Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 195
Emilie Taman
View Emilie Taman Profile
Emilie Taman
2018-09-26 15:47
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My name is Emilie Taman. I'm a lawyer with expertise in criminal law. I have worked as legal counsel at the Supreme Court of Canada, as a federal prosecutor at the Public Prosecution Service of Canada for eight years, and for the last two years I have been teaching criminal law and advanced evidence to students at the University of Ottawa's common law section of the faculty of law.
I want to open by saying I cannot agree more with Professor Parkes in particular in her assessment of the need for comprehensive criminal justice reform.
My personal view is that re-establishment of a federal law reform commission is something that should be very seriously considered and pursued by this Parliament. I have a written brief that will make it to you shortly, but I did circulate a chart, which is in both official languages. I likewise have three main concerns when it comes to the reclassification of offences and the so-called hybridization of offences in Bill C-75.
I think it's important, though, that the members of this committee understand the consequences of a summary conviction versus indictable offences and the various discretionary choices conferred on both the Crown and the accused depending on the nature of the offence. I'm going to take most of my time today on that. I would, of course, very much echo the concerns in relation to access to justice by virtue of the raising of the ceiling for summary conviction offences by default to two years. Also I am very skeptical about whether this hybridization will have the desired impact of enhancing efficiency or expediency in the criminal justice process.
I would just put on my law teacher hat here and ask you to turn your attention briefly to what's noted as appendix A, which is an appendix to my brief, which you don't yet have. It attempts in a very clumsy way, given my lack of expertise with any kind of graphic design, to explain a little bit about the consequences of hybridization.
Essentially in the Criminal Code you have, generally speaking, three kinds of offences. You have what we would refer to as straight summary conviction offences. Those are statutory offences that can proceed only by way of summary conviction. On the other hand, you have what we would call straight indictable offences. Those would be statutory indictable offences. Then there are a large number of offences that we refer to as hybrid offences. Those are offences that can proceed either by way of summary conviction or indictably. The question as to which of the two ways hybrid offences will proceed is really all about the exercise of prosecutorial discretion. Early in the proceedings when it comes to hybrid offences, the Crown is asked to elect whether the matter will proceed summarily or by indictment. You see that with the green arrows in the chart, which are my attempt to show you the Crown's elective options.
Summary conviction offences all proceed in provincial court. If it's a straight summary offence, it goes to provincial court. If it's a hybrid offence in relation to which the Crown has elected to proceed summarily, it likewise can go only into the provincial court and the accused has no election in that regard.
On the other hand, in straight indictable offences or hybrid offences in relation to which the Crown has elected to proceed by indictment, the accused as a general rule can make one of three elections. The accused may elect to have his or her trial proceed in provincial court with a judge alone, because there are no juries in provincial court, or the accused can elect to have his or her trial in superior court presided over by a judge alone. The third option is that the trial can proceed in superior court with a judge and jury.
There are two statutory exceptions to the accused election set out in sections 553 and 469 of the code. Those are very limited exceptions. Certain enumerated offences do fall within the absolute jurisdiction of one court or the other. What I want to highlight here is the impact that hybridizing a large number—136 straight indictable offences—will have in particular when it comes to the accused's right to elect to be tried by jury.
As it stands with these 136 offences, because they are straight indictable, the choice lies wholly with the accused. I really want to underscore that it is common for accused to elect to be tried in provincial court. I wasn't, unfortunately, able to find the exact numbers on that, but I just want to make sure this committee understands that it is not presently the case that all indictable offences proceed in superior court. In fact, a significant number proceed by trial in provincial court.
By taking these 136 offences and making them hybrid, the Crown will now have a very important role to play in relation to the question of whether an accused can exercise his right to a trial by jury. If the Crown should elect at the outset to proceed summarily, the accused loses the ability to elect to have a trial by jury. This is something—again I don't know if this is an intended consequence or if it's an unintended consequence—that I do think is significant. I want to make sure that the committee fully understands that.
I am very concerned any time we take discretion away from a judge and put it in the hands of the Crown. Likewise, here we're taking a choice from the accused and at the outset conferring that decision on the Crown as to whether the accused will even be legally able to elect to be tried by a jury. The exercise of prosecutorial discretion is almost completely lacking in transparency and is not subject to review except at the very high bar of abuse of process.
I want to be clear in saying that this does not give rise to a technical breach of paragraph 11(f) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which is the constitutionally protected right to trial by jury, because paragraph 11(f) is only triggered in the context of offences punishable by five years or more. In hybridizing these offences—offences that currently, as Professor Parkes noted, have statutory maximums of two, five, or 10 years—when the Crown elects to proceed summarily, by virtue of the new default maximum for summary conviction offences being raised to two years, the constitutional right will not, technically, be engaged. But it is the case that, for someone charged before this bill and someone charged after this bill with the same offence in the same circumstances, one of those accused will have the right to elect to be tried by judge and jury, and the other, in the case where the Crown elects to proceed summarily, will no longer be able to exercise that, at least, statutory right. It is an important consequence I want to highlight.
One other thing I want to briefly note about the impact of raising the statutory ceiling, the maximum penalty for summary conviction offences from six months to two years, is that it's important to understand that, as things stand, it is not the case that all summary conviction offences are punishable by a maximum of six months. That is the statutory default, but there are a number of offences, including assault causing bodily harm and sexual assault, for which, even where the Crown proceeds summarily, there is a statutory maximum of 18 months.
The effect of that, and I just want to build on what my colleagues from the student legal aid clinics were noting, is that currently, students and other agents—and it should be noted that a significant number of agents are neither law students nor articling students but paralegals and others—are currently authorized to defend persons charged with offences carrying a maximum punishment of up to six months, that is, not all summary conviction offences. That's why I would be concerned about attempting to address this, I think, unintended consequence of the bill by simply saying that agents can do all summary conviction offences.
The effect of proceeding that way would significantly expand the offences that can be defended by students and agents, and I think there are concerns there. As far as remedies for that go, I would certainly be more on the side of Legal Aid Ontario's submission to have a schedule of offences that would be excluded from agent representation.
I've made some other points in my brief, which will be forwarded to you, but I'll leave it there for now. Thank you.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je m'appelle Emilie Taman. Je suis avocate possédant une expertise en droit criminel. J'ai travaillé comme conseillère juridique à la Cour suprême du Canada, comme procureure fédérale pour le Service des poursuites pénales du Canada, et ce, pendant huit ans. Depuis deux ans, j'enseigne le droit criminel et donne des cours sur les éléments de preuve avancés aux étudiants de la section de la common law de la faculté de droit de l'Université d'Ottawa.
Je veux commencer par dire que je suis tout à fait d'accord avec Mme Parkes, et particulièrement pour ce qui est de son évaluation de la nécessité d'entreprendre une réforme complète du système de justice pénale.
Personnellement, j'estime qu'on devrait envisager très sérieusement le rétablissement de la commission fédérale de réforme du droit. C'est quelque chose que devrait faire le Parlement. Vous allez bientôt recevoir mon mémoire, mais j'ai distribué un tableau dans les deux langues officielles. J'ai également trois préoccupations principales au sujet de la reclassification des infractions et leur soi-disant conversion en infraction mixte prévue dans le projet de loi C-75.
Cependant, je crois qu'il est important pour les membres du Comité de comprendre les conséquences associées à une déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire comparativement aux actes criminels et les divers choix discrétionnaires dont bénéficient la Couronne et l'accusé selon la nature de l'infraction. C'est sur ce sujet que portera la majeure partie de ma déclaration, aujourd'hui. J'aimerais, bien sûr, reprendre à mon compte les préoccupations liées à l'accès à la justice relativement à l'augmentation par défaut à deux ans de la peine maximale pour les infractions punissables par procédure sommaire. Je suis aussi très sceptique quant à savoir si la reclassification en infraction mixte aura l'incidence désirée d'accroître l'efficience ou la rapidité du processus de justice pénale.
Je vais revêtir mon habit de professeur de droit un instant et vous demander de regarder brièvement l'annexe A de mon mémoire que vous n'avez pas encore. J'y tente, de façon très maladroite, vu mon manque d'expertise en ce qui a trait à la conception graphique, d'expliquer rapidement les conséquences de la reclassification des infractions en infractions mixtes.
Essentiellement, dans le Code criminel, il y a, de façon générale, trois types d'infractions. Il y a ce qu'on peut appeler les infractions punissables par procédure sommaire. Ce sont des infractions législatives qui peuvent uniquement être traitées par procédure sommaire. Par ailleurs, il y a ce qu'on peut appeler les actes criminels purs et durs. Ce sont les infractions punissables par mise en accusation prévues par la loi. Il y a ensuite un grand nombre d'infractions qu'on appelle des infractions mixtes. Ce sont des infractions qui peuvent être poursuivies par procédure sommaire ou par mise en accusation. La question de savoir de quelle façon on traitera les infractions mixtes tient vraiment à l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire de la poursuite. Rapidement, dans le cadre des procédures liées à des infractions mixtes, on demande à la Couronne de déterminer si elle procédera par procédure sommaire ou mise en accusation. C'est ce que montrent les flèches vertes dans le tableau, ces flèches étant ma tentative de vous montrer les options qui s'offrent à la Couronne.
Les infractions punissables sur déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire sont toutes traitées devant les tribunaux provinciaux. Si on parle d'une infraction punissable directement par voie de déclaration sommaire, le dossier relève d'un tribunal provincial. Dans le cas d'une infraction mixte relativement à laquelle la Couronne a décidé de procéder par procédure sommaire, le dossier sera aussi traité devant un tribunal provincial, et l'accusé n'a aucun choix à cet égard.
Par ailleurs, dans le cas des infractions où l'on doit obligatoirement procéder par mise en accusation ou les infractions mixtes relativement auxquelles la Couronne décide de procéder ainsi, de façon générale, l'accusé a trois choix: il peut choisir un procès devant un tribunal provincial et un juge seul, parce qu'il n'y a pas de jury dans les tribunaux provinciaux, il peut choisir de procéder devant une cour supérieure présidée par un juge seul ou encore devant une cour supérieure avec juge et jury.
Il y a deux exceptions législatives aux choix de l'accusé aux articles 553 et 469 du Code. Il s'agit d'exceptions très limitées. Certaines infractions énumérées relèvent uniquement de la compétence d'un tribunal ou d'un autre. Ce que j'aimerais souligner, ici, c'est l'incidence qu'aura la reclassification en infractions mixtes d'un grand nombre — 136 infractions punissables directement par voie de déclaration sommaire — sur le droit d'un accusé de choisir un procès devant jury.
Dans l'état actuel des choses, pour ces 136 infractions — parce qu'elles sont punissables directement par mise en accusation —, le choix revient entièrement à l'accusé. Je tiens vraiment à souligner qu'il arrive souvent qu'un accusé choisisse un procès devant un tribunal provincial. Malheureusement, je n'ai pas pu trouver les chiffres exacts à ce sujet, mais je veux m'assurer que le Comité comprend que, actuellement, ce ne sont pas toutes les infractions punissables par mise en accusation qui sont entendues par une cour supérieure. En fait, un nombre important de ces accusations finissent devant les tribunaux provinciaux.
Comme on a fait de ces 136 infractions des infractions mixtes, c'est dorénavant la Couronne qui jouera un rôle important et déterminera si l'accusé peut exercer son droit à un procès devant jury. Si la Couronne choisit d'entrée de jeu de procéder par procédure sommaire, l'accusé ne peut plus choisir un procès devant jury. C'est là quelque chose — et encore une fois, je ne sais pas si c'est une conséquence voulue ou inattendue — qui, à mon avis, est important. Je veux m'assurer que le Comité le comprend bien.
Je suis très préoccupée chaque fois qu'on retire à un juge son pouvoir discrétionnaire et qu'on le donne à la Couronne. Dans un même ordre d'idées, nous parlons ici d'un choix d'un accusé et du fait que, d'entrée de jeu, on réservera le pouvoir décisionnel à la Couronne, qui, elle seule, déterminera si l'accusé a même le droit — d'un point de vue juridique — de choisir un procès devant jury. L'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire de la poursuite manque presque complètement de transparence et n'est pas assujetti à une révision sauf en cas d'abus de procédure, et la barre est ici très haute.
Comprenez bien que je ne dis pas que la situation donne lieu à une violation technique de l'alinéa 11f) de la Charte des droits et libertés, qui concerne le droit à un procès par jury, lequel est protégé par la Constitution, parce que l'alinéa 11f) est seulement déclenché dans les cas d'infraction punissable par emprisonnement de cinq ans ou plus. En constituant ces infractions en infractions mixtes — des infractions qui, comme Me Parkes l'a souligné, sont actuellement passibles de peines maximales de deux, cinq ou dix ans prévues dans la loi —, lorsque la Couronne décide de procéder par procédure sommaire, en raison du fait que la nouvelle peine maximale par défaut pour de telles infractions a été augmentée à deux ans, techniquement, tout ça ne fera pas intervenir le droit constitutionnel. Cependant, ce qui se produira, c'est que si quelqu'un est accusé avant l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi et quelqu'un d'autre l'est après son adoption, et ce, pour la même infraction et dans les mêmes circonstances, l'un de ces accusés aura le droit de choisir un procès devant juge et jury, tandis que l'autre, si la Couronne choisit de procéder par procédure sommaire, ne pourra plus exercer ce droit qui, du moins, était prévu par la loi. Il s'agit d'une conséquence importante que je tenais à souligner.
L'autre chose que je tiens à mentionner rapidement quant à l'incidence de l'augmentation des peines maximales prévues dans la loi — pour les infractions punissables par procédure sommaire, qui passent de six mois à deux ans —, c'est qu'il faut bien comprendre que, dans la situation actuelle, il est faux de dire que toutes les infractions punissables par procédure sommaire sont assorties d'une peine maximale de six mois. Il s'agit de la peine par défaut prévue dans la loi, mais il y a un certain nombre d'infractions, y compris les voies de fait causant des lésions corporelles et les agressions sexuelles pour lesquelles, même lorsque la Couronne décide de procéder par procédure sommaire, la peine maximale prévue par la loi est de 18 mois.
L'effet que cette situation peut avoir — et je poursuis ici tout simplement dans la même veine que mes collègues des Sociétés étudiantes d'aide juridique —, c'est que, actuellement, les étudiants et les autres représentants — et il convient de souligner qu'un grand nombre de représentants sont non pas des étudiants en droit, ni des stagiaires en droit, mais plutôt des techniciens juridiques et d'autres intervenants — ont actuellement le droit de défendre des personnes accusées d'infractions assorties d'une peine maximale de six mois, et c'est donc dire que ces personnes ne peuvent pas le faire dans le cas de toutes les infractions punissables par procédure sommaire. C'est la raison pour laquelle je serais préoccupée si on tentait simplement de régler cette conséquence du projet de loi qui est, selon moi, imprévue, en disant simplement que les représentants peuvent participer à tous les dossiers d'infraction punissable par procédure sommaire.
Cette façon de procéder aurait pour effet d'élargir considérablement les infractions pouvant être défendues par des étudiants et des représentants, et je crois que cela soulève des préoccupations. Pour ce qui est des solutions de rechange, j'irais assurément plus dans le sens du mémoire d'Aide juridique Ontario, qui propose de dresser une liste d'infractions où une telle représentation serait exclue.
J'ai soulevé d'autres points dans mon mémoire, que je vous ferai parvenir, mais je vais m'arrêter ici pour l'instant. Merci.
Collapse
View Ron McKinnon Profile
Lib. (BC)
You mentioned that an accused loses the right to elect trial by jury if the Crown elects to proceed summarily. On the other hand, the jeopardy the accused faces is far less. Jeopardy would be no more than two years less a day. Is losing the right to a jury for an offence that is two years less a day really a serious concern?
Vous avez dit qu'un accusé perd le droit de choisir un procès devant jury si la Couronne choisit de procéder par voie sommaire. Par ailleurs, le risque auquel l'accusé s'expose est bien inférieur. Le risque ne serait pas supérieur à deux ans moins un jour. Le fait de perdre le droit à un procès devant jury pour une infraction qui est de deux ans moins un jour est-il vraiment une grande préoccupation?
Collapse
Emilie Taman
View Emilie Taman Profile
Emilie Taman
2018-09-26 16:29
Expand
From the perspective of accused people, it is serious. That's why I tried to be clear in highlighting that it would not necessarily violate the charter for the reasons you explained. The charter sets the bar at five years to reflect that level of jeopardy. The reality is that there are people who are charged today with offences that are indictable, carrying statutory maximums of 10 years who have jury trials and are ultimately sentenced to less than five years.
One of the concerns I have is this kind of subtle chipping away. If we take away the preliminary inquiry and if we take away the statutory right to a jury trial, I'm very concerned about trying to give effect to the 11(b) rights of the accused in exchange for a bunch of other procedural protections. While it may be the case that no single measure violates the charter in its own right, I do have concerns about the constitutionality when taken comprehensively with abolishing the preliminary inquiry for all of these offences, along with the way we select juries and other things in their totality.
Du point de vue de l'accusé, c'est important. C'est pourquoi j'ai essayé d'être claire lorsque j'ai souligné que cela ne violerait pas nécessairement la Charte pour les raisons que vous avez expliquées. La Charte met la barre à cinq ans pour refléter ce niveau de risque. La réalité, c'est qu'il y a aujourd'hui des personnes accusées d'infractions punissables par voie sommaire, à qui on impose des peines maximales de 10 ans et des procès devant jury, et qui sont au final condamnées à purger une peine de moins de cinq ans.
Une des choses qui me préoccupent, c'est ce genre d'érosion subtile. Si nous éliminons l'enquête préliminaire ainsi que le droit prévu par la loi à un procès devant jury, je suis très inquiète pour ce qui est d'essayer de donner effet aux droits de l'accusé figurant à l'alinéa 11b) en échange d'un tas d'autres protections procédurales. Même s'il est possible qu'aucune mesure unique ne viole la Charte en soi, j'ai des préoccupations par rapport à la constitutionnalité, lorsqu'on les examine globalement, du fait d'abolir l'enquête préliminaire pour toutes ces infractions, en plus de la façon dont nous sélectionnons les jurés et d'autres choses dans leur totalité.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2018-09-26 16:32
Expand
Thanks to all of the witnesses—so many witnesses, so little time.
I want to first, if I may, just do a shout-out to Professor Parkes, whom I won't have time to ask a question of. Congratulations on your editorial in The Globe and Mail yesterday on the impact of mandatory minimum sentences, particularly on indigenous people. It was great, and thank you for introducing the term “sentence creep” to our vocabulary.
Ms. Cirillo, I just want to say, as a proud alumnus of the Downtown Legal Services, I know first-hand the important work that you people do. Thank you for doing it and for shining a light on what, I agree with all of you, is an unintended consequence of Bill C-75, that's to say, essentially shutting you out of the provincial court where you do such great work.
In a moment, I'll come back to you with solutions I'd like to get your take on, but I want to remind people of the quote I took from your excellent submission:
The unintended consequence of Bill C-75 would further exacerbate the access to justice issues facing Ontario criminal courts. SLASS clinics have worked for decades representing individuals charged with criminal summary offences, providing effective and efficient representation for those who would otherwise find themselves unrepresented in the criminal justice system. This bill will put an abrupt end to this legacy.
I couldn't have put it better than that.
Ms. Taman, if I could, I want to ask you a few questions. Thank you for the chart you gave us. I wish we had it when we started this little odyssey a few weeks ago.
