in each year, broken down by the value of bullions product sold to them; (m) what was the total value of numismatic products sold to American distributors and customers for each year; (n) what are the names of the American distributors and customers that the Mint sold numismatic products to in each year, broken down by the value of numismatic products sold to them; and (o) what is the alphabetical list of all approved bullion and numismatic distributors and customers that the Mint sells to for each year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2074--
Mr. Peter Julian:
With regard to the Canada Infrastructure Bank, since its creation: (a) what is the number of meetings held with Canadian and foreign investors, broken down by (i) month, (ii) country, (iii) investor class; (b) what is the complete list of investors met with; and (c) what are the details of the contracts awarded by the Canada Infrastructure Bank, including (i) date of contract, (ii) value of contract, (iii) vendor name, (iv) file number, (v) description of services provided?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2077--
Mr. Alupa A. Clarke:
With regard to all Government of Canada communications (meetings, emails, letters, telephone calls, teleconferences, etc.) regarding (i) the emission of red dust in Limoilou and Québec, (ii) all other possible emissions from the Port of Québec’s industrial and port activities, including various dusts and noxious odours in Limoilou and Québec, (iii) public health, (iv) all forms of emissions under the responsibility of the Ministère des Transports du Québec, in particular from nearby highways, (v) all forms of emissions from the Québec incinerator, (vi) all other forms of dust and emissions that may come from other areas, broken down by subject: what are the details of each communication, including (i) the date, (ii) the sender, (iii) the recipient, (iv) the title and subject, (v) the type of communication, (vi) the file number, (vii) the content surrounding each subject since November 4, 2015, between the government and (a) Port of Québec authorities; (b) the office of the Mayor of Québec; (c) the Government of Quebec; (d) the MNA for Jean-Lesage; (e) the MNA for Taschereau; (f) Quebec Stevedoring Company Ltd. (QSL), formerly Arrimage du Saint-Laurent; (g) companies operating on Port of Québec lands?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2078--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regard to government spending and charges laid pertaining to matters of national security: (a) how much has been spent annually since 2015 by each department investigating and prosecuting Vice Admiral Mark Norman, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Services, (iii) the Privy Council Office (PCO), (iv) the Department of National Defence (DND), (v) the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), (vi) any other department or agency; (b) how much has been spent by each department investigating the 1,366 incidences of actionable financial intelligence on money laundering identified by the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) in 2017, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Service, (iii) PCO, (iv) any other department; (c) how much has been spent by each department investigating and prosecuting the 462 terrorism financing and threats to the security of Canada identified by FINTRAC in 2016 and 2017, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Services, (iii) PCO, (iv) DND, (v) the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), (vi) any other department or agency; (d) how much has been spent by each department investigating and prosecuting the 187 actionable financial transactions related to money laundering, terrorism, terrorism financing and threats to the security of Canada identified by FINTRAC in 2016 and 2017, specifically (i) the RCMP, (ii) the Public Prosecution Services, (iii) PCO, (iv) DND, (v) CSIS, (vi) any other department or agency; (e) how many charges related to specific incidences of terrorism financing reported by FINTRAC were laid in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018; and (f) how many of the cases in (e) have resulted in successful prosecutions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2079--
Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and the Liechtenstein leaks, the Panama Papers and the Bahamas Leaks: (a) how many Canadian taxpayers were identified in the documents obtained, broken down by information leak and type of taxpayer, that is (i) an individual, (ii) a corporation, (iii) a partnership or trust; (b) how many audits did the CRA launch following the identification of taxpayers in (a), broken down by information leak; (c) of the audits in (b), how many were referred to the CRA’s Criminal Investigations Program, broken down by information leak; (d) how many of the investigations in (c) were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, broken down by information leak; (e) how many of the investigations in (d) resulted in a conviction, broken down by information leak; and (f) what was the sentence imposed for each conviction in (e), broken down by information leak?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2080--
Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:
With regard to real estate and office space leased by the government from private sector businesses since November 4, 2015, broken down by department or agency: what are the details of all the contracts, including (i) vendor; (ii) amount; (iii) start and end date of the contract?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2081--
Mrs. Kelly Block:
With regard to Transport Canada’s Community Participation Funding Program: (a) what are the details of all recipients of funding under the program since November 4, 2015, including the (i) recipient, (ii) amount, (iii) start date of the related activity or event, (iv) description and title of the activity or event, (v) purpose of funding; and (b) what are the details of all applicants who were denied funding under the program, including the (i) name, (ii) date of application, (iii) summary or description of the event related to the proposal, (iv) reason why the funding request was denied?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2082--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to the $6 million budget for the Leader’s Debates Commission: what is the breakdown of how the $6 million is projected to be spent by standard object and line item?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2084--
Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:
With regard to government contracts with Cossette Communication Inc., especially the decision to pay $499,800 to come up with a brand, logo, name and website for FinDev Canada: (a) on what date was the FinDev Canada contract signed; (b) on what date was the Minister of International Development or the Minister’s office informed that the contract in (a) existed; (c) who authorized the amount of the contract in (a) to be increased from the original value to $499,800; (d) what was the rationale or justification for increasing the original value of the contract in (a); (e) what are the details of all other contracts any department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity has entered into with Cossette Communication Inc. since November 4, 2015, including the (i) date and duration (ii) amount, (iii) final contract value, (iv) original contract value, if different than the final, (v) justification for increasing the original contract value, if applicable, (vi) detailed description of goods or services provided, (vii) name of advertising or other campaign relevant to the contract; and (f) what is the total value of contracts entered into with Cossette Communication Inc. since November 4, 2015?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2086--
Ms. Rachel Blaney:
With regard to Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSA) in Canada for the three most recent tax years available: (a) what is the total number of TFSAs, broken down by age groups (i) 15 to 24, (ii) 25 to 34, (iii) 35 to 54, (iv) 55 to 64, (v) 65 and above; (b) what is the total value of TFSAs, broken down by amounts (i) under $100,000, (ii) $100,000 to $250,000, (iii) $250,000 to $500,000, (iv) $500,000 to $1,000,000, (v) over $1,000,000; (c) how many individuals have a TFSA; and (d) how many individuals have multiple TFSAs?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2087--
Mr. Chris Warkentin:
With regard to the leaking of information from Cabinet meetings or Cabinet committee meetings, since November 4, 2015: (a) of how many instances of leaked information is the government aware; (b) how many individuals have been, or are, under investigation for leaking such information; (c) have any ministers been investigated for leaking such information and, if so, which ones; and (d) have any former ministers been investigated for leaking such information and, if so, which ones?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2088--
Ms. Lisa Raitt:
With regard to communication sent or received by Statistics Canada since January 1, 2017: (a) what are the details of all communication between Statistics Canada and the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, the Office of the Minister or the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) subject matter, (vi) summary of contents, (vii) format (email, letter, teleconference, etc.); (b) what are the details of all communication between Statistics Canada and banks or other financial institutions, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) subject matter, (vi) summary of contents, (vii) format (email, letter, teleconference, etc.); and (c) what are the details of all communication between Statistics Canada and the Office of the Prime Minister or the Privy Council Office, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) title, (v) subject matter, (vi) summary of contents, (vii) format (email, letter, teleconference, etc.)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2089--
Mr. Guy Lauzon:
With regard to the government’s “price on pollution” or carbon tax: what was the “price on pollution” or carbon tax revenue that the federal government received as a result of the 2018 dump of 162 million litres of raw sewage into the St. Lawrence River in or around Longueuil, Quebec?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2090--
Mr. Deepak Obhrai:
With regard to expenditures related to the Fall Economic Statement in November 2018: (a) what is the total of all expenditures related to the statement; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) vendor, (ii) date, (iii) amount, (iv) detailed description of goods or services, (v) location of vendor, (vi) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2091--
Mr. Tom Lukiwski:
With regard to the government’s policies and protocols in relation to spider sightings and sending government employees home: (a) how many employees from Shared Services Canada were sent home as a result of the alleged spider sightings at the building located at 2300 St. Laurent Blvd, Ottawa, in 2018; (b) on what dates were employees sent home; (c) what is the breakdown of how many employees were sent home on each date in (b); (d) were any dangerous spiders discovered as a result of the sightings and, if so, which ones; (e) how much did the government spend on fumigation, investigations or other activities resulting from the sightings and what is the detailed breakdown of such expenditures; and (f) what are the government’s policies and protocols for when spiders are allegedly sighted on government property and when to send employees home?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2092--
Mr. Peter Julian:
With regards to the three proposed tax provisions in the 2018 Fall Economic Statement to accelerate business investment and their impact on provincial revenue: (a) has the Department of Finance calculated the forgone revenue estimates for provinces and, if not, why; (b) what are the calculated forgone revenue estimates, broken down for each fiscal year until 2023-24, (i) for each province, (ii) by provision; (c) how many times has this topic been discussed with the government and has the question been raised with the Minister or Deputy Minister and, if so, has the Minister provided a response and, if so, what was it; (d) has there been any briefing with detailed information on the matter and for every briefing document or docket prepared, what is (i) the date, (ii) the title and subject matter, (iii) the department's internal tracking number; (e) were provincial officials notified of the government's intent to change these provisions and their fiscal implication and, if not, why; (f) which provincial officials were contacted; (g) which provinces shared concerns about revenues loss stemming from these provisions; and (h) what was the nature of these concerns?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2093--
Mr. Steven Blaney:
With regard to the August 2018 letter sent by the Minister of Health to the then Quebec Health Minister warning that the government would cut health care transfer payments to the province if it continued to allow patients to pay out of pocket for medical exams: (a) which other provinces or territories have received similar warning letters from the Minister since November 4, 2015; and (b) what are the details of each letter, including (i) date, (ii) sender, (iii) recipient, (iv) nature and summary of the warning?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2094--
Mr. Dan Albas:
With regard Statistics Canada’s plan to harvest financial transaction data and the claim by the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development that he found out about the plan through the media: (a) on what date did Statistics Canada begin developing the plan; (b) on what date did Statistics Canada notify banks or financial institutions about the plan; (c) on what date did Statistics Canada notify the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development about the plan; and (d) on what date did Statistics Canada notify the Privacy Commissioner about the plan?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2095--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to expenditures on cellular services by the Privy Council Office (PCO) and the Office of the Prime Minister (PMO): (a) what is the total of all such expenditures since December 1, 2015, broken down by month; (b) what is the total number of devices in use, broken down by month and type of device; (c) what is the average expenditure for cellular services per device, per month; (d) what is the breakdown of (a) and (b) by (i) PCO, excluding exempt staff, (ii) exempt staff in the PMO, (iii) exempt staff in other ministers offices under the PCO (Government House Leader, Minister of Democratic Institutions and Minister of lntergovernmental Affairs); and (e) what is the breakdown of (a) and (b) by vendor or service provider?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2096--
Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:
With regard to the Prime Minister’s trip to France in November 2018: (a) who took part in the trip, broken down by (i) exempt staff of the Office of the Prime Minister, (ii) Members of Parliament, (iii) Senators, (iv) employees of the Privy Council Office, (v) other guests; (b) for each of the participants identified in (a), what were the costs of the trip, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) accommodation, (iii) travel, (iv) meals, (v) all other expenses; (c) what were the details for all of the hospitality activities and events during the trip, including (i) the dates, (ii) the cities, (iii) the number of attendees, (iv) the total costs; and (d) what agreements or arrangements were signed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2097--
Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:
With regard to the Minister of Finance’s trip to China in November 2018: (a) who went on the trip, broken down by (i) Minister’s staff, (ii) Members of Parliament, (iii) Senators, (iv) departmental employees, (v) other guests; (b) for each person identified in (a), what were the travel costs, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) accommodation, (iii) travel, (iv) meals, (v) all other expenses; (c) what are the details of all events and representation activities during the trip, including (i) dates, (ii) cities, (iii) number of participants, (iv) total costs; and (d) what agreements were signed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2098--
Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:
With regard to the speech made by the Minister of Finance to the Canada China Business Council in November 2018: (a) did the Minister know that journalists had been denied access before making his speech; (b) if the answer in (a) is affirmative, why did the Minister agree to make his speech if journalists were excluded; (c) what are the government’s guidelines regarding journalists’ access to events involving ministers; (d) did the Minister follow the guidelines in (c); and (e) what is the government’s position on the prohibition on journalists during the Minister’s speech?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2099--
Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:
With regard to land owned by the Department of National Defence on the slopes of Mont-Saint-Bruno: (a) what are the department’s plans for this 441-hectare wooded area adjacent to the national park; (b) will it respond favourably to the request by the executive committee of the Communauté métropolitiane de Montréal, Mouvement Ceinture Verte, Fondation du Mont-Saint-Bruno and the Municipality of Saint-Bruno-de-Mantarville to incorporate the area in its entirety into Mont-Saint-Bruno provincial park; and (c) when will the Department of National Defence make a decision on the sale, transfer or retention of the area?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2100--
Mr. Blaine Calkins:
With regard to the consultations and roundtables with stakeholders launched in October 2018 by the Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction in relation to firearms: (a) what are the details of each consultation or roundtable discussion, including (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) stakeholders in attendance, (iv) Ministers or Members of Parliament in attendance; (b) who decided which stakeholders would be invited to the discussions, and what criteria was used; and (c) what is the complete list of stakeholders who were (i) invited, (ii) attended the consultations or roundtables?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2103--
Mr. Pierre Poilievre:
With regards to Budget 2016 Growing the Middle Class and the median wage income: (a) what are the details of all documents, including spreadsheets, used to create Chart 1 Real median wage income of Canadians, 1975-2015, in the Budget, broken down by (i) median wage income of women, (ii) median wage income of men, (iii) median wage income; (b) is the data regarding the median wage income of Canadians available for the most recent years after 2015 and, if so, which years; and (c) if the answer to (b) is affirmative, what are the details of all documents, including spreadsheets, regarding the median wage income of Canadians for each of the most recent years available after 2015, broken down annually by (i) median wage income of women, (ii) median wage income of men, (iii) median wage income?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2104--
Mr. David Tilson:
With regard to the process for renewing expiring permanent residency cards: (a) what is the average processing time for a card renewal; (b) what is the average time between when an application for renewal is received by the government and when the replacement card is ready; (c) what is the specific process the government undertakes for card renewals; (d) what specific options are available to residents who wish to travel abroad and have submitted their expiring card to the government as part of the renewal application, but who are still waiting for the government to provide them with a replacement card; and (e) what specific changes will the government make in order to make it easier for permanent residents to travel aboard during the renewal period?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2107--
Mr. Larry Miller:
With regard to the Prime Minister’s tweet on December 2, 2018, pledging $50 million to Education Cannot Wait: was this funding approved by the Treasury Board before or after the Prime Minister posted the tweet?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2108--
Mr. Dan Albas:
With regard to government policies and procedures: what are the government's policies and procedures when a sitting Cabinet minister is being investigated by the RCMP?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2109--
Mr. Glen Motz:
With regard to the Safe Third Country Agreement: how many individuals have been exempted from the Safe Third Country Agreement due to the presence of a relative in Canada who crossed the border “irregularly” since January 1, 2016?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2110--
Mr. Larry Maguire:
With regard to the government's prompt payment consultation process, since consultations started: (a) how many meetings have taken place and where did they take place; (b) how many individuals or companies have participated; (c) how many responses have been received; (d) what are the total costs to undertake the consultations; (e) when are the consultations ending; and (f) when will the consultations and information collected be provided to the Minister's office?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2111--
Mr. Matt Jeneroux:
With regard to the government’s Connect to Innovate Program first announced in the 2016 Budget: (a) what is the total of all expenditures to date under the program; and (b) what are the details of all projects funded to date under the program, including (i) recipient of funding, (ii) name of the project, (iii) location, (iv) project start date, (v) amount of funding pledged, (vi) amount of funding actually provided to date, (vii) description of the project?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2112--
Ms. Rachael Harder:
With regard to the Prime Minister’s recent comment that “There are impacts when you bring construction workers into a rural area”: to what specific impacts was the Prime Minister referring?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2113--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to expenditures on furniture rentals by the government since January 1, 2016, broken down by department or agency: (a) what is the total of all expenditures; and (b) what are the details of each expenditure, including the (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date of the contract, (iv) delivery date of the furniture, (v) duration of the rental, (vi) itemized description, including the quantity of rentals, (vii) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2114--
Mr. Bev Shipley:
With regard to projects funded since May 1, 2018, under the Atlantic Fisheries Fund: what are the details of all such projects, including (i) project name, (ii) description, (iii) location, (iv) recipient, (v) amount of federal contribution, (vi) date of announcement?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2116--
Mr. Dane Lloyd:
With regard to flights taken on chartered or government aircraft by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change since November 4, 2015: (a) what are the details of all flights, including (i) date, (ii) origin, (iii) destination, (iv) number of passengers; and (b) what are the details of any contract related to the flights in (a), including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date and duration of contract, (iv) description of goods or services?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2118--
Mr. James Bezan:
With regard to Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake and the revelation at the Standing Committee on Public Accounts on December 3, 2018, that certain programs at the base were either being moved to Ottawa or are under consideration to be moved to Ottawa: (a) what is the complete list of programs which are either being moved or are under consideration for being moved out of Cold Lake, and to where are each of those programs possibly being moved; and (b) what are the government’s projections regarding the number of individuals subject to transfer away from Cold Lake as a result of each move in (a), broken down by program?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2119--
Ms. Karine Trudel:
With regard to the Minister of International Trade’s trip to China in November 2018: (a) who went on the trip, broken down by (i) Minister’s staff, (ii) Members of Parliament, (iii) Senators, (iv) departmental employees, (v) other guests; (b) for each person identified in (a), what were the travel costs, broken down by (i) total cost, (ii) accommodation, (iii) travel, (iv) meals, (v) all other expenses; (c) what are the details of all events and representation activities during the trip, including (i) dates, (ii) cities, (iii) number of participants, (iv) total costs; and (d) what agreements were signed?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2120--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to ministerial permits: (a) how many Temporary Resident Visas issued under ministerial permit have been granted, broken down by month between November 2015 and December 2018; and (b) how many Temporary Resident Permits issued under ministerial permit have been granted, broken down by month between November 2015 and December 2018?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2121--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to requests from Members of Parliament for Temporary Resident Visas: (a) what is the number of requests received from Members since January 1, 2016, broken down by year; (b) what is the number of requests received, broken down by individual Member; and (c) what is the number of requests granted, broken down by individual Member?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2122--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to requests from Members of Parliament for Temporary Resident Permits: (a) what is the number of requests received from Members since January 1, 2016, broken down by year; (b) what is the number of requests received, broken down by individual Member; and (c) what is the number of requests granted, broken down by individual Member?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2123--
Mr. Mark Warawa:
With regard to the Canadian delegation to the 24th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP24) in Katowice, Poland: (a) what is the total number of members of the delegation, including any accompanying staff, broken down by organization; (b) what is the title of each member of the delegation, broken down by organization; (c) what is the total allocated budget for the delegation; and (d) what is projected or estimated travel and hospitality expenses for the delegation, broken down by type of expense?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2124--
Mr. Jim Eglinski:
With regard to the lack of enforcement actions by the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA): (a) what is the budget of the CTA for the calendar years (i) 2013, (ii) 2014, (iii) 2015, (iv) 2016, (v) 2017, (vi) 2018; (b) what is the number of complaints received by the CTA between 2013 and 2018, broken down by year; (c) what is the number of cases where the CTA representatives turned away any complaints by passengers between 2013 and 2018, broken down by year; (d) what is the number of enforcement actions taken between 2013 and 2018, broken down by year; (e) why has the number of complaints received by the CTA quadrupled between 2013 and 2017, while enforcement actions have seen a near four-fold decrease during the same period; (f) for what reason has the CTA taken no enforcement action against Air Canada for defying Decision No. 12-C-A-2018; (g) why did the Minister of Transport not investigate the allegations of fabrication and fraud levelled against CTA staff who turned away valid complaints by passengers; and (h) what steps has the Minister of Transport taken against the airlines and crew involved in defrauding consumers and authorities in what was referred to as the "Mexican Game", where airlines misled aviation authorities and its passengers about unscheduled stops on flights from Mexico?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2125--
Mr. Ben Lobb:
With regard to government expenditures on Canada Goose products since November 4, 2015: what are the details of all expenditures, including (i) date, (ii) amount, (iii) description of the product, including the volume, (iv) rationale for the purchase, (v) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2126--
Mr. Tom Lukiwski:
With regard to expenditures on hospitality by Environment and Climate Change Canada from December 2, 2018, through December 6, 2018: what are the details of each such expenditure, including (i) date, (ii) amount, (iii) location, (iv) vendor name, (v) number of individuals in attendance, (vi) description of the event, if applicable?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2127--
Mr. Matthew Dubé:
With regard to applications for grants and contributions to the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, the Canada Economic Development Agency for the Regions of Quebec, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, the Northern Ontario Economic Development Initiative and Western Economic Diversification Canada, since November 2015: (a) what applications were first approved by officials within the agencies and organizations listed above, but then rejected by the Office of the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, broken down by agency and organization; and (b) what applications were first refused by officials within the agencies and organizations listed above, but then approved by the Office of the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, broken down by agency and organization?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2128--
Mr. Matthew Dubé:
With regard to the pensions of Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of federal agencies or other federal organizations, since November 2015: (a) how many CEOs are deemed not to be part of the public service for the purposes of the Public Service Superannuation Act; (b) how many times did a minister or any other public office holder order that a CEO be deemed to be part of the public service for the purposes of the Public Service Superannuation Act, broken down by (i) name of CEO, (ii) federal organization, (iii) minister or public office holder responsible for the order, (vi) the rationale behind the order; and (c) what is the estimated total pension income, broken down for each case where a CEO has been deemed part of the public service for the purposes of the Public Service Superannuation Act further to an order?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2129--
Mr. Matthew Dubé:
With regard to Health Canada’s re-evaluation decisions, including RVD2017-01, Glyphosate, and the “Monsanto Papers”: (a) how many and which studies are currently being re-evaluated by Health Canada; (b) for each of the studies in (a), when did Health Canada make the decision to re-evaluate it; (c) has Health Canada verified the independence of the studies in (a); (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, what was the detailed process for verifying the independence of the studies; and (e) does Health Canada have information that approved independent studies were written by Monsanto and, if so, since what date, broken down by study?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2130--
Mr. Matthew Dubé:
With regard to the taxation of businesses, since November 2015: (a) how many Canadian businesses have not paid tax for each of the following fiscal years (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018; and (b) how much tax was deferred by the businesses in (a) in fiscal years (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2131--
Mr. Tom Lukiwski:
With regard to reports of a $355,950 sole-sourced contract to pay Torstar Corporation, which was cancelled following a complaint to the Procurement Ombudsman: (a) what was the original purpose of the contract; (b) which minister initially approved the contract; (c) does the government have enough employees to monitor parliamentary committees without hiring the Toronto Star; and (d) what is the total number of government employees whose job involved, in whole or in part, monitoring parliamentary committees?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2132--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to classified and protected documents, since January 1, 2017, broken down by department or agency: (a) how many instances have occurred where it was discovered that classified or protected documents were left or stored in a manner which did not meet the requirements of the security level of the documents; (b) how many of the infractions in (a) occurred in the offices of ministerial exempt staff, including the staff of the Prime Minister, broken down by ministerial office; and (c) how many employees have lost their security clearance as a result of such infractions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2133--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to funding on infrastructure and the Prime Minister’s comment that “there are impacts when you bring construction workers into a rural area”: (a) does the Prime Minister’s comment represent the position of the government; (b) how many cities, towns, villages and rural municipalities have declined funding for infrastructure projects because such projects would involve bringing in construction workers; and (c) have any mayors or elected officials of rural towns or cities requested that the government not provide infrastructure funding for projects which would lead to more construction workers and, if so, which ones and what towns or cities do they represent?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2134--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the MV Polar Prince and the Canada C3 expedition: (a) since the ship was certified to carry an aggregate of 60 individuals, including passengers, crew and special expedition personnel, why was the vessel over capacity for 6 of the 15 legs of the journey; (b) since the ship was certified to carry 12 passengers, why were more passengers onboard for all 15 legs of the journey; (c) was the Minister of Transport aware that the ship was carrying more individuals, and passengers in particular, than that for which it was certified; (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, when was the Minister made aware; and (e) did the Minister approve the vessel to be over capacity and, if so, why?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2135--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the Department of Indigenous and Northern Affairs: what are the details of all lawsuits settled by the Department between January 2016 and December 2018, including (i) title of case, (ii) reason for lawsuit, (iii) litigants, (iv) legal fees, (v) fiscal total of the settlement?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2136--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the government’s response to Q-1982 regarding the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada office located at 365 Hargrave Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba: (a) why was the government’s rationale for no longer allowing access to the general public without an appointment not provided in the response to Q-1982; (b) what is the government’s rationale for not allowing access to the general public without an appointment; (c) how many clients were served at this location between January 2015 and September 2018, broken down by month; and (d) what is the breakdown of (c) by purpose of visit (Employment Insurance, obtaining a status card, etc.)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2137--
Mr. Todd Doherty:
With regard to the government’s response to Q-2006 that the Global Affairs Summit Management Office did not incur any expenses for yoga teachers for the Prime Minister during the 2018 G7 Summit in Charlevoix: (a) did any other departments or agencies incur yoga-related expenses during the G7 Summit in Charlevoix and, if so, what are the details of such expenses, including amounts; and (b) who paid for the Prime Minister’s yoga instructor in Charlevoix during the time of the G7 Summit?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2138--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to government and Canadian Armed Forces policies for the Vimy Officers’ Mess in Kingston, Ontario: (a) on what date was the booking accepted by the Department of National Defence or the Canadian Armed Forces for the December 19, 2018, Liberal Party fundraising event with the Prime Minister, which was subsequently cancelled; (b) what is the title of the individual who initially accepted the booking; (c) did the Privy Council Office advise the Office of the Prime Minister that attending a partisan event on Canadian Armed Forces property violated government policy and, if so, when was such advice given; and (d) why did the Prime Minister initially agree to attend an event which was in violation of government policy?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2139--
Mr. Blaine Calkins:
With regard to Hillside Cottage (1915), the oldest structure in Banff National Park: (a) what measures are being undertaken to preserve and restore the structure; (b) what measures are in place to prevent the decay, vandalism or incidental destruction of the structure; and (c) what is being done to promote and recognize the history and significance of the structure?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2140--
Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:
With regard to the proposed Eagle Spirit Energy Corridor project for a pipeline between Fort McMurray, Alberta, and Grassy Point, British Columbia: (a) has the government conducted an analysis of the impact of Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, on the proposed project and, if so, what are the details of such an analysis, including the findings; and (b) will the government exempt vessels transporting oil in relation to the project from the moratorium proposed in Bill C-48?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2141--
Mr. Steven Blaney:
With regard to the number of RCMP officers: (a) what is the total number of active RCMP officers as of (i) January 1, 2016, (ii) January 1, 2017, (iii) January 1, 2018, (iv) December 1, 2018; (b) what are the names and locations of each RCMP detachment; and (c) what is the breakdown of the number of RCMP officers assigned to each detachment as of (i) January 1, 2016, (ii) January 1, 2017, (iii) January 1, 2018, (iv) December 1, 2018?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2142--
Mr. Steven Blaney:
With regard to government resources used to handle the situation involving illegal or irregular border crossers and asylum seekers, since January 1, 2016: what is the number of RCMP and CBSA personnel whose duties were, in whole or in part, assigned to handle the illegal or irregular border crossers, broken down by (i) province, (ii) month?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2143--
Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
