Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 3238
View Leona Alleslev Profile
CPC (ON)
Excellent.
There are three main reasons why we feel this motion must be supported. First and foremost, this is about preserving free speech in a democracy, and about the non-partisan nature of our federal public service. Second, it's also about the rapidly deteriorating relations with China and what the government's policy actually is on China. Third, and almost as important, it's about the checks and balances of the institution of this government and the balance that a House of Commons standing committee puts forward in holding the government to account.
What do I mean when I say “free speech”? Clearly, we are in a democracy and, therefore, people who have expertise based on the history of their careers and the experience they have gained over their careers can inform citizens on government behaviour. Whether it was an academic career, a financial management career, an industry career or the public service is irrelevant. They have gained experience, and once they are private citizens, they have the opportunity to inform the public.
We cannot have a Prime Minister's Office, or the Prime Minister himself, for whatever reason, looking to prevent anyone in this country from having the opportunity to speak freely to an issue and to inform citizens on that issue. A democracy is only as good as the information that citizens have. We know from the media reports that part of the conversation is that the PMO directed not to speak out against the government because this is an election year.
Even more so in an election year do we need to have the opportunity to have experts speak out, so that when citizens go to the polls, they have valid and informed information so that they can make a decision on whether or not the current government is the right government to lead them, going forward.
China, and our relationship with China, is one of the most important or significant issues facing the nation at the moment, with two people who are imprisoned in China—wrongfully, in Canada's opinion—and the serious economic impact of our exports of soy, pork and other grains being prevented from getting into China. This is a significant diplomatic and economic relationship and we need to know what experts think of the government's approach before we go to the polls.
We absolutely need to understand whether or not this Prime Minister has continued a pattern of behaviour of attempting to silence those who are experts or private citizens from being able to provide informed opinions, upon which Canadians, in a democracy, can make informed decisions about the shape and direction of their nation, and of course, the expertise of the government.
Secondly, we're looking at the partisan nature of the public service. If, in fact, the Prime Minister's Office is attempting to take non-partisan public officials and arm-wrestle them into behaving in a way that is partisan, if in fact that's what happened when they were asking the assistant deputy minister, Mr. Thoppil, to call these former diplomats and tell them that it's an election year and that they need to check in with the government on the government's policy, then the very fabric of Canada's democracy is at risk.
In Canada we have a non-partisan public service for the very reason that it spans across different governments. If they are asked, or directed by the PMO, whether or not they were specifically directed or whether the PMO merely intimated that direction, everyone in the public service knows that the Prime Minister's Office and the use of the term "Prime Minister's Office" are not to be taken lightly. They are, in many respects, a not-so-veiled threat that your behaviour needs to be a certain way. It's a very difficult position for a public servant to be in when the Prime Minister's Office calls and asks them to do something.
We as a committee have a responsibility to determine whether or not the Prime Minister's Office actually directly phoned a public servant and asked them to behave in an inappropriate way, in a partisan way, when doing so is totally and completely outside of that individual's responsibility to do so and goes against everything in the nature of our government.
Furthermore, we need to understand whether or not that supposed Prime Minister's Office individual did it with the knowledge of the Prime Minister, because the buck stops with the Prime Minister. We also need to know if it went to the Clerk of the Privy Council, or if in fact it completely skipped him, which also would be inappropriate. From free speech to not muzzling people to ensuring that we have non-partisan public servants and whether there is any way the Prime Minister's Office is asking public servants to behave in a partisan way—these are serious allegations that we need to get to the bottom of.
Additionally, we need to talk about Canada's policy on China. Clearly the government's policy up to this point has been weak and has not achieved what we need it to achieve. When supposedly these private citizens—the former diplomats Mr. Mulroney and Mr. Saint-Jacques—were told that they needed to check in with the government on their policy so that they can speak with a single voice, well, perhaps the opposition and all parliamentarians and Canadians should have and be afforded the same opportunity to hear what the government's policy is. We at this committee need to hear from the foreign affairs minister exactly what Canada's China policy is. If this senior associate deputy minister is able to tell two private citizens that they need to check in on the China policy of the country, then I think that all Canadians have as much responsibility to have that information as well. That is the role of a committee, to ensure that information gets to the citizens of the country.
Last, but by no means least, we have a responsibility, as the legislative branch, to do these kinds of investigations. There are only about 30 members of Parliament who are in cabinet, and in our country, in our democracy, they form the executive branch of our government. The other 300 or so, in addition to those cabinet ministers, form the legislative branch. House of Commons standing committees and all members of Parliament in the legislative branch have a responsibility to represent not only the citizens in their respective ridings but also citizens across this country to ensure that we hold the government to account. We're here to understand what the government's doing. We're here to challenge the government. We're here to represent all Canadians in holding the government to account and influencing the government's direction.
