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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you.
Thanks again, Minister. I look forward to talking with your officials in the next hour.
Madame Minister, in follow-up to my colleague's question, I'm a little stunned at the response. One of the named sources that have castigated Canada for failing to deliver its fair share of aid is the OECD. In the development co-operation review of 2018, the OECD severely criticized Canada for the drop in percentage of GNI of aid. Have you provided a response to their concerns, and if so, could you provide that to the committee?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
I have some questions about that, which perhaps I could ask you.
If you have responded to the OECD, I would appreciate you providing that to us. It's an issue of concern raised by every development organization in Canada.
A concern that has been expressed to me is that the department, to its credit, did consult with Canadian civil society on how it plans to deliver the action items under the feminist international assistance policy, but there has been no response. They're wondering when they can expect the guidance.
There was another independent review by the Canadian International Development Platform. They also had the same criticism: When can we expect that there will be some level of guidance?
Where the concern really exists is less so in the organizations that are interested in delivering increased assistance to women, the ones that historically have delivered assistance in things such as sanitation, agriculture and water. When can Canadian civil society expect to finally receive that guidance?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Thanks. We look forward to getting that guidance.
We're currently reviewing how Canada could support democratic governance, and we're hoping that before Parliament closes we might have some type of recommendations to you. I noted in your feminist international assistance policy that one of your action items is actually on that. There has been some disagreement about whether they relate to the SDGs.
I notice in your report that your policy specifically addresses SDG 16. Can you advise me whether it's your understanding that SDG 16 also includes support for democratic governance; and if so, do you intend to move forward to provide more assistance in that area?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Madam Minister, I want to follow up on what my colleague asked about with respect to the SRHR. There is concern expressed that we don't know yet if the government's committed to going beyond the three-year pilot. Is there an intention going forward to give long-term commitment to the SRHR?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Mr. Chair, can we remind the minister that we'd appreciate that report, her report that was given to OECD.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-30 10:04
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Thank you very much.
Thank you, all, for appearing.
I prefer to say “Your Excellency”. We're very grateful for how kind you were when we had our delegation to Ukraine quite some time ago. I didn't realize you were in the department, and it's great to see.
I'm not going to ask you a question about it, but I do hope that there will be follow-up. We are doing this study, as my colleague Ms. Vandenbeld has said.
I'm deeply troubled that, several budgets back, only 4% of the budget was on democratic development. I think you can anticipate that we'll be asking for more. It is one of the action items in the policy, and it obviously is not delivering properly if it stays at that small percentage.
I would like to ask, first of all, two questions related to emergencies and humanitarian assistance.
A number of issues have been raised with me by civil society organizations since I gained this portfolio. First, consistent with the feminist international assistance policy, have you established or do you intend to establish a dedicated pool of aid for gender in emergencies? In other words, a dedicated pool, not just giving money.
Second, Canada has committed that 25% of its aid is supposed to go to local actors; in other words, organizations in the receiving countries for humanitarian assistance. Have you tracked the money going to local groups, and if so, can you release that?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-30 10:06
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My first question was: Have you established or will you establish a dedicated pool of aid for gender in emergencies as opposed to the one-off like Rohingya?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-30 10:07
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You can see why I asked the question. This is a broader question that many are asking—many who have provided emergency assistance and many who have provided engineering assistance and water and sanitation. You've now got this feminist international assistance policy that supposedly overrides everything. The question is: Is there a set-aside, dedicated fund for that, or is all aid now only going to be about assisting women?
I think people are seeking greater clarity. The answer you're giving is exactly why people are puzzled about how that matches up with the new policy.
I won't push it any further but I think there still isn't certainty. There was an earlier question that I put to the minister and it's related to that. Questions have been raised about when we will actually see the more detailed guidelines on how we're delivering the action items under the new policy. That's one of the areas.
My other question is about international assistance for climate change and sustainable development.
The responsibilities in the cabinet appear to have gone from....The statute imposes the duty on the Minister of the Environment, with some responsibility now for the President of the Treasury Board. It jumps from minister to minister. Sometimes it is Minister Monsef and then it's Minister Duclos, who went to the UN meeting.
So far as the feminist international assistance policy is the override, and part of that deals with climate change and environment, who has the budget and who is taking the lead on delivering our commitments on sustainable development?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-30 10:10
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The Minister of Environment and Climate Change signed the international—
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-30 10:10
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Okay. If I have more time, I'd like to follow up.
It remains confusing.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-16 10:18
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Thank you very much, Your Excellency. It's always good to have you here.