In respect of the hybridization issue, you talked about the 136 indictable offences being hybridized, and you made an argument that I don't think had ever been made to our committee before. You said that part of the bill is the potential to significantly limit the accused's existing statutory right to elect to be tried by judge and jury and the effective shifting of this choice from the accused to the Crown. I don't think we've heard that before.
Well, if I may, so what? I understand the accused would lose that choice, but isn't it arguably in his or her best interest to go to a trial with a lower maximum penalty? If the person were to be tried by a jury in a higher court, they would likely be gambling on a harsher penalty. Is that a fair comment?
Je remercie tous les témoins — un si grand nombre de témoins, et si peu de temps.
Si je peux me permettre, j'aimerais d'abord féliciter Me Parkes, à qui je n'ai pas eu le temps de poser de question. Félicitations pour votre éditorial paru hier dans le Globe and Mail sur l'incidence des peines minimales obligatoires, particulièrement pour les Autochtones. Il était excellent, et je vous remercie d'avoir ajouté le terme « alourdissement des peines » à notre vocabulaire.
Maître Cirillo, j'aimerais juste dire, en tant que fier ancien des Downtown Legal Services, que je connais très bien le travail important que vous faites. Merci de le faire et de mettre en lumière ce qui, je suis d'accord avec vous tous, est une conséquence fortuite du projet de loi C-75, c'est-à-dire essentiellement vous écarter de la cour provinciale où vous faites un travail si excellent.
Je vais vous revenir sous peu avec des solutions sur lesquelles j'aimerais votre avis, mais j'aimerais rappeler aux gens la citation que j'ai tirée de votre excellent mémoire:
Cette conséquence fortuite du projet de loi C-75 aurait comme effet d'aggraver encore plus les problèmes d'accès à la justice avec lesquels sont aux prises les tribunaux pénaux de l'Ontario. Depuis des dizaines d'années, les cliniques des SEAJ s'affairent à représenter des personnes accusées d'une infraction de nature criminelle punissable par voie de déclaration sommaire de culpabilité, fournissant des services de représentation efficaces et efficients pour ceux et celles qui, autrement, se retrouveraient non représentés au sein du système de justice pénale. Ce projet de loi mettra abruptement fin à cette longue histoire.
Je n'aurais pas pu mieux le dire.
Madame Taman, si je peux me permettre, j'aimerais vous poser quelques questions. Merci pour le tableau que vous nous avez donné. J'aurais aimé l'avoir lorsque nous avons commencé notre petite odyssée il y a quelques semaines.
En ce qui concerne la question des infractions mixtes, vous avez parlé des 136 infractions punissables par voie de mise en accusation qui seraient converties en infractions mixtes, et vous avez fait valoir un point qui n'a jamais été soulevé devant notre Comité, si je ne m'abuse. Vous avez dit qu'une partie du projet de loi a la possibilité de limiter de façon importante le droit existant de l'accusé, prévu par la loi, de choisir d'être jugé par un juge et un jury et de faire passer ce choix de l'accusé à la Couronne. Je ne crois pas que nous ayons entendu cela auparavant.
Si je peux me permettre: et après? Je comprends que l'accusé perdrait ce choix, mais n'est-il pas probablement dans son intérêt d'aller en justice avec une peine maximale inférieure? Si la personne devait être jugée par un jury d'instance supérieure, elle prendrait probablement le pari d'obtenir une peine plus sévère. Ai-je raison de dire cela?
Collapse
Emilie Taman
View Emilie Taman Profile
Emilie Taman
2018-09-26 16:34
Expand
The decision that an accused has to make when deciding whether or not to avail him- or herself of a jury trial is a complex one. There are a number of factors that have to be considered, especially in terms of the nature of the factual issues at play, because the jury is a trier of fact and not of law. As I said previously, just because it's a jury trial or just because it proceeds indictably and has a higher maximum doesn't mean the accused is in jeopardy of getting that higher maximum, depending on the circumstances of the offence.
It is a consideration that an accused would have to make, but the difficulty is that in this case it will now be the Crown that's making that decision in the first instance. So, yes, when the Crown elects to proceed summarily, the accused is exposed to a lower maximum penalty, that is true, but I think there are likely a number of accused who would prefer to have the jury trial and be exposed to the higher sentence, depending on the circumstances and the issues that are at play in their case.
La décision d'un accusé, qui doit choisir s'il veut ou non se prévaloir d'un procès devant jury, est complexe. Un certain nombre de facteurs doivent être pris en compte, particulièrement en ce qui concerne la nature des questions de fait en cause, parce que le jury est juge des faits, et non du droit. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, ce n'est pas parce que c'est un procès devant jury ou parce qu'il choisit de procéder par mise en accusation et que les peines maximales sont supérieures que l'accusé risque d'obtenir cette peine maximale, selon les circonstances de l'infraction.
C'est une question avec laquelle l'accusé devra composer, mais dans ce cas-ci, la difficulté tient au fait que ce sera maintenant la Couronne qui prendra cette décision en première instance. Donc oui, lorsque la Couronne choisit de procéder par voie sommaire, l'accusé est exposé à une pénalité maximale inférieure, c'est vrai, mais je crois qu'il y a probablement un certain nombre d'accusés qui préféreraient avoir le procès devant jury et être exposés à la peine supérieure, selon les circonstances et les questions en cause dans leur affaire.
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2018-09-26 19:28
Expand
I have another brief question on the racialized communities. We've heard a lot about those communities, but not a lot of direct evidence.
One thing that was clear from Mr. Rudin's testimony was that ending the peremptory challenge model we've had for so many years would ensure better diversity of jurors and benefit the indigenous accused who are so overrepresented in our system.
Do you agree with that submission? Does that also apply to other racialized groups such as black Canadians in the system?
J'ai une autre brève question à poser sur les communautés racialisées. Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de ces communautés, mais nous n'avons pas entendu beaucoup de témoignages directs.
Un élément qui est clairement ressorti du témoignage de M. Rudin, c'était que la fin du modèle axé sur la récusation péremptoire que nous appliquons depuis de très nombreuses années garantirait une meilleure diversité au sein des jurés et profiterait aux accusés autochtones qui sont surreprésentés dans notre système.
Approuvez-vous cette affirmation? Ce principe s'applique-t-il également à d'autres groupes racialisés, comme les Canadiens noirs dans le système?
Collapse
Deepa Mattoo
View Deepa Mattoo Profile
Deepa Mattoo
2018-09-26 19:28
Expand
Yes, I think we agree with that particular provision. That's why we didn't address it. That would definitely help.
When we say “racialized” we are using the term in an all-encompassing way, which includes the indigenous population as well as black Canadians.
Oui, je pense que nous approuvons cette disposition particulière. Voilà pourquoi nous ne l'avons pas abordée. Elle serait assurément utile.
Quand nous disons « racialisé », nous employons le terme d'une manière générale, et cela comprend la population autochtone ainsi que les Canadiens noirs.
Collapse
View Anthony Housefather Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Anthony Housefather Profile
2018-09-26 19:44
Expand
Thank you. That's very powerful.
I have one short question for you, Ms. Hendel, before my time runs out. You didn't get into peremptory challenges. What is your feeling as a prosecutor about the value of peremptory challenges? Would you agree with getting rid of them, or do you think they're valuable and should be retained?
Merci. C'est très puissant.
J'ai une courte question à vous poser, Me Hendel, avant que le temps dont je dispose soit écoulé. Vous n'avez pas abordé la récusation péremptoire. En tant que procureure, que pensez-vous de la valeur de ces récusations? Accepteriez-vous que l'on s'en débarrasse, ou bien pensez-vous qu'elles sont précieuses et qu'il faudrait les conserver?
Collapse
Ursula Hendel
View Ursula Hendel Profile
Ursula Hendel
2018-09-26 19:44
Expand
There isn't unanimity in the membership on this issue. I think it's a tricky one.
To the extent that there's research out there, I think it does support the concern that peremptory challenges are often used in a discriminatory way. I think there's reason to be concerned. When I think about when I've used my peremptory challenges, it's very difficult for me to articulate why it was I felt uncomfortable with a person. He glowered, maybe...? How would you explain that?
You know, it's really a tricky issue. I think there are folks on both sides, prosecutor and defence counsel, who feel it's valuable, but I don't know that any of us are really able to articulate why.
Les membres ne s'entendent pas à l'unanimité sur cette question. Je pense qu'elle est épineuse.
Des recherches ont été publiées et je pense qu'elles appuient la préoccupation découlant de la possibilité que les récusations péremptoires soient souvent utilisées de façon discriminatoire. Je pense qu'il y a lieu d'être préoccupé. Quand je songe aux fois que j'ai eu recours à mes récusations péremptoires, il est très difficile pour moi de formuler les raisons pour lesquelles je ne me sentais pas à l'aise auprès d'une personne. L'homme avait un regard menaçant, peut-être...? Comment peut-on expliquer cela?
Vous savez, c'est vraiment une question épineuse. Je pense qu'il y a des gens des deux camps — les procureurs et les avocats de la défense — qui ont l'impression qu'elles ont de la valeur, mais je ne connais personne d'entre nous qui soit vraiment capable d'expliquer pourquoi.
Collapse
Rick Woodburn
View Rick Woodburn Profile
Rick Woodburn
2018-09-25 18:24
Expand
Good evening, everybody.
Listen, I know it's going to spread around that I may have a flight. I'm not worried about that. The important thing here is that we get this right, so don't hold back on the questions.
I'm Rick Woodburn, the president of the Canadian Association of Crown Counsel. We represent approximately 7,500 Crown counsel across the country, from the 10 provinces and the federal government. This is both Crown attorneys and Crown counsel, so a wide variety of input came into our submissions.
I didn't file a brief. However, we have limited submissions that we'll make, and we'll take questions, of course, as need be.
Thank you to the panel for inviting us. I appreciate that. Some of our comments may go against the grain a bit. I don't want to disparage anybody, the drafters of legislation or anybody who worked diligently on this, but we would like to delve into it a bit.
Our role isn't going to be to endorse or go against the bill itself, but we want to give you the pros and cons, give you some information about what, on the ground, prosecutors and Crown counsel are saying about this particular bill.
Between Crown counsel, of course, we're not universally in agreement with all the sections either. There are viewpoints from both sides, and I hope to get some of that out today, at least to give you the information so that you can perhaps go back and when you think about amendments and about the different sections, some of these things will help in terms of knowing what's going on, on the ground.
The first thing we'd like to look at is the bail reform, and particularly the change from sections 523 and 524 to the new section 523.1.
My understanding of proposed section 523.1, which would be inserted just before section 524 and takes up that entire section, is that we're not eliminating, from what I can see, section 523. Therefore, there's still that opportunity for a Crown to make an application to have somebody's bail revoked. In the Crowns' submission, what this extra layer does is just tack on, in some aspects, another administrative hearing to charges of breaches, and so forth. When we look at it, it actually is repetitive in a lot of senses. We all agree that we're trying to prevent delay here, and having a repetitive section in the Criminal Code won't necessarily help us.
Here's what I mean.
When we look at section 523 as it is right now, the Crown has the discretion to do everything that proposed section 523.1 says. We can withdraw the charge, we can ask that the bail be revoked, and so forth. We can already do that. Proposed section 523.1 presupposes that the Crowns aren't looking at the charges when they first come in and assessing the strength of the Crown's case, but we are. As Crown attorneys, it's important for us to ensure that these charges, these breaches of bail, are sufficiently looked after. In our submission, it's just another layer that is not needed in reality, because the Crowns are already doing their jobs and vetting through this.
The other thing that is interesting about administration of justice charges, or breaches, is that there seems to be a lot of talk about the number of breaches that are in the system and how they're clogging it up. I can tell you from the ground, they don't clog up the system. They don't take that much time. A breach of a court order takes very little time to prove, even if it goes to trial—and that's rare. Keep in the back of your mind that these charges aren't clogging up the system. There are lots in the system, but they're not clogging the system.
The other thing to remember about these charges is, when somebody breaches their court orders, it's important for everybody to realize that this is a cornerstone of our bail system: Somebody has been released on bail, they're supposed to be following conditions and they don't, so they're arrested and brought in. There has to be a penalty to this. My understanding of proposed section 523.1 is that actually, if it plays out, it looks to be more of a slap on the wrist. Believe me, the criminals will realize fairly quickly if there's this extra layer and they can use it, and there will be more people breaching their court orders.
That's a little about the bail reform. Of course, we'll be open to questions later about that.
When we look at preliminary inquiries, we see a lot has been said. I've heard some of the testimony and read some of the briefs. It's very controversial about eliminating preliminary inquiries for non-life sentences.
Once again, Crown attorneys have voiced opinions on both sides of this, and I'd kind of like to give you the pros and cons a little bit about that. First, among the pros to getting rid of them, one of the obvious and most glaring concerns sexual assault victims. Of course, having sexual assault victims testify twice, even a witness here has stated, re-victimizes them, and I've seen it first-hand. Eliminating that will perhaps encourage people to come forward in sexual assault trials. They know they will only have to testify once. Of course when we talk about testifying, that also includes children.
For some reason the bill doesn't include aggravated sexual assaults. In those cases, of course, there's a right to a preliminary inquiry.
There are some issues from a Crown's perspective with regard to preliminary inquiries as they stand right now. Part of it is the so-called focus hearings, and that's where Crown and defence go before the court and we tend to focus the issues at trial. What we're finding more often than not is that they're not getting focused. We end up running what's called mini-trials and we're put to the test to prove our case under the Shepherd test of course. The focus hearings you hear about in the Criminal Code don't necessarily work the same way that they're being explained to you.
The other part is putting forward our case by paper or putting in the witness statements and so forth. Different jurisdictions do this different ways, but what I'm hearing is that in most jurisdictions the courts aren't allowing and defence aren't agreeing to the Crown simply putting in a paper preliminary inquiry. Different jurisdictions do it differently, but we're finding that it's not really the case there. When we're looking at eliminating preliminary inquiries, we see some of the issues that are attached and, I guess, the pro side of it.
The con side of it is, of course, that it doesn't give an opportunity for the parties—not only the Crown but the defence—to analyze the case, see the witnesses, see how the evidence actually comes out. It also doesn't allow for the Crown and defence to come to some sort of resolution after the preliminary inquiry. Those are some of the things that are missing when you're talking about that.
There are some pros and cons, and we've heard some of those already, but I think it's important to keep those in mind.
One of the other things is about the peremptory trial challenges, and that's important. I've done probably 50-plus jury trials and been through many challenges for cause, and it will last somewhere in the range of a day to a day and a half for a homicide trial, so it's a lengthy process as it is right now and if you look through the general exemptions, specifics, and then peremptory challenges, and sometimes a challenge for cause depending on how high it is.
I notice in the Bill now, in proposed sections 638 and 640, that while peremptory challenges are eliminated, the challenge for cause section is actually still there. If you look at it under proposed subsection 640(2), you'll see that there is room for defence counsel and Crown to raise issues regarding the impartiality of a juror. “Juror” as it's been interpreted means the jury panel, so when we have a challenge for cause, that's the section that's invoked. If you look at it, the logical end to that is that we're going to have challenges for cause in more cases, which take a great deal of time, so that's one issue.
The other issue, of course, is that ultimately the judge is going to make the final decisions on each juror who's picked.
If you look at how this is going to actually play out in a challenge for cause, some questions are done up between the Crown and defence and decided upon. Each juror is brought in and questioned. How we envision this to unfold is that the jurors are brought in, they're asked the questions, the defence and Crown are given an opportunity to speak to it, and then the judge is going to ultimately make a decision with regard to whether or not that juror is impartial or not, and that continues on until you have your 12 or 14 or 16 jurors, depending on how it goes, which will make it a lot longer process. It can move from a day to two or three days, depending on how long it's going to take.
The way that we see this is that it's very problematic because you've taken one issue and turned it into a bigger issue, in our submission at least, but we can see how it logically comes out.
Of course there are the cases. The Supreme Court of Canada has stated that a judge should and shall stay out of those impartiality hearings, so their making a decision on the impartiality of a juror inserts them right into the picking of the jury itself. The Supreme Court of Canada says that may be unconstitutional, which is where that part of the bill may end up after we run a couple of jury trials. We find that problematic.
How are we doing for time?
Bonjour à tous.
Je sais que vous ne tarderez pas à savoir que je dois prendre un vol. Cela ne m'inquiète pas. L'important, c'est de bien faire les choses ici. N'hésitez donc pas à me poser des questions.
Je m'appelle Rick Woodburn et je suis président de l'Association canadienne des juristes de l'État. Nous représentons quelque 7 500 avocats de la Couronne de partout au pays, des 10 provinces et du gouvernement fédéral, tant des procureurs que des juristes. Nos propositions prennent donc en compte un vaste éventail d'opinions.
Je n'ai pas déposé de mémoire. J'ai toutefois réduit le nombre de propositions que nous formulerons, et nous entendrons bien entendu vos questions.
Je remercie le Comité de nous avoir invités. Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Il se peut que certains de nos commentaires soient un peu à contre-courant. Je ne veux dénigrer personne, ni les rédacteurs du projet de loi, ni quiconque y a travaillé avec diligence, mais nous aimerions l'examiner plus en détail.
Notre rôle ne sera pas d’appuyer ou de rejeter le projet de loi en soi. Nous souhaitons toutefois vous faire part des arguments pour et contre et vous donner une idée de ce que les procureurs et les avocats de la Couronne pensent de ce projet de loi sur le terrain.
Les avocats de la Couronne ne sont évidemment pas tous d'accord avec tous les articles du projet de loi. Certains sont pour, d'autres contre, et j'espère arriver à vous en faire part aujourd’hui, à tout le moins à vous transmettre de l'information qui vous permettra peut-être de faire marche arrière; lorsque vous réfléchirez à d'éventuelles modifications et aux différents articles, j'espère que ces renseignements vous aideront à savoir ce qui se passe sur le terrain.
Le premier point que nous aimerions examiner est la réforme du cautionnement, en particulier le remplacement des articles 523 et 524 par le nouvel article 523.1.
Mon interprétation du nouvel article 523.1, qui précéderait directement l'article 524 et qui reprend l'article au complet, c'est que l'article 523 n'est pas supprimé, si j'ai bien compris. Par conséquent, la Couronne a toujours la possibilité de demander la révocation de la mise en liberté sous caution d’une personne. Pour les procureurs de la Couronne, cette procédure supplémentaire ne fait que rajouter, dans certains cas, à une autre audience administrative pour non-respect d'une ordonnance et ainsi de suite. Ce nouvel article est donc redondant à bien des égards. Notre but à tous ici est d'éviter les retards, et l'ajout d'un article redondant dans le Code criminel ne nous aide pas nécessairement à atteindre ce but.
Je m'explique.
Conformément à l'actuel article 523, la Couronne peut, à la discrétion, faire tout ce que dit le nouvel article 523.1. Nous pouvons laisser tomber l'accusation, demander la révocation du cautionnement et ainsi de suite. Nous pouvons déjà faire tout cela. Le nouvel article 523.1 présuppose que les avocats de la Couronne ne prennent pas connaissance des accusations lorsqu'ils interviennent une première fois pour évaluer le bien-fondé de la cause, mais nous le faisons. En tant qu'avocats de la Couronne, il est important pour nous de nous assurer que ces infractions, ce non-respect des conditions de libération sous caution, soient prises en compte. Nous disons que c'est seulement là une étape de plus qui n'est pas nécessaire en réalité parce que les avocats de la Couronne font déjà leur travail à cet égard.