If that's not the role of members of Parliament, if the role, specifically of Liberal members of Parliament, is simply to do whatever the government says, then what is the role of members of Parliament and how is that undermining the very fabric and foundation of our democracy?
We saw quite clearly that the Prime Minister and senior people, both elected and unelected...because, of course, one big challenge of the Prime Minister's Office is that they have an incredible amount of authority and are able to dictate all kinds of things, but with far fewer checks and balances by not being elected officials.
If we saw, as we did with the SNC-Lavalin scandal and certainly with the Admiral Norman affair, the undermining and erosion of the independence of the judicial branch and how members of Parliament, specifically Liberal members of Parliament on the justice committee, were shutting down any kind of inquiry and open and transparent democratic investigation into the behaviours of the government, it affects not only one of the key pillars, the independence of the judicial branch, but also the checks and balances and the independence of the legislative branch.
Therefore, I am calling on all members of Parliament today at this committee to assume their responsibility to the citizens of the nation, to the office they hold and to their responsibilities as members of Parliament to hold government to account and ensure not only that the policies and the practices are correct, but also that the institution of government and the Parliament itself remain intact. We must vote in favour of this motion because there is far too much at stake, from free speech to the jeopardizing of a non-partisan public service, to not knowing what the government's China policy is and, therefore, not being able to hear from those who would agree with whatever it is and those who may disagree, and to ensure that we preserve and protect the very structure of our foundation of the independence of the executive, the legislative and, of course, the judicial branches and the role and accountability of a House of Commons standing committee to investigate when the Prime Minister is potentially overstepping his role and responsibility with a pattern of behaviour to muzzle anyone who would criticize, putting partisan goals ahead of the responsibility and the structure of the nation and, of course, covering up what's really going on and hiding the truth from Canadians.
The motion is to hear from these witnesses, to investigate these serious allegations and to protect and preserve Canada's democracy. I am pleading with the members of this committee to vote in favour of the motion.
Thank you.
Excellent.
Selon nous, il y a trois raisons principales pour lesquelles il faut appuyer cette motion. Primo, il est question de préserver la liberté d'expression dans une démocratie et du caractère non partisan de la fonction publique fédérale. Secundo, il est aussi question de la détérioration rapide des relations avec la Chine et de la politique du gouvernement à son égard. Tertio, et c'est presque aussi important, il est question des freins et des contrepoids de l'institution que constitue le gouvernement et de l'équilibre qu'un comité permanent de la Chambre des communes assure en demandant des comptes au gouvernement.
Qu'est-ce que je veux dire quand je parle de « liberté d'expression »? De toute évidence, nous vivons dans une démocratie, et, par conséquent, les gens qui possèdent une expertise qui découle de leur carrière et de l'expérience qu'ils ont acquise au cours de cette dernière peuvent informer les citoyens sur le comportement du gouvernement. Qu'il s'agisse d'une carrière universitaire ou d'une carrière dans la gestion financière, l'industrie ou la fonction publique est sans importance. Ces personnes ont acquis de l'expérience et, lorsqu'ils deviennent de simples citoyens, ils ont la possibilité d'informer le public.
Peu importe la raison, le Cabinet du premier ministre ou le premier ministre lui-même ne peut pas tenter d'empêcher qui que ce soit au pays de parler librement d'une question et d'informer les citoyens sur cette dernière. La valeur d'une démocratie se mesure à l'information dont disposent les citoyens. Selon les médias, nous savons que le Cabinet du premier ministre a essentiellement ordonné de ne pas se prononcer contre le gouvernement parce que c'est une année électorale.
C'est surtout au cours d'une année électorale que des experts doivent pouvoir s'exprimer de sorte que, lorsque les citoyens se rendent aux urnes, ils disposent de renseignements valides et fondés sur des données probantes afin de pouvoir décider si le gouvernement actuel est tout indiqué pour les diriger ou non.
Étant donné que deux personnes sont emprisonnées en Chine — à tort, selon le Canada — et que nos exportations de soya, d'autres céréales et de porc ne peuvent entrer en Chine, ce qui a de graves répercussions économiques, la Chine et notre relation avec elle constituent l'un des problèmes les plus importants auxquels le pays est actuellement confronté. Il s'agit d'une relation diplomatique et économique importante, et nous devons savoir ce que les experts pensent de l'approche du gouvernement avant de nous rendre aux urnes.
