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Results: 1 - 60 of 131
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-06-19 14:39 [p.29387]
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Mr. Speaker, this Prime Minister is the first in Canadian history to be found guilty of violating the Conflict of Interest Act not once, but four times. He took $215,000 of taxpayer money to travel illegally with his family and friends to the Aga Khan's private island. These offences could constitute a violation of subsection 121(1) of the Criminal Code.
I have one simple question for the Prime Minister. How many times did he meet with the RCMP and the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-06-19 14:41 [p.29388]
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Mr. Speaker, let's talk about the SNC-Lavalin affair and Vice-Admiral Norman.
The Prime Minister tried to cancel Davie's contract to help his Liberal Party friends. The Prime Minister did everything in his power to destroy the reputation of Vice-Admiral Norman, an honest and conscientious man of integrity, just as he did to the former justice minister and the former president of the Treasury Board.
Why did the Prime Minister try to ruin the careers of these honest people who simply wanted to stand up for the interests of Canadians?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-05-02 14:34 [p.27299]
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Mr. Speaker, Canadians thought that after the sponsorship scandal the Liberals would turn over a new leaf. What we are seeing today is that the Liberal organization has not changed its culture. The Prime minister and leader of the Liberal Party was found guilty of breaching the Conflict of Interest Act four times. Furthermore, the Federal Court wants to reopen the investigation into his family trip to the Aga Khan's island.
Will the Prime Minister agree to reopen the investigation and collaborate?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-11 14:17 [p.27001]
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Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is politically interfering in a court case. He is denying the truth, resorting to intimidation, and trying to silence all those who do not think like him.
If the Prime Minister has any courage at all, even just a little bit, will he agree to follow through on his notice so that we can all find out the truth in this case? Is he afraid to testify under oath?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-11 14:18 [p.27001]
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Mr. Speaker, for four days now, we have been standing in this place and asking the Prime Minister whether he intends to follow through on his notice. We are told “yes” over and over again, but that he needs to change his story. He has not changed it and keeps repeating it every day. He stands by everything that has been said. This is nothing but bullying on the part of the Prime Minister, because he is not happy when anyone has different ideas.
Will he show some courage and follow through on his notice, so that we and all Canadians will hear the whole truth?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-10 14:48 [p.26929]
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Mr. Speaker, we are faced with a Prime Minister who has been flatly denying the truth from the beginning, ever since The Globe and Mail broke the story on the interference scandal involving him and his entourage.
He was unsuccessful at silencing all the Liberals, so now he is bringing out a new Liberal tactic. He is threatening our leader with legal action, purely in the hope of silencing the members on this side of the House.
Does this Prime Minister have the guts to follow through on his notice?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-10 14:49 [p.26929]
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Mr. Speaker, from the beginning, the Prime Minister has been repeating that there was no political interference. Today, everyone knows that is untrue. He said that the former attorney general never shared her concerns with him, but we now know that is not true either.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, then he should follow through on his notice. We, on this side of the House, are not afraid of the truth. In fact, the truth is all we are asking for. Canadians all want to know the truth.
The Prime Minister should show a little courage and follow through on his notice.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-09 14:22 [p.26878]
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Mr. Speaker, on March 29, our leader issued an official statement in a press release in which he said that the Prime Minister engaged in political interference, personally gave orders, denied the truth, and had therefore lost the moral authority to govern. Our leader stands by everything he said and even reiterated it yesterday.
If the Prime Minister has the slightest sense of leadership, will he proceed with his lawsuit so we can all find out the truth of this matter?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-09 14:23 [p.26878]
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Mr. Speaker, it is rather ironic that the Liberal Prime Minister is trying to lecture parliamentarians here in the House when he himself violated the Conflict of Interest Act four times. The Prime Minister is claiming that what our leader said is false. He reiterated that yesterday evening.
If he wants to demonstrate even a little bit of leadership, will he follow through on his threat so that he can testify under oath in court, yes or no?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-08 14:33 [p.26809]
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Mr. Speaker, when the Prime Minister does not like what he is hearing from people who do not agree with him, he kicks them out of his caucus.
Now he is using a new tactic. He is suing people to silence them. If the Prime Minister thinks he can intimidate the Leader of the Opposition or silence us, he is dead wrong.
When will he proceed with his lawsuit?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-08 14:34 [p.26810]
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Mr. Speaker, first the Prime Minister denied the facts, then he changed his story every week, then he kicked out two upstanding ministers because they did not agree with him, and now he is threatening a lawsuit to intimidate and try to silence the opposition.
The Prime Minister is dead wrong if he thinks that his new tactic will work. If he has nothing to hide, he should follow through on his threat, present the evidence and testify under oath.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-04 14:22 [p.26685]
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Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has been misleading the House for more than eight weeks now. On February 7, he said that claims in this interference scandal involving him and his office were false. He denied everything and then changed his story every week. Yesterday in the House his memory magically came back to him and he ended up admitting that the former attorney general's concerns had been brought to his attention.