L’autre point intéressant à relever au sujet des infractions contre l'administration de la justice ou des cas de non-respect des conditions de mise en liberté, c'est qu'on semble beaucoup insister sur leur nombre et sur l'engorgement du système qui en découle. Je peux vous dire d'expérience que ces cas n'engorgent pas le système et ne causent pas de retards. Le non-respect d'une ordonnance judiciaire est très facile à prouver, même lorsque cela conduit à un procès, ce qui est très rare. N'oubliez jamais que ces infractions n'engorgent pas le système. Elles sont nombreuses, mais elles n'engorgent pas le système.
L'autre chose qu'il faut savoir au sujet de ces infractions, de ces non-respects d'une ordonnance du tribunal, c'est qu'il est important que tout le monde comprenne que c'est une pierre angulaire de notre système de cautionnement: toute personne mise en liberté sous caution est censée respecter les conditions et, si elle ne le fait pas, elle sera alors arrêtée et conduite devant le tribunal. Il doit avoir une pénalité pour ces manquements. D'après ce que je comprends du nouvel article 523.1, s'il est appliqué, ce sera davantage une tape sur les doigts. Croyez-moi, les contrevenants vont vite comprendre qu'ils peuvent tirer profit de cette nouvelle disposition. Ils seront de plus en plus nombreux à enfreindre leurs conditions de mise en liberté sous caution.
Ce ne sont là que quelques arguments au sujet de la réforme du cautionnement. Nous répondrons, bien entendu, à vos questions à ce sujet.
Concernant les enquêtes préliminaires, beaucoup de choses ont été dites. J'ai entendu certains témoignages et lu une partie des mémoires. Les opinions sont très divergentes sur la suppression des enquêtes préliminaires pour les infractions non punissables d'une peine d'emprisonnement à perpétuité.
Les avocats de la Couronne sont également divisés sur cette question et j'aimerais vous faire part des arguments pour et contre. Premièrement, l'un des avantages les plus évidents concerne les victimes d'agression sexuelle. Bien sûr, comme l'a fait remarquer un témoin ici même, le fait que ces victimes doivent témoigner deux fois les victimise doublement, comme je l'ai moi-même constaté. Supprimer cette obligation encouragera peut-être certaines victimes à se manifester dans les procès pour agression sexuelle, sachant qu'elles seront appelées à témoigner qu'une seule fois. Quand nous parlons de témoins, j'inclus également les enfants.
Pour une raison ou une autre, le projet de loi n’inclut pas les agressions sexuelles graves. Dans ces cas, bien sûr, le droit à une enquête préliminaire existe.
Du point de vue de la Couronne, les actuelles dispositions sur les enquêtes préliminaires posent problème. Je parle notamment de ce qu'on appelle les audiences de préparation à l'enquête au cours desquelles les avocats de la Couronne et de la défense se présentent devant le tribunal et tentent de circonscrire les points en litige. La plupart du temps, nous constatons que nous n'arrivons pas à le faire. Nous finissons par tenir des mini-procès au cours desquels nous devons défendre notre cause conformément au critère établi dans l'affaire Sheppard, bien entendu. Les audiences préalables à l'enquête dont il est question dans le Code criminel ne fonctionnent pas nécessairement comme on vous l'a expliqué.
L'autre point consiste à présenter notre cas par écrit ou à ajouter les déclarations des témoins et ainsi de suite. Chaque administration a sa propre manière de procéder, mais d'après ce que j'entends, la plupart des tribunaux n'autorisent pas cette pratique et les avocats de la défense n'acceptent pas que la Couronne procède à une enquête préliminaire sur dossier. Les choses se passent différemment d'un tribunal à l'autre. Nous constatons que la suppression de l'enquête préliminaire présente des avantages, je suppose, dans certains cas.
Le côté négatif, c'est que les parties, tant la Couronne que la défense, n'ont pas la possibilité d'analyser le cas, de rencontrer les témoins, de voir comment les éléments de preuve se présentent. Cela ne permet pas aux avocats de la Couronne et de la défense d'en arriver à un règlement après l'enquête préliminaire. Ce sont quelques-uns des éléments manquants qui ressortent lorsque nous discutons de la question.
Il y a des avantages et des inconvénients, et nous avons déjà entendu parler de certains. Il est donc important de les garder à l'esprit.
Un autre point important, ce sont les récusations péremptoires des jurés. J'ai probablement plaidé dans plus d'une cinquantaine de procès devant jury et assisté à de nombreuses récusations motivées; cette procédure dure entre une journée et une journée et demie dans le cas des procès pour homicide. C'est donc un long processus actuellement, surtout si vous devez en plus tenir compte des exemptions générales, des particularités, des récusations péremptoires et, parfois, des récusations motivées dépendant de l'importance du cas.
Je constate, dans les nouveaux articles 638 et 640 du projet de loi, que malgré la suppression des récusations péremptoires, l’article sur la récusation motivée est toujours là. Si vous regardez le nouveau paragraphe 640(2), vous verrez que ni l'avocat de la défense ni l'avocat de la Couronne ne peuvent mettre en doute l'impartialité d'un juré. Selon l'interprétation qui en est faite, le terme « juré » signifie le jury. Pour une récusation motivée, c'est donc cet article-là qui est invoqué. Si vous l'examinez attentivement, vous constaterez que l'aboutissement logique de cet article, c'est que nous risquons d'avoir des récusations motivées dans un plus grand nombre de procès, ce qui exige beaucoup de temps. Cela pose donc un problème.
L'autre point, c'est que la décision ultime concernant chaque juré sera prise par le juge.
Si vous regardez comment cela se traduira dans le cas d'une récusation motivée, certaines questions sont soulevées et tranchées par la Couronne et la défense. Chaque juré est convoqué et interrogé. La manière dont cela se passera, selon nous, c'est que les jurés seront convoqués et interrogés et que la Couronne et la défense auront la possibilité de s'adresser à eux; le juge prendra ensuite une décision quant à l'impartialité de chaque juré, jusqu'à ce que nous en ayons 12, 14 ou 16, en fonction du déroulement du procès, ce qui en allongera de beaucoup la durée, par exemple, d'un, deux ou trois jours, selon les cas.
Cela nous paraît très problématique parce que ce qui était un petit cas au départ devient un cas beaucoup plus important; c'est du moins ce que nous pensons, mais nous pouvons comprendre la logique de cela.
Bien entendu, il y a les affaires. La Cour suprême du Canada a affirmé qu'un juge doit rester à l'écart des audiences sur l'impartialité afin que sa décision sur l'impartialité d'un juré le place directement dans le processus de sélection du jury. La Cour suprême du Canada dit que cette pratique pourrait être inconstitutionnelle et c'est justement là que cette partie du projet de loi pourrait être contestée après quelques procès devant jury. Selon nous, c'est problématique.
Où en sommes-nous pour le temps?
Collapse
View Anthony Housefather Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Anthony Housefather Profile
2018-09-25 19:02
Expand
Mr. Woodburn, on peremptory challenges, I got your point. What would your feelings be if we, for example, introduced in Canada the Batson test that they have in the United States, where you can't do a peremptory challenge for a discriminatory cause, and if you were to do so, you could be called on it and have to justify your challenge?
Monsieur Woodburn, j’ai compris ce que vous vouliez dire au sujet des récusations péremptoires. Que penseriez-vous si, par exemple, nous introduisions au Canada le test Batson qui existe aux États-Unis, où les récusations péremptoires pour un motif discriminatoire ne sont pas autorisées dans les procès, et si vous y avez recours, vous pouvez être appelé à le justifier?
Collapse
Rick Woodburn
View Rick Woodburn Profile
Rick Woodburn
2018-09-25 19:03
Expand
That's a tough question because in the U.S. the jury system is taken as a whole, so you kind of move through it. Right now, we're inserting things in piecemeal and, in our view, it won't work. The issue that we're having is that we're getting closer to that with this whole notion that challenge-for-cause hearings start to become those in the sense that the questions are put to the juror, and then we argue about the juror and then the judge makes a decision. It's very close to what's happening in the United States right now.
C’est une question difficile parce qu'aux États-Unis, le système de jury est considéré comme un tout , et il s'agit de s'y conformer. Pour le moment, nous sommes en train d'insérer des éléments à la pièce et, à notre avis, cela ne fonctionnera pas. Le problème est que l'audition d'une demande de récusation motivée nous rapproche de ce modèle en ce sens que les questions sont posées au juré, puis nous débattons au sujet du juré, après quoi le juge rend une décision. C’est très proche de ce qui se passe actuellement aux États-Unis.
Collapse
View Anthony Housefather Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Anthony Housefather Profile
2018-09-25 19:04
Expand
In this case, if you were to use that as a component, you've retained your peremptory challenges, and then it would be up to the other side to say, “Hey, I think you're using them for a discriminatory reason”, and that would possibly in itself limit the number of times that anybody would ever even contemplate doing that, because they could be called out on it.
Would that be a preferable solution to you than stripping them from your repertoire of things that you can do?
Dans ce cas, si vous y avez recours, si vous faites des récusations péremptoires, il incombera à l’autre partie de dire: « Hé, je pense que vous y avez recours pour des motifs discriminatoires », et cela limitera peut-être le nombre de fois où vous pourriez envisager de le faire, parce qu’on pourrait vous demander de vous justifier.
Est-ce que ce serait une meilleure solution pour vous que de les éliminer de la liste des recours à votre disposition?
Collapse
Rick Woodburn
View Rick Woodburn Profile
Rick Woodburn
2018-09-25 19:04
Expand
I can't really comment on that, because it still doesn't make sense in our system, from my point of view. It just doesn't.
Je ne peux pas vraiment me prononcer là-dessus, parce que cela n’a toujours pas de sens dans notre système, de mon point de vue. Ce n’est tout simplement pas le cas.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2018-09-24 16:41
Expand
Thank you.
I'm going to start with you, Mr. Fowler, because I think you've come the farthest. I want to say something to you, sir. I disagree with you on some things, but in terms of which is the right coast, I think we would agree that of course it's the left coast. I just wanted to put that on the record.
I think the thrust of your remarks was the need to improve and not abolish preliminary inquiries. I think everyone said that. I thought you said that very forcefully.
You did raise parenthetically the whole issue of peremptory challenges. You said that in your experience they were never misused. I think many people who have come here would say that in the Stanley case in Saskatchewan with Colten Boushie, in which there was an indigenous deceased, the lawyer for Mr. Stanley managed to get no indigenous people on the jury. It certainly caused a lot of Canadians who wrote to me great concern.
I appreciate that some people have indicated that they use peremptory challenges precisely to get racialized people onto juries. I'd just like to give you an opportunity to expand on your forceful remarks on peremptory challenges. I ask you whether you don't think that there was a misuse in at least that case.
Merci.
Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Fowler, car je crois que vous êtes celui qui venez de plus loin. Je veux vous dire quelque chose, monsieur. Je ne suis pas d'accord avec vous sur certains points, mais pour ce qui est de savoir quelle est la bonne côte, je pense que nous serions d'accord pour dire que, bien sûr, c'est la côte ouest. Je voulais juste le dire aux fins du compte rendu.
Je pense que l'idée maîtresse de vos commentaires, c'était le besoin d'améliorer, et non pas d'abolir, les enquêtes préliminaires. Je pense que tout le monde l'a dit. Je crois que vous l'avez dit de façon très ferme.
Vous avez soulevé en passant toute la question des récusations péremptoires. Vous avez dit que, selon votre expérience, elles n'étaient jamais utilisées à mauvais escient. Je pense que de nombreuses personnes qui sont venues ici diraient que, dans l'affaire Stanley avec Colten Boushie, en Saskatchewan, où un Autochtone est décédé, l'avocat de M. Stanley a obtenu qu'aucun Autochtone ne fasse partie du jury. Certainement, cela a sérieusement inquiété beaucoup de Canadiens, qui m'ont écrit.
Je reconnais que certaines personnes ont dit utiliser les récusations péremptoires précisément pour que des personnes racialisées puissent faire partie de jurys. J'aimerais seulement vous donner l'occasion d'approfondir vos commentaires convaincants sur les récusations péremptoires. Je vous demande si vous ne croyez pas qu'il y a eu mauvaise utilisation, dans ce cas, du moins.
Collapse
Richard Fowler
View Richard Fowler Profile
Richard Fowler
2018-09-24 16:42
Expand
Well, you know, I wasn't there, but I've read a lot about it. As far as I know, I've seen no data on who was stood aside, who was indigenous. I've heard no evidence about how many indigenous people were on the array, which is the panel of people from which the jury is selected. Also, I strongly believe that we should not do fundamental criminal law reform based on anecdotes. We should do it based on research and reliably gathered data.
Let me just ask you this rhetorical question, because we know about the Boushie case. Let me ask you this question.
A client is charged with sexual assault. We have gotten rid of peremptory challenges, so the Crown has no ability to decide who is on the jury; I have no ability to decide on the jury. By chance—because that's what it will be—12 men are selected. It's a high-profile sexual assault case, there are 12 men on the jury, and my client is acquitted. What do you think the outcry is going to be?
I can tell you that with peremptory challenges in place, there would be women on that jury. We utilize peremptory challenges because those of us who do jury trials—and many lawyers don't—believe that a representative jury in terms of age, occupation, and gender is the best way to have a cohesive group of 12 people sitting in that room deliberating about our client's fate.
Eh bien, vous savez, je n'étais pas là, mais j'ai beaucoup lu sur cette affaire. À ce que je sache, je n'ai vu aucune donnée sur qui a été écarté, qui était Autochtone. Je n'ai entendu aucun élément de preuve au sujet du nombre d'Autochtones qui figuraient au tableau, qui est le groupe de personnes à partir duquel le jury est sélectionné. De plus, je crois fermement que nous ne devrions pas faire reposer une réforme fondamentale du droit criminel sur des anecdotes. Nous devrions la fonder sur des recherches et des données recueillies à l'aide de sources fiables.
Permettez-moi de vous poser cette question rhétorique, parce que nous sommes au courant de l'affaire Boushie. Permettez-moi de vous poser cette question.
Un client est accusé d'agression sexuelle. Nous avons éliminé les récusations péremptoires, donc la Couronne n'est pas en mesure de décider qui compose le jury; je ne suis pas en mesure de déterminer qui compose le jury. Par chance — parce que c'est ce qui arrivera — 12 hommes sont sélectionnés. C'est un cas d'agression sexuelle très médiatisé, 12 hommes composent le jury, et mon client est acquitté. À quoi ressemblera le tollé, à votre avis?
Je peux vous dire que, quand les récusations péremptoires sont en place, des femmes feraient partie de ce jury. Nous utilisons les récusations péremptoires parce que ceux d'entre nous qui plaident des procès devant jury — et de nombreux avocats ne le font pas — croient qu'un jury représentatif sur le plan de l'âge, de l'occupation et du sexe est la meilleure façon d'avoir un groupe cohésif de 12 personnes qui délibèrent dans cette salle au sujet du destin de notre client.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2018-09-24 16:44
Expand
I understand, and we would have a longer debate that time doesn't permit here, but the Criminal Lawyers' Association, for example, has suggested that there be a stand-alone section that allows a judge at the end of the day to eyeball that jury to see if it is representative of the community. If that section were in place, I think we would probably avoid an all-male jury.
Je comprends, et nous pourrions en débattre plus longuement ailleurs, mais le temps nous presse. La Criminal Lawyers' Association, par exemple, a proposé un article indépendant qui permet à un juge, au final, de jeter un oeil sur la composition de ce jury pour voir s'il est représentatif de la collectivité. Si cet article existait, je crois que nous pourrions probablement éviter un jury composé entièrement d'hommes.
Collapse
Richard Fowler
View Richard Fowler Profile
Richard Fowler
2018-09-24 16:44
Expand
I agree with you, and as best as I know, New Zealand is the one jurisdiction that has that.
Je suis d'accord avec vous, et à ma connaissance, la Nouvelle-Zélande est la seule administration qui prévoit cela.
Collapse
Richard Fowler
View Richard Fowler Profile
Richard Fowler
2018-09-24 16:44
Expand
They have that ability to say to everybody, “This jury is just not representative. You have been misusing your peremptory challenges. We're going to get rid of the jury, and we're going to start again."
Le juge a la capacité de dire à tout le monde: « Ce jury n'est juste pas représentatif. Vous avez mal utilisé vos récusations péremptoires. Nous allons nous débarrasser du jury et recommencer. »
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to all of the guests for being here today.
To give you some context, I come at this not from a legal point of view but from that of a business consultant, an NGO director. It's not from the deep steeping in the law that all of you have, with over 100 years of representation at the bar and what have you.
I want to share some stats with you. I come from a province that is part of the country and has 55% of the indigenous population of Canada. Twenty-five per cent of the youth in my city are indigenous, and we will have the absolute largest concentration of indigenous peoples anywhere in the country by 2025. Indigenous peoples are overrepresented in the criminal justice system, yet under-represented on juries. We're 27 years from the Sherratt decision, which made it clear that peremptory challenges can help make it more representative but can also harm representation.
I take you at your word, Mr. Fowler, that you're one of the good ones and that you don't use peremptory challenges to exclude people, but we have lots of anecdotal evidence that it occurs.
I want to start with Ms. Sullivan. How do we get to this goal of more representative juries if we keep peremptory challenges and practitioners are able to abuse them? I'd like comments from all of you on what Nova Scotia does. Instead of using property ownership as a means to select juries, it uses the health care system. If you take a look at how we're selecting our juries, it's like where we were before women's suffrage for voting.
Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous les invités d'être ici aujourd'hui.
Pour vous mettre un peu en contexte, mon expérience est non pas celle d'un avocat, mais bien celle d'un conseiller d'affaires, d'un directeur d'ONG. Je n'ai pas les connaissances approfondies en droit que vous avez tous, avec plus de 100 ans de représentation au Barreau et que sais-je encore.
J'aimerais vous faire part de quelques statistiques. Je viens d'une province qui renferme 55 % de la population autochtone du Canada. Au total, 25 % des jeunes de ma ville sont autochtones, et nous aurons la plus grande concentration d'Autochtones au pays d'ici 2025. Les Autochtones sont surreprésentés dans le système de justice pénale; pourtant, ils sont sous-représentés dans les jurys. Cela fait 27 ans depuis la décision Sherratt, qui a établi clairement le fait que les récusations péremptoires peuvent aider à les rendre plus représentatifs, mais peuvent aussi nuire à la représentation.
Je vous prends au mot, monsieur Fowler, quand vous dites que vous faites partie des bons et que vous n'utilisez pas les récusations péremptoires pour exclure les gens, mais nous disposons de preuves anecdotiques selon lesquelles cela se produit.
J'aimerais commencer par Mme Sullivan. Comment pouvons-nous atteindre cet objectif de jurys plus représentatifs si nous conservons les récusations péremptoires et que les avocats sont en mesure d'en abuser? J'aimerais obtenir des commentaires de vous tous sur ce que fait la Nouvelle-Écosse. Plutôt que de se servir du droit de propriété comme moyen de sélectionner des jurés, elle utilise le système de soins de santé. Si vous examinez notre mode de sélection des jurés, cela ressemble à la situation qui existait avant le suffrage universel.
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
The justice system evolves, according to Mr. Clement, but maybe we could help move the evolution along a little bit.
I'd like comments on those two points.
Le système de justice évolue, d'après M. Clement, mais peut-être pourrions-nous aider à faire avancer un peu l'évolution.
J'aimerais obtenir vos commentaires sur ces deux éléments.