Nous devons absolument savoir si le premier ministre a continué à tenter de faire taire ceux qui sont des experts ou de simples citoyens pour les empêcher de fournir des opinions éclairées sur lesquelles les Canadiens, dans une démocratie, peuvent prendre des décisions éclairées concernant la forme et la direction que prendra leur pays et, bien sûr, l'expertise du gouvernement.
Ensuite, nous examinons la nature partisane de la fonction publique. Si, en réalité, le Cabinet du premier ministre tente d'obliger des fonctionnaires non partisans à se comporter de façon partisane, si, en réalité, c'est ce qui s'est produit lorsqu'il a demandé à M. Thoppil, le sous-ministre adjoint, d'appeler ces anciens diplomates pour leur dire que c'est une année électorale et qu'ils doivent consulter le gouvernement au sujet de ses politiques, eh bien, le fondement même de la démocratie canadienne est menacé.
Au Canada, la fonction publique est non partisane précisément parce qu'elle transcende les différents gouvernements. Tous les fonctionnaires savent que, si le Cabinet du premier ministre leur demande d'adopter une orientation, que ce soit directement ou non, il ne faut pas prendre cette demande à la légère. À bien des égards, il s'agit d'une menace à peine voilée visant à faire adopter un comportement quelconque. Lorsque le Cabinet du premier ministre appelle un fonctionnaire pour lui demander de faire quelque chose, ce dernier se retrouve dans une situation très difficile.
Il incombe au Comité de déterminer si le Cabinet du premier ministre a téléphoné directement à un fonctionnaire pour lui demander de se comporter d'une manière inappropriée, soit de façon partisane, alors qu'un tel comportement ne fait pas du tout partie des responsabilités de cette personne et va à l'encontre de la nature même du gouvernement.
De plus, nous devons savoir si la prétendue personne au Cabinet du premier ministre a agi au su du premier ministre parce que c'est lui qui est l'ultime responsable. Nous devons aussi savoir si la question a été soumise au greffier du Conseil privé ou si on ne lui en a pas du tout fait part, ce qui serait également inapproprié. Nous devons faire toute la lumière sur de graves allégations qui portent sur la liberté d'expression, le muselage de gens, le fait de s'assurer que les fonctionnaires sont non partisans et le fait de savoir si le Cabinet du premier ministre a pu demander à des fonctionnaires de se comporter de façon partisane.
En outre, nous devons parler de la politique du Canada à l'égard de la Chine. De toute évidence, la politique du gouvernement jusqu'à maintenant laisse à désirer et n'a pas donné les résultats escomptés. Lorsqu'on a dit à ces simples citoyens — MM. Mulroney et Saint-Jacques, qui sont d'anciens diplomates — qu'ils devaient consulter le gouvernement au sujet de sa politique afin de pouvoir parler d'une seule voix, peut-être que l'opposition et l'ensemble des parlementaires et des Canadiens auraient dû avoir la même possibilité de connaître la politique du gouvernement. La ministre des Affaires étrangères doit dire au Comité exactement quelle est la politique du Canada à l'égard de la Chine. Si ce sous-ministre délégué principal est en mesure de dire à deux simples citoyens qu'ils doivent vérifier la politique du pays à l'égard de la Chine, alors j'estime qu'il incombe également à tous les Canadiens de disposer de cette information. C'est le rôle d'un comité, à savoir de veiller à ce que l'information parvienne aux citoyens du pays.
Enfin, et surtout, à titre d'organe législatif, nous avons la responsabilité de mener ce genre d'enquêtes. Le Cabinet se compose seulement d'une trentaine de députés et, dans notre pays, dans notre démocratie, ils forment l'organe exécutif du gouvernement. Les quelque 300 autres, en plus de ces ministres, forment l'organe législatif. Les comités permanents de la Chambre des communes et tous les députés de l'organe législatif ont la responsabilité de représenter non seulement les habitants de leur circonscription respective, mais aussi les citoyens de l'ensemble du pays pour veiller à ce que le gouvernement rende des comptes. Nous sommes ici pour comprendre ce que fait le gouvernement. Nous sommes ici pour contester le gouvernement. Nous sommes ici pour représenter tous les Canadiens en demandant des comptes au gouvernement et en influençant son orientation.
Si tel n'est pas le rôle des députés et si le rôle de ces derniers, en particulier les députés libéraux, est simplement de faire tout ce que le gouvernement dit, alors quel est leur rôle? En quoi cela nuit-il au fondement même de notre démocratie?