With regard to the Minister of Youth, the Prime Minister’s Youth Council, the Youth Secretariat and the Youth Policy for Canada: (a) what is the decision-making flow chart for the Prime Minister’s Youth Council; (b) what is the total amount spent and the total budget for the Youth Council since it was established, broken down by year; (c) what amounts in the Youth Council budget are allocated for salaries, broken down by (i) year, (ii) position, (iii) per diem or any other reimbursement or expense (telecommunications, transportation, office supplies, furniture, etc.) offered or attributed to each of the positions mentioned in (c)(ii); (d) what are the dates, locations and number of participants for each of the meetings held by the Youth Council since June 2017, broken down by (i) in-person meetings, (ii) virtual meetings; (e) how much did the government spend to hold each of the Youth Council meetings mentioned in (d), broken down by (i) costs associated with renting a room, (ii) costs associated with food and drinks, (iii) costs associated with security, (iv) costs associated with transportation and the nature of this transportation, (v) costs associated with telecommunications; (f) what is the decision-making flow chart for the Privy Council’s Youth Secretariat, including each of the positions associated with the Youth Secretariat; (g) what is the total amount spent and the total budget of the Youth Secretariat since it was established, broken down by year; (h) what amounts in the Youth Secretariat budget are allocated for salaries, broken down by (i) year, (ii) position, (iii) per diem or any other reimbursement or expense (telecommunications, transportation, office supplies, furniture, etc.) offered or attributed to each of the positions mentioned in (h)(ii); (i) what is the official mandate of the Youth Secretariat; (j) what is the relationship between the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and the Youth Secretariat (organizational ties, financial ties, logistical support, etc.); (k) is the Youth Secretariat responsible for youth bursaries, services or programs; (l) if the answer to (k) is affirmative, what amounts were allocated to these bursaries, services or programs since they were established, broken down by (i) the nature of the bursary, service or program funded, (ii) the location of the program, (iii) the start and end date of the bursary, service or program; (m) who are all the people who are working or have worked on the Youth Policy for Canada as part of the Office of the Prime Minister or the Office of the Minister of Youth, broken down by role and by start and end date; (n) what consultations were carried out in connection with the youth policy, and what are the dates, locations and number of participants for each consultation held, as well as a description of the topics discussed, broken down by (i) in-person meetings, (ii) virtual meetings; and (o) how much did the government spend to hold each of the consultations mentioned in (n), broken down by (i) costs associated with renting a room, (ii) costs associated with food and drinks, (iii) costs associated with security, (iv) costs associated with transportation and the nature of this transportation, (v) costs associated with telecommunications?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2145--
Mr. Kevin Sorenson:
With regard to the $19,682,232.17 spent by Environment and Climate Change Canada on payments to other international organizations (object code 2319) during the 2017-2018 fiscal year: what are the details of each expenditure, including (i) recipient, (ii) location of the recipient, (iii) purpose, (iv) date of the expenditure, (v) amount?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2146--
Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
With regard to the pipelines passing through the region of Vaudreuil-Soulanges: (a) since 2008, how many hydrostatic tests and any other safety tests (integrity, corrosion, etc.) have been conducted on all the pipelines over their entire length from Ontario to Quebec, broken down by (i) pipeline, (ii) type of test, (iii) date, (iv) federal entity or contractor, (v) test location and province, (vi) test result; (b) when requesting flow reversal for the 9B and Trans-Northern pipelines, did the government or any other entity calculate the greenhouse gas emissions upstream and downstream of the project; (c) if the answer in (b) is affirmative, what are the upstream and downstream emissions for each of the projects; (d) since 2008, how many leaks have there been on all the pipelines, in either Ontario or Quebec, broken down by (i) pipeline, (ii) location and province; (e) for each of the leaks in (d), what is (i) the quantity of the spill in litres, (ii) the company responsible for the pipeline, (iii) the direct or indirect cost to the federal government, (iv) the date of the spill, (v) the date on which the government or one of its regulatory agencies became aware of the spill; (f) since 2008, have the official emergency response plans been sent to the municipal public safety authorities and the regional county municipality for each of these pipelines; (g) if the answer in (f) is affirmative, for each plan sent, what is (i) the date it was sent, (ii) the date of confirmation of receipt, (iii) the names of the sender and the recipient; (h) since 2008, what are the details of all the cases of non-compliance, deficiencies and violations of federal laws and regulations found by the National Energy Board with respect to the pipelines, including (i) the date, (ii) a description of the deficiency found and the corrective action requested, (iii) the location of the deficiency, (iv) the pipeline and the name of the company that owns the pipeline, (v) the amount of the fine paid; (i) for each case of non-compliance, deficiency or violation in (h), on what exact date did the National Energy Board or a federal government department follow up with the respective companies and verify that the corrective action had been carried out; (j) for each follow-up in (i), what actions were taken; (k) since 2008, how many detection system failures have been identified by the National Energy Board on the pipelines and what are the details of each failure, including (i) the date, (ii) the pipeline, (iii) the location, (iv) the reason for the failure; (l) for each pipeline, in the event of a spill in the Soulanges area, what is the expected time (i) to detect it, (ii) to stop the flow of oil, (iii) for emergency services to arrive on site; and (m) where are the companies that have been hired to respond to a spill in the Soulanges area and how long will it take them to arrive on site?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2147--
Mr. Daniel Blaikie:
With respect to the Energy Services Acquisition Program and the modernization plan for the five heating and cooling plants and the associated infrastructure, including pipes and tunnels, in the National Capital Region: (a) has the government conducted any studies or evaluations of the plan, including but not limited to (i) a cost-benefit analysis of proceeding with the plan as a public-private partnership as opposed to a fully public implementation, (ii) an estimate of the plan’s impact on the heating and cooling plants’ greenhouse gas emissions; (b) for each study in (a), what are the details, including (i) dates, (ii) titles, (iii) file numbers, (iv) value for money analysis, (v) metrics developed to assess the benefits of using the public private contract; (c) what are the consequences of this privatization with respect to (i) the number of public service jobs required for the maintenance and operation of the heating and cooling plants, (ii) the reliability of the heating and cooling plants, in particular, during extended power outages and when emergency repairs are required, (iii) site security and the security impact for any buildings served by the heating and cooling plants; (d) in what way were the relevant public sector unions informed of the plan, including (i) dates, (ii) process for consultation, (iii) timeline for participation; (e) in what ways was the input from the relevant public sector unions considered in the decision to move forward with the plan; (f) in what ways were the associated public unions informed of the ultimate decision; and (g) what are the projected impacts and planned changes on (i) the municipal infrastructure, (ii) the rest of the system outside of the heating and cooling plants themselves?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 2148--
Mr. Daniel Blaikie:
With respect to the document “Allocations from Treasury Board Central Votes for Supplementary Estimates (A), 2018-19”, published online: (a) for each allocation from “Vote 25--Operating Budget Carry Forward” and “Vote 35--Capital Budget Carry Forward” to a given “Organization”, what is the corresponding “Authority”; and (b) why are authorities listed proactively for each allocation under “Vote 5 – Government Contingencies” and “Vote 40 – Budget Implementation”, but not those under “Vote 25 – Operating Budget Carry Forward” and “Vote 35 – Capital Budget Carry Forward”?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 2030 --
Mme Elizabeth May:
En ce qui concerne le pipeline Trans Mountain que le gouvernement a acheté le 31 août 2018: a) le ministre des Ressources naturelles a-t-il demandé une analyse des coûts par rapport aux avantages pour l’acquisition du pipeline existant et la construction de son prolongement; b) si la réponse en a) est affirmative, (i) quand a-t-il demandé l’analyse, (ii) quand a-t-il reçu la version définitive de l’analyse, (iii) sous quelle forme a-t-il reçu la version définitive de l’analyse, par exemple sous forme de note de breffage, de note de service, de rapport, etc.; c) si la réponse en a) est affirmative, quels sont les détails de l’analyse, y compris (i) le nom et les qualifications de son auteur ou de ses auteurs, (ii) la date de sa publication, (iii) l’écart entre les prix WTI et WCS utilisé dans les calculs, (iv) les années pour lesquelles des données sur le secteur pétrolier canadien ont été amassées et analysées aux fins de l’étude, (v) les retombées du prolongement du pipeline sur les emplois à la raffinerie de Parkland, (vi) l’estimation du nombre d’emplois en construction et d’emplois permanents créés par le projet de prolongement, (vii) le coût prévu de la construction du prolongement du pipeline, (viii) une évaluation des conséquences d’un déversement ou d’une fuite de pétrole, tant à partir d’un navire-citerne que d’un pipeline, sur les secteurs du tourisme et des pêches en Colombie-Britannique, (ix) la responsabilité du gouvernement en cas de déversement ou de fuite de pétrole, ventilée selon les coûts pour la récupération du pétrole dans les habitats marins, alluviaux et terrestres (entre autres choses la dépollution, la restauration et la remise en état des habitats et des espèces, particulièrement des espèces en péril) et les indemnités versées pour la perte des moyens de subsistance et le déplacement forcé de résidents?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2031 --
M. Matt Jeneroux:
En ce qui concerne les projets d’infrastructures dont le financement a été approuvé par Infrastructure Canada depuis le 4 novembre 2015: quels sont les renseignements associés à chacun de ces projets, y compris (i) le lieu, (ii) le nom du projet et sa description, (iii) les fonds promis par le fédéral, (iv) les fonds que le fédéral a versés jusqu’à présent, (v) les fonds promis par les gouvernements provinciaux, (vi) les fonds promis par les autorités locales et le nom de la municipalité ou du gouvernement local, (vii) le statut du projet, (viii) la date de commencement, (ix) la date d’achèvement ou la date d’achèvement prévue?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2032--
M. Guy Lauzon:
En ce qui concerne les cyberattaques dirigées contre les ministères et les organismes gouvernementaux depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventilées par année: a) combien de cyberattaques dirigées contre les sites Web ou les serveurs du gouvernement ont-elles été déjouées; b) combien de cyberattaques dirigées contre les sites Web ou les serveurs du gouvernement n’ont pas été déjouées; c) pour chacune des cyberattaques en b), quels sont les circonstances, y compris (i) la date, (ii) les ministères et les organismes gouvernementaux touchés, (iii) le résumé de l’incident, (iv) si la police en a été informée ou si des accusations ont été portées?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2033 --
M. Richard Cannings:
En ce qui concerne les communications entre le Cabinet du premier ministre ou le cabinet du ministre de l’Infrastructure et des Collectivités et des employés ou des membres du conseil d’administration de Waterfront Toronto: quels sont tous les cas de communication du 5 novembre 2015 jusqu’à présent, ventilés par (i) date, (ii) personne faisant partie du Cabinet du premier ministre ou du cabinet du ministre, (iii) sujet abordé, (iv) personnes avec qui l’un des cabinets a communiqué et leurs titres, (v) mode de communication?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2034 --
M. Richard Cannings:
En ce qui concerne le Programme d’enseignement primaire et secondaire offert par Services aux Autochtones Canada, ventilé par province et territoire: a) combien de fonds ont été prévus au budget pour ce programme pour chaque exercice financier de 2014-2015 jusqu’à présent; b) combien de fonds ont été consacrés au programme pour chaque exercice financier de 2014-2015 jusqu’à présent?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2036 --
M. Harold Albrecht:
En ce qui concerne l’Allocation canadienne pour enfants: a) combien de bénéficiaires de l’allocation (i) sont résidents permanents du Canada, (ii) sont résidents temporaires du Canada, (iii) ont obtenu le droit d’asile, (iv) ont présenté une demande d’asile qui n’a pas encore été réglée; b) quel est le montant total versé aux bénéficiaires visés au point a)(iii); c) quel est le montant total versé aux bénéficiaires visés au point a)(iv)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2042 --
Mme Michelle Rempel:
En ce qui concerne les passages à la frontière observés aux points d’entrée non officiels au Canada entre le 1er janvier 2017 et le 30 octobre 2018: a) combien de gens ayant passé la frontière ont été suivis, plus tard, par des membres de leur famille qui se sont présentés à un point d’entrée officiel afin de demander l’asile en invoquant l’exception pour les membres de la famille qui est prévue par l’Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs; b) parmi les cas indiqués en a), combien sont actuellement examinés par la Commission de l’immigration et du statut de réfugié?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2043 --
M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de licences de cannabis approuvées par Santé Canada et l’Agence du revenu du Canada en vertu de la Loi sur le cannabis et en vertu du Règlement sur l'accès au cannabis à des fins médicales: a) combien de producteurs agréés sont structurés au sein de fiducies familiales; b) combien de producteurs agréés ont un antécédent judiciaire; c) quelles sont les mesures prises pour s’assurer de l’absence d’antécédents judiciaires; d) les antécédents judiciaires des sociétés mères de producteurs agréés ont-ils été analysés; e) combien de producteurs agréés sont associés à des individus qui ont un antécédent judiciaire; f) combien de sociétés mères de producteurs agréés sont directement et indirectement associées à des individus et des entreprises qui ont un antécédent judiciaire; g) quel est le nombre de producteurs agréés signalés par la Gendarmerie royale canadienne; h) les sociétés mères des producteurs agréés sont-elles dans l’obligation d’obtenir une habilitation de sécurité, et dans l’affirmative, quel est le nombre de sociétés mères des producteurs agréés; i) quelles sont les sources de financement des producteurs agréés, ventilées par juridiction; j) quelle est la structure de propriété détaillée de chacun des producteurs agréés; k) quelles sont les mesures détaillées prises par Santé Canada et l’Agence du Revenu du Canada pour identifier les réels bénéficiaires des producteurs agréés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2045 --
M. François Choquette:
En ce qui concerne le Commissariat aux langues officielles: a) selon l’interprétation de la Loi sur les langues officielles, à quelle branche du gouvernement appartient le commissaire aux langues officielles; b) avant le dernier processus de nomination pour le commissaire aux langues officielles, le Commissariat aux langues officielles avait-il déjà couvert les dépenses d’un processus de nomination pour le commissaire aux langues officielles; c) si la réponse en b) est négative, pourquoi le Commissariat aux langues officielles a-t-il accepté de payer les dépenses du dernier processus de nomination pour le commissaire aux langues officielles; d) qui précisément a approché le Commissariat aux langues officielles pour qu’il signe et paie un contrat avec l’entreprise Boyden pour le dernier processus de nomination du commissaire aux langues officielles; e) le Parlement a-t-il déjà autorisé le Commissariat aux langues officielles à payer pour des dépenses encourues par le gouvernement; f) si la réponse en e) est affirmative, quelles sont les autorisations en question; g) le Parlement a-t-il eu accès aux services de l’entreprise Boyden que le Commissariat aux langues officielles a payés pour le dernier processus de nomination du commissaire aux langues officielles; h) si la réponse en g) est négative, pourquoi; i) comment, dans les détails, le Commissariat aux langues officielles s’est-il assuré que l’argent qu’il dépensait pour le dernier processus de nomination du commissaire aux langues officielles servait bien aux fins pour lesquelles il devait servir; j) le Commissariat aux langues officielles a-t-il tous les détails des fins auxquelles les fonds qu’il a dépensés dans le dernier processus de nomination du commissaire aux langues officielles ont servi; k) le Commissariat aux langues officielles a-t-il déjà autorisé l’entreprise Boyden à sous-traiter des services; l) quelle somme totale le Commissariat aux langues officielles était-il prêt à dépenser pour couvrir les dépenses reliées au dernier processus de nomination du commissaire aux langues officielles?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2046 --
M. Harold Albrecht:
En ce qui concerne le Programme d’échange de seringues en prison de Service correctionnel du Canada: a) quelles consultations ont été menées avec le Syndicat des agents correctionnels du Canada avant le lancement du programme pilote; b) à quelles dates les consultations indiquées en a) ont-elles eu lieu; c) qui a participé aux consultations indiquées en a); d) combien de détenus sont inscrits au programme; e) combien de seringues ont été données aux détenus participant au programme; f) quelles infractions désignées ont été commises par les détenus inscrits au programme; g) prévoit-on mettre en œuvre le programme dans d’autres pénitenciers et, le cas échéant, en quoi les plans consistent-ils; h) la participation du détenu au programme est-elle notée dans le plan correctionnel; i) la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada est-elle avisée de la participation du détenu au programme; j) quelles mesures de sécurité, le cas échéant, sont prises pour protéger les agents correctionnels contre les seringues qui sont maintenant en circulation; k) combien dénombre-t-on de cas de détenus qui ne participaient pas au programme mais qui étaient en possession de seringues fournies dans le cadre du programme; l) combien de seringues ont été retournées aux administrateurs du programme; m) combien de seringues ont été portées manquantes parce que les détenus les ont perdues ou qu’ils ne les ont pas retournées; n) où le gouvernement soupçonne-t-il que les seringues restantes ou manquantes se trouvent; o) combien de détenus ont fait l’objet de mesures disciplinaires pour avoir omis de retourner une seringue fournie dans le cadre du programme ou pour avoir enfreint les règles du programme; p) quel est le taux de voies de fait commises par des détenus sur les agents correctionnels depuis le début du programme?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2047 --
M. Harold Albrecht:
En ce qui concerne les projets d’infrastructures dont le financement a été approuvé par Infrastructure Canada depuis le 4 novembre 2015 pour la région de Waterloo (qui comprend les circonscriptions de Kitchener—Conestoga, de Kitchener-sud—Hespeler, de Kitchener Centre, de Waterloo et de Cambridge): quels sont les détails de tous les projets de ce genre, y compris (i) l’emplacement, (ii) le titre et la description du projet, (iii) le montant que le gouvernement fédéral s’est engagé à verser, (iv) le montant qu’il a versé à ce jour, (v) le montant que la province s’est engagée à verser, (vi) le montant que la localité s’est engagée à verser, y compris le nom de la municipalité ou du gouvernement local, (vii) l’état d’avancement du projet, (viii) la date de début, (ix) la date à laquelle le projet a pris fin ou devrait prendre fin?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2048 --
Mme Alice Wong:
En ce qui concerne les fonds affectés dans le Budget principal des dépenses 2018-2019 au ministère de l’Emploi et du Développement social: a) quels sont les détails de tous les fonds affectés à des programmes destinés aux aînés, y compris (i) le montant des fonds affectés par programme, (ii) le nom du programme, (iii) une description sommaire du programme; b) quels sont les détails concernant chacun des organismes ayant bénéficié jusqu’à présent des fonds dont il est question en a), y compris (i) le nom de l’organisme, (ii) les dates de début et de fin du financement, (iii) le montant, (iv) la description des programmes ou services auxquels les fonds sont destinés, (v) le lieu (c.-à-d. le nom de la circonscription)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2049 --
Mme Tracey Ramsey:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses fédérales dans la circonscription d’Essex, au cours de chaque exercice depuis 2015-2016, inclusivement: quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes les subventions et contributions et à tous les prêts accordés à tout organisme, groupe, entreprise ou municipalité, ventilés selon (i) le nom du bénéficiaire, (ii) la municipalité dans laquelle est situé le bénéficiaire, (iii) la date à laquelle le financement a été reçu, (iv) le montant reçu, (v) le ministère ou l’organisme qui a octroyé le financement, (vi) le programme dans le cadre duquel la subvention, la contribution ou le prêt a été accordé, (vii) la nature ou le but du financement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2050 --
Mme Tracey Ramsey:
En ce qui concerne l’agence fédérale Investir au Canada et son conseil d’administration: a) à ce jour, quelles sont les dépenses totales du président du conseil et des membres du conseil, ventilées par type de dépense; b) quels sont les détails de la mise en œuvre d’une stratégie nationale pour attirer des investissements directs étrangers au Canada; c) combien de nouveaux partenariats ont été créés à ce jour avec des ministères ou organismes de tous gouvernements au Canada, le secteur privé canadien ou tous autres intervenants canadiens s’intéressant à l’investissement direct étranger; d) combien d’activités, d’événements, de conférences et de programmes de promotion du Canada en tant que destination pour les investisseurs ont été créés à ce jour; e) quelle quantité de renseignements a été recueillie, produite et diffusée à ce jour pour aider les investisseurs étrangers à orienter leurs décisions d’investissements directs au Canada; f) combien de services ont été offerts aux investisseurs étrangers à ce jour relativement à leurs investissements en cours ou potentiels au Canada; g) qui sont les investisseurs étrangers que l’agence a rencontrés à ce jour; h) quels sont les fournisseurs de l’extérieur de l’administration publique fédérale auxquels l’agence a eu recours à ce jour; i) quels sont les fournisseurs de services juridiques de l’extérieur de l’administration publique fédérale auxquels l’agence a eu recours à ce jour; j) à quelles mesures et exigences de prévention des conflits d’intérêts les membres du conseil sont-ils assujettis?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2051 --
Mme Tracey Ramsey:
En ce qui concerne le processus de nomination du président et des membres du conseil d’administration de l’agence fédérale Investir au Canada: a) le président, ou tout autre membre du conseil, a-t-il fait part au sous-ministre de tout conseil qui, s’il était appliqué par Investir au Canada, procurerait un bénéfice financier personnel ou professionnel à lui-même ou à un membre de sa famille immédiate, ou à une organisation à laquelle il est associé; b) le président, ou tout autre membre du conseil, est-il autorisé à communiquer aux membres d’autres conseils d’administration (i) des documents, (ii) des comptes-rendus de délibérations, (iii) des dossiers, (iv) des avis obtenus, (v) des mises à jour, (vi) des données de commission; c) le président, ou tout autre membre du conseil, a-t-il déclaré un conflit d’intérêts apparent; d) le président, ou tout autre membre du conseil, s’est-il opposé à la discussion ou la formulation d’une recommandation qui aurait présenté un conflit avec leurs intérêts; e) à quels règlements, lois ou politiques en matière de conflits d’intérêts et d’éthique le président et les autres membres du conseil sont-ils assujettis?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2052 --
Mme Karine Trudel:
En ce qui concerne les problèmes liés au système de paye Phénix et la mise sur pied en juin 2018 d’équipes mixtes de la rémunération dans les 13 ministères: a) quelle est l’évolution de l’arriéré cumulatif, ventilé par ministère; b) combien de personnes ont été sous-rémunérées par le système de paye Phénix, au total et ventilées par ministère; c) combien d’employés ont connu une perturbation complète de leur paye, ventilés par ministère; d) parmi les employés en c), ventilés par ministère et par sexe, (i) combien n’ont pas reçu de paye du tout, (ii) combien ont subi d’autres erreurs relatives à la paye; e) quel est le délai de traitement moyen des erreurs, ventilé par plainte individuelle; f) combien d’heures supplémentaires ont été nécessaires pour régler ces problèmes, ventilées par heures de travail et coûts engendrés par période de paye?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2053 --
M. Pat Kelly:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de crédit d’impôt pour personnes handicapées (CIPH) par les personnes atteintes de diabète insulino-dépendant (type 1) qui ont été rejetées par suite des changements au libellé de la lettre adressée aux médecins en 2017, et qui ont été réexaminées après que ces mêmes changements au libellé ont été annulés: a) combien de demandes ont été réexaminées; b) combien de demandes en a) ont été approuvées après examen; c) combien de demandes en a) ont été rejetées après examen; d) combien des demandeurs en b) ont été informés de l’approbation de leur demande; e) combien des demandeurs en c) ont été informés du rejet de leur demande; f) combien des demandeurs en c) n’ont pas été informés du rejet; g) combien des demandeurs en c) en ont appelé du rejet; h) combien des demandeurs en f) étaient admissibles à en appeler du rejet; i) combien des demandeurs en h) ont dépassé l’échéance de l’appel sans savoir que leur demande a été rejetée; j) si tous les demandeurs en b) avaient interjeté appel avec succès du rejet de leur demande, combien coûteraient l’ensemble des demandes au titre du crédit d’impôt pour personnes handicapées annuellement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2054 --
M. Jim Eglinski:
En ce qui concerne la possibilité que le Canadien National (CN) cesse de desservir une partie de la subdivision de Foothills et l’embranchement Mountain en Alberta: a) le gouvernement a-t-il effectué une analyse des répercussions potentielles de cette cessation; b) quels plans le gouvernement a-t-il établis pour contrer et atténuer ces répercussions; c) quelle est la position du gouvernement pour ce qui est d’accepter la ligne à un coût ne dépassant pas sa valeur de récupération nette; d) à combien le gouvernement estime-t-il la valeur de récupération nette actuelle de cette ligne ferroviaire; e) le gouvernement est-il au courant de la cessation prévue du service sur d’autres tronçons de la ligne ferroviaire par le CN et, le cas échéant, lesquels; f) le gouvernement a-t-il l’intention de prévoir un financement pour la subdivision de Foothills et l’embranchement Mountain ainsi que d’autres cas similaires dans le budget de 2019?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2056 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne les contrats fédéraux avec SNC-Lavalin: a) existe-t-il un plan d’urgence pour les 148 contrats en cours dans l’éventualité où SNC-Lavalin ne pourrait plus obtenir de contrats du gouvernement; b) le gouvernement a-t-il envoyé à SNC-Lavalin des propositions, des lettres d’intention, ou des demandes de prix depuis le 27 avril 2013; c) si la réponse en b) est affirmative, à quelles occasions cela s’est-il produit et quels étaient les projets en question; d) pour tous les contrats octroyés à SNC-Lavalin depuis 2013, quels étaient les montants des offres gagnantes; e) pour tous les contrats terminés octroyés à SNC-Lavalin depuis 2013, quel montant a réellement été déboursé pour chaque contrat; f) parmi tous les contrats modifiés après leur octroi depuis 2013, (i) lesquels ont été modifiés, (ii) pourquoi ont-ils été modifiés; g) en général, quel est le processus d’approbation de modifications à des contrats; h) quels immeubles appartenant au gouvernement fédéral sont actuellement gérés ou entretenus par SNC-Lavalin; i) quels incidents, par catégorie (p. ex. critique, santé et sécurité au travail, sécurité) et par date, sont survenus dans les installations du gouvernement entretenus ou gérés par SNC-Lavalin, ou dans des installations de SNC-Lavalin occupées par des ministères?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2057 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne le chapitre 16 (Loi sur le cannabis) des Lois du Canada 2018, où il est indiqué, au paragraphe 93(2) de la partie 6 du Règlement, que « le cannabis peut contenir des résidus d’un produit antiparasitaire, ses composants ou dérivés, s’ils n’excèdent pas les limites maximales de résidus à l’égard du cannabis fixées, le cas échéant, relativement à ce produit, ses composants ou dérivés au titre des articles 9 ou 10 de la Loi sur les produits antiparasitaires »: a) Santé Canada a-t-il fixé une limite maximale pour les résidus chimiques dans le cannabis récréatif en tant que produit de base; b) si la réponse en a) est affirmative (i) quelle est la limite maximale pour les résidus, (ii) les bases de données publiques sur les limites maximales des résidus ont-elles été mises à jour de manière à indiquer la limite maximale pour les résidus dans le cannabis récréatif; c) si la réponse en a) est négative, Santé Canada a-t-il l’intention de fixer une limite maximale pour les résidus chimiques dans le cannabis récréatif; d) si la réponse en c) est affirmative, quand Santé Canada envisage-t-il de publier la limite maximale pour les résidus chimiques dans le cannabis récréatif; e) si la réponse en c) est négative, le paragraphe 93(2) de la partie 6 du Règlement s’appliquera-t-il au cannabis récréatif en tant que produit de base?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2058 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de visa de visiteur depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventilées par année civile: a) combien de personnes du Pakistan ont fait une demande; b) pour chaque demandeur en a), combien avaient la mention chrétien sur leur passeport; c) pour chaque demandeur en b), combien ont reçu un visa de visiteur; d) pour chaque demandeur en c), combien de demandeurs adultes avaient un revenu annuel de 252 000 roupies pakistanaises (PKR), ou 3 000 dollars canadiens, ou moins; e) pour chaque demandeur en d), combien ont demandé asile au Canada; f) pour chaque demandeur en e), combien se sont vu accorder asile; g) pour chaque réponse donnée de a) à f), quelle est la ventilation par sexe?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2059 --
M. Bernard Généreux:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses relatives au Sommet du G7 de 2018 dans Charlevoix: a) quel est le coût total des dépenses en date d’aujourd’hui; b) quels sont les détails de chaque dépense, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) une description des biens ou des services, (iii) la quantité, (iv) le montant, (v) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2060 --
M. Earl Dreeshen:
En ce qui concerne les lacunes sur le plan des capacités relatives aux aéronefs et aux chasseurs militaires: quels sont les détails de chaque document d’information portant sur le sujet depuis le 4 novembre 2015, y compris (i) la date, (ii) l'expéditeur, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) le titre, (v) le résumé, (vi) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2061 --
M. Alexander Nuttall:
En ce qui concerne le projet de Statistique Canada de recueillir des données à partir des comptes bancaires des Canadiens: pour chacune des cinq prochaines années, quel revenu l’organisme s’attend-il à recevoir pour la vente de renseignements ou de statistiques découlant de son projet?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2062 --
M. Scott Duvall:
En ce qui concerne les consultations publiques prévues dans le budget de 2018 et portant sur la sécurité des fonds de retraite après l’affaire Sears, entre février 2018 et le 2 novembre 2018, ventilées par mois: a) la ministre des Aînés a-t-elle procédé à des consultations publiques; b) si la réponse ena) est affirmative, quels individus et quelles organisations la ministre des Aînés a-t-elle consultés; c) quelles sont les recommandations ou conclusions des individus et organisations consultés, ventilées par individu et organisation consultés; d) dans quelles municipalités ces consultations ont-elles eu lieu; e) dans quelles circonscriptions électorales ces consultations ont-elles eu lieu; f) les députés fédéraux représentants les circonscriptions mentionnées en e) ont-ils été invités à ces consultations?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2063 --
M. Don Davies:
En ce qui concerne la décision du 14 mai 2018 d’Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada de suspendre le traitement des visas de résident permanent des enfants adoptifs du Japon: a) qui a pris cette décision; b) pour quels motifs cette décision a-t-elle été prise; c) sur quelles preuves s’appuie cette décision; d) des fonctionnaires d’Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada ont-ils été en communication avec le Département d’État des États-Unis au sujet de la décision; e) des fonctionnaires d’Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada ont-ils été en communication avec le directeur des adoptions de la Colombie-Britannique au sujet de la décision; f) pourquoi Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada a-t-il approuvé en juin 2018 des visas pour les enfants adoptifs nés au Japon de cinq familles de la Colombie-Britannique malgré la suspension des adoptions du Japon; g) quelles sont précisément les questions sur lesquelles Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada demande des éclaircissements au gouvernement du Japon; h) quelles réponses le gouvernement a-t-il reçues du Japon, le cas échéant; i) quelles sont les préoccupations du gouvernement au sujet du programme d’adoption du Japon, le cas échéant; j) la politique relative à l’adoption de pays non-signataires de la Convention de La Haye a-t-elle changé?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2064 --
M. Don Davies:
En ce qui concerne la Stratégie fédérale de lutte contre le tabagisme (SFLT), pour chacun des exercices 2016-2017 et 2017-2018: a) quel était le budget de la SFLT; b) quelle partie de ce budget a été dépensée au cours de l’exercice; c) quelle partie a été dépensée pour chaque élément de la SFLT, notamment, (i) les communications de masse, (ii) l’élaboration de politiques et de règlements, (iii) la recherche, (iv) la surveillance, (v) les mesures d’exécution, (vi) les subventions et contributions, (vii) les programmes pour les Canadiens autochtones; d) des activités autres que celles énumérées en c) ont-elles été financées par la SFLT et, le cas échéant, quelle somme a été dépensée aux fins de ces activités; e) une partie du budget a-t-elle été réaffectée à des fins autres que la lutte contre le tabagisme et, le cas échéant, quelle somme a été réaffectée?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2066 --
M. Charlie Angus:
En ce qui concerne l’agence fédérale Investir au Canada: a) quelle est la fourchette de rémunération de son conseil d’administration; b) quels sont les détails de tous les frais de déplacement engagés par la Investir au Canada depuis sa création, y compris, pour chaque dépense, (i) le voyageur, (ii) le but, (iii) les dates, (iv) le tarif aérien, (v) tout autre transport, (vi) l’hébergement, (vii) les repas et dépenses accessoires, (viii) autres, (ix) le total; c) quels sont les détails de toutes les dépenses d’accueil engagées par Investir au Canada, y compris, pour chaque dépense, (i) la personne, (ii) le lieu et le fournisseur, (iii) le total, (iv) la description, (v) la date, (vi) le nombre de participants, y compris les fonctionnaires et les invités; d) les dépenses de déplacement et d’accueil de l’Agence seront-elles soumises à une divulgation proactive et sinon, pourquoi; e) depuis la création d’Investir au Canada, quels sont les détails des contrats attribués y compris (i) la date du contrat, (ii) la valeur du contrat, (iii) le nom du fournisseur, (iv) le numéro de référence, (v) la description des services rendus?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2067 --
M. Kelly McCauley:
En ce qui concerne la chaîne YouTube d’Environnement et Changement climatique Canada depuis le 4 novembre 2015: a) combien d’équivalents temps plein gèrent la chaîne;b) quels sont les titres et les échelles salariales correspondantes des équivalents temps plein qui gèrent la chaîne; c) combien d’argent a été dépensé pour la rémunération des heures supplémentaires des équivalents temps plein qui gèrent la chaîne; d) combien d’argent a été dépensé pour produire du contenu pour la chaîne, et combien prévoit-on en dépenser d’ici la fin de l’exercice 2018-2019; e) combien d’argent a été dépensé pour promouvoir le contenu de la chaîne, et combien prévoit-on en dépenser d’ici la fin de l’exercice 2018-2019; f) a-t-on mis en place un plan de promotion interplateformes pour diffuser le contenu de la chaîne sur d’autres plateformes de médias numériques; g) les coûts associés au plan dont il est question en f) sont-ils compris dans le budget YouTube, ou font-ils partie du budget des autres plateformes; h) quelles sont les plateformes de médias numériques utilisées pour promouvoir ou diffuser le contenu YouTube de la ministre; i) quelles sont les dépenses mensuelles pour la chaîne, ventilées par mois; j) quel est le coût associé à chacune des vidéos sur la chaîne; k) quelles sont les dépenses annuelles pour la chaîne, ventilées par année?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2068 --
M. Kelly McCauley:
En ce qui concerne les véhicules électriques du gouvernement du Canada: a) combien de véhicules électriques le gouvernement possède-t-il dans la grande région d’Ottawa; b) pour ce qui est des véhicules visés au point a) quels sont les marques, les modèles et les années de construction de chacun de ces véhicules; c) quand ces véhicules ont-ils été achetés, ventilé par la quantité achetée par mois; d) combien de bornes de recharge électrique le gouvernement a-t-il dans la région d’Ottawa; e) pour ce qui est des bornes de recharge visées au point d), quand ont-elles été installées; f) à ce jour, combien a coûté l’installation des bornes de recharge; g) combien de kW/h sont consommés chaque mois par les bornes de recharge depuis leur installation?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2069 --
M. Kelly McCauley:
En ce qui concerne l’outil de suivi des lettres de mandat: a) quelle est la méthodologie employée pour déterminer l’état actuel d’un engagement; b) quels paramètres sont utilisés pour faire la différence entre un engagement à l’égard duquel des progrès ont été accomplis et un engagement à l’égard duquel des progrès ont été accomplis vers un objectif permanent; c) quels paramètres sont utilisés pour déterminer s’il y a des « défis à relever » à l’égard d’un engagement; d) quel ministère est responsable de l’outil de suivi des lettres de mandat; e) combien d’équivalents temps plein surveillent et mettent à jour l’outil de suivi des lettres de mandat; f) quelles sont les classifications professionnelles des ETP dont il est question au point e)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2073 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les activités commerciales de la Monnaie royale canadienne (la Monnaie royale) au cours des exercices 2015, 2016 et 2017: a) quel a été le total des recettes obtenues des activités numismatiques commerciales de la Monnaie royale pour chaque exercice; b) quel a été le total des recettes obtenues du secteur des produits et services d’investissement de la Monnaie royale pour chaque exercice; c) quel a été le total des profits tirés des activités numismatiques commerciales de la Monnaie royale pour chaque exercice; d) quel a été le total des profits tirés du secteur des produits et services d’investissement de la Monnaie royale pour chaque exercice; e) à quels pays la Monnaie royale a-t-elle fourni des produits numismatiques au cours de chaque exercice, ventilé par pourcentage d’activité commerciale dans chaque pays; f) à quels pays la Monnaie royale a-t-elle fourni des produits d’investissement au cours de chaque exercice, ventilé par pourcentage d’activité commerciale dans chaque pays; g) quelle a été la valeur totale des produits d’investissement vendus par la Monnaie royale à des consommateurs canadiens au cours de chaque exercice; h) quels sont les noms des distributeurs et consommateurs canadiens auxquels la Monnaie royale a vendu des produits d’investissement au cours de chaque exercice, ventilé selon la valeur des produits d’investissement qui leur ont été vendus; i) quelle a été la valeur totale des produits numismatiques vendus à des distributeurs et consommateurs canadiens au cours de chaque exercice; j) quels sont les noms des distributeurs et consommateurs canadiens auxquels la Monnaie royale a vendu des produits numismatiques au cours de chaque exercice, ventilé selon la valeur des produits numismatiques qui leur ont été vendus; k) quelle a été la valeur totale des produits d’investissement vendus par la Monnaie royale à des distributeurs et consommateurs américains au cours de chaque exercice; l) quels sont les noms des distributeurs et consommateurs américains auxquels la Monnaie royale a vendu des produits d’investissement au cours de chaque exercice, ventilé selon la valeur des produits d’investissement qui leur ont été vendus; m) quelle a été la valeur totale des produits numismatiques vendus à des distributeurs et consommateurs américains au cours de chaque exercice; n) quels sont les noms des distributeurs et consommateurs américains auxquels la Monnaie royale a vendu des produits numismatiques au cours de chaque exercice, ventilé selon la valeur des produits numismatiques qui leur ont été vendus; o) quelle est la liste alphabétique de tous les distributeurs et consommateurs approuvés de produits numismatiques et d’investissement auxquels la Monnaie royale vend des produits, pour chaque exercice?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2074 --
M. Peter Julian:
En ce qui concerne la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, depuis sa création: a) quel est le nombre de rencontres organisées avec les investisseurs canadiens et étrangers, ventilé par (i) mois, (ii) pays, (iii) catégorie d'investisseurs; b) quelle est la liste complète des investisseurs rencontrés; c) quels sont les détails des contrats attribués par la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, y compris (i) la date du contrat, (ii) la valeur du contrat, (iii) le nom du fournisseur, (iv) le numéro de référence, (v) la description des services rendus?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2077 --
M. Alupa A. Clarke:
En ce qui concerne toutes les communications du gouvernement du Canada (réunions, courriels, lettres, appels téléphoniques, téléconférences, etc.) au sujet (i) de l’épisode de poussière rouge survenu à Limoilou et dans la ville de Québec, (ii) de toutes autres formes d’émanations possibles provenant des activités industrielles et portuaires du Port de Québec, y compris des poussières variées et diverses odeurs nauséabondes à Limoilou et dans la ville de Québec, (iii) de la santé publique, (iv) de toutes formes d’émanations sous la responsabilité du ministère des Transports du Québec, notamment via les autoroutes avoisinantes, (v) de toutes formes d’émanations provenant de l’incinérateur de la ville de Québec, (vi) de toutes autres formes de poussières et d’émanations pouvant provenir d’autres milieux, ventilées par sujet: quels sont les détails de chacune des communications, y compris (i) la date, (ii) l’expéditeur, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) le titre et le sujet, (v) le type de communication, (vi) le numéro de dossier, (vii) le contenu entourant chacun des sujets depuis le 4 novembre 2015, entre le gouvernement et a) les autorités portuaires de Québec; b) le bureau du maire de Québec; c) le gouvernement du Québec; d) le député provincial de Jean-Lesage; e) le député provincial de Taschereau; f) Quebec Stevedoring Company Ltd (QSL), anciennement nommé Arrimage du Saint-Laurent; g) les entreprises opérant sur les terrains du Port de Québec?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2078 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses engagées et les accusations déposées par le gouvernement dans des affaires relatives à la sécurité nationale: a) quel montant a été dépensé annuellement depuis 2015 par chaque ministère chargé des enquêtes et des poursuites concernant le vice-amiral Mark Norman, notamment (i) la GRC, (ii) le Service des poursuites pénales, (iii) le Bureau du Conseil privé (BCP), (iv) le ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN), (v) le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor (SCT), (vi) tout autre ministère ou organisme; b) quel montant a été dépensé par chaque ministère enquêtant sur les 1 366 cas de renseignements financiers exploitables en matière de blanchiment d’argent communiqués par le Centre d’analyse des opérations et déclarations financières du Canada (CANAFE) en 2017, notamment (i) la GRC, (ii) le Service des poursuites pénales, (iii) le BCP, (iv) tout autre ministère; c) quel montant a été dépensé par chaque ministère chargé des enquêtes et des poursuites concernant les 462 cas de financement d’activités terroristes et de menaces contre la sécurité du Canada communiqués par le CANAFE en 2016 et 2017, notamment (i) la GRC, (ii) le Service des poursuites pénales, (iii) le BCP, (iv) le MDN, (v) le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS), (vi) tout autre ministère ou organisme; d) quel montant a été dépensé par chaque ministère chargé des enquêtes et des poursuites concernant les 187 cas d’opérations financières exploitables en matière de blanchiment d’argent, de terrorisme, de financement d’activités terroristes et de menaces à la sécurité du Canada communiqués par le CANAFE en 2016 et 2017, notamment (i) la GRC, (ii) le Service des poursuites pénales, (iii) le BCP, (iv) le MDN, (v) le SCRS, (vi) tout autre ministère ou organisme; e) combien d’accusations liées à des cas précis de financement d’activités terroristes communiqués par le CANAFE ont été portées en (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018; f) combien des cas en e) ont donné lieu à des poursuites?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2079 --
M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:
En ce qui concerne l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) et les fuites d’informations du Liechtenstein, des « Panama Papers » et des « Bahamas Leaks »: a) combien de contribuables canadiens étaient identifiables dans les documents obtenus, ventilé par fuite d’informations et par type de contribuable, soit (i) un particulier, (ii) une société, (iii) une société de personnes ou une fiducie; b) combien de vérifications ont été déclenchées par l’ARC à la suite de l’identification des contribuables en a), ventilé par fuite d’informations; c) du nombre de vérifications en b), combien ont été référées au Programme d’enquête criminelle de l’ARC, ventilé par fuite d’informations; d) combien d’enquêtes en c) ont été référées au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada, ventilé par fuite d’informations; e) combien de poursuites en d) ont abouti à des condamnations, ventilé par fuite d’informations; f) quelles ont été les peines imposées pour chaque condamnation en e), ventilées par fuite d’informations?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2080 --
M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault :
En ce qui concerne les biens immobiliers et bureaux loués par le gouvernement auprès d’entreprises du secteur privé depuis le 4 novembre 2015, ventilés par ministère ou organisme: quel sont les détails de tous les contrats, y compris (i) le fournisseur; (ii) le montant; (iii) les dates de début et de fin du contrat?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2081 --
Mme Kelly Block:
En ce qui concerne le Programme de financement pour la participation communautaire de Transports Canada: a) quels sont les détails des bénéficiaires de ce programme depuis le 4 novembre 2015, y compris (i) le bénéficiaire, (ii) le montant, (iii) la date du début de l’activité ou de l’événement, (iv) la description et le titre de l’activité ou de l’événement, (v) l’objectif du financement; b) quels sont les détails de tous les demandeurs dont la demande de financement a été rejetée, y compris (i) le nom, (ii) la date de la demande, (iii) le résumé ou la description de l’activité, (iv) le motif du rejet de la demande de financement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2082 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne le budget de 6 millions de dollars pour la Commission des débats des chefs: quelle est la ventilation de la répartition des 6 millions de dollars par article courant et par poste?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2084 --
M. Ziad Aboultaif:
En ce qui concerne les contrats du gouvernement accordés à Cossette Communication inc., notamment la décision de lui verser 499 800 $ pour l’élaboration d’une image de marque, d’un logo, d’une dénomination et d’un site Web pour FinDev Canada: a) à quelle date le contrat de FinDev Canada a-t-il été signé; b) à quelle date la ministre du Développement international ou son cabinet ont-ils été informés de l’existence du contrat en a); c) qui a autorisé l’augmentation de la valeur initiale du contrat en a) à 499 800 $; d) sur quel motif était fondée la décision d’accroître la valeur initiale du contrat en a); e) quels sont les détails de tous les autres contrats accordés à Cossette Communication inc. depuis le 4 novembre 2015 par tout autre ministère, organisme, société d’État ou entité gouvernementale, y compris (i) la date et la durée, (ii) le montant, (iii) la valeur finale, (iv) la valeur initiale, en cas d’écart avec la valeur finale, (v) les motifs justifiant l’augmentation de la valeur initiale du contrat, le cas échéant, (vi) une description détaillée des biens et services fournis, (vii) le nom de la publicité ou de toute campagne associée au contrat; f) la valeur totale des contrats accordés à Cossette Communication inc. depuis le 4 novembre 2015?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2086 --
Mme Rachel Blaney:
En ce qui concerne les comptes d’épargne libre d’impôt (CELI) au Canada, pour les trois plus récentes années d’imposition disponibles: a) quel est le nombre total de CELI, ventilé par groupe d’âge (i) 15 à 24 ans, (ii) 25 à 34 ans, (iii) 35 à 54 ans, (iv) 55 à 64 ans, (v) 65 ans et plus; b) quelle est la valeur totale des CELI, ventilé par montant (i) moins de 100 000 $ (ii) 100 000 à 250 000 $, (iii) 250 000 à 500 000 $, (iv) 500 000 à 1 000 000 $, (v) plus de 1 000 000 $; c) combien de particuliers détiennent un CELI; d) combien de particuliers détiennent plusieurs CELI?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2087 --
M. Chris Warkentin:
En ce qui concerne les fuites de renseignements provenant de réunions du Cabinet ou de réunions de comités du Cabinet, depuis le 4 novembre 2015: a) de combien de cas de fuites de renseignements le gouvernement est-il au courant; b) combien de personnes ont été ou sont visées par une enquête pour avoir divulgué de tels renseignements; c) des ministres ont-ils fait l’objet d’une enquête pour avoir divulgué de tels renseignements et, le cas échéant, lesquels; d) des anciens ministres ont-ils fait l’objet d’une enquête pour avoir divulgué de tels renseignements et, le cas échéant, lesquels?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2088 --
Mme Lisa Raitt:
En ce qui concerne les communications envoyées et reçues par Statistique Canada depuis le 1er janvier 2017: a) quels sont les détails de toutes les communications entre Statistique Canada et le ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, le Cabinet du ministre ou le ministère de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, y compris (i) la date, (ii) l’expéditeur, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) le titre, (v) le sujet, (vi) le résumé du contenu, (vii) le format (courriel, lettre, téléconférence, etc.); b) quels sont les détails de toutes les communications entre Statistique Canada et les banques et autres institutions financières, y compris (i) date, (ii) l’expéditeur, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) le titre, (v) le sujet, (vi) le résumé du contenu, (vii) le format (courriel, lettre, téléconférence, etc.); c) quels sont les détails de toutes les communications entre Statistique Canada et le Cabinet du premier ministre ou le Bureau du Conseil privé, y compris (i) la date, (ii) l’expéditeur, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) le titre, (v) le sujet, (vi) le résumé du contenu, (vii) le format (courriel, lettre, téléconférence, etc.)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2089 --
M. Guy Lauzon:
En ce qui concerne le « prix sur la pollution » ou la taxe sur le carbone du gouvernement: quelles recettes le gouvernement fédéral a-t-il enregistrées grâce au « prix sur la pollution » ou à la taxe sur le carbone suivant le déversement en 2018 de 162 millions de litres d’eaux usées dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent dans les environs de Longueuil (Québec)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2090 --
M. Deepak Obhrai:
En ce qui concerne l’Énoncé économique de l’automne de novembre 2018: a) à combien s’élèvent les dépenses relatives à cet énoncé; b) quels sont les détails de chaque dépense, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) la date, (iii) le montant, (iv) la description détaillée des biens ou services, (v) l’emplacement du fournisseur, (vi) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2091 --
M. Tom Lukiwski:
En ce qui concerne les politiques et les protocoles du gouvernement relatifs à l’observation d’araignées et au renvoi de fonctionnaires fédéraux à la maison: a) combien de fonctionnaires de Services partagés Canada ont été renvoyés à la maison après les observations alléguées d’araignées à l’immeuble situé au 2300, boulevard Saint-Laurent, à Ottawa, en 2018; b) quelles sont les dates où les fonctionnaires ont été renvoyés à la maison; c) combien de fonctionnaires ont été renvoyés à la maison à chacune des dates fournies en b); d) a-t-on en effet découvert des araignées dangereuses après les observations et, le cas échéant, de quelles espèces d’araignées s’agissait-il; e) combien le gouvernement a-t-il dépensé pour la fumigation, les enquêtes et les autres activités découlant des observations d’araignées et quelle est la ventilation détaillée de chacune de ces dépenses; f) quels sont les politiques et les protocoles du gouvernement appliqués en cas d’observations alléguées d’araignées dans des propriétés du gouvernement et pour renvoyer les fonctionnaires à la maison?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2092 --
M. Peter Julian:
En ce qui concerne les trois dispositions fiscales proposées dans l’Énoncé économique de l’automne 2018 et visant à accélérer l’investissement des entreprises et leurs répercussions sur les recettes des provinces: a) le ministère des Finances a-t-il estimé les pertes de recettes par les provinces et, sinon, pourquoi; b) quelles sont les estimations des pertes de recettes, ventilées par exercice financier jusqu’en 2023-2024 (i) pour chaque province, (ii) par disposition; c) à combien de reprises ce sujet a-t-il été discuté avec le gouvernement et la question a-t-elle été soulevée auprès du ministre ou du sous-ministre et, le cas échéant, le ministre a-t-il fourni une réponse et, le cas échéant, quelle était la teneur de cette réponse; d) y a-t-il eu des exposés contenant des renseignements détaillés sur la question et, pour chaque document d’information ou dossier produit, quel est (i) la date, (ii) le titre et le sujet, (iii) le numéro de référence interne du ministère; e) a-t-on informé les fonctionnaires des provinces de l’intention du gouvernement de modifier les dispositions et de l’incidence financière que cela aurait et, sinon, pourquoi; f) avec quels fonctionnaires provinciaux a-t-on communiqué; g) quelles provinces ont fait part de leurs préoccupations concernant les pertes de recettes qu’entraînent ces dispositions; h) quelle était la nature de ces préoccupations?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2093 --
M. Steven Blaney:
En ce qui concerne la lettre envoyée en août 2018 par la ministre de la Santé au ministre de la Santé du Québec d’alors pour l’avertir que le gouvernement fédéral avait l’intention de réduire les paiements de transfert en santé versés à la province si cette dernière continuait de permettre aux patients de payer des examens médicaux de leur poche: a) quels sont les autres provinces ou territoires ayant reçu une lettre d’avertissement semblable de la Ministre depuis le 4 novembre 2015; b) quels sont les détails de chaque lettre, y compris (i) la date, (ii) l’expéditeur, (iii) le destinataire, (iv) la teneur et le résumé de l’avertissement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2094 --
M. Dan Albas:
En ce qui concerne le plan de Statistique Canada visant à recueillir des données sur les transactions financières et l’affirmation du ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, qui dit avoir appris l’existence de ce plan par l’entremise des médias: a) à quelle date Statistique Canada a-t-il commencé à élaborer ce plan; b) à quelle date Statistique Canada a-t-il avisé les banques ou les institutions financières de ce plan; c) à quelle date Statistique Canada a-t-il avisé le ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique de ce plan; d) à quelle date Statistique Canada a-t-il avisé le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée de ce plan?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2095 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses relatives aux services cellulaires du Bureau du Conseil privé (BCP) et du Cabinet du premier ministre (CPM): a) quel est le total de toutes ces dépenses depuis le 1er décembre 2015, ventilé par mois; b) quel est le nombre total d’appareils en service, ventilé par mois et par type d’appareil; c) quels sont les coûts moyens des services cellulaires par appareil et par mois; d) quelle est la ventilation de a) et de b) pour (i) le BCP, à l’exception du personnel exonéré, (ii) le personnel exonéré du CPM, (iii) le personnel exonéré d’autres cabinets de ministres relevant du BCP (le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, le ministre des institutions démocratiques et le ministre des Affaires intergouvernementales); e) quelle est la ventilation de a) et de b) par fournisseur de produits ou fournisseur de services?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2096 --
M. Alexandre Boulerice:
En ce qui concerne le voyage du premier ministre en France en novembre 2018: a) qui sont les gens ayant participé au voyage, ventilés par (i) le personnel exonéré du Cabinet du premier ministre, (ii) les députés, (iii) les sénateurs, (iv) les employés du Bureau du Conseil privé, (v) les autres invités; b) pour chacun des participants identifiés en a), quels sont les coûts du voyage, ventilés par (i) coût total, (ii) hébergement, (iii) déplacement, (iv) repas, (v) toutes les autres dépenses; c) quels sont les détails pour l'ensemble des événements et activités de représentation pendant le voyage, y compris (i) les dates, (ii) les villes, (iii) le nombre de participants, (iv) les coûts totaux; d) quels sont les accords ou les ententes signés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2097 --
M. Alexandre Boulerice:
En ce qui concerne le voyage du ministre des Finances en Chine en novembre 2018: a) qui sont les gens ayant participé au voyage, ventilés par (i) le personnel du Ministre, (ii) les députés, (iii) les sénateurs, (iv) les employés du ministère, (v) les autres invités; b) pour chacun des participants identifiés en a), quels sont les coûts du voyage, ventilés par (i) coût total, (ii) hébergement, (iii) déplacement, (iv) repas, (v) toutes les autres dépenses; c) quels sont les détails pour l'ensemble des événements et activités de représentation pendant le voyage, y compris (i) les dates, (ii) les villes, (iii) le nombre de participants, (iv) les coûts totaux; d) quels sont les accords ou les ententes signés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2098 --
M. Alexandre Boulerice:
En ce qui concerne le discours prononcé par le ministre des Finances devant le Conseil d'affaires Canada-Chine en novembre 2018: a) le Ministre savait-il que l'on avait interdit l'accès aux journalistes avant de prononcer son discours; b) si la réponse en a) est affirmative, pourquoi le Ministre a-t-il accepté de prononcer son discours si les journalistes étaient exclus; c) quelles sont les lignes directrices du gouvernement en matière de l'accès des journalistes aux événements auxquels participent les ministres; d) le Ministre a-t-il respecté les lignes directrices en c); e) quel est la position du gouvernement sur l'interdiction des journalistes au discours du Ministre?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2099 --
M. Alexandre Boulerice:
En ce qui concerne le dossier du terrain du ministère de la Défense nationale sur le versant du Mont-Saint-Bruno: a) quelles sont les intentions du ministère face à ce terrain boisé de 441 hectares adjacent au parc national; b) va-t-il répondre favorablement à la demande du comité exécutif de la Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal, du Mouvement Ceinture Verte, de la Fondation du Mont-Saint-Bruno et de la municipalité de Saint-Bruno-de-Mantarville pour l'intégration de ces terrains dans leurs entièretés au parc national du Mont-Saint-Bruno; c) quand le ministère de la Défense va-t-il prendre une décision quant à la vente, le transfert ou la conservation de ce milieu?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2100 --
M. Blaine Calkins:
En ce qui concerne les consultations et les discussions en table ronde sur les armes à feu que le ministre de la Sécurité frontalière et de la Réduction du crime organisé a menées auprès des parties concernées à partir d’octobre 2018: a) quels sont les détails entourant chaque consultation ou discussion en table ronde, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le lieu, (iii) les parties concernées qui étaient présentes, (iv) les ministres ou les députés qui étaient présents; b) qui a décidé des parties concernées qui seraient invitées aux discussions et des critères qui seraient utilisés; c) quelle est la liste complète des parties concernées qui (i) ont été invitées, (ii) ont assisté aux consultations ou aux discussions en table ronde?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2103 --
M. Pierre Poilievre:
En ce qui concerne le Budget 2016 Assurer la croissance de la classe moyenne et le revenu salarial médian: a) quels sont les détails de tous les documents, y compris les feuilles de calcul, utilisés pour la création du graphique 1 intitulé Revenu salarial réel médian des Canadiens, 1976 à 2015, dans le budget, ventilés par (i) le revenu salarial médian des femmes, (ii) le revenu salarial médian des hommes, (iii) le revenu salarial médian; b) les données relatives au revenu salarial médian des Canadiens sont-elles disponibles pour les années après 2015 et, le cas échéant, pour quelles années; c) si la réponse en b) est affirmative, quels sont les détails de tous les documents, y compris les feuilles de calcul, qui portent sur le revenu salarial médian des Canadiens pour chacune des années après 2015 pour lesquelles les données sont disponibles, ventilés par (i) le revenu salarial médian des femmes, (ii) le revenu salarial médian des hommes, (iii) le revenu salarial médian?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2104 --
M. David Tilson:
En ce qui concerne le processus de renouvellement des cartes de résident permanent venant à échéance: a) combien de temps faut-il en moyenne pour traiter le renouvellement d’une carte; b) combien de temps en moyenne sépare le moment auquel le formulaire de demande de renouvellement de carte parvient au gouvernement et celui auquel la carte de remplacement est prête; c) quel est le processus particulier que le gouvernement entreprend pour les renouvellements de carte; d) quelles options particulières sont mises à la disposition des résidents qui souhaitent se rendre à l’étranger et qui ont présenté au gouvernement leur carte venant à échéance lors de leur demande de renouvellement, mais qui attendent toujours leur carte de remplacement; e) quels changements le gouvernement apportera-t-il pour aider les résidents permanents à voyager à l’étranger pendant la période de renouvellement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2107 --
M. Larry Miller:
En ce qui concerne le gazouillis publié le 2 décembre 2018 par le premier ministre, dans lequel ce dernier s’engage à verser 50 millions de dollars à l’organisme Education Cannot Wait: ces fonds ont-ils été approuvés par le Conseil du Trésor avant ou après la publication du gazouillis du premier ministre?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2108 --
M. Dan Albas:
En ce qui concerne les politiques et les procédures du gouvernement: quelles sont les politiques et ces procédures du gouvernement lorsqu'un ministre en poste fait l'objet d'une enquête de la GRC?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2109 --
M. Glen Motz:
En ce qui concerne l'Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs: combien de personnes bénéficient d’une exemption à l'Entente en raison de la présence au Canada d'un membre de leur famille qui a traversé la frontière « de façon irrégulière » depuis le 1er janvier 2016?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2110 --
M. Larry Maguire:
En ce qui concerne le processus de consultation sur le paiement sans délai, depuis le début des consultations: a) combien de réunions ont eu lieu, et où ont-elles eu lieu; b) combien de personnes ou d’entreprises y ont participé; c) combien de réponses ont été reçues; d) quel a été le coût total des consultations; e) quand les consultations se termineront-elles; f) quand les consultations et les renseignements recueillis seront-ils transmis au cabinet du Ministre?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2111 --
M. Matt Jeneroux:
En ce qui concerne le programme fédéral Brancher pour innover annoncé pour la première fois dans le Budget de 2016: a) à combien s’élève le total de toutes les dépenses à ce jour dans le cadre du programme; b) quels sont les détails de tous les projets financés à ce jour par le programme, y compris (i) le destinataire des fonds, (ii) le nom du projet, (iii) l’endroit, (iv) la date de début du projet, (v) le montant du financement promis, (vi) le montant du financement réellement accordé à ce jour, (vii) une description du projet?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2112 --
Mme Rachael Harder:
En ce qui concerne les propos récents du premier ministre, selon lesquels « il y a des impacts quand des travailleurs de la construction arrivent dans une région rurale »: de quels impacts le premier ministre parlait-il exactement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2113 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses en location de matériel engagées par le gouvernement depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventillées par ministère ou organisme: a) quel est le montant global des dépenses; b) quels sont les détails de chaque dépense, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la date du contrat, (iv) la date de livraison du matériel, (v) la durée de la location, (vi) la description détaillée du matériel, y compris le nombre de locations, (vii) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2114 --
M. Bev Shipley:
En ce qui concerne les projets financés depuis le 1er mai 2018 en vertu du Fonds des pêches de l’Atlantique: quels sont les détails de tous ces projets, y compris (i) le nom du projet, (ii) la description, (iii) l’emplacement, (iv) le bénéficiaire, (v) le montant de la contribution fédérale, (vi) la date de l’annonce?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2116 --
M. Dane Lloyd:
En ce qui concerne les déplacements aériens de la ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique à bord d’appareils nolisés ou d’appareils du gouvernement depuis le 4 novembre 2015: a) quels sont les détails de tous les vols, y compris (i) la date, (ii) l’origine, (iii) la destination, (iv) le nombre de passagers; b) quels sont les détails de tout contrat associé aux vols en a), y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la date et la durée du contrat, (iv) la description des biens et services?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2118 --
M. James Bezan:
En ce qui concerne la base des Forces canadiennes Cold Lake et la révélation faite au Comité permanent des comptes publics le 3 décembre 2018 selon laquelle certains programmes de la base sont transférés à Ottawa ou sont à l’étude en vue d’un transfert à Ottawa: a) quelle est la liste complète des programmes qui sont transférés ou qui sont à l’étude en vue d’un transfert de Cold Lake, et où envisage-t-on de transférer chacun de ces programmes; b) quelles sont les prévisions du gouvernement quant au nombre de personnes susceptibles d’être transférées de Cold Lake en conséquence de chacun des transferts en a), ventilées par programme?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2119 --
Mme Karine Trudel:
En ce qui concerne le voyage du ministre du Commerce international en Chine en novembre 2018: a) qui sont les gens ayant participé au voyage, ventilés par (i) le personnel du Ministre, (ii) les députés, (iii) les sénateurs, (iv) les employés du ministère, (v) les autres invités; b) pour chacun des participants identifiés en a), quels sont les coûts du voyage, ventilés par (i) coût total, (ii) hébergement, (iii) déplacement, (iv) repas, (v) toutes les autres dépenses; c) quels sont les détails pour l'ensemble des événements et activités de représentation pendant le voyage, y compris (i) les dates, (ii) les villes, (iii) le nombre de participants, (iv) les coûts totaux; d) quels sont les accords ou ententes signés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2120 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne les permis du ministre: a) combien de visas de résident temporaire délivrés en vertu d’un permis du ministre ont été accordés, ventilés par mois entre novembre 2015 et décembre 2018; b) combien de permis de séjour temporaire délivrés en vertu d’un permis du ministre ont été accordés, ventilés par mois entre novembre 2015 et décembre 2018?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2121 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de visa de résident temporaire de la part de députés: a) combien de demandes a-t-on reçues de la part de députés depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventilées par année; b) combien de demandes a-t-on reçues, ventilées par député individuel; c) combien de demandes a-t-on accordées, ventilées par député individuel?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2122 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de permis de séjour temporaire de la part de députés: a) combien de demandes a-t-on reçues de la part de députés depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventilées par année; b) combien de demandes a-t-on reçues, ventilées par député individuel; c) combien de demandes a-t-on accordées, ventilées par député individuel?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2123 --
M. Mark Warawa :
En ce qui concerne la délégation canadienne à la 24e Conférence des Parties à la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (COP24) à Katowice (Pologne): a) quel est le nombre total de membres de la délégation, y compris les membres du personnel les accompagnant, ventilé par organisation; b) quel est le titre de chaque membre, ventilé par organisation; c) quel est le budget total affecté à la délégation; d) quelles sont les dépenses de voyage et d’accueil prévues ou estimées de la délégation, ventilées par type de dépense?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2124 --
M. Jim Eglinski:
En ce qui concerne l’absence de mesures d’exécution par l’Office des transports du Canada (OTC): a) quel est le budget de l’OTC pour les années civiles (i) 2013, (ii) 2014, (iii) 2015, (iv) 2016, (v) 2017, (vi) 2018; b) quel est le nombre de plaintes reçues par l’OTC entre 2013 et 2018, ventilé par année; c) quel est le nombre de cas pour lesquels les représentants de l’OTC ont repoussé des plaintes déposées par des passagers entre 2013 et 2018, ventilé par année; d) quel est le nombre de mesures d’exécution prises entre 2013 et 2018, ventilé par année; e) pourquoi le nombre de plaintes reçues par l’OTC a-t-il quadruplé entre 2013 et 2017, alors que les mesures d’exécution étaient presque quatre fois moindres au cours de la même période; f) pourquoi l’OTC n’a-t-il pris aucune mesure d’exécution à l’encontre d’Air Canada pour ne pas avoir respecté la décision no 12-C-A-2018; g) pourquoi le ministre des Transports n’a-t-il pas enquêté sur les allégations de fabrication et de fraude portées à l’encontre du personnel de l’OTC qui auraient repoussé des plaintes valides déposées par des passagers; h) quelles mesures le ministre des Transports a-t-il prises à l’encontre des compagnies aériennes et des équipages ayant induit en erreur des consommateurs et des autorités de l’aviation au sujet d’escales non prévues sur les vols en partance du Mexique, ce qu’on a appelé « Mexican Game »?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2125 --
M. Ben Lobb:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses gouvernementales pour des produits de marque Canada Goose depuis le 4 novembre 2015: quels sont les détails de chacune de ces dépenses, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le montant, (iii) la description du produit, notamment le volume, (iv) la justification de l’achat, (v) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2126 --
M. Tom Lukiwski:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses d’accueil d’Environnement et Changement climatique Canada du 2 au 6 décembre 2018: quels sont les détails de chacune de ces dépenses, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le montant, (iii) le lieu, (iv) le nom du fournisseur, (v) le nombre de participants, (vi) la description de l’activité, le cas échéant?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2127 --
M. Matthew Dubé:
En ce qui concerne les demandes de subventions et de contributions faites à l’Agence de promotion économique du Canada atlantique, à l’Agence de développement économique Canada pour les régions du Québec, à l’Agence canadienne de développement économique du Nord, à l’Agence fédérale de développement économique pour le Sud de l'Ontario, à l’Initiative de développement économique pour le Nord de l'Ontario et à Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest Canada, depuis le mois de novembre 2015: a) quelles ont été les demandes approuvées d’abord par des responsables au sein des agences et organismes énumérés ci-haut, mais rejetées ensuite par le cabinet du ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, ventilées par agence et organisme; b) quelles ont été les demandes refusées d’abord par des responsables au sein des agences et organismes énumérés ci-haut, mais ensuite approuvées par le cabinet du ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, ventilées par agence et organisme?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2128 --
M. Matthew Dubé:
En ce qui concerne les pensions des présidents-directeurs généraux (PDG) d’agences fédérales ou de tout autre organisation fédérale, depuis novembre 2015: a) combien de PDG sont réputés ne pas faire partie de la fonction publique pour l’application de la Loi sur la pension de la fonction publique; b) combien de fois un ministre ou tout autre titulaire de charge publique a ordonné qu’un PDG soit réputé faisant partie de la fonction publique pour l’application de la Loi sur la pension de la fonction publique, ventilé par (i) nom du PDG, (ii) organisation fédérale, (iii) ministre ou titulaire de charge publique responsable de l’ordre, (vi) justifications de cet ordre; c) quelle est l’estimation du montant total de revenu de retraite, ventilée par chacun des cas de PDG qui font désormais partie de la fonction publique pour l’application de la Loi sur la pension de la fonction publique à la suite d’un ordre?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2129 --
M. Matthew Dubé:
En ce qui concerne les décisions de réévaluation de Santé Canada, y compris la décision de réévaluation RVD2017-01, Glyphosate, et les « Monsanto Papers »: a) combien et quelles études sont actuellement réévaluées par Santé Canada ; b) pour chacune des études en a), à quelle date Santé Canada a pris la décision de la réévaluer; c) est-ce que Santé Canada a vérifié l’indépendance des études en a); d) si la réponse en c) est affirmative, quel est le processus détaillé de vérification de l’indépendance des études; e) est-ce que Santé Canada possède de l’information à savoir que des études indépendantes approuvées auraient été rédigées par Monsanto et, le cas échant, depuis quelle date, ventilé par étude?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2130 --
M. Matthew Dubé:
En ce qui concerne la fiscalité des sociétés, depuis novembre 2015: a) combien de sociétés au Canada n’ont pas payé d’impôt pour chacune des exercices suivants (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018; b) à combien s’élève l’impôt reporté par les sociétés visées en a) au cours des exercices (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2131 --
M. Tom Lukiwski:
En ce qui concerne le signalement d’un contrat à fournisseur unique de 355 950 $ attribué à Torstar Corporation, qui a été annulé à la suite d’une plainte auprès de l’ombudsman de l’approvisionnement: a) quel était l’objectif initial du contrat; b) quel ministre a initialement approuvé le contrat; c) le gouvernement compte-t-il suffisamment de fonctionnaires pour suivre les travaux des comités parlementaires sans avoir à retenir les services du Toronto Star; d) quel est le nombre total de fonctionnaires dont le rôle consiste, en tout ou en partie, à suivre les travaux des comités parlementaires?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2132 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne les documents protégés et classifiés, depuis le 1er janvier 2017, ventilés par ministère ou par organisme: a) à combien de reprises a-t-on découvert que des documents protégés ou classifiés avaient été manipulés ou entreposés d’une façon qui contrevient aux exigences liées au niveau de sécurité des documents; b) combien des infractions en a) ont eu lieu dans des bureaux du personnel ministériel exempté, y compris ceux du personnel du premier ministre, ventilés par bureau ministériel; c) combien d’employés ont perdu leur cote de sécurité à la suite de telles infractions?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2133 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne le financement de l’infrastructure et la remarque du premier ministre selon laquelle « il y a des impacts quand des travailleurs de la construction arrivent dans une région rurale »: a) la remarque du premier ministre représente-t-elle la position du gouvernement; b) combien de villes, de villages et de municipalités rurales ont refusé des fonds pour des projets d’infrastructure parce que ces projets auraient nécessité la venue de travailleurs de la construction; c) des maires ou des élus de villes rurales ont-ils demandé que le gouvernement ne fournisse pas de fonds à des projets d’infrastructure qui nécessiteraient la venue de travailleurs de la construction et, le cas échéant, qui étaient ces maires ou élus et quelles villes représentaient-ils?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2134 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne le MV Polar Prince et l’expédition Canada C3: a) étant donné que le navire a été certifié pour transporter un maximum de 60 personnes, y compris les passagers, les membres de l’équipage et le personnel de l’expédition spéciale, pourquoi le navire a-t-il opéré au-delà de sa capacité pendant 6 des 15 étapes du voyage; b) étant donné que le navire a été certifié pour transporter 12 passagers, pourquoi y avait-il davantage de passagers à bord pendant toutes les 15 étapes du voyage; c) le ministre des Transports savait-il que le navire transportait plus de personnes, et de passagers en particulier, que ce pour quoi il avait été certifié; d) si la réponse en c) est affirmative, à quel moment le Ministre a-t-il été mis au courant; e) le Ministre était-il d’accord pour que le navire opère au-delà de sa capacité et, le cas échéant, pourquoi?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2135 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne le ministère des Affaires autochtones et du Nord: quels sont les détails de toutes les poursuites réglées par le ministère entre janvier 2016 et décembre 2018, y compris (i) le titre de l’affaire, (ii) le motif de la poursuite, (iii) les plaideurs, (iv) les frais juridiques, (v) le montant total du règlement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2136 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne la réponse du gouvernement à la question Q-1982 à propos du bureau d’Affaires autochtones et du Nord Canada situé au 365, rue Hargrave, Winnipeg (Manitoba): a) pourquoi le gouvernement n’a-t-il pas fait état de ses raisons de ne plus accorder l’accès au public sans un rendez-vous dans sa réponse à la question Q-1982; b) pour quelle raison le gouvernement a-t-il décidé de ne plus accorder l’accès au public à ce bureau sans l’obtention d’un rendez-vous; c) combien de clients ont été servis à ce bureau de janvier 2015 à septembre 2018, ventilé par mois; d) quelle est la ventilation du nombre de clients en c) par but de la visite (assurance-emploi, l’obtention d’un certificat de statut d’Indien, etc.)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2137 --
M. Todd Doherty:
En ce qui concerne la réponse du gouvernement à la question Q-2006, selon laquelle le Bureau de gestion des sommets d’Affaires mondiales Canada n’a pas engagé de dépenses pour des instructeurs de yoga à l’intention du premier ministre pendant le Sommet du G7 de 2018 dans Charlevoix: a) d’autres ministères ou organismes ont-ils engagé des dépenses liées au yoga pendant le Sommet du G7 dans Charlevoix et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de ces dépenses, y compris les montants; b) qui a payé pour l’instructeur de yoga du premier ministre dans Charlevoix pendant la période du Sommet du G7?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2138 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne les politiques du gouvernement et des Forces armées canadiennes sur le mess des officiers Vimy à Kingston (Ontario): a) à quelle date la réservation relative à l’activité de financement du Parti libéral du 19 décembre 2018 avec le premier ministre a-t-elle été acceptée par le ministère de la Défense nationale ou les Forces armées canadiennes, avant d’être annulée; b) quel est le titre de la personne qui a accepté initialement la réservation; c) le Bureau du Conseil privé a-t-il avisé le premier ministre que la participation à une activité partisane dans un lieu appartenant aux Forces armées canadiennes est contraire à la politique du gouvernement et, le cas échéant, quand cet avis a-t-il été communiqué; d) pourquoi le premier ministre a-t-il au départ accepté d’assister à une activité qui était contraire à la politique du gouvernement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2139 --
M. Blaine Calkins:
En ce qui concerne le Hillside Cottage (1915), la plus ancienne structure du parc national Banff: a) quelles sont les mesures prises pour préserver et restaurer la structure; b) quelles sont les mesures en place pour prévenir la dégradation, le vandalisme et la destruction accessoire de la structure; c) que fait-on pour promouvoir et célébrer l’histoire et l’importance de la structure?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2140 --
Mme Shannon Stubbs:
En ce qui concerne le projet de corridor énergétique d’Eagle Spirit, qui comprendrait un pipeline entre Fort McMurray (Alberta) et Grassy Point (Colombie-Britannique): a) le gouvernement a-t-il effectué une analyse d’impact du projet de loi C-48, Loi sur le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers, sur le corridor proposé et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de cette analyse, y compris les conclusions; b) le gouvernement va-t-il exempter du moratoire prévu par le projet de loi C-48 les bâtiments qui transportent du pétrole pour le corridor proposé?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2141 --
M. Steven Blaney:
En ce qui concerne le nombre d’agents de la GRC: a) quel était le nombre total d’agents actifs en date du (i) 1er janvier 2016, (ii) 1er janvier 2017, (iii) 1er janvier 2018, (iv) 1er décembre 2018; b) quels sont le nom et l’emplacement de chaque détachement de la GRC; c) quel était le nombre d’agents de la GRC affectés à chaque détachement en date du (i) 1er janvier 2016, (ii) 1er janvier 2017, (iii) 1er janvier 2018, (iv) 1er décembre 2018?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2142 --
M. Steven Blaney:
En ce qui concerne les ressources gouvernementales utilisées pour gérer la situation des demandeurs d’asile et des personnes traversant la frontière de façon illégale ou irrégulière, depuis le 1er janvier 2016: quel est le nombre des effectifs de la GRC et de l’ASFC dont les fonctions ont été, en totalité ou en partie, affectées au dossier des personnes traversant la frontière de façon illégale ou irrégulière, ventilé par (i) province, (ii) mois?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2143 --
Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
En ce qui concerne le ministre de la Jeunesse, le Conseil jeunesse du premier ministre, le Secrétariat de la jeunesse et la politique jeunesse pour le Canada: a) quel est l’organigramme décisionnel du Conseil jeunesse du premier ministre, y compris chacun des postes associés au Conseil; b) quels sont les montants totaux des dépenses et du budget du Conseil jeunesse depuis sa création, ventilés par année; c) quels sont les montants du budget du Conseil jeunesse alloués aux salaires, ventilés par (i) année, (ii) postes, (iii) per diem ou toutes autres compensations ou dépenses (télécommunications, transports, matériel de bureau, mobilier, etc.) offerts ou attribués à chacun des postes mentionnés en c)(ii); d) quelles sont les dates, les lieux et le nombre de participants de chacune des rencontres organisées par le Conseil jeunesse depuis juin 2017, ventilés par (i) rencontre en personne, (ii) rencontre virtuelle; e) quel est le montant des dépenses du gouvernement pour l’organisation de chacune des rencontres du Conseil jeunesse mentionnées en d), ventilé par (i) coûts associés à la location d’une salle, (ii) coûts associés à la nourriture et aux breuvages, (iii) coûts associés à la sécurité, (iv) coûts associés aux transports et la nature de ces transports, (v) coûts associés aux télécommunications; f) quel est l’organigramme décisionnel du Secrétariat de la jeunesse du Bureau du Conseil privé, y compris chacun des postes associés au Secrétariat; g) quels sont les montants totaux des dépenses et du budget du Secrétariat de la jeunesse depuis sa création, ventilés par année; h) quels sont les montants du budget du Secrétariat de la jeunesse alloués aux salaires, ventilés par (i) année, (ii) postes, (iii) per diem ou toutes autres compensations ou dépenses (télécommunications, transports, matériel de bureau, mobilier, etc.) offerts ou attribués à chacun des postes mentionnés en h)(ii); i) quel est le mandat officiel du Secrétariat de la jeunesse; j) quels sont les liens entre le Conseil jeunesse du premier ministre et le Secrétariat de la jeunesse (liens organisationnels, liens financiers, appui logistique, etc.); k) le Secrétariat de la jeunesse est-il responsable des bourses, services ou programmes dédiés à la jeunesse ; l) si la réponse en k) est affirmative, quels sont les montants qui ont été attribués pour ces bourses, services ou programme, depuis leur création, ventilés par (i) nature de la bourse, du service ou du programme financé, (ii) lieu du programme, (iii) date du début et de fin de la bourse, du service ou du programme; m) quelles sont toutes les personnes qui travaillent ou qui ont travaillé sur la politique jeunesse pour le Canada au sein du Cabinet du premier ministre ou du Cabinet du ministre de la Jeunesse, ventilées par responsabilité et par date de début et de fin du travail; n) quelles consultations ont été menées en lien avec la politique jeunesse et quelles sont les dates, les lieux et le nombre de participants de chacune des consultations organisées ainsi qu’une description des sujets abordés, ventilés par (i) rencontre en personne, (ii) rencontre virtuelle; o) quel est le montant des dépenses du gouvernement pour l’organisation de chacune des consultations mentionnées en n), ventilé par (i) coûts associés à la location d’une salle, (ii) coûts associés à la nourriture et aux breuvages, (iii) coûts associés à la sécurité, (iv) coûts associés aux transports et la nature de ces transports, (v) coûts associés aux télécommunications?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2145 --
M. Kevin Sorenson:
En ce qui concerne le montant de 19 682 232,17 $ dépensé par Environnement et Changement climatique Canada au titre des paiements aux organisations internationales (code d’article 2319) au cours de l’exercice 2017-2018: quels sont les détails de chaque dépense, y compris (i) le destinataire, (ii) le lieu du destinataire, (iii) l’objet, (iv) la date de la dépense, (v) le montant?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2146 --
Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:
En ce qui concerne les oléoducs passant dans la région de Vaudreuil-Soulanges: a) depuis 2008, combien de tests hydrostatiques et tout autre test de sécurité (intégrité, corrosion, etc.) ont été entrepris sur l’ensemble des oléoducs et tout au long de leur trajet depuis l’Ontario jusqu’au Québec, ventilés par (i) oléoduc, (ii) type de test, (iii) date, (iv) entités fédérales ou contracteur, (v) lieux des tests et province, (vi) résultats des tests; b) lors de la demande d’inversion du flux pour les oléoduc 9B et Trans-Nord, est-ce que le gouvernement ou toute autre entité ont calculé les émissions de gaz à effet de serre émis en amont et en aval du projet; c) si la réponse en b) est affirmative, à combien se chiffre les émissions en amont et en aval pour chacun des projets; d) depuis 2008, combien de fuites ont été dénombrées sur l’ensemble des oléoducs, qu’elles soient en Ontario ou au Québec, ventilé par (i) oléoducs, (ii) lieux et province; e) pour chacune des fuites en d), quel est (i) la quantité en litres du déversement, (ii) la compagnie responsable de l’oléoduc, (iii) coût au gouvernement fédéral direct ou indirect, (iv) la date du déversement, (v) la date du moment où le gouvernement ou un de ses organismes réglementaires a pris connaissance du déversement; f) depuis 2008, est-ce que les plans officiels d’intervention d’urgence ont été envoyés aux responsables de la sécurité publique des municipalités et à la municipalité régionale de comté pour chacun de ces oléoducs; g) si la réponse en f) est affirmative, pour chacune des envois, quel est (i) la date de l’envoi, (ii) la date de confirmation de la réception, (iii) les noms des expéditeurs et des destinataires; h) depuis 2008, quels sont les détails de tous les manques de conformité, d’écarts de conformité et les infractions aux lois fédérales et aux règlements constatés par l’Office national de l’énergie concernant les oléoducs, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le descriptif des manquements constatés et des correctifs demandés, (iii) l’emplacement des manquements, (iv) l’oléoduc et le nom de la compagnie propriétaire de l’oléoduc, (v) montant de l’amende payée; i) pour chacun des manques de conformité et d’écarts de conformités et d’infraction en h), à quelle date exacte l’Office national de l’énergie ou un des ministères fédéraux a-t-il fait un suivi avec les compagnies respectives et vérifié que les correctifs ont été appliqués; j) pour chacun des suivis en i), quels ont été les actions menées; k) depuis 2008, combien de défaillances des systèmes de détection ont été relevées par l’Office national de l’énergie sur les oléoducs et quels sont les détails de chaque défaillance, y compris (i) la date, (ii) l’oléoduc, (iii) l’emplacement, (iv) la raison de la défaillance; l) pour chacun des oléoducs, en cas de déversement dans la région de Soulanges, quel est le temps prévu (i) pour le détecter, (ii) pour stopper le flux de pétrole, (iii) pour l’arrivée des services d’urgence sur les lieux; m) où se trouvent les compagnies qui ont été embauchées pour intervenir en cas de déversement dans la région de Soulanges et en combien de temps peuvent-elles arriver sur place?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2147 --
M. Daniel Blaikie:
En ce qui concerne le Programme d’acquisition de services énergétiques et le plan de modernisation des cinq centrales de chauffage et de refroidissement et de leur infrastructure connexe, y compris la tuyauterie et les tunnels, dans la région de la capitale nationale: a) le gouvernement a-t-il réalisé des études ou des évaluations à l’égard du plan, y compris, sans toutefois s’y limiter, (i) une analyse coûts-avantages de la mise en œuvre du plan dans le cadre d’un partenariat public-privé plutôt que d’un projet entièrement public, (ii) une évaluation de l’incidence du plan sur les émissions de gaz à effet de serre des centrales de chauffage et de refroidissement; b) pour chaque étude en a), quels sont les détails, y compris (i) les dates, (ii) les titres, (iii) les numéros de référence, (iv) l’analyse de l’optimisation des ressources, (v) les paramètres utilisés pour évaluer les avantages de recourir à un contrat public-privé; c) quelles sont les conséquences de cette privatisation en ce qui concerne (i) le nombre d’emplois publics requis pour l’entretien et le fonctionnement des centrales de chauffage et de refroidissement, (ii) la fiabilité des centrales de chauffage et de refroidissement, particulièrement en cas de panne de courant prolongée et lorsque des réparations d’urgence sont requises, (iii) la sécurité des sites et les répercussions en matière de sécurité pour les édifices reliés aux centrales de chauffage et de refroidissement; d) de quelles façons les syndicats du secteur public concernés ont-ils été informés du plan, y compris (i) les dates, (ii) le processus de consultation, (iii) le calendrier de participation; e) de quelles façons les commentaires des syndicats du secteur public concernés ont-ils été pris en compte dans la décision de mettre le plan en œuvre; f) de quelles façons les syndicats du secteur public associés ont-ils été informés de la décision finale; g) quels sont les incidences et les changements prévus pour (i) l’infrastructure municipale, (ii) le reste du système à l’extérieur des centrales de chauffage et de refroidissement proprement dites?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 2148 --
M. Daniel Blaikie:
En ce qui concerne le document « Affectations des crédits centraux du Conseil du Trésor pour le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) 2018-2019 », publié en ligne: a) pour chaque affectation au titre du « Crédit 25 – Report du budget de fonctionnement » et du « Crédit 35 – Report du budget des dépenses en capital » à une « organisation » donnée, quelle était l’« autorisation » correspondante; b) pourquoi les autorisations pour chaque affectation au titre du « Crédit 5 – Dépenses éventuelles du gouvernement » et du « Crédit 40 – Exécution du budget » sont-elles énumérées de façon proactive, mais pas les affectations au titre du « Crédit 25 – Report du budget de fonctionnement » et du « Crédit 35 – Report du budget des dépenses en capital »?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)
Collapse
8555-421-2030 Trans Mountain pipeline8555-421-2031 Infrastructure projects8555-421-2032 Cyberattacks8555-421-2033 Communications with the bo ...8555-421-2034 Elementary and Secondary E ...8555-421-2036 Recipients of the Canada C ...8555-421-2042 Unofficial ports of entry ...8555-421-2043 Cannabis licences8555-421-2045 Office of the Commissioner ...8555-421-2046 Prison Needle Exchange Program8555-421-2047 Infrastructure projects in ... ...Show all topics
View François-Philippe Champagne Profile
Lib. (QC)
moved that Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures, be read the third time and passed.
propose que le projet de loi C-86, Loi no 2 portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février 2018 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures, soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
Collapse
View Patty Hajdu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2018-11-21 16:26 [p.23682]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the finance minister has demonstrated that he can do two things at one time. He can give a speech while adding almost a million dollars to our national debt, in the same half-hour. I congratulate the minister, and we know that Canadians will get the bill for that new debt.
Our government has told us, under the leadership of this Prime Minister, that budgets balance themselves. He predicted that this self-balancing budget would manifest in the year 2019, barely a month from today.
Today, the finance minister has presented a fiscal update, in which the deficit is three times the size the Liberal Party promised in the last election and in which the deficit will not only be in place next year, when it was promised to be gone, it will actually be bigger than it is right now. In fact, this economic update reports that the deficits for the next five years will all be larger than the Liberals projected just six months ago in the 2018 budget.
None of us on this side is surprised that the finance minister and the Prime Minister failed to take responsibility for these promise-shattering deficits. Like most Canadians, we have come to accept that these Liberals never take responsibility for anything, but what is startling about this particular statement is that they just go on doing more and more damage to the fiscal situation of this country, without any concern or hesitation.
What we learned in this document that we did not already know is that not only do the Liberals break their promise, not only will they fail to balance the budget next year as they said, but they now admit that under their plan the budget will never be balanced. There is no time period into the future when they are even committing to returning to a situation where the debt stops growing. That is effectively the election platform they are running on today, that there will be deficits forever and that there could never be an occasion where the government would live within its means.
These two gentlemen of great privilege have inherited enormous fortune: balanced budgets from the previous government; booming U.S. and world economies; a roaring housing sector in Vancouver and Toronto, which has poured more revenue into government coffers; record low interest rates, which make debt more affordable temporarily. All of these factors are out of the government's control but have, through the goddess Fortuna, rained money on the current government, $20 billion of additional revenue, I am pleased to report to the House.
The Prime Minister took that $20 billion and did the responsible thing. He put it against our national debt. He saved it up for a rainy day. He reinforced our foundation against forthcoming storms. I am kidding. He blew every single penny of it, and it was not enough. On top of that windfall, he had to spend $20 billion more.
We are told to take comfort in the debt-to-GDP ratio. All ratios have numerators and denominators. With the Prime Minister lecturing us all about the need to teach us all in the House, as his pupils, he should actually know that. The reality is that the only way for that debt-to-GDP ratio to decline is if inflation and GDP are constantly going up. I just pointed to the factors that the government admits have led to the windfall of revenue before us. That can only continue as long as the world factors, which are out of the government's control, continue on at this pace.
In other words, if a crisis of any kind, another international financial recession, a massive problem with international security, a natural disaster or any other such kind of difficulty, led to the compression of the denominator, then we would face a crisis in the nation's finances. In that crisis, the Liberal government, if it were to keep its promise, something that none of us believe it would ever consider doing, would then be in a position where it would have to raise taxes or cut spending at a time when the economy needs the opposite. Therefore, the Liberals are putting our future in a reckless state of danger by spending our tomorrow on their today.
The second consequence of these growing deficits is this. When governments spend more than they have, they compete for scarce goods and services, which drives up inflation, making the cost of living more and more expensive. We have seen inflation reach nearly 3%, the upper end of the Bank of Canada's range of acceptable levels of consumer price index increases. That is in part, I believe, because the current government is overspending, increasing demand with unnecessary government spending, pouring money into the purchase of the same goods and services that Canadians have to compete for.
Furthermore, when governments borrow, they have to sell bonds. When those bondholders purchase the bond, they get interest in return for it. Why would they lend money to a Canadian homeowner for 2.5% when a rapidly borrowing government will give them 2.75% or 3%? The answer is they would not. That is the reality of the credit markets. When governments borrow, they compete with Canadian consumers and homeowners and drive up the cost of interest on those same people. In other words, while Canadians face record household debt, the government's insatiable appetite for debt is actually making that problem worse, not just in the future but here in the present.
Speaking of the future, we all know that debt today means higher taxes tomorrow. The Parliamentary Budget Officer has indicated that the cost of borrowing for the Government of Canada will rise by two-thirds, to almost $40 billion, over the next four to five years. That is almost as much as we transfer to the provinces to fund our entire health care transfer. In today's update, the government admits that the cost of borrowing is going up. For the first half-year, the increase in the borrowing cost has been 14.3%. That is the combined result of growing deficits and higher interest rates. In other words, at this pace, there will be a massive wealth transfer from working-class Canadians, who will pay higher taxes so that wealthy bondholders and bankers can collect more interest. Even socialist economists recognize that interest on national debt represents a wealth transfer from the working class to the wealthy, because those who own bonds are those who can afford to buy them. One cannot lend money if one does not have money. Therefore, those with money benefit when governments go out and borrow. Instead of the government favouring the have-nots, it once again favours the have-yachts, something we have come to expect from it for a very long time.
We were told that this economic update was going to respond to the attempt by the U.S. President to take our money, business and jobs. So far, the Prime Minister has been prepared to help the President in all of those objectives. His carbon tax, his decision to block pipelines and his massive regulatory state that prevents businesses from functioning here in Canada have driven money out of our country. Canadian investment in the U.S. is up two-thirds and U.S. investment in Canada is down by half, and when money leaves, jobs leave.
A senior at the Business Council of Canada says that the result of this imbalance could lead to half a million jobs lost in this country. What is the government's response to that? Liberals tell us they are going to be bringing forward something called the centre for regulatory innovation. I think that for most people who have dealt with the red tape the government has put forward, the last thing they want to see is more regulatory innovation because so far, that regulatory innovation has meant blocking the northern gateway pipeline. They came up with innovative ways to make it impossible for Trans Canada to build the energy east pipeline. Of course, their most innovative stroke of genius has been to drive Kinder Morgan out of this country by giving them $4 billion of Canadian tax money in order to buy a 65-year-old pipeline that we already had, money that the Texas oil company is now using to build pipelines in the United States of America.
When the Prime Minister took office, three of the world's most respected pipeline companies were ready to put shovels in the ground. Kinder Morgan was going to build Trans Mountain. Enbridge was going to build northern gateway and Trans Canada was going to build energy east. They had the financial commitments, the applications in and they were ready to go and all three of those companies have now left. What does the government offer? A centre for regulatory innovation.
However, that is not all. I should give the Liberals credit for another very exciting announcement they have made in regard to regulation. They are going to make the building code available to all Canadians for free and just in time for Christmas. That is if Canada Post is not on strike and unable to deliver the building code to those Canadians who are anxiously waiting to receive it.
That is the plan that the Liberals have to unwind the massive regulatory obstacles that have driven our oil, our money, our businesses and our jobs right into the arms of Donald Trump and nothing in this announcement today will reverse that direction. In fact, the government has backed down on NAFTA, giving President Trump everything he asked for and getting nothing in return that we did not already have.
We on this side of the House will stand up for the common sense of the common people, the people who understand that budgets do not balance themselves because those people, unlike our leader, have actually had to balance a household budget. A future Conservative government would recognize that we cannot spend what we do not have and we cannot borrow our way out of debt.
I conclude today by challenging the government. I know how painful it is for the Liberals to hear the truth, the painful truth from which they have for so long tried to turn away their eyes. Unfortunately, they have to face up to the fact that they shattered their promise to balance the budget next year, they have built up massive new debt not only for future generations, but for present-day Canadians, the cost of government is driving up the cost of living and that is leading to a serious crunch on the backs of everyday Canadians, Canadians who know what it is like to live within their means.
This is why a Conservative government will make sure that the budget will be balanced in the medium term, to deal with the massive deficits accumulated by the Liberal government and previous governments.
The Conservatives recognize that Canadians work hard for their money and they must balance their own budgets. As a government, we will help them and will not make things harder for them, like the current government is doing.
As the official opposition, we are calling on the government to meet Canadians' demands, tell them how the budget will be balanced, create a plan to do so, and lower taxes so that Canadians can keep the money they earned.
We will put forward a government in the future that will stand with those who know how to balance a budget, because they do so in their own households and they expect the very same of the Government of Canada. Under a Conservative government, they will get no less.
Monsieur le Président, le ministre des Finances a montré qu'il était capable de faire deux choses en même temps. Il peut faire un discours tout en ajoutant près d'un million de dollars à la dette nationale, tout ça en une demi-heure. Je le félicite, mais nous savons que ce sont les Canadiens qui devront éponger cette nouvelle dette.
Le gouvernement, sous la gouverne du premier ministre actuel, nous a dit que les budgets s'équilibrent d'eux-mêmes. Il avait prédit que ce budget autoéquilibré apparaîtrait soudainement en 2019, soit dans à peine un mois.
Aujourd'hui, le ministre des Finances a présenté une mise à jour économique dans laquelle on constate un déficit trois fois plus important que celui promis par le Parti libéral lors de la dernière campagne électorale, un déficit qui, en plus d'être encore là l'année prochaine, alors qu'on nous avait promis qu'il aurait disparu, sera encore plus grand qu'il ne l'est aujourd'hui. D'ailleurs, cette mise à jour économique montre que les déficits des cinq prochaines années seront plus importants que ceux qu'avaient prévus les libéraux il y a à peine six mois dans le budget de 2018.
Personne de ce côté-ci n'est surpris que ni le ministre des Finances ni le premier ministre n'aient accepté la responsabilité des déficits qui ont brisé leurs promesses. Comme la plupart des Canadiens, nous nous sommes résignés à accepter que les libéraux ne prennent jamais leurs responsabilités, mais, ce qui est choquant dans l'énoncé d'aujourd'hui, c'est qu'ils vont continuer à aggraver la situation financière du pays inconsidérément et sans la moindre hésitation.
Ce que ce document nous a appris, c'est que, en plus de ne pas respecter leurs promesses et de ne pas équilibrer le budget à partir de l'année prochaine, les libéraux reconnaissent maintenant que leur plan fera en sorte que le budget ne sera jamais plus équilibré. Ils ne prévoient aucune échéance pour un retour à une situation où la dette cessera de croître. Dans les faits, c'est la plateforme électorale qu'ils présentent aujourd'hui: il y aura des déficits ad vitam aeternam et jamais plus le gouvernement ne pourra dépenser selon ses moyens.
Ces deux hommes jouissant de grands privilèges ont hérité d'une énorme fortune: des budgets équilibrés du gouvernement précédent; une économie américaine et mondiale en plein essor; un secteur immobilier florissant à Vancouver et à Toronto, qui a permis au gouvernement d'engranger encore plus de recettes; des taux d'intérêt plus bas que jamais, ce qui, temporairement, rend l'endettement plus abordable. Tous ces facteurs échappent au contrôle du gouvernement, mais, grâce à la déesse Fortune, je suis heureux de signaler à la Chambre qu'ils ont permis au gouvernement d'encaisser des recettes supplémentaires de 20 milliards de dollars.
Le premier ministre a agi de façon responsable avec cette somme. Il l'a utilisée pour éponger une partie de la dette nationale. Il l'a mise de côté en prévision de périodes difficiles. Il a renforcé les bases financières du pays pour lui permettre d'affronter de futures tourmentes économiques. Je plaisante. Il a totalement dilapidé cette somme, mais ce n'était pas suffisant. Outre cette manne, il a dépensé 20 milliards de dollars supplémentaires.
On tente de nous rassurer en parlant du ratio dette-PIB. Tous les ratios ont des numérateurs et des dénominateurs. Le premier ministre devrait savoir cela, puisqu'il ne rate jamais une occasion de faire la leçon aux députés, qui sont ses élèves. La réalité, c'est que le ratio dette-PIB continuera de baisser uniquement si le taux d'inflation et le PIB continuent d'augmenter. Je viens de souligner les facteurs qui, de l'aveu même du gouvernement, ont généré les immenses recettes actuelles. Cette situation ne pourra se poursuivre que si les facteurs mondiaux, qui sont indépendants de la volonté du gouvernement, continuent d'engendrer des résultats positifs au rythme actuel.
Autrement dit, si une crise quelconque, notamment une autre récession mondiale, un énorme problème lié à la sécurité internationale, une catastrophe naturelle ou un autre problème similaire, entraînait la compression du dénominateur, les finances publiques se retrouveraient en crise. Si le gouvernement libéral voulait respecter sa promesse pendant une telle crise — ce que personne d'entre nous ne croit qu'il envisagerait de faire —, il serait obligé d'augmenter les impôts ou de réduire les dépenses à un moment où l'économie a besoin de l'inverse. Les libéraux mettent donc notre avenir en péril de façon cavalière en dépensant aujourd'hui l'argent de demain.
Les déficits qui ne cessent de croître ont une autre conséquence. Lorsque les gouvernements dépensent plus que ce qu'ils possèdent, ils font concurrence pour les maigres produits et services, ce qui entraîne une hausse du taux d'inflation et du coût de la vie. L'inflation a grimpé à près de 3 %, taux qui, selon la Banque du Canada correspond à la limite supérieure de la fourchette des hausses acceptables de l'indice des prix à la consommation. Je crois que cette hausse s'explique en partie du fait que le gouvernement actuel dépense de façon excessive, augmente la demande en dépensant inutilement et achète les mêmes produits et services pour lesquels les Canadiens doivent lui livrer concurrence.
De plus, lorsque les gouvernements empruntent, ils doivent vendre des obligations. Lorsque les créanciers obligataires achètent ces obligations, ils touchent des intérêts en contrepartie. Pourquoi prêteraient-ils de l'argent à un Canadien propriétaire d'une maison à un taux d'intérêt de 2,5 % quand un gouvernement qui effectue rapidement des emprunts leur versera 2,75 % ou 3 % d'intérêt? Ils ne le feraient pas. Voilà la réalité du marché du crédit. Lorsque les gouvernements empruntent, ils entrent en concurrence avec les consommateurs et les propriétaires de maison du Canada et font grimper les taux d'intérêt. Autrement dit, alors que les ménages canadiens sont confrontés à un endettement record, l'appétit insatiable du gouvernement pour les dettes aggrave le problème non seulement pour les générations futures, mais aussi pour la génération actuelle.
Parlant d'avenir, nous savons tous que la dette d'aujourd'hui signifie une augmentation des impôts pour demain. Le directeur parlementaire du budget a indiqué que le coût d'emprunt pour le gouvernement du Canada augmentera de deux tiers, à près de 40 milliards de dollars, au cours des quatre à cinq prochaines années. C'est presque autant que le montant des transferts aux provinces pour financer le système de soins de santé. Au premier semestre, le coût d'emprunt a augmenté de 14,3 %. C'est le résultat combiné de l'augmentation des déficits et des taux d'intérêt. À ce rythme, il y aura un énorme transfert de richesse: les travailleurs canadiens paieront davantage d'impôt et les riches créanciers obligataires et les banques toucheront davantage d'intérêts. Même les économistes socialistes admettent que l'intérêt sur la dette nationale constitue un transfert de richesse de la classe ouvrière vers les riches, car les détenteurs d'obligations sont ceux qui peuvent se permettre d'en acheter. On ne peut pas prêter de l'argent lorsque l'on n'en a pas. En conséquence, ce sont les riches qui profitent des emprunts des gouvernements. Au lieu de favoriser ceux qui n'ont rien, le gouvernement favorise encore une fois ceux qui ont tout, pratique à laquelle nous avons appris à nous attendre depuis très longtemps.
Le gouvernement a dit que cette mise à jour économique serait la réponse à la tentative du président américain de s'emparer de notre argent, de nos entreprises et de nos emplois. Pour l'instant, le premier ministre s'est montré disposé à aider le président à atteindre tous ses objectifs. La taxe sur le carbone, la décision de bloquer les projets d'oléoducs et la lourdeur de la réglementation étatique, qui empêche les entreprises de fonctionner au Canada, ont fait fuir les investissements de notre pays. Les investissements canadiens aux États-Unis ont augmenté de deux tiers, alors que les investissements étatsuniens au Canada ont diminué de moitié. Or, quand l'argent s'en va, les emplois suivent.
Un représentant du Conseil canadien des affaires a affirmé que ce déséquilibre pourrait entraîner la disparition d'un demi-million d'emplois au pays. Comment le gouvernement réagit-il à une telle éventualité? Il nous dit qu'il va établir un centre d'innovation en matière de réglementation. Plus d'innovation en matière de réglementation, voilà bien la dernière chose que veulent les personnes qui ont subi les lourdeurs administratives imposées par le gouvernement, lourdeurs qui ont mis fin au projet de pipeline Northern Gateway. Les libéraux ont trouvé des façons novatrices d'empêcher Trans Canada de bâtir l'oléoduc Énergie Est. Évidemment, l'éclair de génie le plus novateur qu'ils aient eu fut de pousser Kinder Morgan à quitter le pays en lui donnant 4 milliards de dollars de l'argent des contribuables pour l'achat d'un pipeline vieux de 65 ans que nous avions déjà. L'entreprise pétrolière texane se sert maintenant de cet argent pour bâtir des pipelines aux États-Unis.
Quand le premier ministre est arrivé au pouvoir, trois des sociétés de pipelines les plus respectées du monde étaient prêtes à démarrer des projets. Kinder Morgan allait bâtir l'oléoduc Trans Mountain, Enbridge allait réaliser le projet Northern Gateway et Trans Canada allait concrétiser le projet Énergie Est. Ces entreprises avaient pris des engagements financiers et soumis des demandes. Elles étaient prêtes. Maintenant, elles sont parties toutes les trois. Que propose le gouvernement? Il propose de créer un centre d'innovation en matière de réglementation.
Toutefois, ce n'est pas tout. Je dois donner aux libéraux le mérite d'une autre annonce enthousiasmante concernant la réglementation. Ils vont mettre le Code du bâtiment à la disposition de tous les Canadiens gratuitement, juste à temps pour Noël, à condition que Postes Canada ne soit pas en grève et puisse livrer le Code du bâtiment aux Canadiens qui sont impatients de le recevoir.
C'est le plan de libéraux pour aplanir les gigantesques obstacles réglementaires qui poussent notre pétrole, notre argent, nos entreprises et nos emplois directement dans les bras de Donald Trump, et rien dans l'annonce d'aujourd'hui ne renversera cette tendance. Pour tout dire, le gouvernement a reculé sur l'ALENA, donnant au président Trump tout ce qu'il demandait sans rien obtenir en échange que nous n'avions pas déjà.
De ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous défendrons le bon sens des gens ordinaires, les gens qui savent que les budgets ne s'équilibrent pas tout seuls parce que, contrairement au premier ministre, ils ont déjà eu à équilibrer un budget familial. Un futur gouvernement conservateur reconnaîtrait que nous ne pouvons pas dépenser l'argent que nous n'avons pas et que nous ne pouvons pas rembourser une dette en empruntant constamment.
Je conclus aujourd'hui en interpellant le gouvernement. Je sais à quel point il est pénible pour les libéraux d'entendre la vérité, la dure vérité qu'ils essaient depuis longtemps de ne pas voir. Malheureusement, ils doivent reconnaître qu'ils ont manqué à leur promesse d'équilibrer le budget l'année prochaine. Ils ont augmenté considérablement la dette non seulement pour les générations futures, mais pour les Canadiens d'aujourd'hui. Les coûts du gouvernement font grimper le coût de la vie, et cela nous met dans une très mauvaise position, au détriment des Canadiens ordinaires, qui eux, savent ce que c'est que de vivre selon ses moyens.