Can the Prime Minister tell us why he has such a hard time remembering the truth?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-04 14:23 [p.26685]
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Mr. Speaker, Canadians simply want the truth.
La Presse requested the Michael Wernick documents on November 1 and December 15. The department normally responds to these requests within 30 days. The newspaper was told that the documents would not be ready for 240 days. Coincidentally, that would be four weeks after the election.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, will he release the documents to the media and to Canadians, yes or no?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-03 14:48 [p.26623]
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Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister just said that he was proud of having a gender-balanced cabinet. However, when two women had the courage to be transparent and honest and to tell the truth, the first thing he did was remove them from the Liberal caucus and send them to this side of the House.
Meanwhile, the problem is still there. The Prime Minister interfered in the legal system on a case involving criminal charges.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, will he give La Presse access to the document from the former clerk of the Privy Council, Michael Wernick, so that we can have all of the information between November 1 and—
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-03 14:49 [p.26623]
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Mr. Speaker, my question was simple. La Presse has requested access to all of Michael Wernick's documents from November 1 to December 15.
How did the government respond? It said the documents would be available in 240 days, in other words, four weeks after the election. What a coincidence.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, will he stand here today, before this House and before Canadians, and promise to make those documents available, as requested by La Presse?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-02 14:41 [p.26588]
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Mr. Speaker, the Liberals keep saying that the interference scandal involving the Prime Minister, his office and his inner circle is false and that the matter is closed. Since this morning, the government House leader has been repeating that all the information is now public.
If that is true, will she or the Prime Minister, if he decides to answer the question, agree to make all of Michael Wernick's documents available to all Canadians, as requested by the media and press, yes or no?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-02 14:42 [p.26588]
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Mr. Speaker, I do not think the leader is listening to my questions. My question was simple. La Presse asked to see the documents on Wernick, the former top public servant.
The process should take 30 days at most, but the newspaper was told that the documents would be available in 240 days. This would be after the upcoming election.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, why does he not release all of the information to Canadians?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-01 14:22 [p.26514]
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Mr. Speaker, the interference scandal involving the Prime Minister and his office has been dragging on for over two months.
On day one, the Prime Minister outright denied everything. Then he changed his story from one week to the next. Audio recordings and written submissions were released on Friday, clearly confirming that the Prime Minister and his office interfered and tried to cover up a scandal involving a criminal prosecution.
What new version will the Prime Minister give us today? Will he finally tell Canadians the truth?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-04-01 14:23 [p.26514]
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Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister refuses to hold a public inquiry. He refuses to testify before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. He refuses to let all the relevant witnesses speak freely. The allegations of interference came from Liberal members. We did not make anything up. The allegations came from Liberals who are currently sitting in the House. All we ask is that privilege be waived so that we can get to the bottom of this business.
Seeing as Gerald Butts has more documents to submit, will the Prime Minister let the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights find out the whole truth?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-03-20 14:48 [p.26178]
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Mr. Speaker, Canadians want the truth. However, the Prime Minister refused to call a public inquiry. He refused to testify before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. He refused to let us hear from his senior staff who work in his office. He is refusing to waive solicitor-client privilege for the former attorney general.
Since he shut down the work of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, where we could perhaps have learned a little more, will the Prime Minister agree to testify before the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-03-20 14:49 [p.26178]
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Mr. Speaker, the justice minister resigned, the Treasury Board president resigned, the Clerk of the Privy Council resigned, and the Prime Minister's principal secretary resigned, which is interesting because he is the Prime Minister's friend and supposedly did nothing wrong.
Today we learn that another Liberal MP has abandoned the Liberal ship because she was unhappy with the job. The Prime Minister is hiring private lawyers to defend himself with Canadians' money, but he did nothing wrong.
My question is simple. Will the Prime Minister agree to testify at the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-03-01 11:28 [p.26016]
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Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday, we heard the powerful testimony of the former attorney general and former justice minister.
She stated that various officials had urged her to take into account partisan political considerations. That was clearly inappropriate.
The Liberal's conduct is completely unacceptable.
Will the Prime Minister do the right thing and resign?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-03-01 11:30 [p.26016]
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Mr. Speaker, I cannot believe what we are hearing in the House right now.
The former attorney general was very clear on Wednesday. She said that she had faced repeated pressure from individuals at the Prime Minister's Office, individuals at the Privy Council, the Minister of Finance and his entourage, and the Prime Minister himself. She faced constant pressure for four months from 11 individuals. That is unacceptable.