Nous avons vu très clairement que le premier ministre et les hauts fonctionnaires, élus et non élus... Bien sûr, étant donné que le Cabinet du premier ministre ne se compose pas de représentants élus, l'un de ses gros problèmes, c'est qu'il dispose de pouvoirs incroyables et qu'il est capable d'imposer toutes sortes de choses, mais il comporte beaucoup moins de mécanismes de contrôles.
Dans le scandale SNC-Lavalin et certainement dans l'affaire du vice-amiral Norman, on a vu l'indépendance du pouvoir judiciaire s'affaiblir et s'éroder et la façon avec laquelle les députés, surtout les libéraux membres du comité de la justice, ont mis fin à toute forme d'enquête démocratique ouverte et transparente sur le comportement du gouvernement, ce qui touche non seulement à l'un des principaux piliers de notre démocratie, à savoir l'indépendance du pouvoir judiciaire, mais aussi à ses freins et à ses contrepoids ainsi qu'à l'indépendance du pouvoir législatif.
C'est pourquoi je demande aujourd'hui à tous les députés qui siègent au Comité d'assumer leurs responsabilités envers les citoyens du pays, la fonction qu'ils occupent et leurs responsabilités à titre de députés à demander des comptes au gouvernement et à s'assurer non seulement que les politiques et les pratiques sont adéquates, mais aussi que l'institution gouvernementale et le Parlement lui-même demeurent intacts. Nous devons voter en faveur de cette motion parce que les enjeux sont beaucoup trop importants. Il est question de la liberté d'expression, de la compromission d'une fonction publique non partisane, du fait d'ignorer quelle est la politique du gouvernement à l'égard de la Chine et, par conséquent, du fait de ne pas pouvoir entendre ceux qui seraient d'accord avec elle et ceux qui pourraient s'y opposer. Il est aussi question de veiller à préserver et à protéger la structure même du fondement de l'indépendance des organes exécutif, législatif et, bien sûr, judiciaire ainsi que le rôle et la responsabilité d'un comité permanent de la Chambre des communes d'enquêter lorsque le premier ministre outrepasse peut-être son rôle et ses responsabilités en tentant de museler quiconque le critique, faisant passer les objectifs partisans avant la responsabilité et la structure du pays et, bien sûr, dissimulant la vérité et ce qui se passe véritablement aux Canadiens.
La motion vise à entendre ces témoins, à enquêter sur ces graves allégations et à protéger et à préserver la démocratie canadienne. J'exhorte les membres du Comité à voter en faveur de la motion.
Merci.
Collapse
View Pat Kelly Profile
CPC (AB)
View Pat Kelly Profile
2019-06-11 12:09
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
The minister did claim, boldly, that tax cheats can no longer hide, and yet you say that it is beyond her ability, because she is independent of the prosecutorial decision...and that tax cheaters will continue not to be named. Your lengthy explanation is no comfort to Canadians who still see a set of, presumably wealthy, Canadians who received a settlement.
The question that is unanswered is whether or not taxes were paid. Canadians don't know that.
This is not consistent with the repeated assertions of transparency. You've spoken of transparency, sir, but we see none. We see unnamed taxpayers cutting deals with the CRA.
Back to the case of the single taxpayer and the $133 million, a right to privacy is not absolute. There are public interests as well that have to be considered. If this single taxpayer, for example, were a corporate entity that received a subsidy from the government or that had dealings with the government, there would be an overwhelming public interest, I would imagine. What are you actually doing to increase transparency so that we don't continually have cases of non-transparent settlements being made with taxpayers?
Merci, monsieur le président.
La ministre a déclaré, de façon audacieuse, que les fraudeurs fiscaux ne pouvaient plus se cacher, et pourtant vous dites que cela dépasse ses capacités, parce qu'elle ne participe pas au système décisionnel de l’appareil judiciaire... et que les fraudeurs fiscaux ne seront toujours pas nommés. Votre longue explication n'est pas réconfortante pour les Canadiens, qui continuent de constater qu'un ensemble de Canadiens, vraisemblablement riches, ont obtenu un règlement.
On ne sait toujours pas si des impôts ont été payés ou non. Les Canadiens ne le savent pas.
Cela n'est pas cohérent par rapport aux affirmations répétées sur la transparence. Vous avez parlé de transparence, monsieur, mais nous n'en observons aucune. Nous constatons que des contribuables dont le nom n'a pas été divulgué négocient des règlements avec l'ARC.