Mr. Dzhemilev, welcome back to Canada again.
I have to say on behalf of my colleagues and everybody here that we admire your relentless advocacy on behalf of the Tatar people. It is an exhausting campaign, and you are a remarkable man. Thank you so much.
I know that my colleagues, as well, would welcome.... I'm not sure that we have the list of the additional Russian people who we think should be included on the Magnitsky list. My party campaigned relentlessly during the previous government and in this government to expand that list against the Russian oligarchs, members of the military, businessmen and so forth. We would welcome receiving that list and joining the campaign to extend that list.
My question to you, sir, is about the International Criminal Court. Clearly this is a case of genocide that has just not started with the seizure of Crimea, the most recent seizure, but has gone on and on for decades, if not hundreds of years.
I'm curious to know if you've received any support in bringing cases toward the criminal court. My guess is that these perpetrators fly directly from Crimea back to Russia. I'm wondering if, in any circumstances, they fly into Europe or into Ukraine, and if there is any campaign to seize some of these people and begin proceedings against them.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-16 10:22
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I'm wondering, sir, if you could give us some suggestions of other nations that we might increase our dialogue with, nations that may be major trading partners with Russia on energy, agriculture and so forth, so that we could put our efforts not just on ending any purchase that we might make, any trade we have, but also on other countries to get them on board.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-16 10:25
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In closing, I'll say that it's our honour to support the motion that Borys is bringing forward in the House. We're pleased it's coming forward. It's our honour to be able to support this call to act against the genocide.
Thank you very much, sir.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-05-08 16:49
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Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. It's a pleasure to join you at the finance committee.
I'm particularly interested in the testimony of Mr. Richter and Mr. Morrison, and I want to thank you both for your submissions.
I have two questions, and I will let each of you respond to them. Of course, our party is deeply disappointed that the government rejected the bill we presented that would have created and enacted a binding right to housing, which would have delivered on our international commitments. Thank you for raising that again.
Mr. Richter, two reports have come out recently. One is by Jan Reimer's organization on shelters in Alberta for women and children. When our housing critic and I met with her, she said very clearly that the crisis they're facing is not only the creation of the shelters and the fact they're having to turn away so many people, but also that the costing and the monies coming over are not sufficient to cover the additional counselling and assistance they need. It isn't just a case of providing housing; there are those additional needs.
Mr. Morrison, thank you very much for your comments on indigenous housing. Frankly, I see no reason why UNDRIP cannot be specifically put into that bill. I have brought forward those amendments to two federal laws and they have been rejected. UNDRIP needs to be made legally binding, not just in the preamble—so thank you for raising that. Nothing is stopping the government from doing that, despite the fact that Romeo Saganash's bill has not gone through yet.
I think they're all really excellent suggestions. Thank you for raising the issue of the need for urban indigenous housing. There has been a consistent attitude of federal governments, both Liberal and Conservative, to deny their obligation to indigenous people living in urban areas, which of course constitutionally.... You don't suddenly not become the responsibility of the federal government because you're living in an urban area.
I would like to hear a response from both of you on what you might have to say about both the Alberta and the national reports that have come out on shelters for women and children, and a little more about the need for greater attention to urban indigenous people. I know that in my city, a huge percentage of the population is urban aboriginal, and there's a great dearth of housing.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:04
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Thank you very much. Thank you, all of you, for coming and appearing.
Mr. Gerrard, you had said—and correct me if I'm wrong—that 90% of the canola has been sold and priced. Does that mean that only 10% is left in the bins and not sold?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:04
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Only personally, so my question to you would be, do we have a handle on what percentage of the canola remains in the farm bins, where it's plummeting in value, where it has either not been sold or not been priced?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:04
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I think he has an estimate.
Go ahead.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:06
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Okay. Thanks.
It would be my understanding, then, that a lot of farmers' ability to pay for the seed will be impacted, even if they decide to plant canola this year. There will be a hit to a lot of our growers, not only this year but next year. Are any of the growers running into problems being able to finance even buying the seed right now for canola or any other product?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:07
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I just met with some of the Alberta growers who suggested to me that there have been some sales of canola oil to China. Do we have any kinds of concerns or are there threats that they will stop the sale of the canola oil as well, or do you think that if revenue could be garnered, including from the federal government, there's potential to expand the value-added? Is that going to help some of the growers, at least in the interim term?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:08
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I noticed that France imports a fairly considerable amount, though it's nothing compared with China, Japan or Mexico. But Germany is only the second European country.... Is that because it's a GMO crop? Is that why Europeans are not buying the canola?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:08
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How about the rest of Europe?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:09
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Okay, I know it's been—
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:09
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They do buy the canola oil.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:09
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Okay. I understand a lot of it is for machinery, though, not necessarily for human use.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:09
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So if we completely lost—
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-09 17:09
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Okay, somebody else can ask the question.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:17
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Vacation in constituency week?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:19
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I have some.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:26
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Thank you very much.