C'est la raison pour laquelle un gouvernement conservateur va faire en sorte que le budget sera équilibré à moyen terme, afin de régler les énormes déficits que le gouvernement libéral et les gouvernements précédents ont créés.
Nous, les conservateurs, reconnaissons que les Canadiens travaillent fort pour gagner leur argent et que les Canadiens doivent équilibrer leur budget. Comme gouvernement, nous allons les aider et nous n'allons pas alourdir leur fardeau, comme le fait le gouvernement actuel.
Au nom de l'opposition officielle, nous appelons le gouvernement à répondre enfin aux revendications des Canadiens, à leur dire comment le budget sera équilibré, à fournir un plan pour le faire et à réduire les taxes et les impôts pour que les Canadiens puissent garder dans leurs poches l'argent qu'ils ont gagné.
Nous formerons un gouvernement solidaire des gens qui savent comment équilibrer un budget parce qu'ils le font personnellement chez eux. Ces gens attendent du gouvernement du Canada qu'il fasse la même chose. Un gouvernement formé par le Parti conservateur répondra à leurs attentes.
Collapse
View Lisa Raitt Profile
CPC (ON)
View Lisa Raitt Profile
2018-10-16 10:32 [p.22418]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the minister's work on this matter, and I very much appreciate all the work that our shadow minister also accomplished in this matter.
I am very happy to announce that we will be supporting the government's response, predominantly because the amendments will strengthen the legislation to prevent workplace violence or harassment. Combatting harassment is a pressing need in our Parliament today. Sexual misconduct and sexual harassment have no place in Canadian society, especially within our political system.
In January of this year, when introducing the legislation, the minister herself said:
Parliament Hill features distinct power imbalances, which perpetuates a culture where people with a lot of power and prestige can use and have used that power to victimize the people who work so hard for us. It is a culture where people who are victims of harassment or sexual violence do not feel safe to bring those complaints forward. It is a place where these types of behaviours, abusive and harmful, are accepted and minimized and ignored.
I take it that that is the motivation and the reasoning for the legislation to be introduced and where we are today in finalizing the legislation.
Those are incredibly profound words. They are incredibly disturbing words to be said by a minister, because it is talking about our workplace as members of Parliament. When I reflect on it, the fact is that it can be so easy for many of us as members to initially recoil from the language, saying that we are not all like that, and I do believe that.
At the very beginning, I do think it is important to remember that the collective reputation of all of us becomes damaged when we allow this kind of unacceptable behaviour and the allegations to be made without procedures in place for the complaints to be dealt with.
Not all of us are partaking in the actions that have been alleged against many of the members. Indeed, for the most part, we all do our work, and we all respect and truly appreciate the work that our staff members do for us. However, it has come to our attention through a series of incidents that this needed to be looked at.
I am going to take the House through a little retrospective about my experience with respect the issues surrounding sexual harassment, sexual violence and bullying in the workplace over the next couple of minutes. I hope to inform the House that this is not a unique issue. This is not something we have not tackled before in other industries. This is something that is timely now. However, we can take lessons from other places in order to ensure that we get to the right end result. I will conclude by talking about relevant recent examples, which I believe put in jeopardy the actual implementation of this act in a fair and fulsome way.
I have been working in male-dominated fields for most of my life. What I understand and what I have seen in each of these fields is a similar evolution when it comes to bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct in the workplace.
First of all, we need a simple awareness that certain language and actions are unacceptable. Sometimes people think that they are just telling a joke or are just saying something funny. Sometimes they are saying, “Well, I thought she was appreciative of what I was saying to her, or him.”
The reality is that there has to be an awareness made that not everybody thinks the same way and not everybody takes actions in the same way. That is the first step: awareness.
The second step is training and education, where we go beyond the awareness of the issue and the need to amend behaviour to being shown the way, through training and education, of how one should behave appropriately. I am very pleased to report that we have done that collectively as Parliament. We have done that as members. We all sat through appropriate training and education. I commend the committee and the House of Commons for ensuring that we did all do this, because I believe that took us to the next step.
What we see today in the government legislation is a process. What many will say is that in order for complaints to come forward, in order to make sure that the most egregious issues are being dealt with, there needs to be a structure in place, a place where individuals could go and feel comfortable and confident in being able to enumerate their complaints, with the hope of getting some kind of action.
The final and most important part is that justice is seen to be delivered either in the case where an application or a complaint is shown not to be valid or, where a complaint is shown to be valid, that there is some kind of punishment, that there is some kind of activity that discourages this going to the future.
In order for this legislation to truly be accepted and believed as something that is going to be helpful in our culture, justice has to be seen to be delivered in the implementation. While we are talking about one part of it today in the process, we should always be mindful as members of Parliament that the work has not been finished by any means. This is not a time for a victory lap and I would not assume that things will go smoothly, but I know from all sides of the House that we will be definitely working to ensure that justice will be seen to be delivered in the cases that come forward.
In the 1980s, I was in the field of chemistry. My undergraduate degree was from St. Francis Xavier University. I did an honours degree in physical chemistry, which is not an area where there would be a lot of women. Ironically enough, we were fifty-fifty. It was a small class of six, three men and three women, but we were fifty-fifty in terms of gender balance. While in the eighties StFX was known as a great partying school and it is very proud of that, we did not oftentimes discuss or we were not even aware of the difficulties around sexual harassment and sexual violence.
I often wonder whether the issue did not come home to us in our small faculty because of the gender balance in the faculty. We had no discussion of the concepts. We had no issues that I knew of and we kind of blindly went through and went off to our next levels in life. After graduation, the six of us ended up going into different fields. Some of us continued in grad studies and some of us went to professional school. I went on to grad school to study biochemical toxicology at the University of Guelph and the University of Waterloo, where my eyes were opened to the fact that with gender disparity did come unique difficulties.
I noticed very clearly that women who were faculty were ignored in the mailroom. They were looked down upon for their academic abilities, they were overlooked and shouted down at faculty meetings, and they were not necessarily given their space to come up with their ideas in the field of chemistry. I took all that to heart in the back of my mind determining whether this was a field I wanted to pursue. The reality is that what we see really does impact what we believe and what our decisions are going to be. There were not very many women in the faculty of chemistry at the time and very few role models to look up to, and very few shows of success that we could aspire to in terms of staying in that chosen field.
The good part about it that I was a terrible chemist, so it is not a great loss to the field of chemistry that I ended up not pursuing that field. Academically, it may have been made apparent to me that I was not going to continue to my Ph.D. but certainly in the back of my mind it did come into play, whether it was going to be a place where I would feel validated and listened to. It was not necessarily about wanting to not be harassed; it was about not being overlooked, bullied or put down, all of those insidious things that can happen.
Maybe more women in grad school in the sciences will make a difference, but putting the pressure on women in science all the time that we have to go into science and do better because if we do better then everything will be better is a complete fallacy. What women who choose to go into science need is good structure and to see that results are delivered when they have the right structure.
A lot of times when we see someone touting gender parity within this committee or that committee, or this faculty or that faculty, it is of interest, but that is not the point. The point of it all is whether or not there is a real institutional structure to recognize the value of each individual within that faculty regardless of their gender, taking the gender outside of the box in terms of academic abilities.
Therefore, I am not here to say today that if we have more women in politics it is going to get better, because I am not convinced it will. That is a nice marketing phrase, but I do not believe it is a solution to the real situations and issues that we have in different fields where women may not feel they are welcome and where they may not feel they can have a career.
Not having had enough of a male-dominated area, I decided to go to law school. Law school is very different. It was very gender balanced. Indeed, in my first year at law school, in the incoming class at Osgoode, there were more women than men. We were definitely moving the dial in terms of the people studying there. Again, it was a wonderful facility, a wonderful space, where we did not feel there were any differences with respect to gender. We had a female dean who was extremely effective, and wonderful courses taught by both men and women. We were able to choose which direction we wanted to go in. In that space and time, I did not feel there were any difficulties around gender-based violence or gender-based discrimination, although there was, at the time, definitely a debate and discussion about whether a member of the faculty had been overlooked. Therefore, it was an issue that was circulating, but it certainly did not percolate to where our class was.
However, law firms are different. In 1998, after being called to the bar and doing some time at another summer job, I ended up articling and being placed at law firms. There, one could see that there was a real difference. That is where the stratification started to happen and where one could see that power imbalance that I spoke of in my opening remarks.
In 2000, there was an absolutely outrageous event in downtown Toronto of alleged sexual misconduct that really brought the issue of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct in the legal field in Toronto to the fore. Without getting into all of the gory details at the time, a senior partner was accused of sexual misconduct toward several female lawyers in a public bar. It was something that could not be swept under the rug because so many people were involved, so many people saw what happened and so many people reported what had happened. Therefore, it was an issue that the law firm of the time had to deal with, and it dealt with it very strongly. It removed the partner from that firm and made sure from that point forward there was serious education, awareness, and training within the company. I bring that up because I believe, in part, that it created a greater awareness among many of the downtown companies that perhaps had not gotten on the earlier bandwagon of dealing with sexual harassment or sexual violence in the workplace.
I was working at the Toronto port authority at the time. I was its general counsel, and I decided to try to distinguish where we lacked policies in the workplace with respect to women and men and power. The organization had been around for about 75 years by that time, and it had no maternity leave policy. I guess no women worked at the port authority for 75 years. One of my first jobs was to draft the policy, which I drafted so that it was gender neutral. We became one of the first places where our male firefighters were grateful to take some parental leave as well when their partner was pregnant and after giving birth. After what had happened with the alleged misconduct in Toronto, it became almost imperative at that point in time that boards made sure they had appropriate policies in place to deal with issues that could come up in the workplace. With 100 employees, 90% of them men, we undertook the process of bringing people to an awareness of the issues, educating and training them, setting up a process, and finally showing that, if complaints came forward, there would be justice. I wish I could say it was easy, because it really was not easy.
When people start talking about something like sexual violence, sexual misconduct, harassment and bullying in the workplace, initially there is a great tendency for people to say, “That is not me; I am not like that; why are you accusing; why do I have to go through this process?” Those are all good questions. However, it is up to the management, up to the collective group putting the policies forward and in place, to assure everyone that this is not about seeking out and trying to find people who are to blame, but rather to put in place a system to allow people to come forward so that the bad apples within the mix of 100 are sought out, and not the entire reputation of the organization being questioned.
At the end of the day, I have had 20 years in this space of trying to bring policies into play to deal with these issues. I know I have said it before, but I want to say it again, because if we underpin everything that we are attempting to do within Parliament to try to protect everyone here, if we say that we are doing it, first, to raise awareness, second, to train and educate, third, to have a solid process in place and to have justice be seen to be done, then we are on the right path.
There are some high-profile cases that took place within our parliamentary family in 2018, as well as in the legal community in Toronto in 2000, that have brought us to this place today where we are discussing this legislation. The United Kingdom had the same issue. A study was prompted by a BBC investigative report about bullying and harassment in the U.K. House of Commons. As luck would have it, that report was released yesterday at their House of Commons. How they have approached their issues are different from how we have approached ours. We have approached this by jumping right into the legislative side of it and trying to figure out the best process, because we think that if we put that process in place, it is going to fix everything. A different approach was taken by the U.K. House of Commons. It set up an independent inquiry, run by a separate person, who then had permission to interview widely the people who had complaints, to talk to all MPs, and to develop recommendations. One of the recommendations was that they needed to take the time to get it right. It is a long report, over 155 pages long. However, it is well worth reading, not for the salacious details of what happened to certain individuals or the claims made against others, but to give us more colour to the point of what could have happened or what could be happening if we do not deal with our culture in the appropriate way.
The number one issue that arose out of it was that there were obviously ineffective mechanisms for dealing with what was happening in the United Kingdom House of Commons. They focused on bullying, harassment and sexual harassment. However, what is very interesting is that they are calling for a fundamental change to rebuild trust and restore confidence, the point being that both men and women are making allegations of bullying and harassment within the U.K. House of Commons and that it should be taken seriously and dealt with in the most substantive way possible.
The most controversial part of the report, which is being covered by the U.K. media, is the last three paragraphs, which talk about who can best effect change. I am going to read them into the record because I think they give us a lot to think about.
This is how she concluded her report. She states:
If approached for advice by a constituent who was the victim of bullying or sexual harassment in their own workplace, I am confident that they would not hesitate in assisting them to take forward their complaints. I therefore hope that the recommendations I have made will receive the active support of those elected Members who will be appalled by the abusive conduct alleged against some of their number, but who will also be anxious to ensure that any process for determining disputed allegations is independent, effective and fair to both sides.
I have also referred throughout this report to systemic or institutional failings and to a collective ethos in the House that has, over the years, enabled the underlying culture to develop and to persist. Within this culture, there are a number of individuals who are regarded as bearing some personal responsibility for the criticisms made, and whose continued presence is viewed as unlikely to facilitate the necessary changes, but whom it would also be wrong for me to name, having regard to the terms of reference for this inquiry. I hope, however, that the findings in this report will enable a period of reflection in that respect in addition.
In considering how best to progress the change in culture that is accepted as essential, and how best to take forward the recommendations in this report, it may be that some individuals will want to think very carefully about whether they are the right people to press the reset button and to do what is required to deliver that change in the best interests of the House, having regard both to its reputation and its role as an employer of those who are rightly regarded as its most important resource.
It was heavy for the author of this report to come out swinging, as it were, against their House of Commons' management, but it was necessary that it be said.
One of the issues that I found very interesting when they were talked about why their culture has happened in the way it has was when they noted that it was “a culture, cascading from the top down, of deference, subservience, acquiescence and silence, in which bullying, harassment and sexual harassment have been able to thrive and have long been tolerated and concealed.” Those are all very important words that we should reflect on to ensure that we are not promoting that here.
The executive board of the U.K. House of Commons responded by saying that the report “makes difficult reading for all of us. Bullying and harassment have no place in the House of Commons and the Parliamentary Digital Service. We fully accept the need for change and, as a leadership team, are determined to learn lessons from the report. We apologize for past failings and are committed to changing our culture for the better.” That is by far the best response an executive board could possibly give to such a report, by apologizing for what has happened and vowing to move forward to do better.
As I said many times in my speech, legislation is not the end of the situation. Justice has to be seen to be done with a process that is working. Further, building on what the report said, we have to make sure that the people who will implement this are above reproach, that they absolutely do have the ability to say that they have clean hands and can help foster this changing culture.
How issues are dealt with and what is said will be watched carefully given the amount of press that we have received in the past about conduct in the House of Commons. This brings me to the uncomfortable position of talking about an incident that happened this summer.
This summer it came to the attention of the media through an online blogger that an editorial had indicated many years ago that the Prime Minister was guilty of inappropriate conduct. The writer in question wrote this many years ago. She was young; he was younger. In it she questioned whether or not it was appropriate for someone with that balance of power and fame to come in and be, in her view, inappropriate.
What I find interesting about this incident and why I talk about the culture of acquiescence and deference and subservience is the fact that this story had been around for months. Many people knew about the story but no one had a response or an answer to what actually happened. So, the story grew in strength and in importance, and the question then becomes, are there more rumours around? That does not do anything to help us determine whether or not the appropriate process is in place to deal with these kinds of allegations and that justice will be seen to be done.
The media was well aware of the incident. It knew what the editorial said. It refused to run with it. The Prime Minister over a series of many weeks ended up coming out with a final statement saying that the individual in response did not remember the situation as he remembered it, and that in these situations everyone remembers things differently. It was an unfortunate response and I will tell the House why.
It was not at all the full-throated apology made by the leadership team at the U.K. House of Commons. It was an explanation and an excuse. The difficulty with that is that in the midst of our introducing this legislation and debating and voting on it, and knowing the importance of showing an example to the rest of the country in dealing with these matters, the individual with the most power in the country did not do what would be expected, which was to apologize and move on. For me, that is an unravelling in the most basic form of what we can expect for this legislation to do for us going forward.
The difficulty as well is that I am protected in the House of Commons for saying things like this. I do not know if anybody is watching this speech right now, but I will definitely be noted in social media for once again bringing up this allegation of the Prime Minister and his groping that had been discussed all summer. I hope the House understands that what I am trying to convey in more than a 30-second sound bite is the fact that it does matter. It is not about a victim and it is not about whether or not something did happen; it is an inappropriate response to a real allegation that should show a path forward for other people to feel that they would get justice if they came forward with a complaint in a process against somebody of high power.
We lost an opportunity for the Prime Minister to show a path to making sure that we would have teeth and some kind of truth behind this legislation. It is a missed opportunity. I dwell on it a lot because, at the end of the day, as a woman of 30 years in this field, it does make me sad that a simple apology and acknowledgement would have gone a longer way.
We have not talked a lot about bullying. Bullying is a great difficulty as well within the House of Commons. It is a great difficulty in the workplace. For a period of time, I enjoyed being the minister of labour and we saw very clearly that sometimes overt bullying leads to violent conclusions, and we would never want that to happen. I am not suggesting that would happen here, but I am suggesting that bullying really does not have a place in any forum of discourse, including in this chamber. I would submit it is recognized in the Westminster model that bullying is not accepted, because we have this notion of unparliamentary language. In this space and this time, every member is honourable, and it is not allowed to besmirch the honour of a member. We are all equal and we are treated as such, and it is very important to ensure that we show our honourability at all times. However, this is a protected space for that. This is where this can happen.
I want to bring up two incidents in the past eight months which show to me that, again, a government that seeks to implement this legislation does not walk the talk. As a result, I have a very difficult time having confidence that the Liberals are going to be able to implement this legislation so that people have confidence in it.
Earlier in the year, I was at a committee meeting, and in that committee meeting I was testing and prodding the Minister of Finance, as is my role as a deputy leader. I made sure that I was testing him on some of the underpinnings of his budget. They had to do with gender and whether or not certain things were taken into consideration. In response, the minister grew frustrated and at some point in discussing it, at the very end of our time, he indicated basically that people like me who are putting these questions towards him were neanderthals that would have to be dragged along.
First of all, it is laughable. I have been called far worse in my life. It was not a moment that I lost all of my self-esteem. It would take a lot for me to lose my self-esteem; I am a good politician. Nonetheless, knowing that he had no problem utilizing that word not only in reference to me tangentially but to my party as well shows us that the respect and honourability was not present in that moment. It is an important concept. It is an important issue for us to discuss.
The response from the media was that it was not that bad. It does not matter how bad it was. In that moment, in that time, instead of dealing with the issue and answering the question, the minister chose to use a personal slur in order to answer what was a substantive policy question. That is unacceptable. Again, can the government truly implement legislation that is dependent upon people being able to understand the importance of justice to be seen?
The last time it happened was in this chamber. It is still under consideration by the Speaker of the House, so I will say at the very beginning that, of course, we are awaiting the decision of the Speaker with respect to the use of unparliamentary language by the Prime Minister.
It was, again, on very difficult questioning, which was on the question of whether or not the Prime Minister had the power to move or cause to be moved a prisoner, Terri-Lynne McClintic, from one institution to another. The Prime Minister was asked many questions, first by my hon. colleague for Parry Sound—Muskoka and then by me. Instead of answering the issue, the Prime Minister became frustrated and annoyed and ended up calling me and the rest of our caucus ambulance chasers. An ambulance chaser is an unethical lawyer. The speaker before me was a lawyer and I was a lawyer. These things actually matter to us.
What matters more at the end of the day is the fact that the Prime Minister once again thought it was absolutely acceptable to go from discussing policy to throwing a personal slur across the floor.
One thing I will say is that those two incidents were not made in humour. Nobody was trying to be funny. These were directed. If I were a younger member of Parliament asking that question for the first time on my feet, the message I would receive is, “Be careful in asking that question because I am going to call you a name. I am going to embarrass you on television. You are going to be embarrassed in front of your constituents.” That is the impact and effect of allowing this.
I have been here for 10 years. I just celebrated my 10th anniversary with some of my other colleagues and I have grown a skin thick enough to deal with those kinds of things, but I am absolutely appalled that they would think it is acceptable to do that kind of thing.
Notice that in all of this discussion, not once have I mentioned the fact that I am a female member of Parliament, because it does not matter. Male or female, name calling in this place is recognized in our rules of procedure as being unparliamentary and it should also be held to account on the government side as much as it is on the opposition side. When we do not see laws being applied fairly, we lose our ability to believe that the law and the process will work for us.
That is the danger in this piece of legislation, that while we can have the best process in the world and we can have fantastic outlets for people to discuss, for people to have counselling, for people to go through hearings and have support, the reality at the end of the day is if justice is not seen to be done, everything we have done is for nothing. It is only through the conduct of the government that we can determine from the outside whether or not it will actually do what it set out to do.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie la ministre de son travail dans ce dossier, et je suis très reconnaissante de tout le travail que la ministre de notre cabinet fantôme a réalisé à cet égard.
Je suis très heureuse d'annoncer que nous allons appuyer la réponse du gouvernement, principalement parce que les amendements amélioreront le projet de loi de manière à prévenir la violence ou le harcèlement en milieu de travail. Il est urgent de combattre dès maintenant le harcèlement sur la Colline du Parlement. L'inconduite sexuelle et le harcèlement sexuel n'ont pas leur place dans la société canadienne, tout particulièrement dans le système politique du pays.
Lorsqu'elle a présenté le projet de loi, en janvier dernier, la ministre a déclaré ceci:
Sur la Colline du Parlement, il existe des déséquilibres de pouvoir évidents. Cette situation fait perdurer une culture dans laquelle des gens qui disposent de beaucoup de pouvoir et de prestige peuvent utiliser ces avantages pour s'en prendre à des personnes qui travaillent très fort pour leurs concitoyens. Dans cette culture, les victimes de harcèlement ou de violence sexuelle ne se sentent pas suffisamment protégées pour porter plainte contre leur agresseur. À cet endroit, les comportements abusifs et préjudiciables de ce genre sont acceptés et minimisés, et on n'en tient pas compte.
J'en déduis qu'il s'agit là du motif et du raisonnement qui expliquent la présentation du projet de loi et le fait que nous en soyons aujourd'hui à la dernière étape de l'étude.
Je trouve ces paroles incroyablement profondes, et il est perturbant de les entendre de la bouche d'une ministre, car il s'agit de notre propre milieu de travail. Quand j'y pense, force est de constater que plusieurs députés pourraient d'abord être tentés de rejeter ces propos, rappelant avec justesse que nous n'abusons pas tous de notre pouvoir.
D'entrée de jeu, je suis d'avis qu'il faut garder à l'esprit que c'est notre réputation à tous qui se retrouve entachée lorsque nous tolérons de tels comportements répréhensibles, et qu'il n'y a pas de processus en place pour traiter les plaintes.
Nous ne nous livrons pas tous aux types de comportements reprochés à certains députés. Heureusement, la plupart d'entre nous sont capables d'effectuer leur travail et de témoigner du respect et de la reconnaissance à nos employés pour leur travail. Cependant, une série d'incidents nous a permis de constater que nous devons examiner sérieusement la problématique du harcèlement.
Au cours des prochaines minutes, je présenterai un aperçu à la Chambre de mon expérience des questions entourant le harcèlement sexuel, la violence sexuelle et l'intimidation en milieu de travail. Je souhaite souligner à la Chambre qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une situation isolée. Nous nous sommes attaqués à cet enjeu dans d'autres industries. C'est aussi un sujet brûlant d'actualité. Cela dit, nous pouvons tirer des leçons d'autres secteurs afin d'obtenir les résultats voulus. Je conclurai mes remarques en parlant d'exemples récents pertinents qui, à mon avis, remettent en question la mise en oeuvre juste et complète du projet de loi.
Presque toute ma vie, j'ai travaillé dans des secteurs à prédominance masculine. Grâce à mon expérience dans chacun de ces domaines, j'ai observé une évolution similaire des mentalités par rapport à l'intimidation, au harcèlement et à l'inconduite sexuelle en milieu de travail.
D'abord, il faut tout simplement prendre conscience que certains propos et comportements sont inacceptables. Pour les gens, ce ne sont parfois que des blagues ou des façons de s'amuser. Certains se défendent ainsi: « Bien, je pensais qu'il ou elle appréciait ce que je lui disais. »
On doit tous être sensibilisés au fait que tout le monde ne pense pas de la même manière et que tout le monde n'agit pas de la même manière. La première étape, c'est cela: une prise de conscience.
La deuxième étape, c'est former et éduquer, à savoir que, une fois la prise de conscience du problème faite et la nécessité de modifier son comportement reconnue, la personne concernée doit être formée et éduquée sur la manière adéquate de se comporter. Je suis très heureuse de signaler que c'est ce que nous avons fait collectivement en tant que Parlement et personnellement en tant que députés. Nous avons tous suivi la formation nécessaire. Je félicite le comité et la Chambre des communes d'avoir fait en sorte que nous fassions tout cela, parce que cela nous a amenés à l'étape suivante.
La mesure législative gouvernementale parle, en fait, d'un processus. Beaucoup diront que, pour que des plaintes soient déposées, pour que les problèmes les plus graves soient pris en compte, il faut qu'il y ait une structure en place. Il s'agirait d'un endroit où les personnes pourraient aller et se sentiraient suffisamment à l'aise pour formuler une plainte dans l'espoir de déclencher une quelconque action.
Le dernier élément — le plus important — est qu'il y ait apparence de justice lorsqu'une demande ou une plainte est jugée irrecevable et que, lorsqu'une plainte est jugée recevable, il y ait une conséquence, que des mesures soient prises pour éviter que la situation se répète.
Pour que le projet de loi soit vraiment accepté et perçu comme une solution utile dans notre culture, il doit y avoir apparence de justice dans l'application. Bien que nous discutions aujourd'hui en partie de cette nécessité dans le processus, il faut demeurer conscients, en tant que députés, qu'il reste encore beaucoup de travail à accomplir. Il y a loin de la coupe aux lèvres et je ne crois pas que tout se déroulera sans heurts, mais je sais que les députés de tous les partis travailleront afin qu'il y ait apparence de justice dans le traitement des cas qui seront soulevés.
Dans les années 1980, je travaillais dans le domaine de la chimie. J'ai obtenu mon baccalauréat de l'Université St. Francis Xavier. C'était un baccalauréat spécialisé en chimie physique, un domaine où il y a peu de femmes. Curieusement, nous étions autant de femmes que d'hommes. Nous étions six: trois hommes et trois femmes; il y avait donc parité parfaite entre les deux sexes. Si, dans les années 1980, cette université était reconnue pour les soirées organisées par les étudiants — c'était même motif de fierté —, nous ne parlions pas souvent des problèmes liés au harcèlement et à la violence sexuels et nous n'étions pas vraiment conscients de leur existence.
Je me demande parfois si la raison pour laquelle nous n'avions pas connaissance d'un tel enjeu dans ma faculté est parce qu'il y avait une représentation égale des deux sexes dans mon groupe à cette époque. Personne ne parlait de cette notion. À ma connaissance, ce genre d'incident ne s'est jamais produit dans ma faculté, et nous sommes tous passés aux prochaines étapes de notre vie sans trop y réfléchir. Après avoir obtenu notre diplôme, nous avons tous les six choisi des domaines différents. Certains d'entre nous ont poursuivi des études supérieures, et d'autres se sont inscrits à l'école professionnelle. J'ai suivi un programme de deuxième cycle en toxicologie biochimique à l'Université de Guelph et à l'Université de Waterloo, où j'ai vraiment compris que la disparité entre les sexes pose des problèmes particuliers.
Je me suis rapidement aperçue que l'on ignorait les femmes professeures dans la salle du courrier. Elles étaient méprisées à cause de leurs aptitudes intellectuelles, elles étaient négligées et se faisaient rabaisser dans les réunions de faculté, et on ne leur donnait pas nécessairement l'espace dont elles avaient besoin pour faire valoir leurs idées dans le domaine de la chimie. J'ai pris cette affaire très au sérieux et je me suis demandé si je voulais réellement faire carrière dans ce domaine. La vérité, c'est que nos expériences personnelles influencent grandement notre opinion et les décisions que nous prenons. À cette époque, le nombre de femmes dans la faculté de chimie était très faible, et peu pouvaient servir de modèles féminins. Il y avait très peu d'exemples de réussites dont nous pouvions nous inspirer pour poursuivre dans ce domaine.
Le bon côté, c'est que j'étais une très mauvaise chimiste et que, par conséquent, ce ne fut pas une grande perte que je ne poursuive pas une carrière en chimie. Pour ce qui est de ma formation universitaire, il est possible qu'on m'ait fait comprendre que je n'allais par faire de doctorat dans ce domaine. Quoi qu'il en soit, il est certain que la piètre situation des femmes m'a effleuré l'esprit et a pesé dans la balance. Je me suis demandé si je me sentirais appréciée et écoutée. Je n'étais pas nécessairement préoccupée par le harcèlement; je voulais plutôt ne pas être ignorée, intimidée et rabaissée, autrement dit, faire l'objet d'attaques insidieuses toujours possibles.
La présence d'un plus grand nombre de femmes dans les programmes de deuxième cycle en sciences pourrait peut-être améliorer la situation. Toutefois, il est complètement fallacieux d'exercer constamment des pressions sur les femmes en leur disant qu'elles doivent se diriger vers les sciences et mieux y réussir que les hommes parce que cela leur assurera le succès sur tous les plans. Les femmes qui optent pour une carrière scientifique ont besoin d'évoluer dans un cadre solide et de voir les résultats positifs qui en découlent.
On trouve généralement intéressant d'entendre vanter les mérites de l'égalité des sexes au sein d'un comité ou d'une faculté universitaire, mais ce n'est pas vraiment l'enjeu. Il faut plutôt se demander s'il y a une véritable structure institutionnelle pour reconnaître la valeur de chaque personne au sein d'une faculté, sans égard à son sexe. Il faut faire abstraction du genre lorsqu'on évalue les aptitudes intellectuelles.
Bref, je n'affirme pas aujourd'hui que si davantage de femmes évoluaient dans la sphère politique, la situation serait meilleure. En fait, je n'en suis pas convaincue. Ce serait un bon slogan de marketing, mais je ne crois pas que ce soit une solution aux problèmes et aux enjeux auxquels les femmes sont confrontées dans des domaines où elles ne se sentent pas nécessairement bienvenues et où elles estiment ne pas pouvoir faire carrière.
N'étant pas encore lassée des secteurs dominés par les hommes, j'ai décidé de m'inscrire à la faculté de droit, un milieu très différent. C'était très paritaire. Au cours de ma première année à la faculté de droit Osgoode, il y avait plus de femmes que d'hommes dans la nouvelle cohorte. Les choses étaient certainement en train de changer pour les femmes à cet endroit. Je le répète: c'était un établissement extraordinaire, où les deux sexes étaient traités sur un pied d'égalité. La doyenne était extrêmement efficace, et les excellents cours étaient donnés tant par des hommes que par des femmes. Nous pouvions choisir le secteur dans lequel nous souhaitions nous spécialiser. À cette époque, je n'ai pas perçu de problèmes liés à la violence ou à la discrimination fondée sur le sexe. Un débat faisait toutefois rage, car on se demandait si une personne faisant partie du corps professoral avait été mise de côté. Cet enjeu faisait l'objet de discussions, mais il n'accaparait certainement pas toute l'attention dans ma classe.
Toutefois, la situation est différente dans les cabinets d'avocats. En 1998, après avoir été admise au barreau et occupé un autre emploi d'été, j'ai fait des stages dans des cabinets d'avocats. J'ai pu y constater une véritable différence. C'est là que la stratification a commencé et que je me suis aperçue du déséquilibre de pouvoir dont j'ai parlé au début de mon intervention.
En 2000, un cas absolument scandaleux d’inconduite sexuelle présumée survenu au centre-ville de Toronto a vraiment attiré l’attention sur le problème du harcèlement sexuel et de l’inconduite sexuelle dans le monde du droit à Toronto. Sans entrer dans tous les détails sordides de l’incident, un associé principal a été accusé d’inconduite sexuelle à l’endroit de plusieurs avocates dans un bar. Il était impossible de passer l’incident sous silence parce que tellement de gens étaient impliqués, avaient été témoins des faits ou les avaient rapportés. À l’époque, le cabinet d’avocats a dû régler le problème, et il l’a fait très vigoureusement. Il s’est séparé de l’associé en question et s’est assuré d’avoir dès lors un programme sérieux d’éducation, de sensibilisation et de formation au sein de l’entreprise. Je cite cet exemple parce que je crois qu’on lui doit, en partie, une plus grande sensibilisation au sein de nombreuses entreprises du centre-ville qui ne s’étaient peut-être pas encore attaquées au problème du harcèlement sexuel ou de la violence sexuelle en milieu de travail.