Pour en revenir au cas du contribuable et des 133 millions de dollars, le droit à la vie privée n'est pas absolu. Il faut aussi tenir compte de l'intérêt public. Par exemple, si ce contribuable était une personne morale qui reçoit une subvention du gouvernement ou qui fait affaire avec le gouvernement, je suppose que le public y trouverait un énorme intérêt. Que faites-vous réellement pour accroître la transparence afin que nous ne soyons pas continuellement confrontés à des cas de règlements non transparents conclus avec des contribuables?
Collapse
Bob Hamilton
View Bob Hamilton Profile
Bob Hamilton
2019-06-11 12:11
Expand
I know my answer was lengthy, so I'll try to keep this one short. On the general issue of transparency, we're doing a number of things to make sure that the information the CRA has that would be helpful to people is made transparent. For example, we are making publicly available the tax gap analysis we are doing to try to identify the gap between taxes that should be paid and taxes that are paid.
We made available a study that we did on some of the strengths and weaknesses of CRA, and that included the weaknesses.
Je sais que ma réponse était longue, alors je vais essayer d'être bref. En ce qui concerne la question générale de la transparence, nous prenons un certain nombre de mesures pour nous assurer que les renseignements dont dispose l'ARC et qui pourraient être utiles aux personnes deviennent transparents. Par exemple, nous rendons publique l'analyse du manque à gagner fiscal que nous effectuons pour tenter de déterminer l'écart entre les impôts qui devraient être payés et ceux qui le sont.
Nous avons publié une étude que nous avons réalisée sur certaines des forces et des faiblesses de l'ARC, qui comprenait les faiblesses.
Collapse
Bob Hamilton
View Bob Hamilton Profile
Bob Hamilton
2019-06-11 12:11
Expand
On that general idea, we're taking a number of actions. On the specifics of this case or of settlements in particular, we're in the process of trying to find a way to increase transparency. I certainly would prefer a situation in which we could talk about what actually gets settled. In any of the cases I've been involved in, I believe the agency has done a very good job, together with Justice, to find an outcome that's in the public interest. However, there is this tension, since we cannot reveal taxpayers' confidential information. We need to find a way, and that's what we and the minister have endeavoured to do, and we'll be looking forward to having some better transparency in the future.
Sur cette idée générale, nous prenons un certain nombre de mesures. Pour ce qui est des particularités de cette affaire ou des règlements en particulier, nous essayons actuellement de trouver un moyen d'accroître la transparence. Il est clair que je préférerais qu'on puisse parler de ce qui est effectivement réglé. Dans toutes les affaires auxquelles j'ai participé, je pense que l'Agence et le ministère de la Justice ont fait un excellent travail pour trouver une solution qui soit dans l'intérêt du public. Cependant, il existe une certaine tension, car nous ne pouvons pas révéler les renseignements confidentiels des contribuables. Nous devons trouver un moyen, et c'est ce que nous et la ministre nous sommes efforcés de faire, et nous avons hâte de rehausser cette transparence à l'avenir.
Collapse
View Pat Kelly Profile
CPC (AB)
View Pat Kelly Profile
2019-06-11 12:12
Expand
We're well over time, but this is only a comment on the tax gap. Your agency is, in fact, not providing the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer the full anonymized data that it says it needs to be able to estimate it itself. Your measures are simply internal and they are not subject to outside scrutiny as they are now.
I would say, sir, that you fall short on the transparency.
Nous avons largement dépassé le temps imparti, mais j'aimerais simplement faire un commentaire sur le manque à gagner fiscal. Votre organisme ne fournit pas, en fait, au Bureau du directeur parlementaire du budget toutes les données anonymes dont il dit avoir besoin pour l'estimer lui-même. Vos mesures sont uniquement internes et ne font pas l'objet d'un examen externe, comme c'est le cas aujourd'hui.
Je dirais, monsieur, que vous n'assurez pas la transparence nécessaire.
Collapse
Bob Hamilton
View Bob Hamilton Profile
Bob Hamilton
2019-06-11 12:13
Expand
Yes, we have ongoing discussions with the Parliamentary Budget Officer and we do provide information to his office on every tax gap study that we do.
Oui, nous tenons des discussions continues avec le directeur parlementaire du budget et nous fournissons de l'information à son bureau sur toutes les études sur le manque à gagner fiscal que nous menons.
Collapse
View Yasmin Ratansi Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Yasmin Ratansi Profile
2019-06-05 17:50
Expand
Okay, it's my time.
Thank you, Minister, for being here. Welcome. This is your first meeting here.