Collapse
Rosellen Sullivan
View Rosellen Sullivan Profile
Rosellen Sullivan
2018-09-24 16:50
Expand
I agree. I think that in Newfoundland as well they use the health care system, and Labrador in particular would involve these issues. I've just recently done a jury trial in Labrador. It was the panel itself that was problematic in that case. Even though they did use the health care system, many of the reserves were so far away from the judicial centre that even getting there was a problem, so a lot of people were exempt on the basis of undue hardship and were never participants in the system at all.
I think you need to improve those sorts of things—for example, by making sure everyone is accessible. People do want to serve on juries.
Je suis d'accord. Je crois que, à Terre-Neuve aussi, on utilise le système de soins de santé, et au Labrador en particulier, ces enjeux sont présents. Tout récemment, j'ai participé à un procès devant jury au Labrador. Dans cette affaire, c'était le bassin de jurés même qui posait problème. Même si on avait utilisé le système de soins de santé, bon nombre des réserves étaient si éloignées du centre judiciaire que même le fait de s'y rendre était un problème, donc beaucoup de gens étaient exemptés en raison de difficultés indues et ne participaient pas du tout au système.
Je crois que vous devez améliorer ce genre de choses — par exemple, en vous assurant que tout le monde y a accès. Les gens veulent servir dans des jurys.
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
Rosellen Sullivan
View Rosellen Sullivan Profile
Rosellen Sullivan
2018-09-24 16:51
Expand
Widen the pool and make it easier for people to come. In Newfoundland, geographically, this is a big issue.
Élargir le bassin et faciliter l'accès des gens. À Terre-Neuve, géographiquement, c'est un grand enjeu.
Collapse
Rosellen Sullivan
View Rosellen Sullivan Profile
Rosellen Sullivan
2018-09-24 16:51
Expand
If you make it so that people can come, so that it's not a hardship for them to get there, then people are willing to serve on juries and the pool is more representative.
Si vous faites en sorte que les gens puissent venir, que ce ne soit pas une difficulté pour eux d'aller là-bas, ils sont disposés à servir dans des jurys, et le bassin sera plus représentatif.
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
What else can we do to make juries more representative and keep peremptory challenges?
Que pouvons-nous faire de plus pour rendre les jurys plus représentatifs et conserver les récusations péremptoires?
Collapse
Rosellen Sullivan
View Rosellen Sullivan Profile
Rosellen Sullivan
2018-09-24 16:52
Expand
In my experience, people haven't tried to manipulate the process in that way.
Selon mon expérience, les gens n'ont pas essayé de manipuler le processus de cette façon.
Collapse
Richard Fowler
View Richard Fowler Profile
Richard Fowler
2018-09-24 16:52
Expand
I agree. It's the provincial jury acts that dictate, to a large extent, how big the array is. You can pay jurors more because it's inconvenient.
When it comes to indigenous people, we have to recognize a fundamental.... They have a mistrust of the criminal justice system for obvious reasons, all the reasons you've stated. How do we encourage them to trust the system enough to want to participate on a jury?
I've selected juries in B.C. and the Yukon. The Yukon uses health records, so many more first nations people come. They all say they don't want to sit. Many people try to find reasons not to be on the jury. It would be partly through education and encouraging indigenous people to understand that they have much to gain by being on a jury.
Je suis d'accord. Ce sont les lois provinciales concernant les jurys qui dictent, dans une grande mesure, la taille du tableau. Vous pouvez payer des jurés davantage en raison des dérangements.
Lorsqu'il s'agit des Autochtones, nous devons reconnaître une chose fondamentale... Ils se méfient du système de justice pénale, pour des raisons évidentes, toutes les raisons que vous avez énoncées. Comment pouvons-nous les encourager à faire assez confiance au système pour vouloir participer à un jury?
J'ai sélectionné des jurés en Colombie-Britannique et au Yukon. Le Yukon se sert des dossiers de santé, donc il y a beaucoup plus d'Autochtones qui viennent. Ils disent tous qu'ils ne veulent pas faire partie du jury. De nombreuses personnes essaient de trouver des raisons pour s'en dégager. Il s'agirait, en partie, d'éduquer et d'encourager les Autochtones de manière à ce qu'ils comprennent qu'ils ont beaucoup à gagner en faisant partie d'un jury.
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
Mr. Spratt, I have a question for you and Ms. Dale in terms of other ways to speed up the criminal justice system, as well as on keeping peremptory challenges and preliminary inquiries.
Monsieur Spratt, j'ai une question pour vous et pour Mme Dale en ce qui concerne les autres moyens d'accélérer le système de justice pénale, ainsi que de conserver les récusations péremptoires et les enquêtes préliminaires.
Collapse
Michael Spratt
View Michael Spratt Profile
Michael Spratt
2018-09-24 16:55
Expand
Before I answer that, could I just add one more thing to the jury issue?
The issue is, indeed, the representative sample. Beyond that, it's about who can actually have the privilege if you actually have the representative sample. Take national child care. Every single mother who I've had on a jury wants out, and it's not enough to throw a few bucks; it's national child care that supports people to serve on juries and participate fully, as one prong.
To speed up a trial, there are a few things. I think the preliminary inquiry speeds up trials now, so I think we have to foster that, but if you want to speed up trials, get me more judges, get me more courtrooms. I'm ready to go to trial tomorrow on a number of charges, especially if my client is in custody. The reason we have to wait eight months or 12 months isn't because of disclosure issues—I can solve those in the meantime—it's because the first date that the court offers me is six months or 12 months, and in Ottawa you wait six months or 12 months, and when you get to trial, there are three other cases set in that court.
Just today I had a matter set, and luckily one of my associates was able to take the matter. It was a short trial, but she wasn't able to actually start that trial until about 3 p.m., because she was waiting for a court.
Avant de répondre à cette question, pourrais-je juste ajouter une chose de plus à la question touchant les jurys?
Le problème tient effectivement à l'échantillon représentatif. Au-delà de cela, il s'agit de savoir qui détient, en réalité, le privilège si vous avez un échantillon représentatif. Prenez l'exemple du système national de garderies. Toutes les mères célibataires que j'ai reçues dans un jury veulent en sortir, et ce n'est pas assez de donner quelques dollars; c'est le programme national de garderies qui soutient les gens pour qu'ils puissent servir dans des jurys et participer pleinement, comme un seul volet.
Pour accélérer un procès, on peut faire certaines choses. Je pense que l'enquête préliminaire accélère les procès en ce moment, et nous devrions donc l'améliorer, mais si vous voulez accélérer les procès, donnez-moi plus de juges, plus de salles d'audience. Je suis prêt à aller en procès demain pour un certain nombre de chefs d'accusation, particulièrement si mon client est en détention. La raison pour laquelle nous devons attendre 8 ou 12 mois tient non seulement aux problèmes de communication préalable — je peux les régler entretemps — c'est que la première date que m'offre la cour soit dans 6 ou 12 mois, et, à Ottawa, vous attendez 6 ou 12 mois, et lorsque vous arrivez au procès, on règle trois autres affaires dans ce tribunal.
Juste aujourd'hui, j'ai fait régler une affaire, et heureusement, une personne faisant partie de mes associés a été en mesure d'entendre l'affaire. C'était un bref procès, mais elle n'a pas pu le commencer réellement avant environ 15 heures, parce qu'elle attendait une salle d'audience.
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you.
What steps would you take to make sure that we have a more representative jury pool?
Merci.
Quelles mesures prendriez-vous pour faire en sorte que nous ayons un bassin de jurés plus représentatif?
Collapse
Lisa Silver
View Lisa Silver Profile
Lisa Silver
2018-09-24 17:38
Expand
At least when I think about the situation that has been going on in two cases that we have had in Canada, I believe that the Crown can make a motion before the judge and that the judge could be responding to the fact that the jury that's been chosen is not representative or that it's biased.
À tout le moins, quand je pense à la situation qui s'est présentée dans deux affaires tranchées au Canada, je crois qu'il est possible pour la Couronne de présenter une demande au juge et qu'il est possible pour celui-ci de réagir au fait que le juré sélectionné n'est pas représentatif ou n'est pas impartial.
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you.
Mr. Brown, do you have any recommendations for us for a more representative jury pool?
Merci.
Monsieur Brown, avez-vous des recommandations à nous soumettre pour réussir à obtenir un bassin de jurés plus représentatif?
Collapse
Daniel Brown
View Daniel Brown Profile
Daniel Brown
2018-09-24 17:38
Expand
One of the things that you touch upon is that many racialized and aboriginal people are overrepresented in the justice system, which means that they leave the justice system with criminal records in record numbers. One of the things that bars a person from sitting on a jury is a conviction for an indictable offence. It may be that the government needs to take a look at whether or not we want to exclude the types of people who are overrepresented in the justice system and keep them excluded from participating on juries and from participating in the justice system because of this perhaps out-of-date rule that exists that keeps them off the juries in the first place.
Un des points que vous avez soulevés, c'est que les personnes racialisées et les Autochtones sont surreprésentés dans le système de justice, ce qui signifie qu'un nombre record de ces personnes quittent le système de justice avec un dossier criminel. Un des obstacles à la participation d'une personne à un jury, c'est une déclaration de culpabilité pour une infraction punissable par mise en accusation. Peut-être que le gouvernement devrait se demander si nous souhaitons ou pas exclure les groupes de personnes qui sont surreprésentés dans le système de justice et les empêcher d'être jurés et de participer au système de justice en raison de la règle existante, qui est peut-être désuète, qui les écarte dès le départ.
Collapse
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
Do you like the idea of health cards being the way that we select jury pools?
L'idée d'utiliser les cartes d'assurance-maladie pour sélectionner un bassin de jurés vous plaît-elle?
Collapse
Daniel Brown
View Daniel Brown Profile
Daniel Brown
2018-09-24 17:39
Expand
What I don't like is the idea that we would use property rolls as a way to select juries, because again, there is inherent bias in the way that people end up on the rolls or off the rolls. I think there has to be a better way. It seems, though, that one of the better ways to do it is to assess people by their health cards. It's certainly one of the many solutions, as well as identifying the problem that simply choosing people who are not property holders excludes a group of people from entering the pool in the first place.
L'idée que je rejette, c'est celle d'utiliser les registres fonciers pour sélectionner des jurés, parce que, encore une fois, cette façon de procéder est intrinsèquement tendancieuse pour ce qui est de la façon de figurer, ou pas, sur les registres. Selon moi, il doit exister une meilleure façon. Il semble qu'un de ces meilleurs moyens consiste à évaluer les personnes en fonction de leur carte d'assurance-maladie. Assurément, c'est une des nombreuses solutions, et il faut aussi reconnaître le problème qui tient au fait que si on sélectionne seulement des personnes qui ne sont pas des propriétaires fonciers, on exclut du bassin de jurés un groupe de gens dès le départ.
Collapse
Michael Johnston
View Michael Johnston Profile
Michael Johnston
2018-09-19 15:41
Expand
My name is Michael Johnston. I am a citizen and a barrister-at-law and, as often as my clients' cases and causes permit, I am a jury lawyer.
Before speaking about Bill C-75 and jury selection, I did want to take a moment to thank you for extending to me this incredible democratic opportunity. Not every country gives its citizens a voice in the legislative process. Not every political system is prepared to hear evidence that may call into question the wisdom of a proposed course of legislative action. Providing citizens with a voice and providing citizens an opportunity to be meaningfully involved in acts of government bespeaks a vibrant democracy.
In spirit, Bill C-75 seeks to give citizens more of a voice. Bill C-75 seeks to put more citizens in the jury box, to have more citizens involved. Insofar as that spirit is in Bill C-75, it's to be acknowledged and celebrated. However, it takes more than good intentions to make good legislation. I think we all know that there's a saying about where good intentions alone might sometimes take you.
Bill C-75's measures with respect to jury selection seem a bit perfunctory. They require, in my respectful submission, greater deliberation and calibration to achieve the stated objective, and most importantly, in some cases outright elimination, because if you're going to do something, you must have evidence that there's a problem and have evidence that this is going to achieve the solution.
Trial by jury needs to be better understood in terms of how the provinces and the federal government interplay to achieve a representative jury role. There needs to be a better understanding of how challenge for cause informs and works with peremptory challenges.
Ultimately, trial by jury isn't something that just happened overnight. In many ways, trial by jury started before the Norman Conquest, with trial by compurgation. Over the last thousand years, trial procedure has slowly evolved through trial and error. The provisions that have persisted over time, I would suggest to you, aren't there just as historical vestiges, but stand the testament of time.
Bill C-75 with respect to jury selection comes along 48 days after the government's very public declaration of disagreement with a verdict. Forty-eight days to study provisions and otherwise come up with solutions, from my most respectful perspective, simply isn't enough time.
As a result, in my respectful submission, much of what Bill C-75 proposes in terms of jury selection is a legislative rush to judgment, and while the bill lacks a rational connection between its noble objectives and its actual measures, there nevertheless are some things that can be advanced here today, in my most humble opinion.
We know that there is unfortunately a great problem and a tragic problem of overrepresentation of aboriginal people in our criminal justice system. Correspondingly, there is under-representation in the jury boxes. What is the correlation there? It is criminal records. Criminal records are used to exclude tax-paying citizens, citizens who have a right to vote in federal and provincial elections. Criminal records that don't disqualify them from those civic responsibilities and duties do disqualify them from sitting on a jury. Up to 3.8 million Canadians have a criminal record. Criminal records are used both by the provinces and by the federal government to exclude up to 10% of the population.
Now, if Bill C-75 wants to rid itself of discrimination in the jury selection process, this is the lowest-hanging legislative fruit. Get rid of criminal records as a vector for excluding citizens, and if you want to exclude citizens because you think they're biased, produce the evidence. We have provisions already in place to deal with that under paragraph 638(1)(b) of the challenge for cause provisions.
That being said, Bill C-75 is noble in its spirit. It already contemplates modifying paragraph 638(1)(c) to narrow the exception. It wants people who have gone to jail but who have served only one year of jail to be eligible for jury duty, thus changing it, obviously, from the one year that it currently is to two years.
Parliament wants people with criminal records to be involved. It wants to give these people a voice, but remember what I said about this interplay between the provinces and the federal government. Unfortunately, Parliament's intention to have people with a criminal record who have served one year in an institution, for example, is going to be frustrated by the fact that almost every province excludes people with a criminal record, for much lower reasons.
In Ontario, if you've been convicted of an offence that was prosecutable by indictment, that leads to automatic exclusion. Those are easy areas for the government to come into and create a basis whereby it says that across the country you can only be excluded for this reason.
Justice Iacobucci, in his report, actually appreciated the interplay between the two levels of government. He made a recommendation that I submit you can adopt and take one small step further. I'm suggesting that section 626 of the Criminal Code say that nobody in Canada—or no citizen—is subject to exclusion from jury duty merely because of a criminal record, or simply say that the criminal record exclusion should parallel that of the federal government. They did that with respect to provinces that were excluding spouses of doctors or other people who were otherwise ineligible.
I appreciate that I am almost at the end of my time. I have two other areas that I want to briefly address. Most importantly, I want to speak about challenge for cause in section 640 of the Criminal Code. This is a small provision that has otherwise been tucked away in this omnibus provision, and perhaps not many people have even spoken about it, but this is a criminal law provision that has existed almost in its exact form since 1892. Jurors who are either unsworn or sworn have been entrusted to decide if a challenge for cause is true.
This is also important in terms of giving citizens a voice and encouraging citizen involvement. Jurors pick themselves. When they ultimately determine that a juror can sit on a jury, the jury that ends up sitting is a reflection of the choices of the litigants and the jurors themselves. This piece of legislation proposes to have judges completely overhaul that situation and be the sole people to make that determination. There's no evidence that there was ever a problem with this challenge for cause procedure. There's no evidence that this is going to actually provide any form of meaningful solution or that it will even expedite matters at all.
In my most respectful submission, there is no good reason to interfere with the challenge for cause procedures. They fulfill a very important role in terms of ensuring for a defendant—for whom the right to trial by jury exists—that the body is an independent, impartial and representative one. I would most respectfully submit that this idea to change the challenge for cause procedures is totally unsubstantiated and without merit. It should be eliminated unless there's some reason offered in terms of continuing on with section 640 being modified.
Je m'appelle Michael Johnston. Je suis un citoyen et un avocat et, aussi souvent que me le permettent les causes de mes clients, je plaide devant jury.
Avant de vous parler du projet de loi C-75 et de la sélection des jurés, j'aimerais prendre un instant pour vous remercier de me donner cette occasion extraordinaire sur le plan de la démocratie. Ce ne sont pas tous les pays qui donnent à leurs citoyens l'occasion de s'exprimer dans le processus législatif. Les régimes politiques ne sont pas tous prêts à entendre des témoignages qui peuvent remettre en question le bien-fondé d'une mesure législative proposée. Donner aux citoyens la parole et l'occasion de participer véritablement aux décisions du gouvernement témoigne d'une démocratie vivante.
En principe, le projet de loi C-75 vise à donner aux citoyens une plus grande possibilité de s'exprimer. Il vise à donner l'occasion à plus de citoyens de siéger comme jurés, à faire participer un plus grand nombre de citoyens au processus. Dans la mesure où le projet de loi C-75 contient ce principe, on doit le souligner et s'en réjouir. Cependant, l'adoption de bonnes mesures législatives requiert plus que de la bonne volonté. Je crois que nous le savons tous.
Les mesures contenues dans le projet de loi C-75 qui portent sur la sélection des jurés semblent un peu superficielles. À mon humble avis, elles nécessitent une plus longue réflexion et un meilleur calibrage si l'on veut atteindre l'objectif énoncé, et surtout, dans certains cas, il faut supprimer des éléments, car si l'on veut agir, on doit avoir la preuve qu'il y a un problème et qu'on parviendra à une solution.
Il faut que le procès devant jury soit mieux compris quant à la façon dont les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral interagissent pour la constitution des groupes de jurés représentatifs. Il faut que la mesure dans laquelle la récusation motivée fonctionne avec les récusations péremptoires soit mieux comprise.
Au bout du compte, le procès devant jury n'est pas quelque chose qui est simplement apparu du jour au lendemain. À bien des égards, son apparition précède la conquête normande, avec les procès par témoignages justificatifs. Au cours du dernier millénaire, la procédure régissant le procès a évolué lentement, par essais et erreurs. Je vous dirais que les dispositions qui ont persisté à travers le temps ne sont pas que des vestiges de l'histoire; elles résistent à l'épreuve du temps.
Concernant la sélection des jurés, le projet de loi C-75 est présenté 48 jours après que le gouvernement a déclaré publiquement qu'il n'acceptait pas un verdict. À mon humble avis, 48 jours pour examiner des dispositions et trouver des solutions, ce n'est tout simplement pas assez.
Par conséquent, à mon humble avis, les propositions contenues dans le projet de loi C-75 qui portent sur la sélection des jurés constituent, en bonne partie, des mesures présentées à toute vapeur en réponse au jugement rendu. En outre, bien qu'il manque dans le projet de loi un lien rationnel entre les objectifs nobles qu'il énonce et les mesures qu'il contient, il y a néanmoins des choses à proposer, à mon humble avis.
Nous savons qu'il y a malheureusement un grand problème: la surreprésentation des Autochtones dans notre système de justice pénale. En conséquence, ils sont sous-représentés sur les bancs des jurés. Quel est le lien? Ce sont les casiers judiciaires. Ils sont utilisés pour exclure des contribuables, des citoyens qui ont le droit de voter aux élections fédérales et provinciales. Des casiers judiciaires qui ne les empêchent pas d'assumer leurs responsabilités et leurs devoirs de citoyen les empêchent toutefois de faire partie d'un jury. Jusqu'à 3,8 millions de Canadiens ont un casier judiciaire. Tant les provinces que le gouvernement fédéral utilisent les casiers judiciaires pour exclure jusqu'à 10 % de la population.