What is the Prime Minister waiting for to resign?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-27 14:37 [p.25855]
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Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in her letter to the chair of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, the former attorney general of Canada said that she would not be able to speak freely about the interference by the Prime Minister and his cronies. If we understand correctly, everyone who has appeared before the committee has been able to tell everything they knew, except the former attorney general. She will be the only witness who cannot speak freely.
Could the Prime Minister just tell us why he is trying to muzzle her instead of freeing her to tell Canadians everything she knows?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-27 14:38 [p.25855]
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Mr. Speaker, we on the opposition side are not making this up. It is the former attorney general herself, who remains a Liberal member sitting on that side of the House, who clearly said that she does not have free rein to speak before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. She will not be able to speak about what happened when she was veterans affairs minister. She will not be able to speak about what happened during the meetings in Vancouver before she resigned. She will not be able to speak about what happened during last week's cabinet meeting and Liberal caucus meeting after she resigned. She will not be able to speak her truth, because the Prime Minister does not want to give her—
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-26 14:23 [p.25799]
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Mr. Speaker, Canadians want to know the truth about the SNC-Lavalin case.
However, yesterday, the Prime Minister and the Liberal members refused the request for the Prime Minister to testify before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
Will he answer a simple question? Did anyone in the PMO or any of the ministers close to him assure SNC-Lavalin that there would not be a criminal trial, yes or no?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-26 14:24 [p.25799]
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Mr. Speaker, I asked a very simple and perfectly legitimate question. Did a cabinet minister, the Prime Minister's Office or anyone from the Prime Minister's inner circle tell SNC-Lavalin that it could avoid a criminal trial for the matter we are now all aware of, which was brought to light over three weeks ago?
Why is the Prime Minister refusing to explain his actions to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-25 14:30 [p.25735]
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Mr. Speaker, on September 4, the director of public prosecutions decided that SNC-Lavalin was not entitled to a remediation agreement, and the blitz to try to influence the former attorney general began. The Prime Minister tried to influence her at a meeting on September 17, and his top adviser and friend followed suit on December 5. Many others in the Prime Minister's inner circle also tried the same trick.
Did the Prime Minister clearly try to influence the former attorney general?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-25 14:31 [p.25735]
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Mr. Speaker, right now, the government is changing its story day by day, getting up to all kinds of monkey business in an attempt to influence our justice system. The director of public prosecutions made her decision on September 4. She confirmed that decision on October 9. Nevertheless, the Prime Minister and his cronies repeatedly tried to get her to change her mind.
We want to know whether the Prime Minister will agree to appear before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights to answer all of the opposition's questions.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-25 16:47 [p.25755]
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Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill.
I am very pleased to talk to members of Parliament today about our party's opposition motion, which reads as follows:
That, given the Prime Minister's comments of Wednesday, February 20, 2019, that the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights is the appropriate place for Canadians to get answers on the SNC-Lavalin affair, and given his alleged direct involvement in a sustained effort to influence SNC-Lavalin's criminal prosecution, the House order the Prime Minister to appear, testify and answer questions at the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, under oath, for a televised two-hour meeting, before Friday, March 15, 2019.
This is a very important matter. Essentially, the motion states that the Prime Minister is hiding his involvement in this case. His involvement is serious because it constitutes interference in our justice system. Some might even say that, in Canada, attempting to influence a judicial process is a crime.
This has been going on for just over two weeks, and in the past few days, it has become clear that the Prime Minister is a key player in this matter. We are talking about the Prime Minister of Canada. He is surrounded by important people who advise him and do his work on the ground behind the scenes, in an attempt to protect him. These people play a key role in the scandal that broke just over two weeks ago.
If the members of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights do not have an opportunity to question the Prime Minister directly, we will never know the full truth. He is hiding to avoid giving the real version of the facts.
For the benefit of those watching at home, I will now give a brief overview of everything that has been said in the House of Commons or in the media over the past two weeks.
This all began with a budget implementation exercise in which the Liberal government tried to sneak through legislation to allow for remediation agreements.
What is a remediation agreement? It is a way to prevent a corporation from being convicted of fraud or corruption. These types of agreements are also designed to protect the jobs of the people working for the corporation, so they are not penalized for management decisions that may involve corruption in some cases.
Rather than following the path of transparency and including this in a justice bill, the Prime Minister surreptitiously slipped it into a budget from the finance department so that no one could ask any questions.
In doing so, no parliamentarians from any party, including senators, could ask the justice minister any questions in an effort to improve the bill, which would have been the right thing to do, to see what the Liberals' real intentions were, or where they wanted to go.
Time passed, and on September 4, 2018, the director of public prosecutions announced that the government could not negotiate a remediation deal with SNC-Lavalin.
The director of public prosecutions is neutral, and she works closely with her legal experts and advisers. Under no circumstances should any parliamentarian attempt to influence her decisions. Apparently, the Prime Minister decided that the director of public prosecutions had not made the right decision. The former attorney general, who was also the justice minister at the time, endorsed and supported that decision.