You were part of the process where we have been trying to align the budget and the main estimates. When the government tried to do it from a reconciliation perspective, it put in a vote 40—a one-time vote. There were challenges with it. It was assumed that from a governance perspective, it was not the right thing to do because only one committee, which is ours, was able to review vote 40.
I know the government has listened and made changes. Could you tell us what are some of the changes going forward? How are you continuing to improve accountability and transparency so that we as MPs can understand the spending?
Bon, c'est mon tour.
Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de votre présence et je vous souhaite la bienvenue. C'est votre première réunion ici.
Vous faisiez partie du processus qui visait à établir une concordance entre le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses. Quand le gouvernement a essayé de procéder dans une perspective de rapprochement, il a créé un crédit 40 — un crédit ponctuel qui posait des problèmes. On était parti du principe que, du point de vue de la gouvernance, c'était la bonne chose à faire parce qu'un seul comité, le nôtre, pouvait examiner le crédit 40.
Je sais que le gouvernement a écouté et apporté des changements. Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples de prochains changements? Que faites-vous pour continuer d'améliorer la reddition des comptes et la transparence afin que les députés puissent comprendre les dépenses?
Collapse
View Joyce Murray Profile
Lib. (BC)
Thank you for raising the topic of the budget implementation vote from last year, which I saw as a step forward from what we had before.
Before, we had a situation where the estimates were tabled first and the budget was tabled afterwards, so the estimates had no relation to the decisions being made by government through the budget as to what spending would be added for the year. That was the disconnect that you as a committee were aiming to improve.
It was improved by the budget implementation vote, by taking all of those budgetary items and putting them in one budget implementation vote, which was broken down by departmental and program intention for those funds so that when they were approved by Treasury Board and forwarded to the departments they could be tracked monthly online.
The committee's concerns that this was not going far enough were very valid. It was an important first step, but we needed to do more. That is exactly what Treasury Board did this year. It took the budgetary funds, broke them into the individual departments' allocations and named what program they were for. They were not discretionary funds for that department; they were targeted to a purpose outlined in the budget. Those funds are now scrutinized by the appropriate committee.
From my perspective and that of Treasury Board, this is another step forward, and a big one, in the direction Parliament has been asking for, which is to have faster and fuller ability to follow the money and to be accountable to Canadians for government spending.
Merci d'avoir soulevé la question du crédit d'exécution du budget de l'an dernier, une modalité qui m'a semblé constituer un progrès par rapport aux modalités antérieures.
Auparavant, le Budget principal des dépenses était déposé avant que le budget ne le soit. Il n'y avait ainsi pas de liens entre les décisions gouvernementales qui étaient concrétisées dans le budget sous forme de dépenses additionnelles pour l'exercice en question. C’est de là que venait le décalage que votre comité cherchait à corriger.
Le recours au crédit d'exécution du budget, regroupant tous ces postes budgétaires dans un tel crédit, et les ventilant ensuite selon leur finalité ministérielle ou programmatique pour, une fois approuvés par le Conseil du Trésor, les transmettre aux ministères qui, eux, sont en mesure d’en assurer en ligne le suivi mensuel, a constitué une amélioration.
Le fait que le Comité estime que cette solution n'allait pas assez loin traduisait des préoccupations tout à fait valides. C’était là une première étape importante, mais il nous faut en faire plus. C'est précisément ce que le Conseil du Trésor a fait cette année. Il a pris l'ensemble des crédits, puis les a répartis entre les divers ministères en précisant à quel programme ils étaient destinés. Il ne s’agissait pas de fonds discrétionnaires pour ces ministères; le budget énonçait clairement à quelles fins ils étaient destinés. Les comités auxquels il incombe de surveiller ces ministères vérifient maintenant l’usage que les ministères font de ces fonds.
Tout comme le Conseil du Trésor, je trouve qu’il s'agit d'un autre pas en avant et même d'un grand pas dans la direction demandée par le Parlement, soit d'être à même de suivre plus rapidement et de façon plus détaillée l'argent et d'assumer la responsabilité des dépenses gouvernementales devant les Canadiens.
Collapse
View Yasmin Ratansi Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Yasmin Ratansi Profile
2019-06-05 17:53
Expand
Thank you for that.
When we look at the pillars in the budget and the estimate process, we looked at pillar four as well. In your departmental plans you talked about pillar four being the departmental plans being tabled the same day as the main estimates.
How are departments managing this new process? What are some of the challenges and opportunities that you see?
Je vous en remercie.