It's my first time at this committee. I always wondered what PROC gets up to. I have to say, I'm shaking my head at this one. I'm wondering if we can have some of the members of Samara actually follow a member of Parliament one day, and see that we don't have a second in the day to do something additional. A parallel chamber, I'm like....
I have lots of questions about this. You make a good point with omnibus bills, but time after time, the opposition asks for those to be separated, to go to the appropriate places, which are the relevant standing committees, and we don't get that. That would be my preference, rather than going to some nefarious room that isn't taken as seriously.
I think there are many things that could be done to make this place more democratic, and to not only give more opportunities to the elected members, but to the public, scientists and experts to come in and testify, so that we can hear their opinions.
The big question I would raise is that I think a lot of people would think this sounds exciting, because we're actually finally going to have debates. We don't really have debates in this place. One person speaks, and then another person speaks and another person may get to speak. I think that if there were a mechanism, not necessarily another House, but if there were time set aside each year, where we were generally going to have debates, then there could be agreement on the topics of the day.
Say, for example, we have a genuine debate about how we're going to resolve pharmacare. It's not just people giving speeches; you actually have an interesting debate, and maybe panels of experts.
I looked at these other two parallel chambers and in some cases, it seems like those are exactly the things we do in the House. I'm wondering why we need a parallel chamber. My biggest bone of contention is with majority governments. What guarantee is there in this second chamber that it's not all going to be taken up by majority government members? Who's going to decide who gets more time to debate? Big issues like that need to be discussed.
What's the intent of this? Is it to give opportunity for those who aren't getting a fair chance to speak the chance to speak? We have the frustration right now where many can't even table their private member's bill because of procedural actions by the government of the day.
I'm wondering if you've discussed those kinds of issues with these other two jurisdictions about whether they have dealt with some of these issues, and where they think this second chamber helps any of those issues.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:30
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What happens in the second chamber?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:31
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Other than having to find another chamber, which is already a challenge around here with Centre Block closed—
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:31
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Our caucus can't even meet over there anymore because there's no room for it, so I don't know how we're going to have another chamber. However, in addition to another chamber, we're going to need clerks and interpreters. There's increasing pressure that we would have indigenous interpreters.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:31
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I think, then, that in any consideration of this, we're going to have to think about the whole ball of wax of what it would cost to deliver this.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:32
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I think the family-friendly aspect is going to be a big issue. I think one of those meets at 4:30 in the afternoon. I don't think there will be a lot of favour for that.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:32
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Well, we don't want any candles in here. We already lost one House of Commons.
I think the key to it, as well—if you would even consider it—would be that we're going to have to completely change who gets to set the agenda and who gets to choose what is being debated that day. Right now in our committees, the majority government members decide all of that. If we really want to provide an additional opportunity for other members to participate, those kinds of things are really going to have to be democratized, I would suspect. I think there have been a lot of proposals to try to better democratize the House proceedings as they are, and my suggestion would be to maybe work on that first before we start inventing another chamber.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:43
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I think that the House leaders and the whips are important people to include in this discussion about what the possibilities and the implications are. I know they're challenged enough as it is making sure people show up to fill spots in committee, show up to a vote and be in the chamber to support people when they're speaking and so forth. It would probably be good to hear from them about what complications there might be for them or how we could take that into consideration.
I am deeply concerned about any proposal about spending more when we already have commitments, for example, to be coming up with the dollars to provide interpretation for indigenous and we're not doing that. For example, the committee I just came from agreed for the first time to translate their report into four languages. I think that these kinds of things are going to increase in cost. We need to be thinking about the commitments we've already made in the House of Commons and through committees before we start adding on and then ratcheting back.
Those kinds of factors are really important to look at. When we're looking at interpretation, we're now looking at more complications on things like that. I think costing clearly will be a big one that probably various leaders will ask for—certainly the Speaker's office and so forth.
Who is going to decide the agenda and what debates will occur? Is it going to be different from the way it is right now, which is essentially the majority of members at every committee? Different committees operate more convivially than others. Is this chamber going to be different, particularly if David is saying that it should give more opportunity to the backbenchers? There's a heck of a lot more backbenchers in the majority Liberal government right now than there was in the Conservative majority government.