Si le projet de loi C-75 vise à éliminer la discrimination dans le processus de sélection des jurés, il s'agit de l'objectif le plus facilement réalisable. Il faut cesser d'utiliser les casiers judiciaires pour exclure des citoyens, et si l'on veut exclure des citoyens parce qu'on croit qu'ils ont un parti pris, il faut le prouver. Il existe déjà des dispositions qui portent là-dessus, l'alinéa 638(1)b) qui porte sur la récusation motivée.
Cela dit, le projet de loi C-75 est noble en principe. Il propose déjà de modifier l'alinéa 638(1)c) pour restreindre l'exception. Il vise à ce que les gens qui sont allés en prison, mais qui n'ont été emprisonnés que 12 mois puissent exercer les fonctions de juré; on modifie alors évidemment la période, qui passerait de un an à deux ans.
Le Parlement souhaite que les gens qui ont un casier judiciaire participent. Il veut leur donner une voix, mais n'oubliez pas ce que j'ai dit au sujet de cette interaction entre les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral. Malheureusement, la volonté du Parlement de faire en sorte que des gens ayant un casier judiciaire qui ont purgé une peine d'un an dans un établissement, par exemple, participent se heurtera au fait que presque chaque province exclut les gens qui ont un casier judiciaire, pour des raisons bien moindres.
En Ontario, lorsqu'on a été déclaré coupable d'une infraction qui fait l'objet d'une poursuite par voie de mise en accusation, une exclusion automatique s'applique. Dans ces cas, il est facile pour le gouvernement d'établir les fondements lui permettant de dire qu'on ne peut être exclu que pour cette raison d'un bout à l'autre du pays.
Dans son rapport, le juge Iacobucci a compris l'interaction entre les deux ordres de gouvernement. Il a formulé une recommandation que je vous propose d'adopter et de pousser un peu plus loin. Je propose que l'article 626 du Code criminel prévoie que personne au Canada — ou aucun citoyen — ne peut être exclu du devoir de juré du seul fait d'un casier judiciaire, ou qu'il prévoie simplement que l'exclusion pour cette raison doit être semblable à celle du gouvernement fédéral. Cette recommandation visait les provinces qui excluent les époux de médecin ou d'autres personnes qui n'étaient autrement pas admissibles.
Je sais qu'il ne me reste presque plus de temps. J'ai deux autres points que je souhaite aborder brièvement. Je veux surtout parler de la récusation motivée à l'article 640 du Code criminel. C'est une petite disposition qui est autrement dissimulée dans cette disposition omnibus, et il est possible que peu de personnes en aient parlé, mais cette disposition de droit pénal est presque demeurée inchangée depuis 1892. On a confié à des jurés, assermentés ou non, le soin de décider si une récusation motivée est fondée.
C'est également important pour donner aux citoyens une voix et encourager leur participation. Les jurés se choisissent eux-mêmes. Quand ils concluent que les jurés peuvent faire partie d'un jury, ce jury est à l'image des choix des plaideurs et des jurés proprement dits. Cette mesure législative propose que les juges procèdent à une réforme complète de cette façon de faire et qu'ils soient les seules personnes à prendre cette décision. Rien n'indique que cela fournira une vraie solution ni même que cela accélérera les choses le moindrement.
En toute déférence, il n'y a aucune bonne raison de s'ingérer dans les procédures de récusation motivée. Elles jouent un rôle très important pour assurer à un défendeur — pour qui existe le droit de subir un procès avec jury — que l'entité est indépendante, impartiale et représentative. Avec tout le respect, j'estime que l'idée de changer les procédures de récusation motivée est sans fondement. On devrait s'en défaire à moins que ce soit justifié si l'on persiste à modifier l'article 640.
Collapse
Michael Johnston
View Michael Johnston Profile
Michael Johnston
2018-09-19 15:49
Expand
Finally, l want to say something about peremptory challenges. As a jury lawyer, I'm somebody who is often in a situation where I'm facing unrepresentative jury pools or jury panels. There are many situations. Most recently, I ran a four-week judge and jury trial where my client was an Ethiopian Muslim, and his co-accused was a Muslim. There were not many blacks or Muslims on Ottawa's jury panel, I assure you. We had to exercise, almost to the full extent of our abilities, the challenge for cause and the peremptory challenges in order to get the 12th juror, who was the only visibly racialized juror.
I say that because peremptory challenges are important to protect the rights of the accused. Often what seems to be lost in all of this conversation is that trial by jury is a benefit that exists for the accused person. There are two reports that have been cited by the ministry of the Attorney General, when this legislation was tabled, seeking to justify this legislation. As a lawyer, however, I always like to look at the actual source. I commend to you to look at the Manitoba inquiry report, which is being cited as the basis for this removal.
In 1991, it was suggested that these peremptory challenges should be eradicated because of the discrimination that they allowed. At the time, however, it also made an additional recommendation. The additional recommendation was to change the way in which juries are selected so that there could be some greater questioning of potential jurors. You can't just nitpick, and I respectfully ask this committee to consider that.
If you are going to go so far as eliminating peremptory challenges, I would say that Justice Iacobucci, when he studied this in 2013, came to a non-partisan, determined and decided conclusion that it was good to keep them but to provide some oversight by way of something akin to an American-style Batson challenge.
I'm sure I've exceeded my time at this point, but I'm happy to answer any and all questions with respect to jury selection or anything else.
I thank you kindly.
Je veux enfin dire un mot sur les récusations péremptoires. En tant qu'avocat plaidant devant jury, il m'arrive souvent de faire face à des candidats jurés ou à des tableau de jurés non représentatifs. De nombreuses situations sont possibles. Dernièrement, j'ai pris part à un procès avec juge et jury de quatre semaines pour défendre mon client, un musulman éthiopien, dont le coaccusé était aussi musulman. Je vous assure qu'il n'y avait pas beaucoup de Noirs ou de musulmans dans le tableau des jurés d'Ottawa. Nous avons dû recourir, presque dans la pleine mesure de nos capacités, à la récusation motivée et aux récusations péremptoires pour obtenir le 12e juré, le seul étant issu d'une minorité raciale visible.
Je le mentionne parce que les récusations péremptoires sont importantes pour protéger les droits de l'accusé. Ce qu'on semble souvent oublier à ce sujet, c'est qu'un procès avec jury est un avantage dont l'accusé peut se prévaloir. Lors du dépôt de cette mesure législative, le ministère du Procureur général a cité deux rapports en guise de justification. Cependant, en tant qu'avocat, j'aime toujours consulter la source originale. Je vous recommande donc de consulter le rapport d'enquête du Manitoba, que l'on cite pour justifier l'élimination de cette disposition.
En 1991, on a laissé entendre que ces récusations péremptoires devraient être éradiquées compte tenu de la discrimination qu'elles rendent possible. À l'époque, toutefois, le rapport fait une recommandation supplémentaire, à savoir changer la façon dont les jurés sont sélectionnés de manière à ce que l'on puisse questionner davantage les candidats. On ne peut pas tout simplement se montrer tatillon, et je demande respectueusement au Comité d'en tenir compte.
Si vous allez jusqu'à éliminer les récusations péremptoires, je dirais que le juge Iacobucci, quand il a étudié la question en 2013, en est arrivé à la conclusion non partisane et déterminée qu'il est bon de les garder, mais d'assurer une certaine surveillance à l'aide d'un mécanisme qui ressemble à la récusation américaine de type Batson.
Je suis maintenant certain d'avoir dépassé le temps qui m'était alloué, mais je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions sur la sélection des jurés ou sur autre chose.
Merci beaucoup.
Collapse
View Dave MacKenzie Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dave MacKenzie Profile
2018-09-19 15:51
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to the panel for being here today. I found all of your opening remarks remarkable because they hit the nail on the head for most of what we've been hearing during the last few days.
Mr. Johnston, you mentioned one issue, one trial that turned out to be controversial perhaps because of the jury pool. We also recognize that it was not a long time ago. To make the massive changes that we're trying to make, you're right that it does take a whole lot more research and looking into fixing the problem rather than addressing it in a quick manner.
I think that's where your comments are coming from. Would I be right in that? You believe it needs to be changed, but we need to spend some time to do it.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Merci aux témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui. J'ai trouvé remarquables tous vos exposés, car ils portent précisément sur la majeure partie de ce que nous avons entendu au cours des derniers jours.
Monsieur Johnston, vous avez soulevé un problème, à savoir un procès qui s'est révélé controversé à cause du bassin de jurés. Nous reconnaissons également que cela ne remonte pas à très longtemps. Pour réaliser les énormes changements que nous tentons d'apporter, vous avez raison de dire qu'il faut effectuer beaucoup plus de recherches et chercher à régler le problème plutôt que de procéder à toute vitesse.
Je crois que c'est ce qui sous-tend vos observations. Ai-je raison? Vous croyez qu'un changement s'impose, mais nous devons prendre le temps de l'apporter.
Collapse
Michael Johnston
View Michael Johnston Profile
Michael Johnston
2018-09-19 15:52
Expand
We absolutely need to calibrate the system at all times. A system such as our trial-by-jury system requires modernization. It requires analysis to ensure that it's achieving what it's supposed to achieve. But of course we need a better understanding of it. It has been since 1980 when the Law Reform Commission made a comprehensive study of this.
We need a non-partisan understanding of trial-by-jury because, while trial-by-jury exists in our democracy, it isn't informed by democratic decisions. It's not subject to, let say, public opinion. In fact, it's supposed to guard against the exact opposite. Therefore, I very much agree with you. We need a non-partisan understanding of the system before we start pulling planks away.
Nous devons absolument calibrer le système en tout temps. Un système comme celui de nos procès avec jury doit être modernisé. Une analyse est nécessaire pour s'assurer qu'il accomplit ce qu'il est censé accomplir. Cela dit, nous devons évidemment mieux comprendre le système. La dernière étude approfondie est celle réalisée en 1980 par la Commission de réforme du droit.
Nous avons besoin d'une compréhension non partisane des procès avec jury, car, même s'ils existent dans notre démocratie, ils ne se fondent pas sur des décisions démocratiques. Ce n'est pas assujetti, disons, à l'opinion publique. En fait, c'est censé nous protéger exactement contre l'inverse. Je suis donc parfaitement d'accord avec vous. Nous devons comprendre le système de façon non partisane avant d'en retirer des morceaux.
Collapse
View Dave MacKenzie Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dave MacKenzie Profile
2018-09-19 15:53
Expand
Sometimes common sense seems to be lacking and it's more important that we do things in a hurry in this place. I think you're absolutely right. We need to take our time and do it right as opposed to making wholesale changes in a hurry.
Il arrive parfois ici que le bon sens fasse défaut, et qu'il soit plus important de procéder à la hâte. Je pense que vous avez parfaitement raison. Nous devons prendre notre temps et faire les choses correctement plutôt que d'apporter précipitamment des changements importants.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2018-09-19 16:08
Expand
Thank you.
Mr. Johnston, you were passionate about trying to expand the jury pool and we heard a lot about that yesterday as well, regarding the representativeness issue. Yesterday, we heard a suggestion that health cards are preferable to property rolls because, by definition, those that don't own property wouldn't be brought in. Today, you've suggested that criminal record holders should be added to the list in order to expand the pool, thereby adding 10% of the population, which is quite remarkable. We also heard yesterday that permanent residents ought to be included, as they have a sufficient connection to the community to be included.
Would you agree with those other suggestions?
Merci.
Monsieur Johnston, vous avez parlé avec verve en faveur d'un élargissement du bassin de candidats à la fonction de juré, et nous en avons beaucoup entendu parler hier aussi, pour des raisons de représentativité. On nous a dit hier qu'il serait préférable d'utiliser les cartes d'assurance-maladie plutôt que des titres de propriété parce que par définition, les personnes qui ne sont pas propriétaires ne pourraient pas être convoquées. Aujourd'hui, vous nous avez recommandé d'ajouter à la liste les personnes ayant un casier judiciaire pour élargir le bassin, ce qui y ajouterait 10 % de la population, un chiffre considérable. Nous avons également entendu hier qu'il conviendrait aussi d'inclure à la liste les résidents permanents, puisqu'ils seraient suffisamment liés à la collectivité pour y être inclus.
Seriez-vous d'accord avec ces autres recommandations?
Collapse
Michael Johnston
View Michael Johnston Profile
Michael Johnston
2018-09-19 16:09
Expand
I would agree with the other suggestions. I know that some people talk, for example, about increasing juror participation by allowing jurors to volunteer, as opposed to mandating them by way of subpoenas or juror notices.
That being said, there are many ways that we could create or encourage greater juror participation and I would adopt all of those.
Je serais d'accord avec ces autres propositions. Je sais que certaines personnes parleront, notamment, d'augmenter la participation des jurés en leur permettant de se porter volontaires, plutôt qu'en les obligeant à assumer cette fonction par assignation ou avis de sélection.
Cela dit, il y a de nombreuses façons dont nous pourrions favoriser une plus grande participation des jurés, et je serais prêt à toutes les accepter.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2018-09-19 16:09
Expand
I only have 30 seconds.
On challenges for cause, section 640, you're very clear. We've had it since 1892. Essentially, you're saying that if it ain't broke, don't fix it. However, we've heard a lot of people, although you're not one of them, who say we ought to agree with the bill and abolish peremptory challenges. Yesterday, Professor Roach said that if we remove peremptory challenges, maybe we need to beef up challenges for cause. If we chose that route, would you agree?
Je n'ai que 30 secondes.
Concernant la récusation motivée et l'article 640, vous êtes très clair. Cet article existe depuis 1892. En gros, vous nous dites qu'il n'y a pas lieu de corriger quelque chose qui fonctionne, mais nous avons entendu bien d'autres personnes nous dire qu'il faudrait abolir la récusation péremptoire comme le propose le projet de loi. Hier, le professeur Roach nous a dit que si nous éliminions la récusation péremptoire, il faudrait peut-être renforcer les dispositions sur la récusation motivée. Seriez-vous d'accord avec cela, si nous choisissons cette avenue?
Collapse
Michael Johnston
View Michael Johnston Profile
Michael Johnston
2018-09-19 16:10
Expand
I would not agree because peremptory challenges provide an accused person with the ability to challenge the fairness of what is transpiring. We know that the jury pool and panels are constituted by the provincial governments. They are randomly constituted and they ought to be randomly constituted. The accused has to have some say in who ultimately ends up in the pool. Just by looking at the individuals, there could be any number of reasons why someone can feel it proper to challenge a person peremptorily.
More importantly, there is a residual ability for prejudice to surface during the challenge for cause process. As potential jurors are being challenged and they're being asked if they're racist.... These are situations in which people who may not have been acrimonious to your cause or your opponents cause actually develop that level of prejudice. It would provide an opportunity to use a peremptory challenge in a proper way.
Je ne suis pas d'accord, parce que la récusation péremptoire permet à l'inculpé de contester l'inéquité de la situation. Nous savons que les bassins de candidats et les jurys sont constitués par les gouvernements provinciaux. Ils sont constitués au hasard, comme il se doit. Or, la personne inculpée doit avoir son mot à dire dans la sélection des jurés. À la simple vue des candidats, il y a toutes sortes de raisons pour lesquelles une personne pourrait juger bon de demander une récusation péremptoire.
Mais je crois surtout qu'il reste un risque de préjudice dans le processus de récusation motivée. Quand on conteste la sélection de jurés potentiels et qu'on leur demande s'ils sont racistes... C'est le genre de situation où des personnes qui ne seraient peut-être pas hostiles à l'inculpé ou au plaignant pourraient se sentir victimes de préjudice. Nous pourrions alors utiliser la récusation péremptoire de la bonne façon.
Collapse
View Rob Nicholson Profile
CPC (ON)
View Rob Nicholson Profile
2018-09-19 16:20
Expand
Just one subquestion, with respect to getting rid of the peremptory challenges, you think this will hurt, ultimately, indigenous and racialized people. Is that your stand?
J'ai une sous-question concernant l'élimination de la récusation péremptoire. Vous croyez que cette mesure cause du tort aux Autochtones et aux personnes racialisées, en fin de compte. Est-ce bien votre position?
Collapse
Tony Paisana
View Tony Paisana Profile
Tony Paisana
2018-09-19 16:20
Expand
It is. It is our view that racialized accused can use the peremptory challenge to create a more representative jury. We appreciate the position that has been taken on the other side of things, but I do want to mention one thing. This debate, quite rightly, has focused on the overrepresentation of indigenous people in the system and under-representation on juries. However, peremptory challenges have a far more practical application in some cases.
The one anecdote I can think of is the example I had in a recent jury selection, where I had an accused who was facing a charge where the defence was going to be reasonable alternative inference, a fairly complicated instruction for a jury, where you have to explain circumstantial evidence and the difference between speculation and inference. I was concerned that jury members who were not that proficient in English would not be able to understand the instruction that well, and that it may harm the truth-seeking function. Even though I had a racialized accused, I was using the peremptory challenge to pick off some people who showed that they did not have a very strong grasp of the English language, even though they were of the same race as my client, because I expected that they would not be able to understand the instruction to the extent that I would hope they would. These sorts of considerations are sometimes being lost in the analysis.
Effectivement. Nous croyons qu'un accusé racialisé peut utiliser la récusation péremptoire pour s'assurer d'un jury plus représentatif. Nous sommes conscients de l'argument contraire, mais j'aimerais mentionner une chose. Le débat, à juste titre, porte sur la surreprésentation des personnes autochtones dans le système et de leur sous-représentation parmi les jurés. Cependant, le processus de récusation péremptoire a une application bien plus pratique dans certains cas.
Il y a un exemple récent de sélection des jurés qui me vient à l'esprit. J'ai travaillé avec un accusé qui souhaitait fonder sa défense sur le concept de la conclusion à une alternative raisonnable, un cas où les instructions peuvent être assez compliquées pour un jury, puisqu'il faut expliquer le concept de la preuve circonstancielle et la différence entre une supposition et une conclusion. Je craignais que les membres du jury qui ne parlaient pas tellement couramment l'anglais n'arrivent pas à bien comprendre les instructions et que cela puisse nuire à la recherche de la vérité. Même si l'accusé était racialisé, j'ai choisi d'utiliser la récusation péremptoire pour exclure des personnes qui ne semblaient pas bien comprendre la langue anglaise, même si elles étaient de la même race que mon client, parce que je craignais qu'elles ne puissent comprendre les instructions comme je le souhaitais. On perd parfois de vue ce genre de considérations dans l'analyse.
Collapse
Brian Gover
View Brian Gover Profile
Brian Gover
2018-09-19 19:40
Expand
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
My name is Brian Gover, and I'm the president of The Advocates' Society. As you've just heard, Mr. Dave Mollica joins me. He is our director of policy and practice.
Thank you for the opportunity to make oral submissions to your committee on Bill C-75. The Advocates' Society has also provided written submissions to complement today's oral presentation.
The Advocates' Society was established in 1963 as a non-profit association for litigators. We have approximately 6,000 members across Canada who make submissions to governments and other entities on matters that affect access to justice, the administration of justice, and the practice of law by advocates. This is part of our mandate.
The membership of our society includes Crown prosecutors and members of the criminal defence bar, so the submissions I make this evening reflect the diverse and considered views of our membership.