Je travaillais à l’Administration portuaire de Toronto à l’époque. J’y étais conseillère juridique principale et j’ai décidé de tenter de déterminer dans quels domaines nos politiques en milieu de travail étaient déficientes en ce qui concernait les femmes, les hommes et le pouvoir. L’organisme existait alors depuis environ 75 ans et il n’avait pas de politique relative au congé de maternité. Je suppose qu’aucune femme n’avait travaillé pour l’Administration portuaire en 75 ans. L’une de mes premières tâches a été de rédiger la politique, ce que j’ai fait de manière à ce qu’elle ne fasse aucune distinction entre les sexes. Nous sommes devenus l’un des premiers endroits où nos pompiers hommes étaient reconnaissants de pouvoir prendre eux aussi un congé parental pendant la grossesse et après l’accouchement de leur conjointe. Après l’affaire de l’inconduite présumée à Toronto, il était devenu presque impératif que les conseils d’administration veillent à mettre en place des politiques appropriées pour régler les problèmes susceptibles de se présenter en milieu de travail. Avec 100 employés, dont 90 % d’hommes, nous avons entrepris de sensibiliser, d’éduquer et de former tout le monde, de mettre sur pied un processus et, enfin, de montrer que si des plaintes étaient déposées, justice serait rendue. J’aimerais pouvoir dire que ce fut facile, mais ce n’est vraiment pas le cas.
Quand on commence à parler de sujets tels que la violence sexuelle, l’inconduite sexuelle, le harcèlement et l’intimidation en milieu de travail, au départ, les gens ont tendance à dire: « Ce n’est pas moi; je ne suis pas comme ça; pourquoi lancez-vous des accusations; pourquoi dois-je participer à ce processus? » Et ce sont toutes de bonnes questions. Toutefois, il revient à la direction, au collectif, de proposer des politiques et de les mettre en œuvre, d’assurer à tout le monde qu’il ne s’agit pas de se mettre à l’affût de personnes à blâmer, mais plutôt de mettre en place un système pour permettre aux gens de se manifester afin que les éléments indésirables au sein du groupe de 100 employés soient dénoncés et que la réputation de l’organisation dans son ensemble ne soit pas remise en question.
Au bout du compte, j’ai passé 20 ans à essayer de faire adopter des politiques pour régler ces problèmes. Je sais que je l’ai déjà dit, mais je tiens à le redire, parce que si nous fondons tout ce que nous tentons de faire au Parlement sur des mesures visant à protéger toutes les personnes ici présentes, si nous disons que nous le faisons en premier lieu pour augmenter la sensibilisation, en deuxième lieu pour former et éduquer et en troisième lieu pour établir un processus solide et pour que justice soit faite, nous sommes sur la bonne voie.
Quelques cas très médiatisés survenus au sein de notre famille parlementaire en 2018, de même que dans le milieu juridique à Toronto en 2000, nous ont menés à notre débat sur ce projet de loi. Le Royaume-Uni a eu le même problème. Une enquête de la BBC sur l’intimidation et le harcèlement à la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni a donné lieu à une étude. Le hasard veut que le rapport en ait été publié hier à la Chambre des communes britannique. Nous n’abordons pas les problèmes de la même façon. Nous sommes immédiatement passés du côté législatif de la question pour essayer de trouver le meilleur processus parce que nous croyons que si nous mettons en place ce processus, il va tout régler. La Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni a adopté une approche différente. Elle a lancé une enquête indépendante menée par une personne impartiale qui a été autorisée à interroger abondamment les personnes qui avaient porté plainte, à parler à tous les députés et à formuler des recommandations. L’auteure du rapport recommande ainsi de prendre le temps de bien faire les choses. C’est un long rapport de plus de 155 pages. Il vaut toutefois la peine d’être lu, non pas pour les détails salaces de ce qui est arrivé à certaines personnes ou pour les allégations à l’endroit d’autres personnes, mais pour que nous ayons une meilleure idée de ce qui aurait pu se produire ou de ce qui pourrait se produire si nous ne nous occupons pas de notre culture de la bonne façon.
Le principal problème qui est ressorti de l’enquête est que les mécanismes en place pour sanctionner les incidents qui se produisaient à la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni étaient manifestement inefficaces. L’enquête portait sur l’intimidation, le harcèlement et le harcèlement sexuel. Ce qui est très intéressant, c’est que le rapport recommande un changement fondamental pour rétablir la confiance, le raisonnement étant que des hommes comme des femmes font des allégations d’intimidation et de harcèlement à la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni et qu’il convient de prendre le problème au sérieux et de le régler le plus concrètement possible.
Les trois derniers paragraphes, qui précisent qui est le mieux placé pour changer les choses, constituent la partie la plus controversée du rapport et celle dont parlent les médias britanniques. Je vais vous les lire parce que je crois qu’ils nous donnent amplement matière à réflexion.
Voici comment elle conclut son rapport. Elle écrit:
Si un électeur qui était victime d'intimidation ou de harcèlement sexuel au travail leur demandait des conseils, je suis persuadée qu'ils n'hésiteraient pas à l'aider à porter plainte. J'ose donc espérer que les recommandations que j'ai faites recevront l'appui actif des députés, qui seront scandalisés par les comportements abusifs dont certains de leurs collègues ont été accusés, mais qui veilleront aussi à ce que tout processus visant à déterminer le résultat des allégations soit indépendant, efficace et juste envers les deux parties.
J'ai également parlé tout au long de ce rapport de lacunes institutionnelles ou systémiques, et d'une philosophie collective à la Chambre qui a permis, au cours des années, à la culture sous-jacente de violence de se développer et de persister. Or, certaines personnes sont considérées comme particulièrement responsables de cette situation et des critiques qui en découlent. Leur présence est perçue comme peu susceptible de favoriser les changements nécessaires. Ce serait une erreur de ma part de nommer ces personnes, vu le mandat qui m'a été confié pour la présente enquête. Néanmoins, j'ose espérer que les conclusions du présent rapport susciteront une période de réflexion à cet égard aussi.
Pour déterminer la meilleure façon de procéder aux changements culturels qui seront nécessaires, et la meilleure façon de mettre en oeuvre les recommandations du présent rapport, il se peut que certaines personnes veuillent se demander sérieusement si elles sont bien placées pour déclencher un renouveau et si elles sauront faire le nécessaire pour concrétiser les changements qui seront dans l'intérêt de la Chambre, en tenant compte à la fois de sa réputation et de son rôle d'employeur de ceux qui sont à juste titre considérés comme sa ressource la plus importante.
L'auteure du rapport a dû s'exprimer sans ménagement à propos de la direction de la Chambre des communes de son pays, mais ces choses devaient être dites.
Voici un passage du rapport que j'ai trouvé très intéressant à propos des raisons pour lesquelles une telle culture avait pu s'établir: « l'intimidation et le harcèlement, sexuel ou autre, ont pu se faire une place et sont tolérés et dissimulés depuis longtemps grâce à une culture de déférence, de servilité, d'acquiescement et de silence qui part d'en haut. » Voilà des propos importants auxquels nous devrions nous attarder afin de veiller à ne pas favoriser pareille culture ici.
Le comité exécutif de l'administration de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni a répondu en disant que le rapport « est une lecture difficile pour nous tous. L'intimidation et le harcèlement n'ont pas leur place ni à la Chambre des communes ni à la direction des services numériques parlementaires. Nous acceptons sans réserve qu'un changement s'impose et, en tant qu'équipe de direction, nous sommes bien déterminés à tirer des enseignements du rapport. Nous nous excusons des manquements antérieurs et nous avons bien l'intention d'améliorer notre culture. » C'est de loin la meilleure réaction que le comité exécutif pouvait avoir à l'égard d'un tel rapport: présenter des excuses pour ce qui s'est passé et s'engager à améliorer les choses.
Comme je l’ai dit maintes fois dans mon intervention, une loi ne suffit pas à mettre fin à la situation. Il faut qu’il soit visible que la justice est rendue en suivant un processus qui fonctionne. De plus, en faisant fond sur ce que le rapport dit, nous devons nous assurer que les personnes qui appliqueront la loi sont irréprochables, qu’elles sont tout à fait en mesure de dire qu’elles ont les mains propres et qu’elles peuvent contribuer à favoriser ce changement de culture.
Étant donné la couverture médiatique à laquelle nous avons eu droit dans le passé au sujet de la conduite à la Chambre des communes, on scrutera certainement la façon dont les problèmes seront réglés et ce qui se dira. Ce qui m’amène, et j’en suis gênée, à parler d’une affaire qui s’est produite cet été.
Cet été, donc, les médias ont appris par un blogueur que, d’après un éditorial paru il y a de nombreuses années, le premier ministre se serait rendu coupable d'une conduite déplacée. L’auteure de l’éditorial précisait que les faits remontaient à des années. Elle était jeune et il était encore plus jeune. Dans son article, elle se demandait s’il était approprié, pour un homme qui possède une notoriété et des pouvoirs considérables, d'avoir eu un comportement qu'elle qualifiait d'inapproprié.
Ce que je trouve intéressant, au sujet de cette affaire, et ce qui explique mon propos sur la culture d’acquiescement, de déférence et de servilité, c’est que l'histoire circule depuis des mois. Beaucoup de gens la connaissaient, mais personne n’avait de réaction ou de réponse quant à ce qui s’est vraiment passé. Donc, l’histoire a pris de l’ampleur, ce qui nous amène à nous demander s'il y a d’autres rumeurs qui circulent, mais ne nous permet pas de savoir si un mécanisme adéquat existe pour traiter ce genre d’allégations et pour que justice soit faite.
Les médias sont tout à fait au courant de cette affaire. Ils savaient ce que contenait l’éditorial. Ils ont refusé de l’utiliser. Après des semaines de tergiversations, le premier ministre a fini par publier une déclaration disant que la femme en question n’avait pas le même souvenir que lui de ce qui était arrivé et que, dans ces situations, chacun se rappelle les choses différemment. La réponse était malheureuse et je vais expliquer pourquoi à la Chambre.
Cette réponse n’avait rien à voir avec les regrets exprimés sans ambiguïté par l’équipe de dirigeants administratifs de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni. Le premier ministre a plutôt donné une explication pour se disculper. Le problème, c’est qu'alors même que le projet de loi actuel était présenté, débattu et soumis à des votes au Parlement, la personne la plus puissante au pays, qui doit être un exemple pour ses concitoyens dans ce genre d’affaires, n’a pas eu le comportement que l'on attend d'elle, c’est-à-dire présenter ses excuses et passer à autre chose. C’est à mon sens ni plus ni moins qu'aller à l’encontre de ce que nous attendons comme résultat de cette loi à l’avenir.
Le problème aussi, c’est que je suis protégée à la Chambre des communes si je tiens de tels propos. Je ne sais pas si quelqu’un regarde mon intervention actuelle, mais les médias sociaux ne manqueront certainement pas de souligner que je remets une fois de plus sur le tapis les accusations de tripotage visant le premier ministre, accusations dont il a été question tout l’été. J’espère que la Chambre comprend ce que j’essaie de dire en faisant autre chose que débiter une trentaine de secondes de phrases accrocheuses. Je suis en train de soulever une question importante. Il ne s'agit pas de parler d’une victime en particulier ou de savoir si des événements allégués ont bel et bien eu lieu. Il s’agit de dire que la réponse du premier ministre aux allégations bien réelles dont il fait l'objet n'est pas appropriée. Au lieu de donner cette réponse, il devrait montrer aux gens que, si une personne porte plainte contre quelqu’un de très puissant, elle obtiendra justice.
Le premier ministre a laissé passer une occasion de montrer que nous sommes vraiment rigoureux et que ce projet de loi est inspiré par la sincérité. C’est une occasion manquée. J’insiste beaucoup parce qu’en fin de compte, après 30 ans d’expérience dans ce domaine, je sais malheureusement qu’une simple reconnaissance et de simples excuses auraient été plus utiles.
Nous n’avons pas beaucoup parlé d’intimidation. Or, l’intimidation est aussi un grand problème à la Chambre des communes. C’est un grand problème dans les milieux de travail. J’ai été un temps ministre du Travail et nous avons vu très clairement que, parfois, des actes d’intimidation manifestes conduisent à de la violence, ce que nous ne voudrions jamais voir arriver. Je ne veux pas dire que cela arriverait ici, mais que l’intimidation n’a vraiment pas sa place lorsque des gens discutent, y compris à la Chambre. Il me semble que, dans le modèle de Westminster, l’intimidation est considérée comme inacceptable, car il inclut la notion de propos non parlementaires. Chaque député est honorable, et il n’est pas permis de ternir l’honorabilité d’un député. Nous sommes tous égaux et nous sommes tous traités comme tels. Il est très important de nous comporter en tout temps de manière honorable. Pourtant, même si le Parlement est un lieu protégé, des actes d'intimidation peuvent y être commis.
Je souhaite rappeler deux affaires survenues au cours des huit derniers mois. À mes yeux, elles montrent une fois de plus que le gouvernement qui cherche à faire adopter ce projet de loi ne prêche pas par l'exemple. J’ai donc beaucoup de mal à croire que les libéraux vont être en mesure de mettre en œuvre la loi de manière à inspirer confiance aux gens.
Il y a quelques mois, je me trouvais à une réunion de comité et, en qualité de leader adjointe, j’essayais d’interroger le ministre des Finances au sujet de certains des principes qui sous-tendaient son budget. S’agissant du genre, je voulais savoir si, oui ou non, certaines choses avaient été prises en considération. Au fur et à mesure de sa réponse, le ministre a perdu patience et il a fini par me dire, tout à la fin, que les gens comme moi qui lui posaient ce genre de questions étaient des dinosaures qu’il fallait pousser de l’avant.
À première vue, j’ai trouvé ça risible et pitoyable. On m’a déjà traitée de qualificatifs bien pires que celui-là. Ça ne m’a certainement pas déstabilisée, il m’en faut beaucoup plus que ça, je suis une bonne politicienne. Néanmoins, sachant qu’il n’hésitait pas à utiliser ce mot non seulement à mon égard, par ricochet, mais à l’égard de mon parti, j’estime qu’il a fait preuve d’un manque de respect. C’est un concept important, qui mérite qu’on en discute.
De leur côté, les médias ont jugé que ce n’était pas si grave. Quelle que soit la gravité de la chose, à ce moment précis, au lieu de répondre à la question qui lui était posée et qui portait sur une question sérieuse, le ministre a choisi l’invective et l'insulte. C’est inacceptable. Encore une fois, le gouvernement peut-il vraiment mettre en œuvre une loi qui dépendra de la capacité des gens à comprendre combien il est important que justice soit rendue ?
La dernière fois que cela s’est produit, c’était dans cette Chambre. Le Président de la Chambre n’a pas encore rendu sa décision, et j’attendrai donc qu’il se prononce au sujet de l’utilisation de propos non parlementaires par le premier ministre.
Le sujet était encore une fois très difficile, car il s’agissait de savoir si le premier ministre avait, oui ou non, le pouvoir de transférer ou de faire transférer une détenue, en l’occurrence Terri-Lynne McClintic, d’un pénitencier à un autre. Le premier ministre s’est vu poser un grand nombre de questions, d’abord par mon collègue de Parry Sound—Muskoka et ensuite par moi. Au lieu de répondre, le premier ministre a perdu patience et a fini par nous accuser de courir après les ambulances. Or, ce sont les avocats véreux qui courent après les ambulances, et comme je suis moi-même avocate, tout comme le député qui avait parlé avant moi, nous nous sommes sentis insultés.
Ce qui importe, au bout du compte, c’est que le premier ministre a encore jugé bon de répondre par une invective et une insulte plutôt que de discuter sérieusement.
J’ajouterai que, lors de ces deux incidents, le ministre et le premier ministre ne cherchaient certainement pas à faire de l’humour. L’heure n’était pas à la plaisanterie. Ces insultes étaient donc délibérées. Si j’avais été une députée moins expérimentée et que c’était la première fois que je posais cette question à la Chambre, j’aurais interprété cette réponse de la façon suivante: « Faites attention, si vous posez cette question, je vais vous humilier devant les électeurs de votre circonscription qui vous regardent à la télévision. » Quand on tolère ce genre de comportement, voilà l’impact que l’on a.
Je suis députée depuis 10 ans. Je viens de célébrer cet anniversaire avec plusieurs de mes collègues, et j’ai aujourd’hui la couenne assez épaisse pour faire face à ce genre de choses. Je suis toutefois sidérée que ce genre de comportement soit toléré.
Les députés remarqueront que, jusqu’à présent, je n’ai pas mentionné une seule fois que j’étais une femme, car cela ne doit pas entrer en ligne de compte. Qu’on soit un homme ou une femme, les insultes n’ont pas leur place ici, et notre Règlement les considère comme des propos non parlementaires. D’ailleurs, c’est un principe qui devrait être respecté aussi bien par le gouvernement que par l’opposition. Lorsque nous estimons que les lois ne sont pas appliquées de façon équitable, nous cessons de croire que les lois peuvent nous protéger.
C’est le danger d’un projet de loi comme celui-ci, car on a beau avoir les meilleures procédures au monde, le maximum d’occasions pour les gens de discuter, de recevoir du soutien psychologique, de participer à des audiences et d’obtenir l’accompagnement nécessaire, au bout du compte, si justice ne semble pas avoir été rendue, alors tout ce que nous avons fait ne sert à rien. Ce n’est qu’avec le temps que le gouvernement pourra nous démontrer qu’il va véritablement faire ce qu’il a dit qu’il allait faire.
Collapse
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2018-09-28 10:04 [p.21969]
Expand
moved that Bill C-82, an act to implement a multilateral convention to implement tax treaty related measures to prevent base erosion and profit shifting, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
propose que le projet de loi C-82, Loi mettant en œuvre une convention multilatérale pour la mise en œuvre des mesures relatives aux conventions fiscales pour prévenir l'érosion de la base d'imposition et le transfert de bénéfices, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2018-09-28 13:10 [p.21998]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, today I rise to address the subject of tax fairness.
In the last federal election, the Prime Minister barnstormed across the country, promising billions of dollars of new spending. A chicken in every pot, he said. When Canadians inevitably asked how he would pay for it all, he said not to worry for a moment, that he would just raises taxes on the so-called wealthiest 1%, the rich guy living up on the hill.
Today, as we debate the subject of tax fairness, it is appropriate to ask if he has, in fact, kept his promise to fund his spending through those means. He certainly has kept the promise to spend vast new sums. Spending has grown, at around 7% per year, which is three times the combined rate of inflation and population growth. In other words, the government is spending three times faster than is the need among Canadians.
The result has been that the deficit this year is three times the size the Liberal Party promised in its most recent election platform and the budget will not be balanced next year, as the Prime Minister promised it would. According to Finance Canada, that will only happen in the year 2045, a quarter century from now, during which time Finance Canada admits the government will add a half a trillion dollars in additional debt. In other words, the budget will not balance itself.
What has become of the rich? The Prime Minister claimed he was going to raise taxes on those people. The results are in. CRA data released two weeks ago demonstrated that in the first year after the tax increase took effect, the government actually collected $4.6 billion less from the wealthiest 1%. Finance Canada released documents almost exactly a year ago today in its annual financial report, on September 19, 2017, in which it revealed almost exactly the same phenomenon. Revenues went down from the wealthiest 1%.
The government said that this was all due to one-time factors. People were playing games to avoid the higher taxes, said the government and that phenomenon would disappear in future years. The government is right. There were some wealthy individuals who moved money around to avoid paying their fair share.
One of them is the Minister of Finance. He announced a tax increase to take effect on January 1, 2016, and he sold his shares in his own company, Morneau Shepell, just 30 days before that in order to ensure his capital gain would be taxed at the lower earlier rate so he would not have to pay the same higher taxes he imposed on everyone else. Is that not nice? He knew the tax increases were coming, but being a multi-millionaire who had worked hard his entire life to avoid paying taxes, he was not going to pay a penny more on that capital gain. He was going to ensure he was taxed under a lower rate than everyone else.
He says, and his department has said, that many people did that. However, now that phenomenon is behind us, they say that in the future more revenue will come in. There is no question that in the 2017 tax year there will be probably be a one-time windfall of revenues from certain entrepreneurs and other Canadians as a result of reactions to government policies.
For example, the anecdotes by accounting firms and the reports in our business media are so common now that it is hard to be skeptical of their truth that people are moving money out of Canada. They are moving money out because the tax burden and the regulatory burden is so high that it is better for some people to do business outside of the country rather than keep their money here. Therefore, they will pay exit taxes. As that money goes out the door, it will be taxed one time.
The Prime Minister, who is only concerned about the here and now, who wants to spend more money today, might celebrate that one-time burst of cash as he shovels it out the door as quickly as possible.
What he forgets is that the problem with one-time cash is that a person only gets it one time and in the future it is gone. That money, once it leaves the country, will be taxed by other governments. When a wealthy CEO moves his fortune to London, England, the government today gets a one-time tax benefit for that as he pays an exit tax. However, in years subsequent, his tax burden in Canada is zero. He pays taxes to another government and funds services for another non-Canadian population. In 2017, I have no doubt that many people will pay one-time exit taxes as they took their money out of our country.
Furthermore, in the fall of 2017, the government announced small business tax changes that would have punished families for selling their businesses to their children. If a farmer sold his farm to his kids, he would pay a dividend tax rate of nearly 45% instead of a capital gains tax rate of 25%. If he sold that same farm to a foreign multinational, he could pay the lower tax rate.
In other words, there is a massive penalty for farmers selling their farms to their own kids, but a tax break for selling those same farms to a foreign multinational and having that multinational turn those children into tenants on their ancestral lands.
Because of the ferocious backlash led by the Conservatives and spontaneously ignited on the ground by Canadian taxpayers, the government has decided to put that change on hold until after the next election when it will surely be back. However, small businesses and farmers are not stupid. They know what bullet they dodged and are not going to risk having that change brought forward again.
What have many of them done? According to some of the most respected accounting firms in the country, many of them did their farm sales immediately upon learning that the government had put the change on ice. Therefore, those people will pay a one-time tax on that transaction in the 2017 year. After that year is gone, so too will future revenues, because those transactions will not repeat themselves every single year.
Finally, the government proposed to punish families that shared the work and earnings of a company. It calls that “sprinkling”. I can understand why it calls that sprinkling. The Minister of Finance and the Prime Minister did have their wealth sprinkled upon them as if by an angel from above. Would it not be wonderful if we could all have trust funds and if we could all be trust fund babies like those two trust fund twins? They did have money sprinkled upon them from above, so it is not surprising that they would use the term “sprinkling” to describe small family businesses that own a local restaurant and therefore share the earnings of that restaurant with the kids who show up everyday and help run it.
The change proposed by the government took effect on January 1. Businesses knew that so they had to pay out higher levels of dividends to their children and their family members in 2017 before the tax change took effect. There is no question that the government will tax those dividends in the 2017 year. In other words, the government will get a burst of revenue from that phenomenon of forcing businesses to pay out to their family members before the punitive new rules take effect. There is no question the government will get more money in the 2017 year as a result of that.
Any day now, though, we can expect that the Minister of Finance and the Prime Minister will march triumphantly into this room, as if they were Caesar at a Roman triumph, saying,“Aha! Look at all the money we took from all these people”. They will say that their high-tax plan actually worked in raising cash for them to spend. However, all of these phenomena I just described are one-time cash, in and out. Then it is no longer available to future governments to spend. For that reason the burden will inevitably fall upon the working and middle class that always suffer the most as the government gets big and expensive.
Why is that? Because higher earners and capital are far more mobile than lower earning people and workers. Labour has a harder time moving. Why? Because labour is carried out by a person and therefore he or she would have to move physically to another jurisdiction to have his or her labour tax at a lower rate. However, capital can flee or travel just like the air. Anyone can open their laptop computer and purchase equities, foreign stocks in companies around the world, literally in a matter of five minutes, moving their money out of the country just like that.
However, a working family who lives in Oshawa or Windsor on the assembly line floor cannot just get up and move because the government has hit it with a higher tax burden. That is why workers and labour cannot move around to avoid taxes the way capital and wealth can move around.
The end result is that when government gets big, capital flees and the burden gets more and more punitive on the working class Canadian. That is exactly what has happened. The average Canadian middle-class family is paying $800 higher income tax today than when the government took office. That is before the carbon tax and before payroll taxes that the government plans to institute the year after the next election. In other words, it is only going to get worse.
It is also before the increased cost of servicing our national debt, which is growing at a spectacular rate. In fact, last year, our government spent $23 billion on servicing the national debt. Within three years, the Parliamentary Budget Officer says that amount will rise to $40 billion, a two-thirds increase in just a few years, as debt rises and interest rates rise simultaneously to have a compounding effect of transferring more and more wealth, again, from the working class taxpayer to the wealthy bankers and bondholders who own our debt.
Here we are with these social justice warriors bringing in deficits and debts that have the effect of transferring wealth from low-income people who pay tax to wealthy bondholders and bankers who own the debt, in exchange for which we will get nothing. Interest on debt does not pave roads, does not build hospitals, does not hire nurses, does not pay soldiers, none of those things. It simply fattens the wallet of the wealthy people who have enough means to lend to the government.
If people ever wanted proof that these people are wealthy, the government cancelled the Canada savings bonds. It used to be that modest income people would buy Canada savings bonds and lend to the government. The government does not do that. It borrows all of its money from wealthy private equity fund managers, investment bankers and others of vast fortune.
Therefore, it always is that when the government gets big, the wealthy and well-connected and powerful are better off. It is ironic. Jeremy Corbyn, who calls himself a socialist, the socialist leader of the Labour Party in Great Britain, says that he wants to end greed is good capitalism. He is going to ban greed. The Prime Minister has made similar comments. The plan to end greed is to make the government so big that there is no room left for greed. It will be removed from human DNA. People will become altruistic and generous. No one will have more than anyone else, so they say. These socialists are actually going to transform human nature because they are so powerful they can do even that.
Can they really transform human nature? Apparently they did not read Macaulay, who wrote:
Where'er ye shed the honey, the buzzing flies will crowd;Where'er ye fling the carrion, the raven's croak is loud;Where'er down Tiber garbage floats, the greedy pike ye see;And wheresoe'er such lord is found, such client still will be.
The point is that wherever there is money, there will be people trying to get it. If all the money is in the government, there will be greedy people trying to make money off the government. We see it all the time.
There are corporations coming to Ottawa saying they need a corporate handout, and they have had a very generous benefactor in the Liberal government, such as the $400 million for Bombardier, which went on to immediately give big bonuses to its executives. There is the infrastructure bank, for example, which will provide loan guarantees to powerful construction companies so that if ever their projects lose cash, the taxpayer and not the business owner will pay the price.
In Ontario, the Liberals brought in something called the Green Energy Act, which simply did not create any green energy, but it did put a lot of green in the pockets of the wealthy lobbyists who were able to get the so-called green energy contracts, double the cost of electricity and cause what the Ontario Association of Food Banks call “energy poverty”. People literally walked in with their power bills and said that they could not afford to keep their lights on and eat and asked for food so that they could pay their power bill. So, yes, it was great for the wealthy one percenters who got tens of billions of dollars in subsidies for their phony electricity, but it was not so great for the working-class people who could barely afford to turn the lights on and live a normal life.
So, yes, wherever we fling the honey, the buzzing flies will crowd. My colleague did not say “bees”. He said “flies”, and flies do not make honey but will happily consume it. They are parasitical. Bees create honey through the process of pollination, which is the free exchange between a vegetative life and a creature, which is the essence of the free market economy, right? That is the free market economy, the voluntary exchange of capital for interest, product for payment, work for wages.
Every single transaction in a free market economy happens through voluntary exchange. Do members know why? It is because every single transaction must improve the lives of both people or they would not engage in it. It is why we have something called the “double thank you”. We go to a coffee shop, buy a cup of coffee, pay for our coffee and say “thank you”. What do they say back? It is not “your welcome”, but “thank you”. Why? It is because our payment is worth more to them than their coffee, and their coffee is worth to us than our payment. In other words, we both have something worth more to us than we had before. If I have an apple and want an orange, and someone else has an orange and wants an apple, we trade. We still have an apple and orange between us, but we are both richer because we each have something worth more to us than we had before. That is the genius of voluntary exchange.
Why does no one write “thank you” on their tax forms? It is supposed to be a voluntary exchange. It is supposed to be an exchange. We are paying for something. We are supposed to get something in return. The answer is, because we have no choice. It is not a voluntary exchange. It is mandatory. We are forced to engage in it, and that is the rule of the government economy. Every single transaction in the government economy is done by force. Every single transaction in the free market is done by voluntary will of every single participant.
We on this side of the House of Commons believe in a bottom-up free market where businesses obsess over customers rather than over politicians. It is where one gets ahead not by having the best lobbyist but by having the best product. That is the free market economy. It is a bottom-up economy and not a trickle-down, government-directed economy, like the government on the other side of the aisle believes.
Therefore, we will continue to champion the free market system, a system based on meritocracy, not heiritocracy, where we do not have to have a trust fund to have hope for a better future. We just have to have big dreams and hard work. That is our plan for tax fairness.
Monsieur le Président, j'interviens aujourd'hui pour parler d'équité fiscale.
Au cours de la dernière campagne électorale, le premier ministre a parcouru le pays en promettant des milliards de dollars en nouvelles dépenses. Tout le monde sera gagnant, disait-il. Quand, bien sûr, les Canadiens ont demandé comment il comptait payer pour tout cela, il leur a répondu de ne pas s'inquiéter: il augmenterait juste les impôts du centile supposément le plus riche, ceux du voisin fortuné des quartiers en surplomb.
Aujourd'hui, alors que nous parlons d'équité fiscale, il convient de se demander s'il a bien tenu sa promesse de financer ses dépenses de cette manière. Il a certainement tenu sa promesse de dépenser de gros montant d'argent frais. Les dépenses ont augmenté de presque 7 % cette année, ce qui équivaut à trois fois le taux combiné de l'inflation et de la croissance démographique. En d'autres termes, le gouvernement dépense trois fois plus vite que ne l'exigent les besoins des Canadiens.
En conséquence, le déficit, cette année, est trois fois supérieur à ce que le Parti libéral a promis dans son tout dernier programme électoral, et le budget ne sera pas équilibré l'année prochaine, comme le premier ministre l'avait promis. D'après Finances Canada, le budget ne sera équilibré qu'en 2045, dans un quart de siècle, et pendant ce temps, Finances Canada le reconnaît, le gouvernement ajoutera un billion et demi de dollars de dettes en plus. Autrement dit, le budget ne s'équilibrera pas de lui-même.
Que deviennent les riches? Le premier ministre avait affirmé qu’il allait augmenter leurs impôts. Les résultats sont sortis. Selon les données publiées il y a deux semaines par l’Agence du revenu du Canada, pendant l'année qui a suivi l’entrée en vigueur de l’augmentation d'impôt, le gouvernement a en fait perçu 4,6 milliards de dollars de moins auprès du 1 % de la population le plus riche. De son côté, Finances Canada a publié il y a un an presque jour pour jour, soit le 19 septembre 2017, son rapport financier annuel,qui fait ressortir presque exactement le même phénomène: les recettes provenant du 1 % de la population le plus riche ont baissé.
Le gouvernement prétend que tout cela est dû à des facteurs ponctuels. Les gens s’ingéniaient à trouver des moyens d’éviter les augmentations d’impôts, déclarait le gouvernement, et ce phénomène disparaîtrait au fil des années. Le gouvernement a raison. Certains particuliers fortunés ont fait des transferts pour éviter de payer leur juste part.
Le ministre des Finances est l'un deux. Il avait annoncé une augmentation d’impôt qui entrerait en vigueur le 1er janvier 2016, mais il avait vendu ses parts dans sa propre entreprise, Morneau Shepell, 30 jours avant pour garantir que son gain en capital serait imposé au taux inférieur précédent. De la sorte, il n’aurait pas à subir les augmentations d’impôt qu’il imposait à tout le monde. N’est-ce pas beau? Il savait qu’il y aurait des augmentations d’impôt mais, en tant que multimillionnaire qui avait travaillé dur toute sa vie pour éviter de payer de l’impôt, il n’allait pas payer un sou de plus sur ce gain en capital. Il allait faire en sorte d’être imposé à un taux inférieur à celui qui s’appliquerait à tout le monde.
Le ministre et le ministère qu'il dirige ont affirmé que beaucoup de gens faisaient de même. Cependant, maintenant que ce n'est plus le cas, ils disent que, à l'avenir, l'État pourra recueillir plus de recettes. Nul doute que, pour l'année financière 2017, on assistera à une entrée unique de recettes provenant de certains entrepreneurs et d'autres Canadiens, en réaction aux politiques du gouvernement.
Par exemple, il existe tellement d'anecdotes touchant des firmes comptables et de reportages publiés par les médias d'affaires qu'il est difficile de remettre en doute le fait que des gens sortent des fonds du Canada. Ils agissent ainsi parce que le fardeau fiscal et réglementaire est tellement lourd au Canada que, dans certains cas, il vaut mieux faire des affaires à l'étranger, plutôt que de garder l'argent ici. Ils paient donc des impôts de sortie. Comme l'argent part à l'étranger, les impôts ne sont prélevés qu'une fois.
Le premier ministre, qui ne se soucie que du moment présent et qui souhaite dépenser toujours plus d'argent maintenant, se réjouit peut-être de cette entrée soudaine et strictement ponctuelle d'argent, car il s'empresse aussitôt de le dépenser.