Then, rather curiously, on September 17, 2018, the Prime Minister met with the former attorney general to discuss the matter.
In the days that followed, there was a blitz of meetings with very influential people and SNC-Lavalin lobbyists. They tried to influence the former attorney general's decision in the matter. On December 5, Gerald Butts, senior adviser and friend to the Prime Minister, pressured the former attorney general. As I pointed out, so did the Prime Minister, on September 17.
On December 19, Mr. Wernick, this government's top public servant, told the former attorney general, who should be independent and has experts to provide her with legal advice, that, in his opinion, she had not made the right decision. I said “in his opinion”, but I could say in the Prime Minister's opinion. I would like to point out that the director of public prosecutions confirmed this decision once again on October 9. The decision was confirmed on two occasions.
It appears that if you do not agree with the Prime Minister, you are wrong. That is when the monkey business started and pressure was brought to bear to try to change the former attorney general's mind. It was not enough to be told no. It was not enough to apply pressure. She refused to budge, and we all know where that landed her. After the holidays and before the House resumed, there was a cabinet shuffle. Suddenly, this justice minister, whom no one had complained about, lost her job just because she did not want to do the Prime Minister's bidding. She believed in her heart and soul that she had made the right decision. The Prime Minister and his advisers should never have pressured her.
That is what gave rise to what is now being called the SNC-Lavalin scandal. That is what the media is calling it. It is not an SNC-Lavalin scandal, it is the Prime Minister's scandal. That is the reality. We should be focusing on that and allowing the former attorney general to speak. She is asking to speak, but just an hour ago she refused to appear before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights because she would not have the complete freedom to give her side of the story. We will not know what happened. We will once again be left with a Prime Minister who hid the truth and was not transparent with people.
Then, there was a dramatic turn of events. After the Prime Minister blamed former minister Scott Brison for stepping down and said that what happened may have been his fault, and after saying that neither he nor his close collaborators ever interfered in the matter, we saw his principal adviser and close friend step down. He did not step down because he made a mistake. He said he stepped down because he did nothing wrong. That is incredible. No one here called for his resignation even though he was the Prime Minister's best friend and principal adviser. The fact is that he stepped down simply to protect the Prime Minister from the fallout of the major mistake he made in this file.
The strange thing is that the Prime Minister has given several different versions of what happened. First, he said that the allegations were false. Then he blamed the former attorney general for the confusion. He is shifting the blame because he is unable to take responsibility for his own actions. He said that the Ethics Commissioner's investigation would be enough to get answers in this case.
I would like to remind everyone that he is the only prime minister in the history of Canada to have been found guilty by the Ethics Commissioner four times. That has done nothing to change his behaviour.
He reminded the House that the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights is independent and impartial, but then he refused, via the Liberal committee members, to accept the proposals that the Conservative Party made to the committee.
What is more, the member for Mount Royal said that it was the former attorney general's fault because she did not speak French. Those same members make a huge deal about trying to defend French. Everything that we have heard is rather unbelievable. The story has been changing every day for the past two weeks, and we still do not know the truth about this scandal.
I would like to remind members that this scandal is not about SNC-Lavalin, but about the Liberal Prime Minister. It is an obvious failure. The election is approaching. Canadians have the right to know the truth about this matter.
Lastly, according to Jean-Claude Hébert, it is obvious that the Liberal government committed a serious parliamentary blunder by inserting such changes into the Criminal Code via a federal budget implementation bill.
We need to shed some light on this matter, and we expect the government and this Prime Minister to tell Canadians the whole truth.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-25 16:59 [p.25756]
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Mr. Speaker, if the government and the Prime Minister have nothing to hide, as the member opposite says, then why is the Prime Minister choosing not to waive the solicitor-client privilege binding the former attorney general and justice minister?
Why will the Prime Minister not vote in favour of our motion to have him explain his actions to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights?
All we want is the truth, and that is what Canadians want too. If they have nothing to hide, the Prime Minister and the former attorney general should appear before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights to answer questions transparently in public. All we are asking for is transparency.
Canadians are smart. They will be able to see through the rhetoric. Believe me when I say that, on October 21, we will clean up the mess on that side of the House.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-25 17:02 [p.25757]
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Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for that very important question.
When I take a look at the situation, my trust in this Prime Minister is not very high. However, I would think that in committee, in front of the cameras, faced with a barrage of questions from all the opposition parties, he would have no choice but to tell the truth, because if he lied, Canadians would see it on his face.
One of the reasons I do not really trust him has to do with the senior official who appeared before committee last week and said that cabinet never discussed this file. That contradicts what the Minister of National Revenue said on the radio last week, when she told the host that she could not talk about discussions that were held within cabinet. Even the Prime Minister said that he could not talk about it because these cabinet discussions were confidential. We see that there are two versions and that the Prime Minister is not telling the truth, which is very unfortunate for Canadians.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-21 14:23 [p.25629]
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Mr. Speaker, on September 4, after carefully reviewing the case, the director of public prosecutions decided to pursue criminal charges.