The Advocates' Society applauds the government for its willingness to implement reforms with a view to enhancing efficiency within our criminal justice system. The system is, as the Minister of Justice stated in her remarks to the House of Commons on May 24, "under significant strain". This strain is felt by all those who are part of the justice system, including judges, lawyers, litigants, witnesses, and particularly indigenous people and marginalized Canadians living with mental illnesses and addiction who are overrepresented in the criminal justice system, both as victims and as accused persons.
However, The Advocates' Society has concerns about certain mechanisms that Bill C-75 proposes to use to implement these reforms, as they could result in a compromise of the rights of victims and accused persons. In our written submissions, we have highlighted the areas where The Advocates' Society urges the committee to further scrutinize the provisions in Bill C-75. Today I will focus my presentation on two key areas. One is the elimination of peremptory jury challenges and the other is the acceptance of routine police evidence in writing.
With respect to the elimination of peremptory jury challenges, The Advocates' Society is concerned that Bill C-75's proposal to eliminate the peremptory challenge is not the product of careful study or extensive consultation. The Advocates' Society recommends further study and stakeholder input on other possibilities for reform before any measures are taken.
The peremptory challenge provides a mechanism to both the defence and the prosecution to help ensure an impartial and representative jury. It also gives the accused person a certain measure of control over the selection of the triers of fact who will determine his or her fate in a criminal proceeding. The criminal defence bar overwhelmingly believes that the peremptory challenge is a vital tool in protecting the fair trial rights of an accused person, particularly where that person is indigenous or a person of colour. The defence can exercise peremptory challenges to attempt to secure a jury that is more representative of the Canadian population.
The stated rationale in the minister's charter statement for eliminating peremptory challenges is that either the Crown or the defence can use them in a discriminatory way. The possibility that peremptory challenges may be abused should not be used as a rationale for their elimination. Given that peremptory challenges do serve a useful social function, the focus ought to be on reform rather than abolition.
If the concern is with the discriminatory use of the peremptory challenge, then it is the discriminatory use that ought to be eliminated, not the peremptory challenge itself. The few courts in Canada to have considered these issues have held that the Crown's discriminatory use of peremptory challenges violates subsection 11(d) and section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and deprives the accused of the right to a representative jury.
In the United States, when counsel believe that their adversary has used a peremptory challenge for a discriminatory purpose, they can mount what is termed a Batson challenge—based on a 1986 decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in Batson v. Kentucky—and ask that the judge demand a racially neutral reason for having exercised the peremptory challenge. If the judge finds that the objecting party has made a first impression or prima facie case, the burden then shifts to the party exercising the peremptory challenge to justify its use.
The mere existence of the Batson process has been shown to have a chilling effect on discriminatory conduct in the United States in jury selection. The Advocates' Society recommends further study and consultation with stakeholders on the use and utility of the peremptory challenge. Alternatively, our society recommends adopting a Batson-type procedure in Canada instead of abolishing the peremptory challenge.
The second area is with respect to proposed amendments to the provisions of the Criminal Code dealing with what is termed “routine police evidence” in writing. The Advocates' Society has concerns that these provisions will not enhance efficiency, will infringe on the rights of the accused, and may be constitutionally vulnerable. The Advocates' Society recommends that these proposed provisions be removed in their entirety from Bill C-75.
The breadth of the definition of “routine police evidence” is such that the vast majority of evidence that is provided by police officers in criminal trials would be admissible in writing. This would effectively rob accused persons of their opportunity to test the credibility and reliability of Crown witnesses through cross-examination, which has been uniformly heralded as a central aspect of our Canadian criminal justice system and a constitutionally protected entitlement for those who stand accused of criminal offences.
Cross-examination allows defence counsel to examine potential frailties or inconsistencies in police evidence and determine whether disclosure has been fully made. Uncovering issues with regard to Crown evidence can assist in reducing wrongful convictions. Large-scale restrictions on the accused's right to cross-examine the Crown's witnesses will not necessarily make for a criminal justice system that is more efficient while still fair. We know of no empirical data to support such a claim. It must remain the responsibility of the trial judge in enforcing the rules of criminal procedure and evidence to manage trials such that cross-examination that is abusive, redundant or irrelevant does not take up court time.
In combination with the proposal to eliminate preliminary inquiries in all but the most serious cases, admitting Crown evidence in this fashion would pose a potentially insurmountable hurdle to making full answer and defence. In addition, putting the onus on the accused person to justify their request for the Crown's evidence to be presented orally would likely require the accused to reveal aspects of their defence to the Crown. This may interfere with the accused's constitutionally enshrined right to remain silent in the face of a criminal allegation. The Advocates' Society recommends that clause 278 and other proposed sections dealing with routine police evidence be removed in their entirety from Bill C-75.
Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee, for giving The Advocates' Society the opportunity to make submissions this evening. We would be pleased to answer any questions your committee members may have.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.
Je m'appelle Brian Gover, et je suis président de l'Advocates' Society. Comme on vient de le mentionner, M. Dave Mollica m'accompagne. Il est le directeur des politiques et pratiques.
Je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de comparaître pour discuter du projet de loi C-75. L' Advocates' Society a également préparé un mémoire qui servira de complément à notre exposé aujourd'hui.
L'Advocates' Society est une association sans but lucratif de plaideurs qui a été fondée en 1963. Elle compte aujourd'hui environ 6 000 membres au Canada qui fournissent des plaidoiries aux gouvernements et à d'autres groupes sur des questions qui touchent à l'accès à la justice, à l'administration de la justice et à la pratique du droit par les plaideurs. Cela fait partie de notre mandat.
Parmi nos membres, on trouve notamment des procureurs de la Couronne et des avocats de la défense, si bien que mes observations ce soir reflètent les points de vue diversifiés et éclairés de tous nos membres.
L'Advocates' Society félicite le gouvernement de vouloir implanter des réformes pour améliorer l'efficacité de notre système de justice pénale. Ce système, selon les mots mêmes qu'a employés la ministre de la Justice à la Chambre des communes le 24 mai dernier, « est considérablement surmené », un surmenage que sentent tous les intervenants dans le système, notamment les juges, les avocats, les plaignants, les témoins, et plus particulièrement les Autochtones et les gens marginalisés qui ont des problèmes de maladie mentale ou de toxicomanie et qui sont surreprésentés dans le système, à la fois comme victimes et comme accusés.
Certains mécanismes prévus dans le projet de loi C-75 pour mettre en oeuvre les réformes inquiètent toutefois l'Advocates' Society, car ils risquent de porter atteinte aux droits des victimes et des accusés. Dans notre mémoire, nous avons souligné les points sur lesquels l'Advocates' Society presse le Comité d'examiner plus à fond les dispositions du projet de loi C-75. Aujourd'hui, je vais me concentrer sur deux éléments clés, soit l'abolition de la récusation péremptoire de jurés, et l'acceptation d'éléments de preuve de routine présentés par la police par écrit.
Dans le cas de l'abolition de la récusation péremptoire de jurés, l'Advocates' Society n'est pas convaincue que la proposition contenue dans le projet de loi C-75 est le fruit d'un examen minutieux ou de vastes consultations. L'Advocates' Society recommande donc, avant que des mesures soient prises, qu'on procède à un examen approfondi de la question et qu'on consulte les intervenants sur d'autres mesures possibles.
La récusation péremptoire procure tant à la poursuite qu'à la défense un mécanisme pour s'assurer que le jury sera représentatif et impartial. Elle accorde en outre à l'accusé un certain contrôle sur la sélection des juges des faits qui décideront de son sort dans une procédure pénale. La grande majorité des avocats de la défense considèrent que la récusation péremptoire est un outil indispensable pour protéger le droit à un procès équitable de l'accusé, en particulier lorsqu'il s'agit d'une personne autochtone ou de couleur. Dans ce cas, la défense peut se prévaloir de la récusation péremptoire pour tenter d'avoir un jury représentatif de la population canadienne.
La raison invoquée dans l'énoncé concernant la Charte de la ministre pour abolir la récusation péremptoire est que tant la Couronne que la défense peuvent l'utiliser de façon discriminatoire. Le fait que son utilisation puisse donner lieu à des abus ne devrait pas servir à justifier son abolition. Comme la récusation péremptoire joue un rôle social utile, on doit mettre l'accent sur sa réforme plutôt que sur son abolition.
Si on s'inquiète d'une utilisation discriminatoire de la récusation péremptoire, il faut cibler l'abolition de cette utilisation, plutôt que la récusation péremptoire comme telle. Les quelques tribunaux au Canada qui se sont penchés sur la question ont statué que l'utilisation discriminatoire de la récusation péremptoire par la Couronne contrevenait au paragraphe 11(d) et à l'article 15 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés en privant l'accusé du droit à un jury représentatif.
Aux États-Unis, lorsqu'un avocat considère que son adversaire a eu recours à la récusation péremptoire à des fins discriminatoires, il peut présenter ce qu'on appelle une récusation de type Batson — qui tire son nom de l'arrêt de la Cour suprême des États-Unis de 1986 dans l'affaire Batson c. Kentucky — et demander que le juge exige une raison neutre du point de vue racial pour avoir utilisé la récusation péremptoire. Si le juge considère que l'opposant a fait une première impression ou présenté une preuve prima facie, le fardeau de la preuve revient alors à la partie qui a demandé la récusation péremptoire de justifier son utilisation.
Du simple fait de son existence, le mécanisme Batson a grandement refroidi les ardeurs discriminatoires dans la sélection des jurés aux États-Unis. L'Advocates' Society recommande donc qu'on procède à une étude approfondie et qu'on consulte les intervenants sur l'utilisation et l'utilité de la récusation péremptoire. Elle recommande également que l'on adopte au Canada une procédure de type Batson au lieu d'abolir la récusation péremptoire.
La deuxième source d'inquiétude concerne les modifications proposées aux dispositions du Code criminel qui portent sur ce qu'on appelle les « éléments de preuve de routine » par écrit. L'Advocates' Society croit que ces dispositions n'accroîtront pas l'efficacité, qu'elles empiéteront sur les droits de l'accusé et qu'elles sont vulnérables sur le plan constitutionnel. L'Advocates' Society recommande donc qu'elles soient supprimées entièrement du projet de loi C-75.
La définition de l'expression « éléments de preuve de routine » est si vaste que la grande majorité des éléments de preuve fournis par les agents de police dans un procès criminel seraient admissibles au moyen d'un écrit. Dans les faits, on priverait ainsi un accusé de la possibilité de vérifier la crédibilité et la fiabilité des témoins de la Couronne dans le cadre du contre-interrogatoire, que tous considèrent comme un élément central de notre système de justice pénale et un droit protégé par la Constitution pour ceux qui sont accusés d'une infraction criminelle.
Le contre-interrogatoire est l'occasion pour l'avocat de la défense de détecter les incohérences ou les faiblesses dans les éléments de preuve de la police et de déterminer si la divulgation a été complète. En décelant les problèmes dans les éléments de preuve de la Couronne, on peut réduire le nombre de condamnations injustifiées. Le fait de restreindre grandement le droit d'un accusé à contre-interroger les témoins de la Couronne ne rendra pas nécessairement le système de justice pénale plus efficace tout en demeurant équitable. Aucune donnée empirique, à notre connaissance, ne soutient un tel argument. Le juge du procès doit continuer d'avoir la responsabilité de veiller, en appliquant les règles régissant la procédure pénale et les éléments de preuve, à gérer le procès de manière à ce que les contre-interrogatoires qui sont abusifs, redondants ou non pertinents ne gaspillent pas le temps du tribunal.
Si on ajoute à cela la proposition visant à éliminer les enquêtes préliminaires, sauf dans les affaires les plus graves, le fait d'accepter de cette façon les éléments de preuve de la Couronne risque de créer un obstacle insurmontable à une défense pleine et entière. De plus, en demandant à l'accusé qui veut que les éléments de preuve de la Couronne soient présentés oralement de justifier sa requête, on le forcerait probablement ainsi à révéler des aspects de sa défense à la Couronne. Cela pourrait aller à l'encontre du droit de l'accusé garanti dans la Constitution de garder le silence face à des accusations criminelles. L'Advocates' Society recommande donc que l'article 278 et les autres articles proposés qui portent sur les éléments de preuve de routine de la police soient complètement supprimés du projet de loi C-75.
Merci, monsieur le président, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, d'avoir permis à l'Advocates' Society de comparaître ce soir. Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.
Collapse
Geoffrey Cowper
View Geoffrey Cowper Profile
Geoffrey Cowper
2018-09-19 20:05
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee.
Thank you for the opportunity to address Bill C-75. Let me say at the outset that I'm here as a private citizen. I represent no firm or organization. I might be what passes as an outsider in this debate, as may come clear in a moment.
The main reason that it was suggested I come here was that in 2012, I authored a reported called “A Criminal Justice System for the 21st Century”. In that report, I identified what I thought to be a culture of delay in our criminal justice system. That term and the report were referred to by the majority, and the minority, in the Jordan decision as one of the reasons that action is required to reduce delay in our systems.
I also served for the better part of a decade on the board of our legal services society, administrating the defence side of the criminal legal system, and I encountered in a managerial sense the issues of administration from that perspective. Otherwise, I'm not a criminal law practitioner. I have occasionally practised criminal law, but only at a high risk to my clients.
I have a couple of general comments and then I have some specific requirements.
First, I think the most useful thing I can do is to shine a bit of a light on the general enterprise. Delays have a hugely long history in our justice system and in almost every justice system that you can study. If you study this carefully, you see that delay is a chronic, recurring problem and that solutions, almost always, are short and temporary fixes that don't produce enduring benefits for the public good.
The first point I would make is to recognize that an enduring solution here will have to be organized around changes that are legislative in nature but that will have an impact on the culture of our system and systemic changes.
I think one of the problems in this debate is that we strive to avoid delay, which ought not to be our goal. Our goal should not be to avoid disaster. Our goal should be to deliver justice in a timely way that's responsive to the public interest and to the needs of the victim and the community generally. All too often we don't state or pursue those goals in any aspects of our system, and I think we need to achieve that cultural change.
The success of the changes you're considering really depends upon not only the wisdom of the changes you make but also in resourcing the execution of those changes. In history, the number of changes that have been passed legislatively that weren't supported by resources is legion.
Second is to gather data as to what's working and not working. One of the difficulties is that people make changes, and then no one sees what happens and gathers the information about the consequences and then responds appropriately. The latter two are difficult to do in any system, but they are the most important. I will come back to the implications of that for specific proposals.
With respect to the elimination or reduction of preliminary inquiries, for most of the people in this room, this debate started when you were in grade seven. The first time that I participated in a debate about whether preliminary inquiries had any modern utility was in the 1980s, and that dates me a little. However, there was a consensus amongst most of the first ministers of this country in the early 1990s that preliminary inquiries were no longer necessary and needed to be radically reduced.
In my respectful submission, the fact that they originated in their current form over a hundred years ago is not a reason to hold on to them. I think we have to let go of the preliminary inquiries and find better ways to address the goals that they originally sought to address.
If I can take one of my earlier remarks, the whole Stinchcombe reality has changed the context in which preliminary inquiries are conducted. I think we have to recognize that and tell the system it has to find better ways to achieve those goals.
With respect to routine police evidence—and I may well be the dissenter in all of this—if you wander around the provincial courts and you're not a criminal practitioner, there seems to be an enormous amount of time spent on nothing, on things that people ought not to spend time on. Taxpayers who do that will say, “I went on jury duty and wandered around the courthouse. What was happening there?” We need to take hold of this issue. I support the proposal to identify categories of evidence that don't require cross-examination as of right. Judges can be trusted to identify and respond to applications where cross-examination isn't necessary.
Most importantly, it's an opportunity to learn. If we do that, we may learn how to discriminate between areas of evidence that require a conventional approach and those that don't.
I would say two things about peremptory challenges. First, there is a waterbed effect that I'm concerned about with respect to peremptory challenges. It's not sleep, which is probably what you were hoping I was going to suggest you do. If we eliminate peremptory challenges, the challenges for cause become much more popular elsewhere. That has been done in other systems. We know that challenges for cause can increase astronomically, because it has happened in jurisdictions in the United States. Those can end up being much more conducive to delay and loss of efficiency, and I think that's a very legitimate concern.
Let me make a remark you may not have heard from others. It relates to what we know about the jury system in Canada. We have made it a criminal offence to study the jury system, because jurors are not allowed to disclose jury deliberations. There is an ocean of legitimate research in the United States looking into the effectiveness of jurors—how they conduct their work, and when they're good and when they're bad—because research is allowed. As a result of section 649 of the Criminal Code, that's not permitted in Canada.
There have been calls from time to time for its qualification, and I strongly suggest that anybody who cares about the jury system would support an amendment to qualify the prohibition to permit legitimate academic research into the Canadian jury system. That proposal has wandered around the policy halls and really should be taken up and dusted off as part of this debate, in my respectful submission.
I have a comment on administrative offences. I looked at this in some detail in British Columbia, and I would say the astronomical increase in administrative offences justifies doing something differently with them. What to do with them brings up a fair amount of debate, but I would hope that after due consideration, we would think differently about the terms of release and how we supervise them.
My final point is not a legislative one but an observation about a critical question of the success of any package of proposals. If the resources found for this are unequally parcelled out among judges, the Crown, and police officers, and we don't properly resource defence counsel through the legal aid plans in Canada, they will not succeed. I can guarantee that. Legal aid is still the poor sister in these debates and discussions, and in my respectful submission, it can be the source of collaborative and effective partnership in making our system more effective.
Thank you.
Merci, monsieur le président, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.
Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de discuter du projet de loi C-75. Je tiens à préciser tout d'abord que je témoigne à titre personnel. Je ne représente pas de cabinet ou d'organisation. Je pourrais passer pour un non-initié dans le débat, mais les choses se préciseront dans un instant.
Si on a suggéré que je témoigne, c'est principalement parce qu'en 2012, j'ai rédigé un rapport intitulé « A Criminal Justice System for the 21st Century ». Dans ce rapport, j'ai parlé de ce que je considérais être une culture de complaisance à l'égard des délais dans notre système de justice pénale. Cette expression et le rapport ont été cités par la majorité, et la minorité, dans l'arrêt Jordan comme l'une des raisons nécessistant que des mesures soient prises pour réduire les délais dans nos systèmes.
J'ai aussi siégé pendant presque une dizaine d'années au conseil d'administration de notre société d'aide juridique, en administrant le côté défense de notre système de justice pénale, ce qui m'a permis de voir les problèmes administratifs du point de vue de la gestion. Je ne suis pas, toutefois, un praticien du droit criminel. J'ai pratiqué le droit pénal à l'occasion, mais seulement à haut risque pour mes clients.
J'ai quelques observations générales à faire, puis je vous parlerai de quelques besoins particuliers.
Premièrement, je pense que la chose la plus utile que je puisse faire, c'est de jeter un peu de lumière sur la situation en général. Les délais ont une très longue histoire dans notre système de justice et dans presque tous les systèmes de justice qu'on peut étudier. Quand on examine attentivement la question, on se rend compte que les délais sont un problème chronique, récurrent, et que les solutions sont toujours des solutions temporaires et à court terme qui ne procurent pas d'avantages durables pour le bien public.
J'aimerais mentionner tout d'abord qu'il faut prendre conscience qu'une solution durable nécessitera des changements législatifs qui auront un impact sur la culture dans notre système, de même que des changements systémiques.