Those kinds of things.... You'll have more enthusiasm in the members of Parliament if they think that is generally going to give them an opportunity to be debating.
This idea is coming, as I understand, from Samara. They did that report on the frustrations former members of Parliament had with democracy and so forth. Part of it, too, is that the public wants to hear more of what the various parties and members of Parliament think. I haven't really heard anybody talk about the role of the great unwashed public in this.
Is that room going to have to allow for substantial audiences? That is another issue because they can come and sit in on our debates in the House. They'll probably want to sit in on some of these debates, particularly if they recommend them.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:59
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I'd have to talk to my party about that.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 11:59
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Well....
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:02
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They're not necessarily appropriate witnesses.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:02
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They would become the—
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:35
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Here's my perspective, having been here for 11 years.
Rather than going back in deep dark history when we burned the place down, why would we not first of all try to make this place—what we have—more democratic? Basically we have a system where the government, with procedure rules, can simply control the agenda. It varies from committee to committee, but they have the majority and they can decide what they're going to talk about and for how long, and who the witnesses are.
I think that's where a lot of the frustration is. When you're the third party or you don't have party status, you have very little chance to speak in the House. I don't think we're dealing with the democratic actions in the House. I'm not convinced that setting up yet another chamber is going to resolve the frustrations of a lot of members, and that includes backbenchers in majority governments.
I have a couple of questions.
First, what makes you think that party influence and discipline are going to be removed from the second chamber? Are members going to be free all of sudden to express their opinion if it's against the government's position, or even the opposition party's position? How is it going to be set up? Is it going to be first-come, first-served? We have 180-plus backbench Liberals who are probably going to be keen to have a chance to finally stand up and debate something keen to their constituency. How would that be balanced out? Who's really going to decide what the topics are and who gets to speak?
Also, why couldn't petition debates be made part of the House agenda, like maybe once a month? I think that would be fascinating. Instead, they just table them and say that the responses have been issued. Other than sending out the responses to the people who signed the petition, nobody else ever knows what the government response was.
There are a whole lot of things that could be done with the current regime without increasing the amount of work. Is there then going to be pressure on the opposition members and the backbenchers—“Well, why aren't you proposing something in the other chamber”—and adding that to their agenda?
Also, the majority government has all kinds of members that they can send around. The smaller parties are pressured as it is. They have to be in the House. They have to be in committee. Some of them may be travelling with committee. It's a different kind of proposition. If you have a whole lot of members, it's, “Oh yes, we can probably do something in the additional chamber.” I think that needs to be thought through as well.
I would love to also see some good ideas coming forward on how can we make the current chamber more democratic and interesting to the public.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:39
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How are you going to change that?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:40
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I don't disagree with what your concern is, and I think that's a challenge, but I question how you are going to, all of a sudden, transform somebody into not caring what their cabinet minister, their whip, the House leader or the caucus has decided is their position. It's a nice idea, but that's the challenge. I would be interested to know if any of that changed in Australia and England.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:41
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That would be an issue that would be worthwhile, talking to the elected members in those two countries: whether they genuinely became freed up from party discipline. That's what you want to have happen, so I think it would be really useful to find out. Did that actually happen in those parallel chambers?
We have media panels every day, and people are still saying the party line. All of a sudden because it's in a different room, I don't know if it'll change, if it is still broadcast. It's a challenge, but it would be interesting to find out in those two countries if in fact there was a transformation and people felt....
If it were more of a discussion as opposed to a debate—you're looking at an issue and everybody is coming up with innovative ideas—how are we going to resolve that? That's a possibility, but if you're debating a bill that has been in the House and those lines have already been drawn, it's interesting.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:43
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I think on studies in committee that happens sometimes, but not so much on a bill.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:52
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Then you could do that in the second chamber, presumably.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-04-04 12:53
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By consensus is a great concept.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you very much.
Thank you for appearing before us.
Loyce, thank you for coming all the way from Zimbabwe. I visited your beautiful country in 1986, when the country was in I'd say a much more positive and different situation. Thank heavens we've been able to keep you healthy.
You have reported that Canada is the seventh and I understand that's in the G7. What's the differential between the top donors in the G7 and what Canada's giving?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
It's encouraging that Canada is giving a 24% increase, but of course we're still only at one-third of what we should be donating globally. We'll just keep the pressure up, because Canada can afford to give more, not just to the Global Fund, but obviously the Global Fund is in need.