Why did the Prime Minister choose to meet his former attorney general and justice minister 13 days later, on September 17? Why?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-21 14:24 [p.25629]
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Mr. Speaker, the question is simple.
The day after September 4, 2018, after the director of public prosecutions launched a criminal case against SNC-Lavalin, ministers and their staff met with people from the company. I am talking about people in the Department of Finance and the Department of International Trade, the office of the Clerk of the Privy Council and the Prime Minister's Office.
If the decision had already been made by the director of public prosecutions, why did the Prime Minister think it was appropriate to meet with his former attorney general?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-19 14:29 [p.25512]
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Mr. Speaker, last week, the former justice minister resigned. Yesterday, the Prime Minister's top adviser, who is also his best friend, resigned. This all came about in the wake of serious allegations that the Prime Minister's Office pressured the former attorney general of Canada regarding a fraud case. Canadians want the truth, and only one person can give it to us.
Why will the Prime Minister not waive the former attorney general of Canada's solicitor-client privilege?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-02-19 14:30 [p.25513]
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Mr. Speaker, every day since the Globe and Mail broke this story, the Prime Minister has given us a new version. Oddly enough, his story changes day by day.
Yesterday, his principal secretary and close personal friend resigned from his job while saying he had done nothing wrong. However, the situation is serious. This is about political interference in the justice system. There is one person who can give her side of the story and tell Canadians the truth, and that is the former attorney general of Canada.
Could the Prime Minister just let her speak?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2019-01-29 15:09 [p.24978]
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Mr. Speaker, constituents of Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel have been waiting seven months for an answer about the special status of the Liberal member.
On June 22, he announced that he was resigning. On September 27, he changed his mind. On November 14, he announced on his Facebook page that he would resign on January 22. We were just officially notified that he is resigning.
Unfortunately, the constituents of Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel are suffering because of the member's seven-month absence and soon the lack of representation for several more months.
The question I would like to ask the Prime Minister is simple: does he intend to call a by-election before the end of the term, or will the constituents be without an MP for more than 17 months?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-12-05 14:37 [p.24445]
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Mr. Speaker, a director from a company with ties to the Liberals, notably the Minister of Innovation, made a really good deal. He bought land from the Ontario government for $3.3 million and sold it a back a few months later for $4.4 million. Talk about a deal. It is so questionable that the City of Brampton asked the RCMP to investigate.
Now that we know this director went on the Prime Minister's disastrous trip to India, we would like to know who invited him.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-12-05 14:38 [p.24445]
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Mr. Speaker, allow me to refresh the Prime Minister's memory.
This administrator, Bhagwan Grewal, is a former Liberal association president. He is a Liberal Party donor. He went on the India trip and even took the time to have his picture taken with the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development so he could keep a nice souvenir of that great trip to India.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, when will he present the official list of all his VIP guests who were with him on his trip to India, which was paid for by Canadian taxpayers?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-12-04 14:29 [p.24404]
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Mr. Speaker, if the Liberals think they can threaten and bully the members on this side of the House into silence, they are profoundly mistaken.
Yesterday, the Minister of Innovation refused to answer simple questions relating to a National Post article about a troubling, sketchy transaction that took place in Brampton. The municipality even filed an official complaint with the RCMP.
Here, again, is my question. What is the Minister of Innovation's connection to that company?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-12-04 14:31 [p.24405]
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Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons can talk louder, shout or make threats all she wants, but I can assure her that our knees are not knocking. On the contrary, we are going to stand tall on this side of the House.
If the Minister of Innovation does not want to disclose what ties he has with that company's executives, can he tell us why several of the company's directors took part in the Prime Minister's disastrous trip to India?
Why did this minister take a photo with one of these directors, who is a former member of a Liberal association?
Why have this company's executives made donations to the Liberal Party?
These are all legitimate questions.
Has the Minister of Innovation been contacted by the RCMP? If so, when?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-12-03 14:19 [p.24314]
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Mr. Speaker, according to the National Post, the City of Brampton asked the RCMP to investigate a troubling situation.
Two Liberal members, including the Minister of Innovation, received confidential information about the price the City of Brampton offered the Ontario government in a land deal. What happened? A private sector company purchased the land only to resell it quickly at a huge profit.
My question for the minister is simple. How is he connected to that company?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-12-03 14:20 [p.24314]
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Mr. Speaker, I do not understand why the minister is being so defensive. If he has done nothing wrong, why will he not answer the questions he is being asked? At least one of the company's directors took part in the Prime Minister's disastrous trip to India. The minister even took a photo with one of the company's directors, who is also a former Liberal riding association president. On top of that, many of the company's directors are Liberal Party donors.