Il oublie que le problème avec ce genre d'entrée ponctuelle d'argent, c'est qu'elle se produit une seule fois. Les sommes d'argent transférées dans un autre pays seront assujetties à l'impôt de ce pays. Par exemple, lorsqu'un PDG bien nanti transfère sa fortune à Londres, en Angleterre, il doit payer des impôts de sortie et le gouvernement en tire un avantage fiscal, sous forme de recettes, une seule fois. Toutefois, au cours des années suivantes, le fardeau fiscal de ce PDG tombe à zéro au Canada. Il paie ainsi des impôts à un gouvernement étranger et finance de ce fait des services offerts à une autre population. Pour l'année 2017, je suis persuadé qu'un grand nombre de gens vont payer des impôts de sortie parce qu'ils ont envoyé leur argent à l'étranger.
Qui plus est, à l'automne 2017, le gouvernement a annoncé des changements fiscaux visant les petites entreprises qui auraient eu pour effet de punir les familles qui décident de vendre leur entreprise à leurs enfants. Un agriculteur qui choisit de vendre son exploitation à ses enfants paierait un impôt sur les dividendes dont le taux s'élève à près de 45 %, au lieu d'un taux d'imposition des gains en capital de 25 %. La vente de cette même exploitation à une multinationale étrangère lui permettrait donc de payer moins d'impôts.
Cela signifie que l'agriculteur qui vend son exploitation à ses enfants doit payer le prix lourd, alors qu'il bénéficie d'un allègement fiscal s'il la vend plutôt à une multinationale étrangère, qui risque à terme de faire de ses enfants les locataires de leurs propres terres ancestrales.
Devant la riposte implacable menée par les conservateurs et la réaction spontanée des contribuables canadiens, le gouvernement a décidé d'attendre après les élections pour apporter ce changement et il le fera, c'est certain. Toutefois, les propriétaires de petites entreprises et les agriculteurs ne sont pas stupides. Ils savent ce qu'ils ont évité de justesse et ils ne vont pas prendre le risque que ce changement soit de nouveau proposé.
Qu'ont fait un grand nombre d'entre eux? Selon certains des cabinets comptables les plus respectés du pays, un grand nombre d'entre eux ont vendu leur exploitation agricole dès qu'ils ont su que le gouvernement avait décidé d'attendre pour procéder à ce changement. Par conséquent, ces gens auront payé l'impôt sur cette transaction en 2017, après quoi on ne pourra plus en tirer de recettes fiscales, puisqu'elle ne se répétera pas tous les ans.
Enfin, le gouvernement propose de punir les familles qui travaillent ensemble au sein d'une entreprise et qui en partagent les gains. Il appelle cela de la « répartition ». Je comprends bien pourquoi il utilise ce terme: le ministre des Finances et le premier ministre ont tous les deux bénéficié d'une répartition de richesse sans avoir à lever le petit doigt. Ne serait-ce pas merveilleux si nous pouvions tous venir au monde dans une famille riche, comme ces deux-là? Pas étonnant qu'ils parlent de « répartition » pour décrire la petite entreprise familiale, le restaurant local dont les propriétaires partagent les revenus avec leurs enfants qui viennent y travailler chaque jour.
La modification proposée par le gouvernement est entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier. Les propriétaires d'entreprise étaient au courant; ils ont donc dû verser des dividendes plus élevés à leurs enfants et autres membres de la famille en 2017, avant la prise d'effet du changement fiscal. Évidemment, le gouvernement allait imposer ces dividendes en 2017. Autrement dit, le gouvernement va tirer une rentrée importante de recettes du fait qu'il force les entrepreneurs à verser des montants aux membres de leur famille avant l'entrée en vigueur des nouvelles règles punitives. Il est clair qu'il va récolter plus d'argent en 2017 grâce à cela.
On peut s'attendre d'un jour à l'autre à voir le ministre des Finances et le premier ministre faire une entrée triomphale dans cette enceinte, comme des généraux romains victorieux, et déclarer: « Voyez tout l'argent que nous avons réussi à amasser. » Ils vont dire que leur plan de hausses fiscales a bel et bien fonctionné et qu'il leur a permis de recueillir des fonds à dépenser. Or, toutes ces rentrées de fonds sont des rentrées de fonds strictement ponctuelles; les fonds entrent, on les dépense. Ce n'est pas de l'argent qui sera là pour les gouvernements à venir. Ainsi, le fardeau retombera inévitablement sur les travailleurs et la classe moyenne, soit ceux qui écopent toujours quand le gouvernement prend de l'ampleur et dépense sans compter.
Pourquoi? Parce que les personnes à revenu élevé et les capitaux sont beaucoup plus mobiles que les personnes à revenu moindre et les travailleurs. Il est plus difficile de déplacer la main-d'oeuvre. Pourquoi? Parce qu'elle est faite de personnes et que, pour pouvoir payer moins d'impôt, il faudrait que ces personnes déménagent dans un autre pays. Les capitaux, eux, sont libres comme l'air et peuvent se déplacer allègrement. N'importe qui peut allumer son ordinateur portable et acheter des actions d'entreprise étrangère partout dans le monde, littéralement en l'espace de cinq minutes. On peut très facilement retirer son argent d'un pays.
À l'inverse, une famille qui habite à Oshawa ou Windsor et dont les parents travaillent sur une chaîne de montage ne peut pas faire ses bagages et partir sans crier gare dès que le gouvernement augmente son fardeau fiscal. Les travailleurs ne peuvent pas déménager pour éviter de payer de l'impôt de la même manière que les capitaux et la richesse se déplacent.
En fin de compte, lorsque le gouvernement fait fuir les gros capitaux, ce sont les travailleurs canadiens qui se retrouvent avec un fardeau fiscal plus important. C'est exactement ce qui s'est produit. La famille canadienne typique de la classe moyenne paie aujourd'hui 800 $ de plus au fisc, par rapport au moment où le gouvernement a commencé son mandat. Cela ne tient pas encore compte de la taxe sur le carbone et des taxes sur la masse salariale que le gouvernement prévoit imposer dès l'année suivant les prochaines élections. Autrement dit, les choses ne feront que s'aggraver.
Ce montant ne tient également pas compte de la hausse du coût du service de la dette nationale, qui augmente à un rythme spectaculaire. D'ailleurs, l'année dernière, le gouvernement a consacré 23 milliards de dollars au service de la dette nationale. Selon le directeur parlementaire du budget, d'ici trois ans, ce montant grimpera à 40 milliards de dollars, ce qui représente une hausse de deux tiers en l'espace de seulement quelques années. À mesure que la dette et les taux d'intérêt augmentent simultanément, ils auront comme effet cumulatif de transférer encore une fois la richesse des contribuables de la classe ouvrière vers les riches banquiers et créanciers obligataires qui sont les propriétaires de la dette.
Nous voici avec des guerriers de la justice sociale qui accumulent des déficits et des dettes ayant pour effet de transférer la richesse des personnes à faible revenu qui paient de l'impôt vers les riches créanciers obligataires et banquiers qui sont les propriétaires de la dette et en échange de quoi nous ne recevrons rien. Les intérêts sur la dette ne permettent pas de paver les routes, de construire des hôpitaux, d'engager des infirmières ou de rémunérer des soldats. Ils ne font rien de cela. Ils ne font que garnir le portefeuille des riches qui ont les moyens de prêter de l'argent au gouvernement.
Si quelqu'un voulait la preuve que ces gens sont riches, il n'a qu'à penser au fait que le gouvernement a annulé les obligations d'épargne du Canada. Autrefois, les personnes à revenu modeste pouvaient acheter des obligations d'épargne du Canada et prêter de l'argent au gouvernement. Ce n'est plus le cas. Le gouvernement emprunte tout son argent à de riches gestionnaires de fonds de capital-investissement, des courtiers en valeurs mobilières et d'autres personnes très riches.
Par conséquent, lorsque le gouvernement prend beaucoup de place, cela profite toujours aux gens riches, puissants et bien placés. Voilà qui est paradoxal. Jeremy Corbyn, qui se dit socialiste, et qui est le chef socialiste du Parti travailliste britannique, affirme vouloir mettre fin au capitalisme fondé sur le principe voulant que la cupidité soit une bonne chose. Il veut interdire la cupidité. Le premier ministre a tenu des propos semblables. Le plan pour éliminer la cupidité consiste à faire en sorte que le gouvernement prenne tellement de place qu'il n'en reste plus pour la cupidité. Ce comportement humain sera éliminé. Les gens deviendront altruistes et généreux. Selon eux, personne ne possédera davantage que son prochain. Ces socialistes sont si puissants qu'ils réussiront même à transformer la nature humaine.
Peuvent-ils vraiment transformer la nature humaine? Apparemment, ils n'ont pas lu Macaulay, qui a écrit ceci:
Là où coule le miel, les mouches bourdonnent;Là où pourrit la charogne, le chant du corbeau résonne;Là où le Tibre porte les rebuts, le brochet vorace en fait son repaire;Et où que l'on trouve tel maître, on trouvera tel bénéficiaire.
Ce qu'il faut retenir, c'est que, là où il y a de l'argent, il y aura toujours des gens qui essaient de l'avoir. Si tout l'argent est au gouvernement, des gens cupides tenteront d'en avoir auprès du gouvernement. Cela arrive constamment.
Certaines entreprises demandent des cadeaux au gouvernement, et le gouvernement libéral s'est montré un généreux bienfaiteur pour elles. Il a donné 400 millions de dollars à Bombardier qui en a profité pour offrir d'importantes primes à ses cadres. Il y a la Banque de l'infrastructure, par exemple, qui va offrir des garanties de prêt à de puissantes entreprises de construction pour que ce soit le contribuable plutôt que le propriétaire de l'entreprise qui paie la note si jamais un projet perd de l'argent.
En Ontario, les libéraux ont adopté une loi sur l'énergie verte, qui n'a pas créé d'énergie verte, mais qui a mis de l'argent dans les poches des riches lobbyistes qui ont réussi à obtenir les soi-disant contrats d'énergie verte, fait doubler le prix de l'électricité, et entraîné ce que l'Association ontarienne des banques alimentaires appelle la « pauvreté énergétique ». Des gens se sont rendus dans les banques alimentaires avec leur facture d'électricité en expliquant qu'ils n'avaient pas les moyens de payer leur facture d'électricité et de manger. Ils devaient quémander leur nourriture pour avoir les moyens de payer leur facture d'électricité. Alors, oui, ce fut très bien pour le 1 % le plus riche qui a gagné des dizaines de milliards de dollars en subventions pour ses supposés besoins en électricité, mais ce fut très mauvais pour les travailleurs qui ont eu de la difficulté à garder leurs lumières allumées et à vivre une vie normale.
Eh oui, là où on met du miel, des essaims de mouches se rassemblent. Mon collègue n'a pas parlé d'abeilles, il a parlé de mouches et, comme on le sait, les mouches ne font pas de miel, mais elles le mangent volontiers. Ce sont des parasites. En revanche, les abeilles fabriquent du miel grâce au processus de pollinisation qui permet un échange libre entre un organisme végétal et une créature vivante. L'économie de libre marché repose sur un modèle similaire. Dans ce genre de modèle économique, il y a échange volontaire de capitaux moyennant des intérêts, de produits moyennant paiement, de travail moyennant rémunération.
Dans une économie de libre marché, toutes les transactions reposent sur un échange volontaire. Les députés savent-ils pourquoi? C'est parce que chaque transaction doit améliorer la vie des deux parties, autrement elles ne seraient pas intéressées à la transaction. Voilà pourquoi il y a ce qu'on appelle le double merci. Lorsqu'on va dans un café et qu'on y achète une boisson, on remercie la personne qui nous sert. Que dit cette personne en retour? Elle ne dit pas de rien, mais plutôt merci. Pourquoi? Tout simplement parce que le paiement qu'on lui donne vaut davantage pour elle que le café qui a été servi et, pour le consommateur, le café vaut davantage que son prix. Autrement dit, les deux parties ont le sentiment d'avoir obtenu davantage qu'avant la transaction. Si j'ai une pomme et que je veux une orange, et qu'une autre personne a une orange et veut une pomme, nous faisons un échange. Il y a toujours une pomme et une orange dans l'équation, mais nous sommes tous les deux plus riches parce que nous estimons avoir quelque chose qui vaut davantage que ce que nous avions auparavant. Voilà le génie des échanges volontaires.
Pourquoi personne n'écrit-il « merci » sur sa déclaration d'impôt? C'est censé être un échange volontaire. C'est censé être un échange. On paie pour quelque chose. On est censé obtenir quelque chose en échange. C'est tout simplement parce que l'on n'a pas le choix. Il ne s'agit pas d'un échange volontaire. C'est obligatoire. On est forcé de le faire, et voilà la règle de l'économie gouvernementale. Toutes les transactions dans l'économie gouvernementale sont imposées. Toutes les transactions dans le libre marché sont effectuées selon le bon vouloir des participants.
De ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous croyons à un libre marché ascendant où les entreprises font des pieds et des mains pour les consommateurs plutôt que pour les politiciens. C'est un marché dans lequel on prospère non pas en ayant les meilleurs lobbyistes, mais bien en ayant les meilleurs produits. Voilà ce qu'est l'économie de marché. Il s'agit d'une économie ascendante et non d'une économie du ruissellement étatique, comme le croit le gouvernement libéral.
Par conséquent, nous continuerons d'être les champions du système de libre marché, un système fondé sur la méritocratie, et non sur « l'héritocratie », où il n'est pas nécessaire de posséder un fonds en fiducie pour espérer avoir un avenir meilleur. Il ne faut que de grands rêves et des efforts soutenus. Voilà notre plan pour l'équité fiscale.
Collapse
View Mike Lake Profile
CPC (AB)
View Mike Lake Profile
2018-06-13 22:49 [p.20892]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I find it interesting that no Liberal wanted to get up to speak to this, but they have no hesitation in heckling us as we are speaking to this important bill.
We have been discussing the bill for several hours tonight, and those who are watching, and I am sure many people are riveted to the debate tonight, may have forgotten what we are talking about. I will read the bill as a way of reintroducing it to folks who may have tuned in late and who may not know what we are talking about.
It is Bill S-218, an act respecting Latin American heritage month, which was moved by Senator Enverga, who was a valued member of our Conservative team. He was a senator from 2012 until he passed away in 2017.
Senator Enverga was the first Filipino Canadian elected in the city of Toronto. He was a Catholic School Board trustee in Toronto, and he was known in the region for launching the Philippine Canadian Charitable Foundation. He was also co-chair of the Canada-Philippines Interparliamentary Group.
He inaugurated the annual Filipino independence day flag-raising on Parliament Hill, and he was a “tireless champion for multiculturalism” and was “an advocate for people with disabilities”, as pointed out in The Globe and Mail article, as his daughter Rocel has Down's syndrome, which is obviously something close to my heart as well, as people in the House know.
One of the things that strikes me about this legislation is the fact that even though Senator Enverga was a tireless champion for folks in the Filipino community, he decided to move a bill to propose a Latin American heritage month. That just speaks to who he was.
One of the things that I will remember about Senator Enverga is that whenever he walked into a room, the room got brighter because he was there. He was a shining light.
He was very passionate about Canada and about the work our Conservative government was doing. He was also very passionate about the opportunity he had as someone born in the Philippines who immigrated to Canada and who took his place as a senator in this country. We miss him in our caucus, and the Hill is diminished by not having him around.
I often think about my own community in Edmonton—Wetaskiwin. A lot of people looking at this riding on a map make the mistaken assumption that there is no diversity there. However, Wetaskiwin, which is a community of 17,000 people, actually has a significant Filipino population. When I am in Wetaskiwin, I think of folks like Senator Enverga, and I see this unbelievable passion within the Filipino community there.
Those members of Parliament who have a sizable Filipino community in their riding will recognize what it is like to get to a Filipino household when they are door-knocking. It is almost like there is a celebration because a member of Parliament is there. When members show up for events, the Filipino people have an incredible joy. Senator Enverga was the personification of that within our team and within the confines of Parliament Hill.
His bill, an act respecting Latin American heritage month, is pretty simple. It reads:
Whereas the Parliament of Canada recognizes that members of the Latin American community in Canada have made significant contributions to the social, economic and political fabric of the nation;
Whereas the designation of a month as Latin American Heritage Month would be a meaningful way to remember, celebrate and educate the public about these contributions;
Whereas Latin American communities across Canada would be mobilized by a Latin American Heritage Month to jointly celebrate, share and promote their unique culture and traditions with all Canadians;
And whereas October is a significant month for the Latin American community around the world;
Now, therefore, Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons of Canada, enacts as follows:
1 This Act may be cited as the Latin American Heritage Month Act.
2 Throughout Canada, in each and every year, the month of October is to be known as “Latin American Heritage Month”.
It is very simple, and I hope members from all parties will support this bill.
I am really glad we have had the opportunity to discuss this tonight. Having listened to the debate tonight, it is probably one of the most productive evenings we have had in the House of Commons in the last several weeks. It is a nice break, because if we look at the things we have been discussing in the absence of legislation like this—
An hon. member: Closure and time allocation.
Hon. Mike Lake: Yes, a lot of closure and time allocation debates, and then the time spent during the votes on those things. I think we had five in a three-day span last week. We have been discussing the $18-billion deficit that the government is running, despite the fact that it promised a balance budget by next year. We are talking about some pretty devastating stuff.
The government has increased spending by $58 billion annually and cannot find a way to balance the budget. It had increased spending by over 21% in four years and our kids and grandkids are the ones who will pay the price for that down the road, just like in the days of the former Trudeau government of the 1970s. There were massive increases in spending and it was the generation in the mid-1990s that had to pay for a $35-billion cut in health care, social services, and education transfers to the provinces, which was when the bill came due. We are going in the same direction now.
It is very encouraging to have the opportunity to talk about something other than the nationalization of pipelines, for example. At one point, there were four pipelines in the pipeline, so to speak, when the Liberal government was elected in 2015. Northern gateway was approved and energy east was well on its way. Trans Mountain was moving forward as well, and there was a lot of talk about Keystone XL.
The Liberals managed to cancel northern gateway and completely changed the rules that made it impossible for energy east to move forward. The energy minister likes to say that the company made an economic business decision to cancel energy east, after it had spent $1 billion navigating a regulatory system, and the government changed the rules on it. Naturally, it made an economic decision not to go forward and not to waste another $1 billion.
It is very encouraging to have the opportunity to talk about something tonight other than the Liberals' failed policy on pipelines, which has it now buying a pipeline for $4.5 billion because it cannot find a private sector company to move forward with it, when there used to be four projects on the go. It is very nice to have the opportunity to talk about something other than those things tonight.
We could have been talking about the carbon tax. There has been a lot of discussion about the carbon tax.
On a point of order, Madam Speaker. I would ask for the unanimous consent of the House to have the finance minister go before the finance committee of the House of Commons and tell Canadians what the carbon tax will cost Canadian families.
Madame la Présidente, je trouve intéressant que les libéraux n'aient pas voulu prendre la parole sur cette question, mais qu'ils n'hésitent pas à chahuter pendant que nous parlons de cet important projet de loi.
Nous en discutons depuis plusieurs heures déjà ce soir, et ceux qui nous regardent — et je ne doute pas qu'un vaste auditoire soit captivé par ce débat — ont peut-être oublié quel était le sujet des discussions. Je vais lire le texte du projet de loi pour m'assurer que les personnes qui viennent de se joindre à nous savent bien de quoi il est question.
Il s'agit du projet de loi S-218, Loi instituant le Mois du patrimoine latino-américain, qui a été présenté par le sénateur Enverga, un membre apprécié de l'équipe conservatrice. Il a été nommé au Sénat en 2012 et y a siégé jusqu'à son décès, en 2017.
Le sénateur Enverga a été le premier Canadien d'origine philippine a être élu à une charge publique de la Ville de Toronto. Il a également été commissaire au Conseil scolaire catholique de Toronto et s'est fait connaître dans la région pour avoir lancé la Philippine-Canadian Charitable Foundation. Il était coprésident du Groupe interparlementaire Canada-Philippines.
Il a inauguré la cérémonie annuelle de levée du drapeau pour souligner le jour de l'indépendance des Philippines sur la Colline du Parlement. Il était un champion infatigable du multiculturalisme et un défenseur des personnes handicapées, comme le soulignait un article du Globe and Mail. Sa fille Rocel est atteinte du syndrome de Down, et cette cause me tient aussi beaucoup à coeur, comme les députés le savent.
Ce qui me frappe, entre autres, dans ce projet de loi, c'est que, bien que le sénateur Enverga fut un champion infatigable de la communauté philippine, il a décidé de présenter un projet de loi pour instituer le Mois du patrimoine latino-américain. Cela en dit long sur l'homme qu'il était.
S'il y a une chose dont je me souviens quand je pense au sénateur Enverga, c'est bien que, chaque fois qu'il entrait dans une pièce, sa présence y faisait régner une ambiance radieuse. Il était inspirant.
Il se passionnait pour le Canada et pour le travail accompli par le gouvernement conservateur. Il parlait aussi avec une grande passion de la chance qu'il avait eue, après être né aux Philippines, d'immigrer au Canada et d'y devenir sénateur. Sa présence nous manque au sein de notre caucus, et son départ est une perte pour le Parlement.
Je pense souvent à ma circonscription, Edmonton—Wetaskiwin. Beaucoup de gens se disent à tort, en regardant la carte, que la population de cette circonscription ne doit pas être caractérisée par une grande diversité. Pourtant, on trouve à Wetaskiwin, une municipalité de 17 000 habitants, une importante population philippine. Lorsque je suis là-bas, je pense à des gens comme le sénateur Enverga et je vois la passion incroyable qui anime la communauté philippine de l'endroit.
Les députés dont la circonscription comprend une communauté philippine assez importante savent ce que c'est que de cogner à la porte d'un foyer philippin. Dès qu'un député arrive, c'est presque comme un jour de fête. Lorsque les députés se rendent à des événements, les gens d'origine philippine manifestent une grande joie. Le sénateur Enverga était l'incarnation même de cette joie au sein de notre équipe et sur la Colline du Parlement.
Le texte de son projet de loi, Loi instituant le Mois du patrimoine latino-américain, est assez simple. Voici ce qu'il dit:
Attendu: que le Parlement du Canada reconnaît que les membres des communautés latino-américaines au Canada ont apporté une précieuse contribution au tissu social, économique et politique du Canada;
que la désignation d’un Mois du patrimoine latino-américain permettrait à la population d’en apprendre davantage sur cette contribution, de la mettre en valeur et d’en perpétuer le souvenir;
que les communautés latino-américaines des quatre coins du Canada se mobiliseraient à l’occasion du Mois du patrimoine latino-américain afin de partager et célébrer avec tous les Canadiens leur culture et leurs traditions sans pareil ainsi que d’en faire la promotion;
que le mois d’octobre revêt une importance particulière pour les communautés latino-américaines du monde entier,
Sa Majesté, sur l’avis et avec le consentement du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes du Canada, édicte:
1 Loi sur le Mois du patrimoine latino-américain.
2 Le mois d’octobre est, dans tout le Canada, désigné comme « Mois du patrimoine latino-américain ».
Le projet de loi est très simple et j'espère que les députés de tous les partis l'appuieront.
Je suis très heureux que nous ayons eu l'occasion de discuter de ce sujet ce soir. Après avoir écouté le débat de ce soir, je peux dire que cette soirée à la Chambre des communes est probablement l'une de nos plus productives des dernières semaines. Cela nous a donné un bon répit, car si nous examinons les sujets dont nous avons discuté en l'absence d'un projet de loi comme celui-ci...
Une voix: La clôture et l'attribution de temps.
L'hon. Mike Lake: Oui, il y a beaucoup de débats sur la clôture et l'attribution de temps, et nous passons ensuite du temps à voter sur ces questions. Je pense que nous avons eu cinq débats de ce type en trois jours la semaine dernière. Nous avons discuté du déficit de 18 milliards de dollars que le gouvernement accumule, malgré le fait qu'il a promis de rétablir l'équilibre budgétaire l'année prochaine. Nous parlons de sujets plutôt accablants.
Le gouvernement a augmenté les dépenses de 58 milliards de dollars par année et n'arrive pas à trouver le moyen de rétablir l'équilibre budgétaire. Il a augmenté les dépenses de plus de 21 % en quatre ans, et ce sont nos enfants et nos petits-enfants qui paieront la note, comme à l'époque de l'ancien gouvernement Trudeau dans les années 1970. Il y avait eu des augmentations massives des dépenses, et c'est la génération du milieu des années 1990 qui a fait les frais de compressions de 35 milliards de dollars dans les transferts en santé, en services sociaux et en éducation aux provinces. Nous allons dans la même direction à l'heure actuelle.
C'est très encourageant d'avoir l'occasion de parler d'autre chose que de nationalisation de pipelines, par exemple. Lorsque le gouvernement a été élu en 2015, quatre projets de pipeline étaient en voie de se réaliser. Le projet Northern Gateway avait été approuvé, et le projet Énergie Est était sur la bonne voie. Le projet Trans Mountain allait aussi de l'avant, et il y avait de nombreuses discussions au sujet de Keystone XL.
Les libéraux ont réussi à annuler le projet Northern Gateway et ont complètement modifié les règles, de sorte qu'il est devenu impossible pour le projet Énergie Est d'aller de l'avant. Le ministre de l'Énergie aime dire que l'entreprise a pris une décision économique en choisissant d'annuler le projet Énergie Est après avoir dépensé 1 milliard de dollars pour se conformer à notre régime de réglementation. Le gouvernement a ensuite changé les règles. Bien évidemment, l'entreprise a pris la décision économique de ne pas aller de l'avant avec le projet et de ne pas gaspiller 1 milliard de dollars de plus.
C'est très encourageant d'avoir l'occasion de parler ce soir de quelque chose d'autre que la politique ratée des libéraux en matière de pipelines. Le gouvernement compte maintenant acheter un pipeline pour 4,5 milliards de dollars parce qu'il n'arrive pas à trouver une entreprise du secteur privé qui accepterait d'aller de l'avant avec le projet, alors qu'il y avait auparavant quatre projets en cours. C'est très agréable d'avoir l'occasion de parler d'autre chose ce soir.
Nous aurions pu parler de la taxe sur le carbone. Il y a eu de nombreuses discussions sur la taxe sur le carbone.
J'invoque le Règlement, madame la Présidente. Je demande le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour faire témoigner le ministre des Finances devant le comité des finances de la Chambre des communes afin qu'il dise aux Canadiens combien la taxe sur le carbone coûtera aux familles canadiennes.
Collapse
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
View Carol Hughes Profile
2018-06-13 22:58 [p.20893]
Expand
It is not a point of order. The hon. member has less than a minute left if he would like to finish his speech.
Il n'y a pas matière à invoquer le Règlement. Le député dispose de moins d'une minute s'il souhaite terminer son discours.
Collapse
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Geoff Regan Profile
2018-06-07 15:15 [p.20456]
Expand
I am now prepared to rule on the question of privilege raised by the hon. member for Carleton on May 31, 2018, concerning the alleged intimidation of a potential witness by the office of the Minister of Finance.
I would like to thank the member for raising the matter, as well as the parliamentary secretary to the government House leader for his comments.
According to the member for Carleton, the Canadian Association of Mutual Insurance Companies, CAMIC, received two phone calls from the office of the Minister of Finance, which he claimed were intended to stop them from raising their objections to Bill C-74, either by meeting with parliamentarians or by appearing before committee. He surmised that these comments, which he characterized as threatening, might be why this association did not even express an interest in appearing as a committee witness.
In addition to questioning the timeliness of this question of privilege, the parliamentary secretary framed the matter as one of debate and contended that actions of a civil servant have not historically qualified as breaches of privilege.
The issue of timeliness is one that the Chair has raised on several occasions recently since it is a requisite condition that members must heed. In this instance, it is a valid issue to be raised again. This question could have, and should have, been brought to the attention of the House much earlier. The article from The Globe and Mail, dated May 15, 2018, in which the member for Carleton is quoted, suggests that he was aware of this matter as early as May 15. Additionally, it could have been raised at any point since May 22, when the House returned from a break week. The fact that the member for Carleton gave notice of his question of privilege a full week prior to actually rising in the House to make his case also suggests that he could have done so earlier.
House of Commons Procedure and Practice, third edition, explains at page 145 what is expected of members in this respect, when it states:
The matter of privilege to be raised in the House must have recently occurred and must call for the immediate action of the House. Therefore, the member must satisfy the Speaker that he or she is bringing the matter to the attention of the House as soon as practicable after becoming aware of the situation.
In the past, Speakers have chosen not to pursue further on a matter when it is not apparent that it is being raised at the earliest practicable time.
In fact, Speaker Sauvé determined, on March 1, 1982, in a ruling found at pages 15473 and 15474 of Debates, that a question raised by a member was not a breach of privilege, as it had not been raised at the earliest opportunity. She stated:
The first problem I have with this question of privilege is that it does not appear to have been raised at the earliest opportunity....
I must therefore decline to accord this matter precedence over the regular business of the House, particularly in view of the fact that it does not appear to have been raised at the earliest opportunity. This requirement is not a mere technicality, but indeed in some respects a test of the validity of the complaint.
Today the Chair can only come to the same conclusion. This matter was clearly not raised at the first opportunity; the member did not meet this requisite condition, and therefore the Chair will not comment further on it.
I thank all hon. members for their attention.
Je suis maintenant prêt à rendre une décision sur la question de privilège soulevée par l'honorable député de Carleton le 31 mai 2018 concernant des tactiques d’intimidation de la part du personnel du bureau du ministre des Finances aurait usé contre un témoin potentiel.
Je remercie le député d'avoir soulevé la question, ainsi que le secrétaire parlementaire de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre de ses observations.
Selon le député de Carleton, l’Association canadienne des compagnies d’assurance mutuelles a reçu deux appels téléphoniques de la part du personnel du bureau du ministre des Finances, lesquels, à son avis, avaient pour but de dissuader l’Association de s’opposer au projet de loi C-74 lors de rencontres avec des parlementaires ou d’une comparution devant un comité. En bref, il a affirmé que les appels, qu’il a qualifiés de menaçants, pourraient expliquer pourquoi l’Association n’a même pas manifesté l’intérêt de comparaître devant un comité.
En plus de remettre en question la recevabilité de la question de privilège compte tenu du moment où elle a été soulevée, le secrétaire parlementaire a soutenu que l'affaire relève du débat et que, dans le passé, des mesures prises par des fonctionnaires n'ont pas été qualifiées d'atteintes au privilège.
L’importance du moment où la question de privilège doit être soulevée a récemment fait l’objet de plusieurs rappels de la présidence, car les députés doivent tenir compte de cette condition. En l’espèce, c’est encore à juste titre qu’on a invoqué le non-respect de cette condition. La question de privilège aurait pu, et aurait dû, être portée à l’attention de la Chambre bien plus tôt. Il ressort d’un article du Globe and Mail du 15 mai 2018, dans lequel le député de Carleton est cité, que ce dernier était déjà au fait de l’affaire à cette date. La question aurait pu être soulevée à la Chambre à tout moment à compter du 22 mai, soit au retour de la Chambre après la relâche. Le fait que le député a donné avis de sa question de privilège une semaine complète avant de faire valoir son point à la Chambre donne aussi à penser qu’il aurait pu présenter sa question de privilège plus tôt.
À la page 145 de la troisième édition de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre, on explique l'exigence que les députés doivent respecter à cet égard:
La question de privilège dont sera saisie la Chambre doit porter sur un événement survenu récemment et requérir l'attention de la Chambre. Le député devra donc convaincre le Président qu'il porte la question à l'attention de la Chambre le plus tôt possible après s'être rendu compte de la situation.
Dans le passé, les Présidents ont décidé de ne pas donner suite aux affaires qui ne semblaient pas avoir été soulevées le plus tôt possible.
En fait, la Présidente Sauvé a conclu, le 1er mars 1982, dans une décision consagnée aux pages 15473 et 15474 des Débats de la Chambre des communes, qu’une question de privilège soulevée par un député ne constituait pas une atteinte au privilège parce qu’elle n’avait pas été soulevée le plus tôt possible, et je cite:
La première difficulté, c’est que cette question de privilège n’a pas été soulevée le plus tôt possible. […]
Je dois donc refuser de donner à cette question la priorité sur les travaux réguliers de la Chambre, étant donné surtout qu’elle ne semble pas avoir été soulevée à la première occasion. Cette exigence n’est pas seulement une question de forme, mais permet aussi, à certains égards, de juger de la validité du grief.
Aujourd’hui, la présidence ne peut donc en venir qu’à la même conclusion. La question de privilège n’a clairement pas été soulevée à la première occasion. Le député n’a pas respecté cette condition essentielle. La présidence se gardera donc de faire tout autre commentaire.
Je remercie les honorables députés de leur attention.
Collapse
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2018-06-05 15:20 [p.20267]
Expand
moved that Bill C-74, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, and other measures, be read the third time and passed.
propose que le projet de loi C-74, Loi portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures, soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2018-06-01 10:33 [p.20058]
Expand
Madam Speaker, there are actually three points of order or references I am going to have to respond to today, so I will start with the first one.
First, I rise in response to a question of privilege raised by the hon. member for Carleton on May 31, 2018, with respect to alleged ministerial interference with regards to Bill C-74. My hon. colleague, in his statement, argued that his and the members of the finance committee's freedom from obstruction and interference had been breached.