I'm curious to follow up a bit more and Loyce may be able to speak to this. You spoke a bit to the significant blockages and barriers to being able to reach everyone. Obviously money would be one. I wonder if you can speak to whether some of the problems are simply the denial of the problem.
When I travelled at the same time to Malawi, the Government of Malawi was denying that they even had HIV. I'm wondering if there's still some vestige of that, of the government not admitting to the scale of the problem, particularly in diseases like HIV. Is it also a problem that we're simply not addressing poverty or education?
I'd love to hear from Loyce.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
My understanding is that the Global Fund not only helps to provide medicines to people who have contracted these diseases, but do you also work in the area of trying to prevent the spread, for example, of TB or prevent people contracting malaria? Is there more that could be done about that? Again I go to the issue that, even in our country, they say that one of the main causes of illness is simply poverty. I would like to hear more about that, about the bigger analysis of why it is that we haven't been able to address these problems yet.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
I have to say that personally I find you the most important witnesses we've had here, and I wish we could have you all day.
Some committees have expanded into six hours as of last night, but I don't think this one will, unfortunately.
Whatever entity might be set up, I think it would be very valuable to continue dialogue with both of you and your organizations.
There are many questions. The first is—and we talked at the beginning about this—whether the answer to Canada's providing more assistance in building effective democracy and human rights and justice and anti-corruption is to create yet another organization or whether we should be flowing the money through the number of entities we have already in Canada. That's the first challenge we have to face.
If the decision were that we recommend yet another organization, where did we go wrong with the last organization we had?
The third question is: If we create an organization, should it be an organization that directly helps to deliver this knowledge and support, or would it become a funding entity like Mr. Lamarre's organization? We've heard from both.
I welcome your advice on this. Frankly, I think it would be good to follow up, if you're willing to send to us your best advice, because obviously Mr. Lamarre's organization simply funds.
Mr. Lamarre, I'm very interested in the process you follow. I used to work for the Commission for Environmental Cooperation. We were established by Canada, the United States and Mexico. We had a program with a slush fund, and funds were given out to local organizations.
I know that Canada already does some of this work—building judiciary and so forth. Some of the groups we've talked to actually have bases in some of the receiving countries, and that helps them to identify appropriate organizations. You, however, seem to have a unique process whereby the local organizations themselves apply to you for funding. Could you speak to me about why you've chosen to go in that direction?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
I'll go back to you and you can tell me how we can impose that firewall, but maybe we can hear from Mr. Lamarre.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
I have so many more questions, but my time is up.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-28 10:12
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Thank you to all three of you.
I look forward to invitations to your events. I've been here for 11 years, and it's the first time I've heard of the group.
I think it was you, Mr. LaRose-Edwards, who raised this issue. I'm wondering if you think this committee—if we decide that there needs to be an new entity—should potentially be recommending two things.
You're both obviously already doing good work. We've heard from a number of Canadian organizations that are already doing incredible work. We've also heard some from the UN and some from the United States and Europe. Do you think, as the first step in deciding whether to form another group and what exactly its mandate could be, there would be value in doing some kind of gap analysis, analyzing what entities are already out there and the kind of work they're doing related to either the creation of democracy or better delivery of democracy, including all the entities we talked about before, addressing corruption, ensuring justice and so forth? Could you then give some clarification on what is the core need for this group?
Along with that, could you give some kind of recommendations and clarity on whether there's intent to replace everything that's out there, or recognition of the continuing need to support the good work that is being done by the other groups, having got a better understanding of the difference in their roles? I'm curious to get your feedback on that.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-28 10:15
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That's helpful.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-28 10:17
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Do I have more time?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-28 10:17
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Neither of you has really responded to my question.
I think the starting point is that the proposal for a new group isn't in any way to say that we don't think the existing organizations are doing anything. What's necessary as a first step is to clearly define where we think the value is in the existing institutions that Canada decides to continue funding and then identify what the gaps are. These are likely what that group would do.
One value I would love to have people speaking to—and we won't have a chance for more witnesses—is that when an entity is established independently as an NGO or incorporated as a society, they can accept funds from the public or from private corporations, but if you were created as a government entity, you cannot necessarily.
I think, then, there are many issues we need to look at, but I really appreciate your input.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Yes. Thank you very much. Of course, I wasn't part of the committee when you reviewed this.
I certainly also want to thank Mr. Farrant. It's very brave of you to come forward, and it must be reassuring to have something actually happening to your need.
I have to share that for many years my partner was a criminal defence lawyer. I know what those files look like. It's about time that this measure were taken, so thank you to Michael Cooper, and thank you for recognizing my colleague. He's very reassured that when he participates and brings forward ideas, something actually happens. He's very grateful to you, Mr. Cooper.