It is a simple question. Did the RCMP contact the minister and, if so, when?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-11-28 14:37 [p.24091]
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Mr. Speaker, this week, The Globe and Mail reported that not only did the Liberal member for Brampton East gamble away millions of dollars at casinos—and by the way, we wonder where he got all that money—but he was also under RCMP investigation for months. This is an extremely worrisome, even troubling, situation. This is another case of a Liberal MP caught up in some wild shenanigans.
My question for the Prime Minister is simple and is the same as the one my colleague asked just now.
When did the Prime Minister find out that the RCMP was investigating this member?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-11-28 14:38 [p.24091]
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Mr. Speaker, we are talking about a Liberal MP. Last I checked, he had not been expelled from caucus. He was part of the delegation that went to India, the disastrous trip the Prime Minister organized with several other members, in case anyone has forgotten. The Liberal member even invited his old boss to come along. It is actually rather ironic, when you think about it. He was a member of the Standing Committee on Finance and was asking the RCMP about how it investigates money laundering. The Prime Minister is telling us today that he has known about this situation only since last week.
Can he confirm the date?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-11-05 14:19 [p.23254]
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Mr. Speaker, no information has been collected, but the Privacy Commissioner has started an investigation. That is interesting.
I now want to talk about another issue that is worrying more and more Canadians.
On April 25, the member for Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel announced that he was quitting politics. On June 12, he gave his farewell speech here, in the House, to all parliamentarians, saying that he was quitting politics. On September 27, he suddenly announced that he would take a month to reflect on his future in politics. In a recent development, we have learned that the Prime Minister apparently gave him a secret mandate.
What is this secret mandate that the Prime Minister gave Liberal agent 007?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-10-16 14:30 [p.22451]
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Mr. Speaker, the President of the Treasury Board, a Liberal, lobbied for Irving. Everyone knows the member has close ties to the Irving family. To lobby on behalf of a corporation, the member needs prior authorization from the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner.
My questions are simple. Did the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner authorize his lobbying activities? Why is the Prime Minister's Office hiding these documents?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-10-15 14:31 [p.22331]
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Mr. Speaker, Vice-Admiral Norman is a man who courageously served Canada all his life. It is unfair and unacceptable for the Liberal government to fail to give him every opportunity to defend himself. The documents that have been requested include communications between an Irving lobbyist and the Liberal member for Kings—Hants, who coincidentally enough is also the President of the Treasury Board.
My question is simple. Did the President of the Treasury Board get clearance from the Ethics Commissioner to lobby on Irving's behalf?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-06-19 14:14 [p.21265]
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Mr. Speaker, I want to take a moment to congratulate the new member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, Richard Martel.
After six months with no one to represent them, the people of this magnificent region will finally have a voice in Ottawa. They chose an authentic, passionate, and hard-working man I have gotten to know over the past few months. I could not be prouder to be welcoming this new member of Parliament to our big, beautiful caucus.
The people of Chicoutimi—Le Fjord sent a strong message to the Liberal government and the rest of Canada. The Conservative Party is the only serious alternative to the current government, and it is the only political party that can defend Quebec's interests in Ottawa within a strong, united Canada.
I want to congratulate Richard on his resounding victory last night. I also want to thank all the members of our wonderful Conservative family and all the volunteers for their tireless efforts throughout this campaign. I want to thank everyone who is making sure the riding of Chicoutimi—Le Fjord will have a worthy representative here in the Parliament of Canada.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-05-22 14:41 [p.19446]
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Mr. Speaker, after the Minister of Finance was found guilty of conflict of interest and the Prime Minister was found guilty four times of conflict of interest for his trip to the Aga Khan's private island, we now learn that it is the turn of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Coast Guard, who is favouring his friends and family in the allocation of fishing licences.
I have a simple question for the Prime Minister. What is he waiting for to do what any good manager would do, namely take this file out of the hands of the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Coast Guard and start the process all over again?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-05-22 14:42 [p.19446]
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Mr. Speaker, the problem is that this is not an isolated incident. Again, there is the Minister of Finance, the Prime Minister, and the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard. It feels like the sponsorship scandal all over again.
Now we can add to the mix the hon. member for Brampton East, who is under investigation for a conflict of interest after inviting a business partner to official events during the Prime Minister's disastrous trip to India.
When will the Prime Minister ensure that his caucus obey the basic ethics and conflict of interest rules that all Canadians expect us to obey here in the House?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-04-24 12:50 [p.18674]
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Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise in the House today to talk about a critically urgent issue that Canada's Parliament needs to address. That issue is the crisis involving refugees currently crossing our borders illegally.