À mon avis, un des problèmes dans ce débat est qu'on s'efforce d'éviter les délais, et que cela ne devrait pas être notre but. Notre but ne devrait pas être d'éviter une catastrophe. Notre but devrait être d'administrer la justice en temps opportun en servant l'intérêt public et en répondant aux besoins des victimes et de la collectivité en général. Il nous arrive trop souvent de ne pas tenter d'atteindre ce but dans tous les éléments de notre système, et je pense que nous devons accomplir ce changement culturel.
Le succès des changements envisagés dépend non seulement de leur bien-fondé, mais aussi des ressources qu'on y investit pour les accomplir. Historiquement, les changements législatifs qui ont été faits sans être accompagnés des ressources nécessaires sont légion.
Deuxièmement, il faut documenter ce qui fonctionne et ce qui ne fonctionne pas. Un des problèmes vient du fait que les gens font des changements, et qu'ensuite personne ne fait de suivi et ne recueille de l'information sur leurs conséquences pour pouvoir réagir de la bonne façon. Les deux derniers éléments sont les plus difficiles à accomplir dans tout système, mais ils sont aussi les plus importants. Je vais revenir sur les conséquences de cela plus tard avec des propositions précises.
Au sujet de l'élimination ou la limitation des enquêtes préliminaires, je dirais que pour la plupart des gens dans cette salle, le débat a commencé quand vous étiez en 7e  année. J'ai participé à mon premier débat sur l'utilité des enquêtes préliminaires dans les années 1980, ce qui ne me rajeunit pas. Au début des années 1990, toutefois, la plupart des premiers ministres au pays étaient d'accord avec l'idée que les enquêtes préliminaires n'étaient plus nécessaires et que leur nombre devait être radicalement réduit.
À mon humble avis, le fait que les enquêtes préliminaires dans leur forme actuelle aient vu le jour il y a plus d'une centaine d'années ne justifie pas qu'on les maintienne. Je pense qu'on doit s'en débarrasser et trouver de meilleures façons d'atteindre leurs objectifs premiers.
Si je peux revenir à une de mes remarques précédentes, la réalité de l'arrêt Stinchcombe a modifié le contexte dans lequel les enquêtes préliminaires sont menées. Je pense qu'il faut en prendre conscience et dire au système qu'il doit trouver de meilleures façons d'atteindre ces objectifs.
Au sujet des éléments de preuve de routine de la police — et il se pourrait bien que je sois la voix dissidente dans tout ce débat —, si vous vous promenez dans les tribunaux provinciaux sans être praticien en droit pénal, vous aurez l'impression qu'on consacre beaucoup de temps à des riens, à des choses auxquelles les gens ne devraient pas consacrer de temps. Les contribuables qui le font diront: « J'ai été appelé à faire partie d'un jury et je me suis promené dans la salle d'audience. Qu'est-ce qui s'y passait? » Il faut s'occuper du problème. J'appuie la proposition visant à recenser les catégories de preuves qui ne nécessitent pas de contre-interrogatoire de plein droit. On peut faire confiance aux juges pour déterminer quand une demande ne nécessite pas de contre-interrogatoire.
Mais ce qui est plus important encore, c'est une occasion d'apprendre. Si nous le faisons, nous pourrons apprendre comment faire la différence entre les preuves qui nécessitent une approche conventionnelle et celles qui n'en nécessitent pas.
Je vais dire deux choses au sujet des récusations péremptoires. Premièrement, je m'inquiète de l'effet des vases communicants. Si on abolit les récusations péremptoires, les récusations motivées gagneront en popularité ailleurs. L'expérience a été tentée dans d'autres systèmes. On sait que les récusations motivées peuvent bondir de façon astronomique, car c'est ce qui s'est produit dans certains États aux États-Unis. Elles peuvent entraîner une perte d'efficacité et des délais importants, et je pense que c'est une préoccupation tout à fait légitime.
Je me permets de faire une observation que vous n'avez sans doute pas encore entendue. Elle concerne le système de jurés que nous avons au Canada. Nous avons fait de l'étude du système de jurés une infraction criminelle, car les jurés ne sont pas autorisés à parler des délibérations du jury. Aux États-Unis, une foule de recherches légitimes sont effectuées sur l'efficacité des jurés — sur leur façon de travailler, sur les éléments positifs et négatifs —, car la recherche est autorisée. Au Canada, l'article 649 du Code criminel ne l'autorise pas.
Des voix réclament de temps à autre qu'on nuance la question, et je suggère fortement à quiconque a à coeur le système de jurés d'appuyer une modification visant à nuancer l'interdiction afin de permettre que des recherches légitimes soient effectuées sur le système de jurés au Canada. La proposition erre dans les corridors et, à mon humble avis, quelqu'un devrait s'en emparer pour la dépoussiérer et l'inclure dans le débat.
J'ai aussi une observation à faire sur les infractions administratives. J'ai examiné la question en Colombie-Britannique, et je dirais que l'augmentation astronomique des infractions administratives justifie qu'on les traite de façon différente. La question de savoir comment les traiter suscite beaucoup de débats, mais j'espère qu'après un examen minutieux, on aura un point de vue différent sur les conditions de remise en liberté et la façon de les superviser.
Mon dernier point n'est pas d'ordre législatif, mais une observation à propos d'une question cruciale au succès de tout ensemble de propositions. Si les ressources consenties sont réparties de manière inéquitable entre les juges, la Couronne et les agents de police, et qu'on n'accorde pas de ressources suffisantes aux avocats de la défense grâce à des programmes d'aide juridique, les propositions vont échouer. Je peux vous le garantir. L'aide juridique est encore l'enfant pauvre dans ces débats et discussions, et à mon humble avis, elle peut être une source de partenariats efficaces pour accroître l'efficacité de notre système.
Merci.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2018-09-19 20:28
Expand
Thank you, everyone.
I don't want to be accused of discriminating against Toronto, so I want to speak to Mr. Gover. It's nice to see you, Mr. Gover.
I understand very clearly that you and The Advocates' Society favour peremptory challenges. You've suggested that if we're going to change it, we need to do further studies and consultation. In the alternative argument, you said we should take a look at the Batson v. Kentucky procedure that the United States has implemented, which allows for addressing discrimination and so on. What would that look like? Would that look like more challenges for cause?
Mr. Cowper has said that if we were to do that, there would be this waterbed effect, that we might end up with more delay as we do more challenges for cause. Could you elaborate on how that would look? We've had some witnesses say we should give the courts the discretion to look at the representivity—if that is such a word—on the jury and decide whether that's fair. That's what we've heard others suggest. How exactly would you line up?
Merci à tous.
Je ne veux pas être accusé d'avoir un parti pris contre Toronto; je m'adresserai donc à M. Gover. Je suis enchanté de vous voir, monsieur Gover.
Je crois comprendre que vous et l'Advocates' Society êtes en faveur des récusations péremptoires. Vous avez indiqué que si nous voulons apporter des changements à cet égard, nous devons effectuer d'autres études et de plus amples consultations. Vous avez également proposé que nous examinions la procédure mise en oeuvre aux États-Unis dans l'affaire Batson c. Kentucky, laquelle permet de régler la question de la discrimination. Comment cela fonctionnerait-il? Y aurait-il plus de récusations motivées?
M. Cowper a dit que si nous procédons à la réforme, cela aurait pour effet de causer davantage de délais, parce qu'il y a plus de récusations motivées. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer comment cela fonctionnerait? Certains témoins nous ont affirmé que nous devrions accorder aux tribunaux le pouvoir discrétionnaire de se pencher sur la représentativité — si tel est le mot — du jury et de décider si elle est équitable. C'est ce que nous avons entendu de la part d'autres témoins. Comment procéderiez-vous?
Collapse
Brian Gover
View Brian Gover Profile
Brian Gover
2018-09-19 20:29
Expand
It would be done on a juror-by-juror basis, with the exercise of the peremptory challenge, and it would be where the objecting party, either the Crown or the defence, feels that the jury is no longer being representative, that discriminatory use underlies the exercise of the peremptory challenge. That's where the exercise would be engaged.
I don't see it taking very much time in jury selection, Mr. Rankin. This is the kind of thing, in my experience, that would take a trial judge something like five to 10 minutes at the outside to decide in making a determination about whether there has been prima facie or first impression of discriminatory use.
Overall, I think this is going to be time-efficient because of the alternative raised by Mr. Cowper.
Nous procéderons juré par juré aux fins de récusation péremptoire, et c'est quand la partie qui a soulevé une objection, que ce soit la Couronne ou la défense, considère que le jury n'est plus représentatif que l'utilisation discriminatoire sous-tend l'exercice de la récusation péremptoire. C'est en pareil cas que nous appliquerons cette procédure.
Je ne pense pas que cela accaparerait beaucoup de temps lors du choix du jury, monsieur Rankin. D'après mon expérience, c'est le genre de démarche qui prendrait quelque chose comme 5 à 10 minutes à un juge pour déterminer d'entrée de jeu s'il y a une preuve prima facie ou une première impression d'utilisation discriminatoire.
Dans l'ensemble, je pense que cela permettra d'économiser du temps en raison des arguments soulevés par M. Cowper.
Collapse
Geoffrey Cowper
View Geoffrey Cowper Profile
Geoffrey Cowper
2018-09-19 20:30
Expand
It might be helpful to know—I did speak to American colleagues on this—that the Batson procedure actually rarely produces lengthy additions to process. The challenges for cause process in the United States can produce weeks and weeks of delay. I spoke to one fellow who said they had to have questionnaires distributed to 1,200 people—one jury—last year in Seattle. Therefore, in terms of risks, challenges for cause are a greater risk for adding time and delay than is the Batson procedure.
Ayant parlé de la question à des collègues américains, je pense qu'il pourrait être utile de savoir que la procédure Batson rallonge rarement le processus, alors que les récusations motivées peuvent engendrer des semaines et des semaines de retard aux États-Unis. J'ai parlé à quelqu'un qui m'a indiqué que des questionnaires avaient été distribués à 1 200 personnes l'an dernier à Seattle pour former un seul jury. Sur le plan des risques, donc, les récusations motivées risquent davantage de provoquer des retards que la procédure Batson.
Collapse
Michael Lacy
View Michael Lacy Profile
Michael Lacy
2018-09-18 15:41
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chair and honourable members. We're glad to be here and to be invited to speak to the work of this very important committee.
Really, we appear today on behalf of the 1,400 members who are part of our organization, which includes criminal defence lawyers and also academics in Ontario and otherwise. We hope to persuade you to consider making recommendations to amend the bill as it currently exists and to also consider suggesting that aspects of the bill not be passed at all.
By way of introduction, we have been critical of the bill, but there are many aspects of the bill that we think are laudable and heading in the right direction, aspects that you've heard about from other witnesses, such as amending the proposed bail provisions; the concept of judicial referral hearings; giving the discretion to judges not to impose the victim fine surcharge; increased case management powers; and, finally, bringing criminal justice into the century that we practice in by taking advantage of video conferencing. Obviously, these are all positive things that will assist in the orderly, timely administration of criminal justice throughout Canada, but there are aspects of the bill that we find particularly troubling.
We have outlined those submissions in the paper we've provided you in advance. Many other people will speak to many of the things we've outlined, but today, in the brief time we have, the 10 minutes before we are asked specific questions, we would like to talk about the proposed jury selection amendments.
Again, we want to acknowledge at the outset that the government's acknowledgement of the potential problems in the jury selection process and the goal to bring more fairness and transparency to the process are laudable. Eliminating discrimination in the jury selection process and ensuring that jurors are truly representative of the community where the crimes are alleged to have occurred is a goal that we wholeheartedly support.
The goal of addressing systemic racism or discriminatory practices within the jury selection is similarly shared by our members, but unfortunately, as we look at the means that have been chosen, they fall far short of what's required and, if adopted, will not actually assist in addressing the problems.
We view ourselves as significant stakeholders in the administration of criminal justice. We believe that, like all significant stakeholders, we have a responsibility to ensure that community members who become jurors decide the case fairly, objectively and without prejudice, bias or favour for either party, whether it's the accused or the Crown prosecuting the case.
The race, gender, nationality, socio-economic status or other descriptor of either the accused person or the victim of crime has no role to play in terms of what the result in a criminal case should be. Discrimination or improper stereotyping has no place in the courtroom or in jury deliberations, or in the way in which juries are chosen.
The way in which jurors are chosen not only has to be substantively fair, but it has to appear to be fair. The appearance of fairness with respect to the jury selection process is very important. This includes having a diverse pool from which the jury can be chosen.
Recent high-profile cases have raised questions about whether the current procedure, including the use of peremptory challenges, meets that standard, particularly in relation to the appearance of fairness. We don't need to name the cases that get named all the time with respect to this issue, but let's just be clear. No one was entitled to have a biased juror. No one was entitled to have a biased jury in favour of the accused or in favour of the Crown.
That is no doubt the impetus for this really significant change. When the minister came and spoke to you most recently, she described this as a significant, substantive change to the law, and we agree. The difficulty is that in terms of eliminating the peremptory challenges without some of the other proposed ways that academics and practitioners are telling you to consider, changing the jury selection process will not help the system. It will not lead to diversity and in fact will leave us without the opportunity to protect our clients, who are most often racialized, indigenous or other marginalized people. These are the bulk of the people who come into conflict with the criminal justice system.
The unfortunate reality is that although racialized and indigenous persons are overrepresented in the criminal justice system as accused persons, their communities are unrepresented in the jury pool from which the jurors are chosen to decide a case. In communities with large indigenous populations, there are often very few indigenous people who ultimately come before the court as part of the jury pool from which 12 men and women from the community are chosen to decide a case. Even in large urban centres like Toronto, the pool of eligible jurors does not reflect the diverse Toronto urban community.
There are many reasons for this, some of which can be dealt with through legislative action that is missing in the proposed bill.
First, although this is not within the purview of Parliament, the way in which people are summoned for jury duty—which is left to the provincial governments and has been done by relying on property tax assessment rolls or on other areas—leads to a situation in which a case does not actually draw the representative, diverse community wanted in the jury pool. Historically, this leads to the exclusion of people like renters, boarders, and low-income people—people who might be considered to be on the margins of society but who nonetheless reflect our communities. It also leads to the exclusion of indigenous jurors. You have many submissions before you from groups that speak to this issue, not simply from the Criminal Lawyers' Association. One of the problems is that the pool from which juries are chosen is not diverse.
Second, which this committee knows particularly well, is the failure on the part of provincial governments to compensate jurors properly for their time in court. It was the subject of a report that this committee released in May. One of the recommendations you made is important with respect to this issue.
Just imagine how this plays out in practice. People get excused from the jury pool on the basis of financial hardship. Anyone living day to day in Toronto, Ottawa, Saskatoon or in more rural communities who cannot afford to take time off work to serve on a jury pool is going to be excused, and so should they be. You don't expect people to go into financial ruin to serve on the jury pool. What does that leave you with? It leaves you with some unionized people whose unions are smart enough to negotiate compensation. It leaves you with a lot of retirees. It leaves you with very wealthy people. You're not drawing a representative sample in terms of the eligible people who can in fact serve on a jury.
When it comes to dealing with the issue of peremptory challenges, the collective experience of our members is that when an accused person is a different race or colour or looks different from most of us in this room, who are white, it's important that potential jurors be asked questions to determine whether there are racial stereotypes or biases that will affect the way they will adjudicate the evidence vis-à-vis our clients. This is normally done through a challenge for cause process. You have all the background information on this. Jurors are basically asked one or two questions so that someone can decide—some other two people who are chosen from the jury pool—whether they display bias such that they should be removed from the jury.
As a consequence of the lack of diversity in the jury pool, peremptory challenges are used each and every day by responsible criminal defence lawyers in this country to try to get deeper into the jury pool in the face of having lack of diversity on the jury. When you're looking out at a room of 200 people and your client is a young black man from the city of Toronto, and you see five, six or 10 people who, by the time those with financial hardship are weeded out, are actually eligible to sit on the jury, you're trying to find someone diverse on that jury.
As I said, we're not interested in bias or partiality. What we're looking for is to have someone in the room who is representative of the actual community. That's the way our members are using peremptory challenges. It's the only tool we have in our tool kit to get deeper into the jury pool to try to improve the diversity of the jury. Sometimes people can get through a challenge for cause—for reasons that are difficult to explain—even if they do display signs of bias. I know the new legislation will give a judge the power to control the challenge for cause, but again, peremptory challenges allow a lawyer to try to shape the jury in such a way that actually encourages diversity.
There are three things this committee should consider:
First, it should consider providing a more robust statutory challenge for cause, based on evidence. This means taking an evidence-based approach to determining how the jury is chosen and asking modest questions of the jurors to determine whether or not they display potential bias.
Second, it should consider inviting submissions from the parties. Professor Roach, whose submission you have before you, speaks to this issue as well, and I know you're going to hear from other academics on this issue. There seems to be a myth being perpetuated that the practitioners are at odds with the academics on the issue of jury diversity or on the issue of peremptory challenges. We all want the same result. It's how you get there, at the end of the day.
Third, it should consider forcing the provincial government to create mechanisms to have representative jury pools. Because of the division of powers, the only way to do that is with the proposed amendment that we suggested for subsection 629(4), which would be a new provision that would allow for a challenge for cause based on the lack of representation in terms of the jury pool that's been assembled.
If the provincial governments won't act, then this government needs to act. It needs to create a challenge for cause process and provide compensation for those jurors. Your recommendations were welcome before, and they will be welcome again, but let's go further. Let's suggest transfer payments to the provinces so they can compensate people, or do whatever is needed. With all these very smart people running our collective governments, perhaps we can compensate people so that the poor, the marginalized and the racialized are not excluded.
We have a lot to say about the legislation otherwise, but I do appreciate this opportunity to speak to you directly about the jury issue.
Thank you very much.
Merci, monsieur le président et honorables membres du Comité. Nous sommes heureux d’être ici pour parler des travaux de ce comité très important.
En fait, nous comparaissons aujourd’hui au nom des 1 400 membres qui font partie de notre organisation, dont des avocats de la défense en droit criminel ainsi que des universitaires de l’Ontario et d’ailleurs. Nous espérons vous convaincre d’envisager de faire des recommandations dans le but de modifier le projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle, mais également de proposer que certains aspects du projet de loi ne soient tout simplement pas adoptés.
Dans notre introduction, nous nous sommes montrés critiques envers ce projet de loi, mais il comporte de nombreux aspects qui sont louables et qui vont dans la bonne direction, des aspects sur lesquels d’autres témoins se sont exprimés, comme la modification des dispositions sur la mise en liberté sous caution, le concept des comparutions pour manquement, le pouvoir discrétionnaire des juges de ne pas imposer la suramende compensatoire, des pouvoirs accrus de gestion de cas et, enfin, l'idée de faire entrer la justice pénale dans le siècle actuel en utilisant la vidéoconférence. De toute évidence, ce sont tous là des éléments positifs qui contribueront à l’administration ordonnée et opportune de la justice pénale partout au Canada. Cela dit, il y a des aspects du projet de loi que nous trouvons particulièrement troublants.
Nous avons décrit ces aspects dans le document que nous vous avons remis à l’avance. Les choses que nous avons décrites seront abordées par bien d’autres personnes, mais aujourd’hui, dans le peu de temps dont nous disposons, les 10 minutes avant que l’on nous pose des questions précises, nous aimerions parler des modifications proposées au processus de sélection des jurés.