Lorsque nous examinons les piliers du budget et du processus d’élaboration du Budget principal des dépenses, nous examinons également le quatrième pilier. Dans vos plans ministériels, vous avez parlé du pilier quatre, soit les plans ministériels qui sont déposés le même jour que le Budget principal des dépenses.
Comment les ministères gèrent-ils ce nouveau processus? Quelles sont les difficultés que cela vous pose et est-ce une source de possibilités intéressantes pour vous?
Collapse
View Joyce Murray Profile
Lib. (BC)
I'll take a crack at it, and because the officials with me are the ones who really had to wrestle with that, I'll turn it over to them as well.
One of the concepts here is that the departmental plans also need to align with the budget to help parliamentarians understand what's planned. The challenge is that when there were only a few weeks between the tabling of the budget and the tabling of the estimates and departmental plans, not all of that planned spending could be incorporated in the departmental plans. However, the departments very quickly worked to complete their plans and tabled supplementary pages to bring it to full alignment. That full alignment was in place before any of the committees were examining the estimates and the departmental plans. That is another piece of the puzzle, as you mentioned, pillar four, of reporting and information.
Je vais essayer de vous répondre, mais comme ce sont les fonctionnaires qui m’accompagnent qui s’attaquent concrètement à cette tâche, je vais aussi leur céder la parole.
Pour aider les parlementaires à comprendre ce qui est planifié, il faut que les plans ministériels soient harmonisés avec le budget. Lorsque nous ne disposions que de quelques semaines entre le dépôt du budget, celui du Budget principal des dépenses et celui des plans ministériels, nous ne parvenions pas toujours à inscrire la totalité des dépenses prévues dans les plans ministériels. Les ministères mettaient alors très rapidement la dernière main à leurs plans et déposaient des pages additionnelles assurant la complète harmonisation des contenus des divers documents. Cette harmonisation complète était faite avant que n’importe lequel des comités n'examine le Budget principal des dépenses et les plans ministériels. Comme vous l'avez rappelé, nous avons là, avec le pilier quatre, une autre pièce du casse-tête de la préparation des rapports et de l'information à communiquer.
Collapse
View Francis Drouin Profile
Lib. (ON)
I would expect no less.
Minister, you and your predecessor and your department and have pushed a digital government strategy. I'm wondering if you could give our committee an update.
At the same time, I know there was an open government partnership international summit last week. I was hoping you could provide some context into what the objectives and outcomes of that conference were.
Je n’en attendrais pas moins.
Madame la ministre, vous et votre prédécesseur, comme les autres représentants de votre ministère, avez plaidé pour une stratégie de gouvernement numérique. Seriez-vous en mesure de nous faire le point sur cette stratégie?
En même temps, je sais que le Sommet mondial du Partenariat pour un gouvernement ouvert s’est tenu la semaine dernière. J’aimerais que vous nous donniez des précisions sur le contexte dans lequel les objectifs de ce sommet et les résultats obtenus s’inscrivent.
Collapse
View Joyce Murray Profile
Lib. (BC)
That is a very important part of my mandate. Digital is about improving services to Canadian citizens. That's the bottom line. We're part of what was the D9—there may be more digital countries that have banded together, but there were nine the last time I heard—to share information, best practices and new ideas as to how to move forward to improve services to citizens.
The Open Government Partnership is almost a parallel initiative. It is a group of over 80 countries that have signed on to a partnership to improve and increase citizens' access to their government. Why is that important? It's important because by having access to government data, people can use the data to solve problems, to create apps or businesses and serve and grow the economy. By having government be open to citizens, they can be involved in decision-making. They can be consulted, so that better decisions get made.
When governments are more open and provide their data openly and consult, there is a stronger level of trust between citizens and their government. For some countries in this partnership, it has been a means of reducing corruption. Once the data is out there, then people can press their government to actually flow the funds that were supposed to have flowed to a particular initiative. One example that came up was a maternal health clinic. It's a very powerful tool for trust and for having better decisions made and having superior outcomes in the government's delivery of services.
Lastly, trust is about strengthening democracy as well. As the digital world gets much more sophisticated, that's a good thing, but at the same time we're seeing that it can be exploited or abused for negative purposes that divide people and create opportunities that undermine democracy. Open government is also about addressing that and finding ways to strengthen democracies and innoculate against the kinds of attacks on democracies that we've been seeing and that have used digital as a way to do it.