It is important that those tuning in understand how this situation came to pass, because it is a rather sensitive subject. Things often get mixed up. We know that Canada has a labour shortage and needs a certain level of immigration to meet its needs and support diversity. However, there is another problem, namely that some people are not following the rules.
If we look back to the not-too-distant past of January 2017, we see that one person did something very irresponsible. That person was our Prime Minister. In January 2017, he posted a tweet in response to what was happening on our southern border. As we know, tweeting can be a very powerful tool to send a message to the entire world. He tweeted, “To those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength. #WelcomeToCanada”.
Imagine all of these people that we are seeing crossing the border on the news every evening coming with their cellphones displaying the message from the Prime Minister that says, “welcome to Canada” without any note or link to tell them the proper procedure for coming to our beautiful and magnificent country. According to the Canada Border Services Agency, in 2017 alone, over 20,000 refugee claimants crossed the border “irregularly”. That is the term some members are using to downplay the situation, but the truth is that those people crossed the border illegally. Nearly 90% of them crossed the border into Quebec.
Canadians expect their immigration system to work efficiently in a orderly, safe, and predictable manner. It is also important that the system be fair. Immigrants who cross the border illegally are clogging up the system. A government analysis indicated that it may take the Immigration and Refugee Board up to 11 years to process all of the claims and supporting the system could cost Canadian taxpayers $2.9 billion.
The worst part is that there is no funding in this government's budget for the Immigration and Refugee Board. There is a serious lack of organization and planning on the part of our Prime Minister, the Minister of Finance, and the Minister of Immigration.
The vast majority of people who enter Canada illegally are deported, but only after having used the services meant for refugees or legitimate asylum seekers. In fact, under the Liberal government's previous rules, 50% of Haitian refugees were rejected. Therefore, despite everything, and after all the mixed messaging, the government has to send the migrants back, no matter the human cost of it all.
The worst part is that our Prime Minister is doing absolutely nothing to change the message he is sending in order to fix the situation. There has been nothing but inaction from this government, this Prime Minister, and this Minister of Immigration.
Journalist Claude Villeneuve described the Prime Minister's conduct as dangerous for Canada and its interests.
Now, here is the situation in Quebec. Schools in the Montreal area are currently having difficulty dealing with the situation. Five school boards raised the alarm with the Quebec government. The schools are already overflowing. There is simply not enough room for these new arrivals who are adding to all the hard work of Canadians and Quebecers to accommodate those who really need to be here and who respect the rules for entering the country.
Last summer alone, an additional 2,500 children entered the school system, the equivalent of five large elementary schools in Quebec. They require more space, professional resources, teachers, principals, and managers, not to mention the extra burden they place on the health care system.
The province’s reception services have reached a level of saturation, and Quebec does not have the resources to continue accepting asylum claimants right now. The opposition parties are often told that they never have anything to propose and that all they do is criticize the government, but that is not true. We have made proposals, and the government needs to take action.
First, the government must find a solution concerning the Canada-U.S. safe third country agreement, particularly with the United States. We believe that, by setting up a system that would designate our entire border a border crossing, we would avoid having all these people try to manipulate the system and cross between official ports of entry along the border. That would solve the problem quite simply by giving border officers the legal tools they need to do their job.
This is not just poor Liberal management of our immigration system, although we should not be too surprised, considering the way in which they manage the country’s finances, but a serious lack of compassion on their part for human beings who are being given the wrong information and who will, in the vast majority of cases, have to return to their country with all the hopes the Prime Minister gave them dashed.
Instead of helping people who really need help, this government allows its programs to accumulate huge backlogs and then refuses to manage the influx of refugee claimants entering Canada. We are at a point where obeying the law is a mistake for some people and where people are better off entering the country illegally.
Here is a bit of history. In 2017, although the situation was in the news almost all summer, there was no immigrant crisis, according to the federal Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship. We want to solve a problem, and the Minister of Immigration is denying the very existence of the crisis. In my opinion, he is one of the only Canadians who cannot see it, along with his Prime Minister and Liberal colleagues.
In December 2017, not too long ago, during the last holiday season, financial assistance to the asylum seekers arriving by the thousands in Quebec skyrocketed and reached $41.6 million for the previous 11 months.
In January 2018, more than 40,000 asylum seekers were awaiting their hearing before the board, and the Customs and Immigration Union indicated that the Prime Minister's government was not prepared to meet the needs of Salvadorean migrants.
In February 2018, public servants started dealing with asylum seekers on a first-come, first-served basis, since the number of applications had been increasing steadily for four years. This was just two months ago. More than 47,000 new cases were filed with the board in 2017 alone.
In March 2018, Ottawa decided not to reimburse the Government of Quebec, which was asking for $146 million in response to the Prime Minister's and his government's decision to open all of the major crossings instead of putting applications through the legal process. In April 2018, we hit 49,000 applications. This is just getting started and the numbers are increasing.