Encore une fois, nous tenons à souligner dès le départ que la reconnaissance par le gouvernement des problèmes potentiels dans le processus de sélection des jurés et son objectif d’accroître l’équité et la transparence de ce processus sont louables. Éliminer la discrimination dans le processus de sélection des jurés et veiller à ce que les jurés soient vraiment représentatifs de la collectivité où les crimes présumés ont été commis constituent des objectifs que nous appuyons sans réserve.
Nos membres sont également d'accord avec l'objectif de lutter contre le racisme systémique ou les pratiques discriminatoires dans le cadre du processus de sélection des jurés, mais malheureusement, lorsque nous examinons les moyens qui ont été proposés, nous constatons qu’ils sont bien en deçà de ce qui est nécessaire et, s’ils étaient adoptés, ne nous aideraient pas vraiment à résoudre les problèmes.
Nous nous considérons comme des intervenants importants dans l’administration de la justice pénale. Nous croyons, à l'instar de tous les intervenants importants, que nous avons la responsabilité de veiller à ce que les membres de la collectivité qui deviennent jurés tranchent la cause de façon juste, objective, impartiale et sans préjugés en faveur de l’une ou l’autre des parties, qu'il s'agisse de l’accusé ou de la Couronne intentant la poursuite.
La race, le sexe, la nationalité, le statut socioéconomique ni quelque autre trait que ce soit de la personne accusée ou de la victime d’un crime ne devrait influencer le résultat dans une affaire criminelle. La discrimination ou les stéréotypes inappropriés n’ont pas leur place dans la salle d’audience, ni dans les délibérations du jury ou dans le mode de sélection des jurés.
La façon dont les jurés sont sélectionnés doit non seulement être fondamentalement équitable, mais elle doit aussi paraître équitable. L’apparence d’équité dans le processus de sélection des jurés est très importante. Cela suppose que l'on dispose d'un bassin diversifié à partir duquel le jury peut être établi.
De récentes affaires très médiatisées ont soulevé des questions quant à savoir si la procédure actuelle, notamment le recours aux récusations péremptoires, était conforme à cette exigence, particulièrement en ce qui concerne l’apparence d’équité. Nul besoin de faire référence une fois de plus aux mêmes causes en ce qui a trait à ce problème, mais soyons clairs: personne n’avait droit à un juré partial. Personne n’avait le droit d’avoir un jury partial que ce soit en faveur de l’accusé ou en faveur de la Couronne.
C’est sans aucun doute ce qui motive ce changement vraiment important. Lorsque la ministre est venue vous parler tout récemment, elle a dit qu’il s’agissait d’un changement d'envergure à la loi, et nous sommes d’accord. Le problème, c’est que si les récusations péremptoires sont écartées sans qu'il y ait possibilité de se prévaloir des autres moyens proposés par les universitaires et les praticiens, le fait de modifier le processus de sélection des jurés n’améliorera pas le système. Cela ne mènera pas à la diversité et, dans les faits, cela nous laissera sans possibilité de protéger nos clients, qui sont le plus souvent des personnes racialisées, autochtones ou autrement marginalisées. Ce sont eux qui sont confrontés au système de justice pénale.
La triste réalité, c’est que même si les personnes racialisées et les personnes autochtones sont surreprésentées dans le système de justice pénale en tant qu’accusés, leurs collectivités sont sous-représentées dans le bassin où l'on puise les jurés amenés à trancher dans une affaire. Dans les collectivités où vivent d'importantes populations autochtones, il y a souvent très peu d’Autochtones qui, au bout du compte, se présentent à la cour en étant issus de la liste des jurés à partir de laquelle 12 hommes et femmes de la collectivité sont sélectionnés pour trancher une affaire. Même dans les grands centres urbains comme Toronto, le bassin de jurés admissibles ne reflète pas la diversité de la communauté urbaine de Toronto.
Il y a de nombreuses raisons à cela et on peut remédier à certaines de ces lacunes par des mesures législatives absentes du projet de loi.
Tout d’abord, bien que cela ne relève pas du Parlement, la façon dont les gens sont convoqués pour faire partie d'un jury — ceci est laissé aux soins des gouvernements provinciaux, qui se fondent sur les rôles d’évaluation de l’impôt foncier ou sur d’autres critères — mène à une situation où une affaire n'attire pas vraiment le groupe représentatif et diversifié recherché pour constituer le jury. Historiquement, cela a mené à l’exclusion de personnes comme les locataires, les pensionnaires et les personnes à faible revenu — des personnes que l'on pourrait considérer comme étant en marge de la société, mais qui sont néanmoins le reflet de nos collectivités. Cela mène également à l’exclusion des jurés autochtones. Vous avez reçu de nombreux mémoires de groupes qui s’intéressent à cette question, et pas seulement de la Criminal Lawyers' Association. L’un des problèmes, c’est que le bassin de sélection des jurés n’est pas diversifié.
Deuxièmement, ce que le Comité sait pertinemment, c’est que les gouvernements provinciaux n’indemnisent pas adéquatement les jurés pour le temps qu’ils passent au tribunal. Ceci a fait l’objet d’un rapport que le Comité a publié en mai. Une des recommandations que vous avez faites est importante à cet égard.
Imaginez comment cela se passe en pratique. Les gens sont dispensés de leur fonction de juré en raison de leurs difficultés financières. Quiconque vit au jour le jour à Toronto, à Ottawa, à Saskatoon ou dans une collectivité rurale et n’a pas les moyens de s’absenter du travail pour faire partie d’un jury sera exempté et devrait l’être. On ne peut pas attendre des gens qu'ils se ruinent pour faire partie d'un jury. Alors qu'est-ce qu'il reste? Il reste des gens syndiqués dont les syndicats sont assez intelligents pour négocier une rémunération. Il reste un bon lot de retraités. Il reste des gens très riches. Ce n'est donc pas un échantillon représentatif des personnes admissibles et aptes à faire partie d’un jury qui est retenu.
Pour ce qui est de la question des récusations péremptoires, l’expérience collective de nos membres veut que lorsqu’un accusé est d’une race ou d’une couleur différente de celle de la plupart d’entre nous dans cette salle — qui sommes blancs —, il est important de poser des questions aux jurés potentiels pour déterminer s’ils ont des préjugés raciaux qui auront une incidence sur la façon dont ils évalueront la preuve en rapport avec nos clients. Cela se fait normalement au moyen d’un processus de récusation motivée. Vous avez toute l’information de base à ce sujet. On pose une ou deux questions aux jurés de sorte que des gens — deux autres personnes qui sont choisies à même le bassin des jurés — puissent déterminer s’ils ont un parti pris tel qu’ils devraient être retirés du jury.
En raison du manque de diversité dans le bassin des jurés, les avocats responsables de la défense en droit criminel du pays ont recours à des récusations péremptoires tous les jours pour faire en sorte que l'on cherche plus à fond dans le bassin des jurés, vu le manque de diversité au sein du jury. Lorsque vous regardez une salle de 200 personnes, que votre client est un jeune Noir de la ville de Toronto et que vous voyez les 5, 6 ou 10 personnes qui, une fois les personnes ayant des difficultés financières éliminées, sont en fait admissibles pour siéger au jury, essayez d'y trouver une seule personne qui représente la diversité.
Comme je l’ai dit, les préjugés et la partialité ne nous intéressent pas. Ce que nous voulons, c’est d'avoir dans la salle une personne qui représente la collectivité. C’est pour cela que nos membres utilisent les récusations péremptoires. C’est le seul outil dont nous disposons pour fouiller davantage le bassin des jurés afin d’essayer d’améliorer la diversité du jury. Parfois, les gens peuvent être retenus malgré un processus de récusation motivée — pour des raisons qui sont difficiles à expliquer — même s’ils montrent des signes de partialité. Je sais que la nouvelle loi donnera au juge le pouvoir de contrôler la récusation motivée, mais encore une fois, les récusations péremptoires permettent à un avocat de tenter de façonner le jury de façon à encourager la diversité.
Il y a trois choses dont le Comité devrait tenir compte:
Premièrement, il devrait envisager l'autorisation d'une récusation motivée légale plus solide, fondée sur des preuves. Cela signifie qu’il faudrait adopter une approche fondée sur des données probantes pour déterminer la façon de sélectionner un jury et poser de simples questions aux jurés afin de déterminer s’ils peuvent ou non faire preuve de partialité.
Deuxièmement, il devrait envisager d’inviter les parties à présenter des mémoires. M. Roach, dont le mémoire vous a été remis, aborde également cette question, et je sais que vous allez entendre d’autres universitaires à ce sujet. On semble perpétuer un mythe selon lequel les praticiens sont en désaccord avec les universitaires sur la question de la diversité des jurés ou sur la question des récusations péremptoires. Nous recherchons tous le même résultat. En fin de compte, il faut juste trouver une façon d'y arriver.
Troisièmement, il devrait envisager de forcer le gouvernement provincial à créer des mécanismes qui font en sorte de constituer des groupes de jurés représentatifs. En raison de la répartition des pouvoirs, la seule façon d’y arriver serait d'avoir recours à l’amendement que nous avons proposé au paragraphe 629(4), qui serait une nouvelle disposition permettant une récusation motivée en raison de la faible représentativité du groupe de jurés ayant été constitué.
Si les gouvernements provinciaux ne passent pas à l'action, alors ce gouvernement doit agir. Il doit créer un processus de récusation motivée et indemniser ces jurés. Vos recommandations ont déjà été bien accueillies et elles continueront de l'être, mais allons plus loin. Proposons des paiements de transfert aux provinces afin que celles-ci puissent indemniser les gens ou faire ce qui doit être fait. Avec le concours de toutes les personnes très intelligentes qui dirigent nos gouvernements collectifs, peut-être pouvons-nous indemniser les gens de sorte que les personnes pauvres, marginalisées et les racialisées ne soient pas exclues.
Nous avons beaucoup à dire au sujet du projet de loi, mais je suis heureux de pouvoir vous parler directement de la question du jury.
Merci beaucoup.
Collapse
View Iqra Khalid Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you to the witnesses for their testimony today.
Mr. Lacy, you spoke at length about the proposed jury selection process, and about getting rid of peremptory challenges in Bill C-75. Yesterday we heard from an indigenous organization that spoke in favour of getting rid of the peremptory challenges, but you outlined that it would not have the impact that we want it to have here in terms of diversifying the jury selection.
I'm not sure if you had the chance to go over what their arguments and reasoning were.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je remercie les témoins de leurs témoignages d’aujourd’hui.
Monsieur Lacy, vous vous êtes longuement arrêté sur le processus proposé de sélection des jurés et d’élimination des récusations péremptoires dans le projet de loi C-75. Hier, nous avons entendu le témoignage d’un organisme autochtone qui s’est prononcé en faveur de l’élimination des récusations péremptoires, mais vous avez dit que cela n'aiderait pas à diversifier la sélection des jurés.
Je ne sais pas si vous avez eu l’occasion de lire rapidement leurs arguments et leur raisonnement.
Collapse
Michael Lacy
View Michael Lacy Profile
Michael Lacy
2018-09-18 16:10
Expand
I did. We're talking about Jonathan Rudin's submissions to this committee, in which he fully endorses the recommendations of Professor Roach. This is about how each organization may choose different ways to express the point, but if you reflect on our submissions and reflect on Professor Roach's submissions, all of which were adopted by Aboriginal Legal Services, you'll see that we are all talking about the same thing—that a stand-alone elimination of peremptory challenges combined with the one other change, which is allowing a judge to determine the challenge for cause, will not result in actual diversification of the jurors who are chosen to decide a case.
In that respect, there is actually no conflict among the positions taken by our organization, by Aboriginal Legal Services and by Professor Roach.
Je l’ai fait. Il s'agit des mémoires que Jonathan Rudin a présentés au Comité et dans lesquels il appuie entièrement les recommandations du professeur Roach. Il explique que chaque organisme peut choisir différentes façons d’exprimer son point de vue. Cependant, si vous examinez nos observations et celles du professeur Roach, qui ont toutes été adoptées par Aboriginal Legal Services, vous verrez que nous parlons tous de la même chose. Une élimination autonome des récusations péremptoires combinée à l'autre changement, qui permet au juge de déterminer la récusation pour motif valable, n’entraînera pas une diversification réelle des jurés choisis pour trancher la cause.
À cet égard, il n’y a en fait aucun conflit entre les positions adoptées par notre organisme, par Aboriginal Legal Services et par le professeur Roach.
Collapse
View Iqra Khalid Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
As a recommendation in terms of amending the bill, you also mentioned taking an evidence-based approach to jury selection, with regard to asking questions or bringing in testimony, etc. Can you talk about that a little more? Also, can you talk about whether or not that would delay the whole process? That is something that is already a concern in our justice system.
Merci.
Parlons maintenant de la modification du projet de loi. Vous avez également recommandé une approche fondée sur des données probantes pour la sélection des jurés, pour ce qui est de poser des questions ou de convoquer des témoins, etc. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet? Pourriez-vous aussi nous dire si cela retarderait le processus? Les retards préoccupent déjà notre système judiciaire.
Collapse
Michael Lacy
View Michael Lacy Profile
Michael Lacy
2018-09-18 16:11
Expand
It is very much an anecdotal exercise when you ask us to reflect on what happens. As it stands now, this is what you know about potential jurors absent a challenge for cause: you know their name, in most cases; you know the city where they reside and perhaps their municipal address; and in some cases you know their occupation. That is it. You know nothing else about the person.
The way it is now, by its very nature the peremptory challenge forces you to rely on stereotypes about people, whether they are socio-economic stereotypes or gender stereotypes, based on a particular case. In this regard, we agree with Professor Roach that there is a way in which you can have limited questioning of the jurors in a challenge process that allows you to find out a little more about this person who is going to be sworn in as a judge to decide whether or not someone has committed a criminal offence.
In the United States, as Professor Roach and other academics have pointed out, the system has gone a bit awry. It has led to lengthy proceedings and jury-vetting procedures, but it need not do that. One of my colleagues, who does a lot of work with respect to aboriginal communities, was telling me about an inquest he was recently involved in, in the province of Saskatchewan. The coroner was able to allow limited questioning of the jurors and was allowed to draw a jury—a differently constituted jury, obviously, for that purpose—that included representative people from the indigenous community and also from the rest of the community. He was reflecting on the experience and, knowing that I was coming here today, he said that when you allow a little bit of inquiry and you control it through judicial management—in that case, the coroner was managing it—you get a much better appreciation for the particular biases, whether they're known biases or implicit biases, that might be affecting not the willingness of the person to decide the case fairly, but their ability to do so.
We do support an evidence-based approach in that regard.
Notre réflexion sur ce qui se passe est plutôt empirique. À l’heure actuelle, tout ce que nous savons des jurés potentiels, en l’absence d’une récusation motivée, est leur nom dans la plupart des cas, la ville où ils habitent et peut-être leur adresse municipale; dans certains cas, nous connaissons leur profession. C’est tout. Nous ne savons rien d’autre sur ces personnes.
À l’heure actuelle, de par sa nature même, le défi péremptoire nous oblige à nous fier à des stéréotypes socioéconomiques ou sexistes sur les gens dans le cadre d'une cause particulière. À cet égard, nous sommes d’accord avec M. Roach pour dire qu’il est possible de poser des questions limitées aux jurés dans le cadre d’un processus de récusation qui permette d’en apprendre un peu plus sur des personnes que l'on compte assermenter pour juger si l'accusé a commis ou non une infraction criminelle.
Aux États-Unis, comme le professeur Roach et d’autres universitaires l’ont souligné, le système a un peu dérapé. Cela a donné lieu à de longues procédures et à des procédures de sélection par jury qui ne sont pas nécessaires. Un de mes collègues, qui travaille beaucoup avec les communautés autochtones, me parlait d’une enquête à laquelle il a participé récemment en Saskatchewan. Le coroner a pu permettre un interrogatoire limité des jurés et a été autorisé à constituer un jury — constitué différemment, évidemment, à cette fin — qui comprenait des représentants de la communauté autochtone et du reste de la collectivité. En repensant à cette expérience et sachant que je venais témoigner ici aujourd’hui, il m'a dit qu'en autorisant une petite enquête contrôlée par une gestion judiciaire — dans ce cas, le coroner gérait la situation —, on cerne beaucoup mieux les préjugés, connus ou implicites, qui pourraient nuire non pas à la volonté de la personne de rendre une décision équitable, mais à sa capacité de le faire.
Nous appuyons une approche fondée sur des données probantes à cet égard.
Collapse
View Iqra Khalid Profile
Lib. (ON)
Would giving extensive discretion to counsel on either side to pick and choose which jurors are being selected perpetuate an unfairness and lead to people selecting a jury based on which way it would lean, for a favourable outcome for whichever counsel?
Est-ce que le fait d’accorder un pouvoir discrétionnaire étendu aux avocats des deux parties pour choisir les jurés perpétuerait une injustice et inciterait les gens à choisir le jury en fonction de l’orientation qu’il prendra, en vue d’obtenir un résultat favorable pour l’avocat en question?
Collapse
Michael Lacy
View Michael Lacy Profile
Michael Lacy
2018-09-18 16:14
Expand
No. The proposal would be to allow some limited questions, and then allow submissions to the trial judge as to why a particular person's questions display a bias or not. With the new proposal, you're going to be doing that for challenge for cause, but challenge for cause is currently practically limited to race-based challenges or publicity challenges. It doesn't allow you to deal with other potential biases that may be affecting the ability of the jury to decide a case fairly and objectively, which is what all the stakeholders want and what the community wants.
Non. La proposition consisterait à permettre certaines questions limitées, puis à permettre de présenter au juge des observations sur les raisons pour lesquelles les réponses d’une personne en particulier reflètent ou non un préjugé. La nouvelle proposition appliquera cela aux récusations motivées, qui actuellement se limitent à des récusations fondées sur la race ou sur la publicité. Cela ne permet pas de tenir compte d’autres préjugés potentiels qui pourraient nuire à la capacité du jury de trancher une affaire de façon juste et objective, ce que désirent tous les intervenants et la collectivité.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2018-09-18 16:16
Expand
Thanks to all the witnesses for being here. I have very little time, so I would like to start, please, with the Criminal Lawyers' Association.
You really focused in on the jury representation issue but didn't do justice to the excellent points you made elsewhere in your brief. There are three points I want to get on the record and see if you want to elaborate on any of them.
The first involves preliminary inquiry reform. You are against what's in this bill.
Second, your position on increasing the maximum sentences to two years less a day for all summary convictions—clause 319—is that you're against those changes.
Third, on the routine police evidence, clause 278, you point out that, in your judgment, this clause is unnecessary.
I want to make sure that's on the record.
Merci à tous les témoins d’être venus. Comme j’ai très peu de temps, j’aimerais d'abord m'adresser à la Criminal Lawyers’ Association.
Vous avez vraiment mis l’accent sur la question de la représentation des jurés, mais vous n’avez pas mentionné d'excellents points soulevés ailleurs dans votre mémoire. Il y a trois points que j’aimerais faire consigner au compte rendu et savoir si vous pourriez en parler davantage.
Le premier concerne la réforme de l’enquête préliminaire. Vous êtes contre les propositions de ce projet de loi.
Deuxièmement, vous vous opposez à la proposition d’augmenter les peines maximales à deux ans moins un jour pour toutes les déclarations de culpabilité par procédure sommaire, à l’article 319.
Troisièmement, en ce qui concerne l'élément de preuve de routine présenté par la police, à l’article 278, vous trouvez cet article inutile.
Je veux m’assurer que cela figure au compte rendu.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 195 | Page: 1 of 4

1
2
3
4
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data