My first question would be for Mr. Farrant—in fact two questions that you could answer together. One, it will not be fair. What will happen with this amendment is that we're simply amending the code so that, in fact, those who may be suffering from serving as jurors can seek medical treatment or counselling. The cost of that is, by this report, generally to be borne by the provinces and territories. My first question to you would be this. Do you believe that the burden still falls on you to try to now get the provinces and territories to put up the dollars, or are you confident that the federal government is delivering on the recommendation that they should approach the provinces and territories?
My second question for you, Mr. Farrant, is, do you think there will also be a need now for the federal Department of Justice to educate the medical and counselling professionals? You mentioned in your testimony the difficulties you faced when you tried to seek assistance, as they were nervous because they didn't think that would be allowed.
I'm just wondering if you'd like to respond to those two questions. Actually, I'd also welcome responses by Mr. Cooper to those questions.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Mr. Chair, I had understood that a representative from the Department of Justice was testifying.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
So he's not to testify.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Thanks. I'll just write a letter about it.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-21 11:39
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Thank you. I have a few minutes here.
Thank you very much. I welcome your visit here, and I look forward to your talk tomorrow. I have just met with civil society coalitions on exactly what you're saying the priority for Canada could be, and they will be delighted with the framework you're presenting. They'll be asking for $650 million from Canada to support that.
A while back, the British High Commission brought in a speaker, a military general who'd been tagged specifically to deal with security matters related to climate. My question to you, sir, is this: Are you beginning to factor climate change impacts into the growing needs for humanitarian assistance?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you very much, both of you, for your work. What your countries are delivering is very profound.
Following up on what my colleague just mentioned, Mr. Gershman, I noted that you said your endowment is established by statute, and that creates a firewall by law. I'm wondering, Mr. Smith, if you could speak to that.
I'm interested in the issue of political interference or accountability. It would be a two-way street. Some people may object, saying that if all of these initiatives are being delivered by somebody at arm's length, then the government doesn't have to say it's accountable for how those monies are being spent. On the other hand, if you do have a firewall, then it does give you the independence from the government of the day.
I'm wondering if both of you could speak to that.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you very much.
I'm interested that your two organizations actually deliver your services and your support in different ways. Mr. Smith outlined that they actually have 30 in-country offices, whereas the NED does not have any in-country offices.
My question is for both of you. Who decides what the priorities are, and how do you move toward what Mr. Gershman mentioned, which I think is really important, that it be a bottom-up initiative? If you're going to build democracy, in my view, it will last longer if it's bottom-up. I'm interested in the two approaches.
How do you decide what the priorities are in the receiving country if you don't have in-country offices?
What is your experience, Mr. Smith, of having in-country offices in order to develop the priorities for your organization?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Are you not going to let Mr. Gershman answer? No?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
Chair, may I ask a question?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
I'm wondering if Mr. Gershman can send us the citation to the report on top-down and bottom-up approaches. It sounds very interesting.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-19 10:24
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Thank you very much.
Of course we'd like to have everybody here all day long. The most important discussion that should be going on is about building democracy.
By the way, Ms. O'Neill, of course you're fabulous, because you're from Edmonton, as am I.
Your testimony is raising lots of interesting questions in my head, and I'd be interested to hear both of you respond to this—particularly Mr. Broadbent. Mr. Gershman reminded us that the National Endowment for Democracy was not founded by government. It was founded through NGOs, and they set the terms and objectives for the organization. The federal government simply funds it.
That raises a question in my mind. Is it really going to be an independent organization if the government creates it? What do you think is the best direction to go in for establishing this to make sure that it is arm's-length from government?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-19 10:27
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Do you believe the appointments to this entity should be by government...?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-02-19 10:29
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Ms. O'Neill, I wonder if you could speak to this, and then you, Mr. Broadbent.
There's one thing that puzzles me. I think there is some interest in the current government in re-establishing such an organization, yet the Global Affairs budget right now doesn't see judicial development, democratic development, human rights, women's rights and so forth as working together. They're all separate lines in the Global Affairs budget and, in fact, democratic participation in civil society is given next to nothing.
Does the creation of this entity also mean that we need a rethink within Global Affairs and within the government, and how would they work together? That's a small little question.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-10 16:01
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Thank you very much.
You can continue on that line, because my question will be along the same one. Over two decades ago, the World Bank decided to take a different approach to Indonesia, where the central government was very corrupt. They decided to start trying to shift aid to the regional governments, to the provinces or states.