I spoke about 2017. However, today, there are 20,000 claims in the system for a total of 90,000. This year alone, people who have crossed the border illegally have made 6,373 claims, including the more than 5,600 from Quebec. At this rate, the number of claims will double.
This is what we are asking of the government in this motion:
That, given the government’s failure to address the crisis created by the influx of thousands of illegal border crossers travelling across our southern border between ports of entry [I want to point that out], that the agencies responsible for dealing with this crisis have found gaps in security screening for newly arrived refugee claimants, as well as a backlog in both scheduled hearings and carrying out deportation orders, and that this trend is expected to increase over the summer months; the House call on the government to:
(a) ensure the agencies responsible for our borders are properly equipped so that they can continue to do their jobs effectively and that those arriving at Canadian borders go through the appropriate processes;
(b) admit the Prime Minister’s irresponsibility of tweeting #WelcometoCanada to those seeking to enter Canada through illegal means;
(c) take responsibility for the massive social services costs burdening the provincial governments;
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-03-27 14:38 [p.18159]
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Mr. Speaker, during the Prime Minister's catastrophic trip to India, the director of national security, Daniel Jean, organized a briefing for journalists on what has now become known as the Atwal affair. Oddly enough, yesterday, the Minister of Public Safety indicated that this information had magically been classified as confidential.
Why is the Prime Minister refusing to give MPs and Canadians the same information that he gave journalists on Parliament Hill? What is he trying to hide?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-03-27 14:39 [p.18159]
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Mr. Speaker, what constitutes a confidential document for the Government of Canada? A confidential document is one that contains information that, if compromised, could cause injury to the national interest, defence and maintenance of the social, political, and economic stability of Canada.
I would therefore like to repeat my question to the Prime Minister. Why did the Prime Minister give journalists information that was classified as confidential and that started a diplomatic conflict with India, and why is he refusing to give that same information to MPs and Canadians? What is he trying to hide?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-03-19 14:40 [p.17654]
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Mr. Speaker, a terrorist convicted of attempted assassination was invited to an official dinner with the Prime Minister. There are two possible explanations for this. A Liberal MP says he invited the felon, but the Prime Minister himself says it was an Indian conspiracy.
How can it be an Indian government plot against a Canadian trade mission if a Liberal MP says he is the one who invited that person, that terrorist?
If the Prime Minister has evidence, let him present it to the House and answer questions to bring transparency—
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-03-19 14:41 [p.17654]
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Mr. Speaker, this is serious. The Prime Minister's national security adviser said there was a conspiracy theory, and the Prime Minister publicly supported the allegation. The Indian government categorically denied it. Now the Minister of Foreign Affairs is calling it a simple mistake. A simple mistake? Some 19 MPs and ministers take a trip to India, a terrorist gets an invitation, the PM does a half day's work in eight days in India, all on the taxpayers' dime, and this is being called a simple mistake.
Will the Prime Minister apologize to the Indian government and to all Canadians?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-03-01 14:22 [p.17542]
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Mr. Speaker, no one is talking about our public service, and no one is disparaging the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.
What we are talking about is the Prime Minister's senior adviser, a person who works very closely with him as part of his duties.
On Tuesday, the Prime Minister told the House that the presence of the terrorist Jaspal Atwal at events attended by the Canadian delegation in India was part of a conspiracy by members of the Indian government to sabotage his visit to India.
My question is simple. Does the Prime Minister still believe in this conspiracy theory? If so, all he has to do is table the evidence in the House.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-03-01 14:23 [p.17542]
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Mr. Speaker, here is what India's Minister of External Affairs said:
Let me categorically state that the Government of India, including the security agencies, had nothing to do with the presence of Jaspal Atwal [in India]. Any suggestion to the contrary is baseless and unacceptable.
What a strongly-worded and extremely serious statement. Does the Prime Minister agree with it? If not, what has he done to prove otherwise?
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-02-28 14:48 [p.17464]
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Mr. Speaker, here are the facts. On the one hand, a Liberal MP apologized for inviting a terrorist to attend an event with the Prime Minister in India. On the other, the Prime Minister is insinuating that the Indian government tried to sabotage the trip by inviting the terrorist to India with him.
As anyone would expect, the Indian government reacted strongly to those insinuations by the Prime Minister and his chief adviser.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, he should table his evidence in the House.
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View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alain Rayes Profile
2018-02-28 14:49 [p.17464]
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Mr. Speaker, indeed, we will continue to focus on the Prime Minister, because his performance has been a diplomatic disaster.
While his national security adviser was suggesting that the Indian government wanted to sabotage the Prime Minister's visit because he was not happy with the media coverage he was getting of his family trip to India, the Prime Minister made some serious accusations. The Indian government has denied all the allegations, calling them baseless and unacceptable. This is all very serious.
If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, he needs to produce the evidence to support his allegations.
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