I would argue that the matter before us today does not meet the requirements to be considered a prima facie breach of privilege, but is rather a debate as to the facts. First of all, as you have mentioned on many occasions in recent rulings, matters must be raised at the earliest opportunity. This is not the case here.
In an article dated May 14, 2018, from The Globe and Mail, the member is reported as saying that he would be asking the Speaker of the House of Commons to rule on the issue when the House of Commons resumes next week. This clearly did not happen, as it was a whole 17 days later that the hon. member raised his question of privilege. Secondly, the actions alleged here are related to the actions of a civil servant. These matters have historically not been qualified as a breach of privilege.
In a ruling dated May 15, 1985, Speaker Bosley stated:
I think it has been recognized many times in the House that a complaint about the actions or inactions of government Departments cannot constitute a question of parliamentary privilege.
At no point is there an indication that members of the committee were forbidden from inviting the group as witnesses or that the minister's office had any role in the selection of witnesses. As such, Parliament has acted independently from the minister's office, and there is no ground to qualify these actions as interference.
At the core of the current debate lies the concept of parliamentary privilege. Matters of privilege and contempt can be broadly defined as, one, anything improperly interfering with the parliamentary work of a Member of Parliament, or two, an offence against the authority of the House. The situation brought forward by the hon. member for Carleton does not fit any of these categories, as no individual MP has been impeded and there has not been any offence against the authority of the House.
Failing to see how anyone's rights have been compromised or infringed, I would respectfully submit that this matter does not constitute a prima facie question of privilege.
Madame la Présidente, il y a en réalité trois recours au Règlement auxquels je dois répondre aujourd'hui. Je commence par le premier.
Tout d'abord, je prends la parole pour répondre à une question de privilège soulevée par le député de Carleton le 31 mai 2018 au sujet de l'ingérence présumée des ministres concernant le projet de loi C-74. Le député a dit dans son intervention que son privilège de protection contre l'obstruction et l'ingérence et celui des membres du comité des finances avaient été enfreints.
Je dirais que la question dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui ne répond pas aux critères nécessaires pour être considérée comme une atteinte au privilège de prime abord. Elle relève plutôt d'un débat sur les faits. Tout d'abord, comme vous l'avez dit de nombreuses fois dans de récentes décisions, la question doit être soulevée à la première occasion. Cela n'a pas été fait dans ce cas-ci.
Un article datant du 14 mai 2018, du Globe and Mail, rapporte que le député a dit qu'il demanderait au Président de la Chambre des communes de trancher la question quand la Chambre des communes reprendrait ses travaux la semaine suivante. Cela n'a de toute évidence pas été fait. C'est 17 jours plus tard que le député a décidé de soulever une question de privilège. De plus, les actions prétendument commises dans ce cas-ci sont celles d'un fonctionnaire. Les questions de ce genre n'ont jamais été considérées comme une atteinte au privilège.
Dans sa décision du 15 mai 1985, le Président Bosley a déclaré ceci:
On a admis à maintes reprises à la Chambre qu'une plainte sur les agissements ou sur l'inaction du gouvernement ne pouvait donner lieu à la question de privilège.
Rien n'indique que les membres du comité n'ont pas pu inviter ce groupe à témoigner ou que le cabinet du ministre ait eu son mot à dire sur la sélection des témoins. Le Parlement a donc agi en toute indépendance par rapport au cabinet du ministre. Par conséquent, il n'y a pas lieu de parler d'ingérence.
Le présent débat repose sur la notion de privilège parlementaire. Les questions de privilège et d'outrage au Parlement s'appliquent de façon générale lorsque, d'une part, quelque chose empêche indûment un député d'exercer ses fonctions parlementaires ou, d'autre part, lorsque l'autorité de la Chambre est transgressée. Le cas soulevé par le député de Carleton ne correspond à aucune de ces catégories, car aucun député n'a été gêné dans l'exercice de ses fonctions et personne n'a porté atteinte à l'autorité de la Chambre.
Dans la mesure où les droits d'aucun parlementaire n'ont été lésés, j'estime qu'il n'y a pas, de prime abord, matière à question de privilège.
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2018-05-31 15:42 [p.19996]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I regret to bring to your attention a possible breach of privilege. The matter came to my attention in an article by The Globe and Mail reporter Bill Curry. Mr. Curry indicates that a ministerial staff member allegedly intimidated an important would-be witness to the Standing Committee on Finance. The Canadian Association of Mutual Insurance Companies planned to raise concerns about the budget implementation act's amendments to the Banking Act.
The article stated:
An insurance lobby group says it was the subject of two "angry" phone calls from Finance Minister Bill Morneau's office aimed at blocking it from raising privacy concerns over new measures in the budget bill related to how banks use customer data. In an interview with The Globe and Mail, Normand Lafrenière, president of the Canadian Association of Mutual Insurance Companies, said the first call came on April 12 from the Finance Minister's senior policy adviser, Ian Foucher.
“I was asked not to meet with MPs and senators,” said Mr. Lafrenière, who has led the organization for 25 years after a public-service career that included senior positions at the Finance Department.
Furthermore, the article indicates that a member of the minister's office said this to the group:
Are you going to play ball with us or not? You better not appear in front of committees, and stop talking to senators and stop talking to MPs. Everything will be taken care of through regulations that will be published down the road.
These threatening comments may have prevented members from hearing testimony on an important bill. This group indicated in the same article that it was trying to raise objections to amendments to the Bank Act that had an effect on the privacy rights of Canadians.
The Minister of Finance has enormous legislative and regulatory powers over the industry that the would-be witnesses represent. That is why such a call from his office demanding their silence would have had great power to intimidate.
The group never testified before the House of Commons finance committee. Members of the government may point out that none of the opposition MPs on the committee put the group forward to serve as witnesses. However, and this may be true, but I do not know for sure, that might have been because the group was hesitant to lobby opposition MPs to be put on the witness list in the first place.
In chapter 3 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice, authors Bosc and Gagnon indicate:
A Member may also be obstructed or interfered with in the performance of his or her parliamentary functions by non-physical means. In ruling on such matters, the Speaker examines the effect the incident or event had on the Member’s ability to fulfill his or her parliamentary responsibilities.
For a minister's office to silence a group over which the minister has regulatory power deprives parliamentary committees of valuable witness testimony and prevents members from doing their jobs. I am such a member. I am on the finance committee as a vice-chair, but other committee members would have benefited from having this testimony, which may have been effectively blocked by a threat emanating from the minister's office. If this had been a phone call from just a random person on the street telling a potential witness not to testify, I am sure that potential witness could simply ignore the call. However, when the call comes from the office of the minister that regulates one's industry, and language like, “Are you going to play ball? You better not testify. Don't talk to MPs”, is used, people are obviously tempted to stay silent to protect their interests or to avoid regulatory or legislative harm. That is why I believe that my privileges and those of other members on the committee may have been breached by our inability to hear the witnesses and question them.
Therefore, I ask that you rule on whether it is appropriate for ministerial staff members to tell groups not to testify. I also ask that you determine if this case represents a prima facie case of a breach in privilege.
Monsieur le Président, je suis désolé d'avoir à attirer votre attention sur ce qui semble être une possible atteinte au privilège. C'est un article de Bill Curry paru dans le Globe and Mail qui a attiré mon attention sur la question. M. Curry écrit qu'un membre du personnel d'un ministre aurait usé de tactiques d'intimidation à l'égard d'un possible témoin devant comparaître devant le Comité permanent des finances. L'Association canadienne des compagnies d'assurances mutuelles avait prévu de nous faire part de préoccupations au sujet des amendements à la Loi sur les banques prévus dans le projet de loi d'exécution du budget.
Voici ce qu'on peut lire dans l'article:
Un groupe de pression de l'assurance dit avoir reçu deux appels d'un employé en colère du ministre des Finances, Bill Morneau. Cet employé aurait cherché à empêcher le groupe de pression de soulever des préoccupations relatives à la protection des renseignements personnels. Ces préoccupations découleraient des nouvelles mesures prévues dans le projet de loi d'exécution du budget quant à la façon dont les banques utilisent les renseignements personnels des clients. Au cours d'une entrevue accordée au Globe and Mail, Normand Lafrenière, président de l'Association canadienne des compagnies d'assurances mutuelles, a affirmé que le premier appel a été fait le 12 avril par Ian Foucher, conseiller principal en politiques du ministre des Finances.
« On m'a demandé de ne pas rencontrer de députés et de sénateurs, » a dit M. Lafrenière, qui dirige l'organisation depuis 25 ans, après une carrière au sein de la fonction publique, où il a occupé des postes supérieurs au ministère des Finances.
L'article mentionne également qu'un membre du personnel du cabinet du ministre a dit ce qui suit:
Alors, vous allez coopérer avec nous, oui ou non? Vous feriez mieux de ne comparaître devant aucun comité et d'arrêter de parler aux sénateurs et aux députés. Nous allons nous occuper de tout dans les règlements qui seront publiés plus tard.
Ces menaces ont peut-être privé les députés de témoignages sur un projet de loi important. On apprend dans le même article que ce groupe entendait s'opposer aux modifications à la Loi sur les banques qui avaient une incidence sur la protection des renseignements personnels des Canadiens.
Parce que c'est lui qui fait adopter les lois et qui prend les règlements, le ministre des Finances a énormément d'emprise sur le secteur que représentent ces gens. On peut donc s'imaginer l'effet qu'a pu avoir un tel appel et une aussi forte exhortation au silence.
L'Association canadienne des compagnies d'assurance mutuelles n'a jamais comparu devant le comité des finances de la Chambre. Les ministériels répondront sans doute qu'aucun des députés de l'opposition faisant partie du comité n'en a proposé le nom. Je ne jurerais de rien, mais se pourrait-il que ce soit parce que l'Association n'a pas osé s'adresser à eux pour leur demander de témoigner?
Bosc et Gagnon indiquent ceci au chapitre 3 de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes:
Un député peut aussi faire l’objet d’obstruction ou d’ingérence dans l’exercice de ses fonctions par des moyens non physiques. Dans ses décisions sur ce type de situation, la présidence examine l’effet de l’incident ou de l’événement sur la capacité des députés de remplir leurs responsabilités parlementaires.
Le fait qu'un cabinet de ministre fasse taire un groupe sur lequel le ministre a un pouvoir de réglementation prive les comités parlementaires de témoignages précieux et empêche les députés de faire leur travail. Je suis un de ces membres. Je siège au comité des finances à titre de vice-président, mais d'autres membres du comité auraient bénéficié de ce témoignage, qui a peut-être été bloqué par une menace émanant du cabinet du ministre. S'il s'était agi d'un appel téléphonique d'un quelconque étranger disant à un témoin potentiel de ne pas témoigner, je suis sûr que ce témoin potentiel pourrait simplement ignorer l'appel. Cependant, lorsque l'appel vient du bureau du ministre qui réglemente son secteur et qu'on vous tient un discours du genre: « Allez-vous coopérer, oui ou non? Vous feriez mieux de ne pas témoigner. Ne parlez pas aux députés », les gens sont évidemment tentés de garder le silence pour protéger leurs intérêts ou pour éviter des préjudices réglementaires ou législatifs. C'est pourquoi je crois qu'on a peut-être porté atteinte à mes privilèges et à ceux des autres membres du comité, car nous n'avons pas pu entendre ces témoins et les interroger.
Par conséquent, je vous demande de décider s'il convient que les membres du personnel ministériel disent aux groupes de ne pas témoigner. Je vous demande également de déterminer si cette affaire constitue à première vue une atteinte au privilège.
Collapse
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2018-05-31 15:47 [p.19997]
Expand
I thank the hon. member for Carleton for bringing this to the attention of the House. We will take it under advisement and get back to the House in due course.
I see the hon. parliamentary secretary to the government House leader rising. Is it on the question of privilege?
Je remercie le député de Carleton d'avoir porté cette question à l'attention de la Chambre. Nous prendrons la question en délibéré et nous reviendrons à la Chambre en temps opportun.
Je vois le secrétaire parlementaire de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre se lever. S'agit-il de la question de privilège?
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2018-05-31 15:47 [p.19997]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, this is the first time I have had the opportunity to hear the concerns raised by the member. We will take it, as always, and look into the matter. We will want to report back to the House at some point in time.
Monsieur le Président, c'est la première fois que j'ai l'occasion d'entendre les préoccupations soulevées par le député. Nous en prenons note, comme toujours, et nous nous pencherons sur la question. Nous voudrons faire rapport à la Chambre à un moment donné.
Collapse
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2018-05-31 15:48 [p.19997]
Expand
That is duly noted. In the short time ahead, perhaps when he is able to, we will hear from the parliamentary secretary on the question as well.
Resuming debate, the hon. member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan.
C'est dûment noté. Dans le peu de temps qu'il nous reste, peut-être quand il le pourra, nous entendrons également le secrétaire parlementaire sur la question.
Nous reprenons le débat. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan a la parole.
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2018-05-22 19:02 [p.19484]
Expand
Madam Chair, I will be using the duration of my time for questioning and I will start with part II in the main estimates, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, an office that regulates about 1,200 pensions across the country.
The finance minister introduced a pension bill while owning about $20 million of shares in a pension company. The minister is now under an Ethics Commissioner investigation for that alleged conflict. Has the finance minister spoken to the Ethics Commissioner and been questioned as a result of that investigation?
Madame la présidente, je vais utiliser tout mon temps de parole pour poser des questions et je vais commencer par la partie II, le Budget principal des dépenses, où il est question du Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières, un bureau qui réglemente près de 1 200 régimes de retraite à l'échelle du pays.
Le ministre des Finances a présenté un projet de loi sur les pensions alors qu'il détenait des parts d'une valeur d'environ 20 millions de dollars dans une société de gestion de caisses de retraite. Le ministre fait maintenant l'objet d'une enquête du commissaire à l'éthique pour ce présumé conflit d'intérêts. Le ministre des Finances s'est-il entretenu avec le commissaire à l'éthique et a-t-il été interrogé à la suite de cette enquête?
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2018-05-22 19:03 [p.19485]
Expand
Madam Chair, if the Ethics Commissioner finds the finance minister is guilty of a conflict of interest, would he resign from cabinet?
Madame la présidente, si le commissaire à l'éthique juge que le ministre des Finances est coupable de conflit d'intérêts, celui-ci démissionnera-t-il du Cabinet?
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2018-05-22 20:03 [p.19493]
Expand
Mr. Chair, my question is for the finance minister. The minister's office reportedly called the Canadian Association of Mutual Insurance Companies and told the group, which the office regulates, not to testify at the finance committee on the budget. Does the finance minister think it appropriate for his office to tell witnesses not to speak up on his budget?
Monsieur le président, ma question s'adresse au ministre des Finances. Le bureau du ministre aurait appelé l'Association canadienne des compagnies d'assurances mutuelles et dit à ce groupe, qu'il réglemente, de ne pas comparaître devant le comité des finances pour parler du budget. Le ministre des Finances pense-t-il qu'il est approprié que son bureau dise à des témoins de ne pas s'exprimer sur son budget?
Collapse
View Joël Lightbound Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Joël Lightbound Profile
2018-05-22 20:04 [p.19493]
Expand
Mr. Chair, just to be clear, no stakeholders have been told by the minister's office not to engage with parliamentarians or appear before a committee. We are always open to engaging with stakeholders directly at the department, but no such thing has ever been said to any stakeholder. In fact, it is the prerogative of the member for Carleton to invite whomever he wants to committee. He invited Jason Kenney, and we were happy to welcome Jason Kenney to the finance committee. The department and the minister's office would not discourage stakeholders from engaging with parliamentarians, and it has not been done.
Monsieur le président, je tiens à préciser clairement que le bureau du ministre n'a dit à aucun intervenant de ne pas faire connaître son point de vue aux parlementaires ou de ne pas comparaître devant un comité. Nous n'avons jamais dit de telles choses aux intervenants. Au contraire, nous sommes toujours prêts à nous entretenir directement avec eux au ministère. En effet, c'est la prérogative du député de Carleton d'inviter qui bon lui semble au comité. Il a invité Jason Kenney, que nous avons été heureux d'accueillir au comité des finances. Le ministère et le bureau du ministre ne dissuaderaient pas les intervenants de consulter les parlementaires, et cela n'a pas été fait.
Collapse
View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Scott Brison Profile
2018-05-10 15:13 [p.19340]
Expand
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-77, an act to amend the National Defence Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts.
demande à présenter le projet de loi C-77, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la défense nationale et apportant des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d'autres lois.
Collapse
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2018-04-23 15:14 [p.18611]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to present a petition signed by thousands of people electronically.
Whereas the Minister of Finance until recently owned millions of dollars worth of shares in Morneau Shepell, a firm he was an executive of until elected and a firm with which the federal government does millions of dollars worth of business; that the passage of government bills introduced by the minister, such as Bill C-27, which targets pensions and would make retirement savings less secure and enrich the shareholders of Morneau Shepell, including, until recently, the finance minister himself; that the changes to the tax code proposed by the finance minister will incentivize businesses to move away from pension plans and help shareholders and firms like Morneau Shepell; that Morneau Shepell is handling the close-out of the Sears pension fund, and after emergency debate in the House on the subject of the company's bankruptcy, the government refused to take action, which will benefit the shareholders in Morneau Shepell, and until recently, the Minister of Finance; and that the pattern of the Minister of Finance's non-disclosure and retention of assets could be seen reasonably to be a conflict of interest that has caused Canadians to lose confidence; the undersigned call upon the Government of Canada to immediately withdraw Bill C-27, to disqualify Morneau Shepell from any government contract work, and to remove the finance minister from his position as finance minister.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais présenter une pétition électronique signée par des milliers de Canadiens.
Attendu que le ministre des Finances détenait jusqu’à tout récemment des actions d’une valeur de plusieurs millions de dollars dans Morneau Shepell, une compagnie dans laquelle il occupait un poste de cadre avant d’être élu et une compagnie avec laquelle le gouvernement fédéral a des contrats de plusieurs millions de dollars; que l’adoption de projets de loi du gouvernement présentés par le ministre, comme le projet de loi C-27, qui cible les pensions et qui fragiliserait les retraites des travailleurs, enrichirait les actionnaires et les gestionnaires de firmes comme Morneau Shepell, y compris, jusqu’à tout récemment, le ministre des Finances lui-même; que les changements proposés au code fiscal présentés par le ministre des Finances inciteraient les propriétaires de petites entreprises à investir dans des régimes de pension privés, ce qui enrichirait les actionnaires et les gestionnaires de firmes comme Morneau Shepell; que Morneau Shepell est responsable de la liquidation du régime de retraite de Sears, après le rejet d’une demande de débat d’urgence à la Chambre des communes concernant la faillite de l’entreprise, ce qui sera financièrement avantageux pour les actionnaires de Morneau Shepell, y compris, jusqu’à tout récemment le ministre des Finances; et la tendance du ministre des Finances à ne pas divulguer et à conserver des biens qui pourraient raisonnablement être perçus comme pouvant causer un conflit d’intérêts a fait en sorte que le ministre n’a maintenant plus la confiance des Canadiens; nous, soussignés, citoyens et résidents du Canada, prions le gouvernement du Canada de retirer immédiatement le projet de loi C-27, de déclarer Morneau Shepell inadmissible à recevoir des contrats du gouvernement, et de retirer le ministre Bill Morneau de son poste de ministre des Finances.
Collapse
View Jody Wilson-Raybould Profile
Ind. (BC)
View Jody Wilson-Raybould Profile
2018-04-16 12:03 [p.18289]
Expand
moved that Bill C-74, an act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
propose que le projet de loi C-74, Loi portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février 2018 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
Collapse
View Pat Kelly Profile
CPC (AB)
View Pat Kelly Profile
2018-04-16 15:59 [p.18329]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is always an honour to rise in this place, even during difficult times such as today when it is with somewhat of a heavy heart one rises after the tributes we heard on the terrible tragedy in Saskatchewan.
It is also sometimes difficult to rise in trying times such as these when so much is at stake for the future of our country, even as we grapple with the ongoing crisis over the Trans Mountain expansion and the implications that a failure of that project would have for all future projects in Canada.
This budget implementation act necessarily brings us back to the budget that it implements. The bottom line of any budget, and really the first thing that anyone wants to know about a budget, is whether it is going to be a surplus budget or a deficit budget. Any analysis, criticism, or commentary has to take place in the context of the size and scope of any surplus or deficit. All the choices of inclusion or omission from a budget have to be viewed through that lens.
In the case of a deficit, it is customary to address the question of when the budget will return to surplus. I say this is customary because indeed it is. In fact, all 13 provincial and territorial governments either have a balanced budget or have a specific timeline or projection for when their budget will be balanced, and it is contained in their budget.
The finance minister is currently running a significant deficit, and neither the budget nor this implementation act make any mention of the means or timing of a return to balance. I raised this with the minister when he appeared before the finance committee last month. I asked him why he is the only finance minister in Canada who has no plan for a balanced budget, and why he did not even address the issue in a 400-page budget document. He said, “No matter how many times the Conservative members ask us to follow the playbook of the previous Conservative government, we won't do it.” I may disagree with the minister on the point of whether or not he should follow the Conservative playbook, but at this point I think most Canadians would settle for this government merely following its own playbook.
On page 12 of the 2015 Liberal platform, its playbook, it reads:
We will run modest short-term deficits of less than $10 billion in each of the next two fiscal years to fund historic investments in infrastructure....
After the next two fiscal years, the deficit will decline and our investment plan will return Canada to a balanced budget in 2019.
On page 72 under the fiscal plan and costing chapter it reiterates, “We will run modest deficits for three years so that we can invest in growth for the middle class and credibly offer a plan to balance the budget in 2019.” Later on in the same chapter it says, “After the next two fiscal years, the deficit will decline and our investment plan will return Canada to a balanced budget....” The Liberal playbook refers to balanced budgets, and in fact, the Liberals promised balanced budgets. They promised small deficits and a return to a balanced budget.
Given that the Liberals promised a balanced budget by 2019 in the 2015 election, given that they promised only short-term deficits of less than $10 billion, and given that they promised these short-term deficits only to fund historic investments in infrastructure, the question is why they are now implementing a structural deficit in a budget with over a $20-billion deficit. Why does the finance minister repeatedly refuse to give any timeline for a balanced budget at all? Why does he bizarrely criticize the Conservatives for even asking about a balanced budget when he ran on an election platform that contained that very promise?
In fact, the finance minister got lucky this past year. The Canadian economy benefited from a whole host of factors, for none of which the finance minister can take any credit. Commodity prices were better than forecast. The world economy has had perhaps its best year since the great recession. The American economy was positively booming with a record-setting stock market run. Real estate price inflation has continued in Canada. Interest rates have remained low. Even with all of these factors in his favour, the finance minister still ran a promise-breaking deficit in this budget following what will surely be one of the strongest economic years in this Parliament.
If the minister promised to return to balanced budgets, he has completely failed to deliver, and it is more than reasonable for opposition members to ask if not now, then when. Given that a return to balance was a huge part of the Liberals' election promise, we would not be doing our jobs as an opposition holding the government to account without asking that question and no answer has been given so far. Still, there really is nothing in the bill to address that question either.
There is, however, in the original budget a troubling item contained on page 290, and that is a recognition of the fact that Canadian oil sells at a significant discount to world prices due to a lack of pipeline capacity in general and the routing of existing pipeline capacity mostly to the oversupplied Cushing, Oklahoma hub rather than to tidewater or to other refinery areas with spare capacity. This discount from world prices, which the government commented on in the budget itself, has grown significantly worse in the past few months.
This difference between the price that our producers get and world prices has a significant impact on business profits and jobs in the industry. The discount has an enormous impact on tax revenues to both the oil-producing provinces and to the federal government itself and it dictates the viability or non-viability of future projects. Simply put, this discount means that we are actually exporting tax revenue and public services to the United States.
Using round numbers, Canadian exports are about three million barrels a day. If Canadian producers take a $20 discount, that means the industry loses $60 million a day, or roughly $22 billion per year. A significant portion of that $22 billion will be taxable income at both the federal and provincial levels. The federal government loses billions in tax revenue because of this price differential, so it cannot be ignored as a factor in the budget.
What is truly alarming today, given the debacle over the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain expansion, is that the finance minister, in his budget, assumes that both Trans Mountain and Keystone XL will be built at a reduced price discount. We obviously know that these assumptions are being challenged right now. Both projects at best will delay projected revenue from profitable oil production, but in typical fashion, the finance minister has just assumed that the pipelines will be built even though a host of opponents are doing everything they can, including breaking the law, to prevent these pipelines from getting built.
The finance minister surely knows that he has cabinet colleagues who oppose the energy industry, that he has caucus colleagues who campaigned in the last election against the Trans Mountain expansion, and that the most senior unelected adviser to the Prime Minister is notoriously anti-pipeline. Therefore, it was a fairly bold assertion for him to simply assume the Trans Mountain and Keystone XL pipelines would be built. Both projects are behind schedule. Both continue to be opposed by extremists committed to everything from vexatious litigation to violent clashes with police while defying court orders, trespassing, and destroying private property.
Given the government's track record, what credibility does it really think it deserves on pipelines? The finance minister's budget assumes the pipelines are going to be built, and yet one of the first things the government did after it was elected was to kill the northern gateway project, which was a pipeline to tidewater approved previously. The proponent was working through the conditions and the concerns that had been raised about the project when the Liberal government used an arbitrary tanker ban to ensure that it could never be built.
Then the Prime Minister completely failed to get Barack Obama to approve Keystone XL, which added another couple of years to the delay of that project. The finance minister is counting on this project to reduce the differential that has to be taken into account in his tax revenue projections.
We know energy east was killed by the government's decision to move the goalposts on its proponent by absurdly deciding to make both upstream and downstream emissions part of the criteria. I say absurd because the emissions from fossil fuels moved through a pipe are mostly determined by the type of vehicle the fossil fuel is put into by the end consumer.
Now the government is even pushing through Bill C-69. At the environment committee, the president of the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association said, “It is hard to imagine that any pipeline project proponent would be prepared to test this new process or have a reasonable expectation of a positive outcome at the end of it.” He went on to say, “If the goal is to curtail oil and gas production and to have no more pipelines built, this legislation may have hit the mark.”
What is the finance minister going to do if the capital flight that has been under way for months cannot be reversed? What is he going to do if nobody will invest and create jobs in the resource sector? What is he going to do if interest rates exceed his expectations? What is he going to do if there is a real estate price correction? What is he going to do if the NAFTA renegotiations end in trade restrictions that damage Canadian access to the American market? Even with everything going his way he cannot balance the budget. Was he going to do it if any of these eventualities happen or any of the hundred other unforeseen events should happen? Now is the time to establish a fiscal cushion to prepare for the inevitability of difficult times ahead.
The budget is not balanced. There is no plan to balance it. There is no date for the budget to be balanced. There is no plan that will get pipelines built, which has a significant impact on the finance minister's ability to balance future budgets. There is no apology by the Liberals to Canadian voters for breaking their promise on the deficit in the first place. There is nothing in the budget implementation act to address any of these issues.
What does this bill do? It makes certain changes to the Income Tax Act to implement changes announced by the Minister of Finance last summer on the taxation of Canadian-controlled private corporations, and other tax changes that we are now getting to the point where the CRA has to actually implement them.
We know that on July 17, the Minister of Finance dropped his bombshell announcing that too many wealthy Canadians were using complex corporate structures to avoid taxes. He went on to announce, following a brief summertime sham consultation, that the Liberals would ram through private corporate tax changes to severely restrict dividend payments between related shareholders, the so-called sprinkling, eliminate the dividend tax credit, which would create the double taxation of passive income with rates at about 73%, and make it virtually impossible to sell a business to a relative, among other things.
I am sure that every member of this House heard from small business owners who do not have a pension, do not have a minimum wage, do not have the protections of employment law, and cannot collect employment insurance. They have to be 100% liable for the conduct of their own employees, who they also cannot sue for gross negligence. What all of these people, these hard-working business owners, heard in the summer was the wealthy finance minister called them tax cheaters.
What happened after that announcement was remarkable. Business owners and tax experts all across Canada spontaneously rose up and with diverse voices unanimously spoke in opposition to every aspect of the minister's proposals. This grassroots opposition did cause the government to partially backpedal on some of its plans contained in this bill. The part of last summer's announcement that many found the most egregious was the double taxation of passive income. Therefore, in December, the finance minister backpedalled and said there would be a limit under which the double tax would not apply. What he did instead in the budget, was he said there would now be a tie-in between passive income and access to the small business rate, which will now be reduced or eliminated for small business owners who have passive incomes of greater than $50,000.
My suggestion to addressing the problem that he created back in the summer was simply a complete retraction of what the Liberals had announced then, and an apology to all of the hard-working small business owners across Canada who were deeply wounded by the bold assertions the finance minister made. Let us face it. The reason the finance minister and the Prime Minister believe that small businesses are really just tax dodges for the wealthy is that they themselves use private corporations to dodge taxes. All the while he was pointing his finger at shopkeepers, farmers, plumbers, realtors, accountants, doctors, lawyers, engineers, taxi drivers, and restaurant owners, the finance minister, that wealthy-born one percenter, was found to have failed to disclose the private corporation he used for tax planning purposes to shelter income and future gains on his French villa. Contrary to his past statements and all expectations of a minister of the crown, much less a finance minister, the finance minister still owned millions of dollars of Morneau Shepell shares.
How was that fact concealed from the public for almost two years? The shares were held in a private numbered company the finance minister registered in Alberta, presumably for tax-planning purposes. It was owned by him, his wife, and another Ontario numbered company. For the first time in the span of a few months, the finance minister was found not only to be personally using complex corporate structures to avoid paying tax but was using them to avoid requirements of the Conflict of Interest Act.
It is high time for this finance minister to end his war on small-business owners and to apologize for his own hypocrisy instead of proceeding with changes to the Income Tax Act contained in this bill.
If passed, this bill would also hand over to the CRA responsibility for dealing with the changes to the tax on split income and the reduction of the limit on the small-business tax rate for small businesses with over $50,000 in passive income.
As shadow minister for national revenue, I could not help but notice that 2017 was a particularly tough year for the Minister of National Revenue and her agency. Every time we turned around, it seemed the agency had a half-baked plan to raise additional tax revenue at the expense of some vulnerable group or another, such as when the minister spent the entire months of October and November insisting that the CRA had done nothing to deny the disability tax credit to type 1 diabetics, despite the fact that it was obvious to everyone except her, and perhaps her parliamentary secretary, that of course the CRA had changed its forms in May 2017 to make it harder to qualify.
The agency also changed its folio to state that after 2017, it would tax employee discounts and meals, but the minister again seemed to be the last person at the agency to be aware that this was being done, before she ordered a reversal. The agency also appeared to be targeting single parents, restaurant-server tips, and disabled Canadians, who suddenly had problems qualifying for the disability tax credit.
On top of that, tax preparers complained about an ever-increasing backlog of corrections and appeals caused by sloppy or incompetent assessments, and a scathing Auditor General's report confirmed that the agency's call centre hangs up on people 64% of the time and gives incorrect information to 30% of the rest who get through.
To an agency already struggling, and a minister who is clearly not in control of her department, this bill would now add a complex reasonableness test for dividends paid to related shareholders of private corporations. Let us think about that. An agency that hangs up on people and is wrong almost a third of the time when it speaks to taxpayers would now have to answer questions about things like the reasonableness of the payment of dividends, questions about share classes, questions about labour contributions, questions about property contributions, questions about the financial risks assumed, and a great catch-all, questions about such other factors as may be relevant.
How on earth can Canadians expect that they will get reliable answers to these questions, given the track record of both the current government and the CRA's call centre? These questions have been asked here in this House and at committee meetings and even at public meetings attended by the minister, and nobody from the government has been able to give anything but the most vague and hypothetical answers to these questions. Canadians might be forgiven if they are a bit worried that nobody knows the answers to these questions and that the legality of thousands of Canadians' tax planning is going to be at the mercy of future court decisions.
It would be very easy to go on for a lot longer about different aspects of this act, such as the implementation of the higher taxes on beer, wine, and spirits and the escalator clause; and certainly about the carbon tax, which is also part of the government's horrific mismanagement of its natural resources policy and an outrageously regressive tax on the poorest and most vulnerable members of society. However, time marches on, so I will wrap up.
I would like to conclude by urging members to vote against this bill, given that it would increase taxes; would fail to even address the very concept of a balanced budget; would do absolutely nothing to get pipelines built, the very same pipelines the budget needs for its own tax revenue; would help facilitate this minister's war on small business through the changes to the taxation of private corporations, and of course, would enable the job-destroying, poverty-inducing carbon tax. Therefore, I will be voting against this act, and I urge all other members to do so as well.
Monsieur le Président, c’est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole dans cette enceinte, même dans les moments difficiles comme aujourd’hui, où je m’exprime le cœur lourd après avoir entendu les hommages dans la foulée de la terrible tragédie survenue en Saskatchewan.
Il est également parfois difficile de prendre la parole dans une conjoncture difficile comme celle d'aujourd'hui, alors que les enjeux pour l’avenir de notre pays sont si grands, que nous sommes aux prises avec la crise entourant le projet d’expansion du rése