Dr. Menkhaus, you have called for innovative aid. Are any of the donors starting to go in that direction of giving direct assistance to the member states where they think they could improve their ability to govern more democratically and effectively, have them begin to work together, and in turn put pressure on the central government?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-10 16:04
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I'd like to put a question to both of you on the partially lifted arms embargo.
Obviously there was pressure by Somalia to lift that embargo. How much of the arms that go into the countries actually get into the hands of al Shabaab and other members? Is that an issue? Is it kind of a pointless exercise?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-10 16:06
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I'm wondering if you're seeing any kind of an age divide in Somalia. Is there any greater hope with the younger generation coming forward and pushing more for engagement in civil society, or a more democratic regime, or more rule of law, or is it the other way around?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-10 16:09
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You've called for innovative aid. Do you know of any brilliant, innovative ideas for how to address that?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-10 16:11
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Thank you.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-05 13:32
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Thank you.
Welcome.
As I mentioned to you, Minister Hassan, you have very impressive credentials, as my colleague from the Conservative Party pointed out.
Could you elaborate a bit more on what my colleague just raised about educating women and girls? Recently in the Canadian media, we had a story of a success in one African country where the struggle to educate and give opportunities to women and girls was simply that they each had to spend five hours a day carting water. Canadian aid then provided the drilling for safe wells run by solar.
Could you speak to the main barriers to women becoming educated and girls getting access to the schools? Is it religious? Is it cultural? Is it basic survival?
What is your strategy on moving forward on that agenda?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-05 13:36
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I have a simple question related to that. You know that Canada has adopted this feminist international assistance policy. Is your country willing, in your request for assistance, to make that a priority on how you will spend your assistance dollars?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-05 13:37
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You've raised the issue about the refugees, a good number of whom are essentially stranded in Yemen, which is not a very safe place to be right now.
I wonder if you could speak to whether there is a repatriation strategy. Is it safe for them to come back to Somalia? Is Somalia investing any kind of effort in trying to bring those Somalis back to Somalia?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-12-05 13:39
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I have a few more minutes. I'd like to ask you about your strategy for exploiting oil and gas.
The experience around the world of exploiting oil and gas has been mixed. With that exploitation come potential conflicts with the communities where that development is occurring, and potential environmental impacts.
I am wondering if you have been developing an overriding strategy for how you might explore the exploitation of that resource while trying to do it in a better way than has been attempted in many other nations.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-28 16:28
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Mr. Kapenda, I look at your list of recommendations, and they're definitely a list of all the things that need to be done to stabilize any nation, including Congo. The problem is, how is any of that possible until you have a stable government?
I'm looking at the recommendation for a transitional government. I know a number of nations go through that. Sometimes after the election, the vice-president takes over. There's a transitional government for a while.
My colleagues have said that there doesn't appear to be any one candidate in the coming election, except for the one people don't want, because he's the one creating all the terror—at least the government-driven terror. How would you recommend that Canada would be involved in supporting a transitional government? Have you put that recommendation to the United Nations?
I note that there's already a huge investment by the UN in peacekeepers in the stabilization mission, yet they haven't been able to have any effect. My understanding would be that the support for a stable, peaceful nation is going to have to come from the people of Congo. Surely it's going to have to take somebody in the Congo to bring everybody together. I can't imagine some external force coming in—Canada, the United States, any other nation—and imposing some kind of transitional government and that going over well.
I would welcome what you mean by a transitional government. In addition, I'll just throw out a couple of questions to you.
Absolutely, there needs to be references to the International Criminal Court. First of all, you have to get a hold of those people, get them out of the country and bring them to the court. Certainly we want to have retraining for the child soldiers. However, with a lot of the obviously really great platform that you have for reform for the country, you need to have the stabilization first.
I guess what I would ask is what you're asking of Canada that Canada could do alone, or are you asking us to make requests of others to do something, for example, towards the transitional government?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-28 16:31
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I would welcome it from both of you.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-28 17:21
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Thank you.
Thank you to both of you. It's really important testimony.
I think we have to be pragmatic here. The election is less than a month away. Canada is not about to initiate some kind of a training program for the election.
Are you aware if there is already an international election-monitoring mission on the ground there that will be helping to monitor the election? If so, are you in touch with that monitoring mission?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-28 17:21
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There are international organizations that go to various countries. I'm not sure whether anyone has stepped in, given the violence there. I would encourage you to find out who is on the ground and is doing that, and then try to encourage them to do specific training for the women to encourage them to vote, to support them when they vote and so forth.