C’est là un volet très important de mon mandat. La finalité du monde numérique est d’améliorer les services offerts aux citoyens canadiens. C’est le résultat final que nous visons. Nous faisons partie du groupe baptisé D9 auparavant. Il se peut qu’il y ait maintenant un plus grand nombre de pays voulant passer à l’ère numérique qui se soient regroupés, mais il y en avait neuf la dernière fois que j’en ai entendu parler. L’objectif de ce groupe était de permettre à ses membres d’échanger des informations, des pratiques exemplaires et de nouvelles idées sur la façon d’améliorer les services fournis aux citoyens.
Le Partenariat pour un gouvernement ouvert, le PGO, est presque une initiative parallèle. Il regroupe au-delà de 80 pays qui ont adhéré à un partenariat pour améliorer et accroître l’accès des citoyens à leur gouvernement. Pourquoi est-ce important? Parce que, en ayant accès aux données gouvernementales, les utilisateurs peuvent utiliser ces données pour résoudre des problèmes, créer des applications ou des entreprises qui alimenteront la croissance de l’économie. Si le gouvernement est ouvert aux citoyens, il devient possible de les impliquer dans la prise de décisions. On peut les consulter pour prendre de meilleures décisions.
Lorsque les gouvernements sont plus ouverts, qu’ils communiquent ouvertement leurs données et qu’ils consultent, la confiance entre les citoyens et leur gouvernement s'accroît. Pour certains pays membres de ce partenariat, cela a été un moyen de réduire la corruption. Une fois que les données sont accessibles, les gens peuvent faire pression sur leur gouvernement pour qu’il verse réellement les fonds destinés à une initiative donnée. Un exemple qui s’est présenté a été celui d’une clinique de santé maternelle. C’est un outil très puissant pour instaurer la confiance, pour prendre de meilleures décisions et pour que la prestation des services gouvernementaux donne de meilleurs résultats.
Enfin, la confiance contribue au renforcement de la démocratie. C’est une bonne chose alors que le monde numérique devient de plus en plus sophistiqué. Nous constatons en même temps qu’il peut être exploité de manière abusive à des fins néfastes qui divisent les citoyens et donnent des occasions de miner la démocratie. Un gouvernement ouvert vise également à remédier à cette situation et à trouver des moyens de renforcer les démocraties, à les inoculer contre le type d’attaques numériques dont elles ont déjà été victimes.
Collapse
View Francis Drouin Profile
Lib. (ON)
Just on a personal basis, I want to congratulate you for your new role, although you have been in your new role for quite some time now. I certainly miss you not being here anymore, but I'm getting used to Mr. Fergus now.
We've often talked about digital government and aspiring to what Estonia has done with its citizens, for example. I know that in Estonia, I think citizens get a notice on their cellphones—or they can pick which device to receive it on—when governments are sharing information about them. Is that something Canada can aspire to in the future? I know we're a lot more complex than the Estonian government, but do you think that's a vision we could aspire to?
À titre personnel, je tiens à vous féliciter pour votre nouveau rôle, même si cela fait maintenant un certain temps que vous l’assumez. Je regrette que vous ne soyez plus là, mais je commence à m’habituer à M. Fergus.
Nous avons souvent parlé de gouvernement numérique et, par exemple, vu dans réalisations de l’Estonie pour ses citoyens une sorte de modèle. Je crois savoir que, en Estonie, les citoyens peuvent recevoir des avis sur leurs téléphones portables, choisir sur quel appareil ils en recevront lorsque les gouvernements partageront des informations les concernant. Est-ce le genre de solution auquel le Canada peut aspirer à l’avenir? Je sais que notre appareil gouvernemental est beaucoup plus complexe que celui de l’Estonie, mais pensez-vous que nous pourrions aspirer à une solution de ce genre?
Collapse
View Joyce Murray Profile
Lib. (BC)
Absolutely, but in the Canadian way, because we have a federation and provinces and territories.... There is already work being done with a trial province to coordinate some digital identification with the province's digital identification.
Yes, we want to move forward on that. We're going to do it very carefully and hand in hand with our provincial partners.
Absolument, mais à la manière canadienne, car nous sommes une fédération et nous avons des provinces et des territoires… Nous faisons déjà, avec une province, des essais de coordination de nos modalités respectives d’identification numérique.
Oui, nous voulons aller de l’avant dans ce domaine. Nous allons prendre quantité de précautions et avancer de concert avec nos partenaires provinciaux.
Collapse
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
Okay.
What accountability measures by your department are taking place, in terms of the spending of these dollars?
Très bien.
Quelles mesures de reddition de comptes votre ministère applique-t-il pour ce qui est de l'attribution de cet argent?
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 3238 | Page: 1 of 216

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Show single language
Refine Your Search
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data