You mentioned Beni.
I'm sorry. It was you, Julienne.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-28 17:22
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Just a second, let me ask my question.
My understanding is that Beni is one of the places where there is the Ebola crisis. Given the violence that is still going on there, are you seeing problems? Is there any specific assistance that Canada or Canada talking to its allies can provide to make sure that somebody intervenes to protect the health workers there to get the Ebola under control and not spreading?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 16:04
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Thank you to both of you for your work. Having worked overseas myself, I think we often give thanks to our troops, as we should, but I don't think there's enough credit given to aid workers, particularly from civil society, so thank you.
It's interesting, Mr. Queyranne, that you raised the issue of security, as has Ms. Juac. Just recently there was a feature article in The Globe and Mail raising exactly that, with aid agencies, civil society, saying that they need somebody to step up because they can't deliver assistance.
I'm wondering if both of you could talk to.... Is there a difference between needing better security for providing what we call the straight aids—in other words, sending in bundles of tents or food and so forth—as opposed to international assistance that tries to get the dollars and the skills to local civil organizations? In this time of strife, does it make more sense for us to be giving more assistance?
Mr. Queyranne, you might have mentioned that you are encouraging more direct assistance between civil organizations in Canada and civil organizations on the ground. Could you elaborate on that a bit? Are you asking for two things? Are you asking Canada to step up and provide peacemakers, in order to deliver the goods, and also asking us to rethink how we are providing the aid?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 16:08
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Would you like to respond to that at all?
Ms. Juac, you mentioned the plight of women in the turmoil and so forth. Canada, as you're aware, now has a feminist international assistance policy. Is there value in giving direct assistance to women in the rural communities or to women in the larger urban areas to try to be a stronger voice for decision-making?
It's my understanding that civil society in South Sudan wants to have that peace, but the government, as you mentioned, is not directing resources towards what civil society is asking for.
Where do you see Canadian aid best being placed? Is it to help the communities push for better governance? What direction do you suggest Canadian aid should go?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 16:10
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Clearly, deliver the aid directly, as much as possible, to the local organizations but definitely not through the government.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 16:10
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Okay, we're hearing that clearly.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 16:10
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Am I done?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 17:16
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I want to thank both of you. Obviously, you have many years of solid experience.
I'm hoping you are going to give us your written briefs, because it was hard to follow. There was so much depth there. I really want to thank you.
Ms. Stigant, I noted that you mentioned the Red Sea forum. Our own Library of Parliament, which does research for the committees, pointed out that there are over a million Somalian refugees in the Horn of Africa and Yemen.
Given what's going on in Yemen right now, can you speak to what impact that has on also resolving issues in Somalia?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 17:18
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Yes, I note that both the OECD and Fund for Peace put Yemen ahead of several of these other African countries as to the fragility of states, to add to your additional work that you do.
Ms. Gagnon, I really appreciate all that you've provided. Overriding all the issues that you've raised, are you suggesting that Canada could contribute more to UN initiatives, or are you also, or instead, suggesting that Canadian aid could perhaps target? For example, someone I know who just retired as a prosecutor in British Columbia is being sent by the UN to Myanmar to work for the prosecutors to try to train them on how you deal with human rights violations in the courts.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 17:19
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I would welcome what exactly it is that you're suggesting Canada might do in the role we play in perhaps focusing more or specific directed aid in those particular countries.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 17:20
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Do you actually see hope in aid working with the judicial process? Are they free enough from the government in those countries that it actually could have an impact?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 17:21
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I think there might have been earlier witnesses talking about freedom of journalism. Is there also a need for getting the message out more, where good actions are taken, and letting the populace know that in fact people are intervening and there's—
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-11-19 17:22
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Thank you very much.
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-05-31 16:02
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Thank you.
My first questions will be about the DRC. My understanding is, you can correct me if I'm wrong, that there is some level of assistance going there for women's health, particularly maternal care and so forth.
What degree of assistance is Canada giving to address AIDS?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-05-31 16:03
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As I understand, we're assisting women's clinics on diagnosis, but are we providing medicines?
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View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2018-05-31 16:04
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I've been trying to read and catch up as much as I can, and I'm concerned by what I read about Canadian arms dealers selling indirectly to South Sudan. I know my colleague on this committee put forward an amendment that was rejected to stop the indirect sales; that is, in other words, if you sell to the U.S. and then they in turn sell it on to a banned nation. What is happening with arms sales from Canada to South Sudan now? Is that still going on, even indirectly?
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