Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-06-12 18:20 [p.29068]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to rise in the House. As usual, I want to say hello to all the residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching right now. I had the honour of meeting thousands of them last weekend at the Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, where I had a booth, as the local member of Parliament. It was a fantastic outdoor party, and the weather co-operated beautifully.
Before I discuss the motion, I just want the people of Beauport—Limoilou to know that we will have plenty of opportunities to meet this summer at all the events and festivals being held in Beauport and Limoilou. As usual, I will be holding my annual summer party in August, where thousands of people come to meet me. We often eat hot dogs, chips and popcorn from Île d'Orléans together. It is a chance for me to get to know my constituents, talk about the issues affecting the riding, and share information about the services that my office can provide to Canadians dealing with the federal government.
I also want to say that this may be the last speech I give in the House during the 42nd Parliament. It was a huge honour to be here, and I hope to again have that honour after election day, October 21.
I plan to run in the upcoming election and I hope to represent my constituents for a long time to come. I am extremely proud of the work I have done over the past four years, including the work I did in my riding, on my portfolio, Canada's official languages, and during debates.
I am asking my constituents to do me a favour and put their trust in me for another four years. I will be here every day to serve them.
Today we are debating Motion No. 227, a Liberal motion to conduct a study in committee. It is commendable to do a study at the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities. This is a very important House of Commons committee. A Liberal Party MP is proposing to conduct a study on labour shortages in the skilled trades in Canada.
As soon as I saw that I wanted to say a few words about this motion. Whether it be in Quebec City, Regina, Nanaimo, or elsewhere in Canada, there is a crisis right now. The labour shortage will affect us quite quickly.
We have heard that, a few years from now, the greater Quebec City area will need an additional 150,000 workers. This remarkable shortage will be the result of baby boomers retiring. Baby boomers, including my parents, will enjoy a well-deserved retirement. This is a very important issue, and we must address it.
I would like to remind the House that, in January, February and March, I asked the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour about the serious labour shortage problem in Canada. Each time, she made a mockery of my question by saying that the Liberals had created 600,000 new jobs. Today, they say one million.
I am glad that this motion was moved, but it is more or less an exercise in virtue signalling. Actually, it is more of an exercise in public communications, although I am not questioning my colleague's sincere wish to look into the issue. In six or seven days, the 42nd Parliament will be dissolved. Well, the House will adjourn. Parliament will be dissolved in a few months, before the election.
My colleague's committee will not be able to study the motion. My colleagues and I on the Standing Committee on Official Languages are finishing our study of the modernization of the Official Languages Act. We decided that we would finalize our recommendations tomorrow at noon, to ensure that we are able to table the report from the Standing Committee on Official Languages in the House.
In essence, this is a public communications exercise, since the committee will not be able to study the issue. However, I think it would be good to talk about the labour shortages in the skilled trades with the Canadians who are watching us. What are skilled trades? We are talking about hairdressers, landscapers, cabinetmakers, electricians, machinists, mechanics, and crane or other equipment operators. Skilled trades also include painters, plumbers, welders and technicians.
I will explain why the labour shortage in the skilled trades is worrisome. When people take a good look around they soon realize that these trades are very important. Skilled tradespeople build everything around us, such as highways, overpasses, waterworks, subways, transportation systems like the future Quebec streetcar line that we have talked about a lot lately, the railroads that cross the country, skyscrapers in major cities like Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, factories in rural areas, tractors, equipment and the canals of the St. Lawrence Seaway, which were built in the 1950s.
China, India and the United States are making huge investments in infrastructure. For example, in recent years, the U.S. government did not flinch at investing $5 billion to improve the infrastructure of the Port of New York and New Jersey, which was built by men and women in the trades. In Quebec, we are still waiting for the Liberals to approve a small $60-million envelope for the Beauport 2020 project, now called the Laurentia project, which will ensure the shipping competitiveness of the St. Lawrence for years to come.
There has been a lack of infrastructure investment in Canada. The Liberals like to say that their infrastructure Canada plan is historic, but only $14 billion of the $190 billion announced have actually been allocated. That is not all. Even if the Liberals were releasing the funds and making massive investments to surpass other G20 and G7 countries, the world's largest economies, they would not be able to deliver on their incredible projects without skilled labour. Consider this: even Nigeria, with a population of 200 million, is catching up with us when it comes to infrastructure investments.
It is about time that we, as legislators, dealt with this issue, but clearly that is not what the Liberals have been doing over the past few years, although I have heard some members talk about a few initiatives here and there in some provinces. The announcement of this study is late in coming.
I would also remind the House that this is a provincial jurisdiction, given that provincial regulations govern the training of skilled workers. That said, the federal government can still be helpful by implementing various measures through federal transfers, such as apprenticeship grants and loans, tax credits and job training programs. This all requires a smooth, harmonious relationship between the provinces and the federal government. Not only do the political players have to get along well, but so do the politicians themselves.
If, God forbid, the Liberals get another four-year term in office, taxes will increase dramatically, since they will want to make up for the huge deficits they racked up over the past four years. In 2016, they imposed conditions on health transfers. Then, they rushed ahead with the legalization of marijuana even though the provinces wanted more time. Then, they imposed the carbon tax on provinces like New Brunswick, which had already closed a number of coal-fired plants and significantly reduced its greenhouse gas emissions. The Liberals said that they still considered the province to be an offender and imposed the Liberal carbon tax. Finally, today, they are rushing through the study of Bill C-69, which seeks to implement regulations that are far too rigid and that will interfere with the development of natural resources in various provinces, even though six premiers have stated that this bill will stifle their local economies.
How can we hope that this government will collaborate to come to an agreement seeking to address skilled trades shortages when it has such a poor track record on intergovernmental relations?
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole à la Chambre. Comme d’habitude, j’aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent présentement. Nous avons eu l’honneur de nous rencontrer, par milliers, en fin de semaine, au Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, où j'avais un kiosque, en tant que député. C’était une très belle fête à l’extérieur, et le beau temps était présent.
Avant de discuter de la motion, j’aimerais dire aux citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou que nous pourrons nous rencontrer tout au long de l'été, lors des activités ou des festivals qui se tiendront à Beauport ou à Limoilou. Comme chaque année, je vais tenir, au mois d’août, la Fête de l’été du député, où plusieurs milliers de personnes viennent me rencontrer. Souvent, nous dégustons ensemble des hot dogs, des croustilles et du blé d’Inde de l’île d’Orléans. C’est pour nous une chance de nous rencontrer, de discuter des enjeux de la circonscription et de faire part des services que mon bureau peut donner en ce qui a trait au gouvernement fédéral.
J’aimerais dire qu'il s'agit peut-être du dernier discours que je prononcerai à la Chambre lors de la 42e législature. Ce fut un honneur incroyable d'être ici, et je voudrais voir cet honneur renouvelé le 21 octobre prochain, le jour de l'élection.
J’ai l’intention de présenter ma candidature lors des prochaines élections, et j'espère représenter mes concitoyens encore très longtemps. Je suis extrêmement fier du travail que j’ai fait au cours des quatre dernières années, que ce soit le travail que j'ai fait dans ma circonscription, le travail relatif à mon portefeuille, les langues officielles du Canada, ou le travail que j'ai fait lors des débats.
Je demande donc à mes concitoyens de me faire une faveur, soit celle de me faire confiance pour quatre autres années. Je serai présent tous les jours pour les servir.
Aujourd’hui, nous débattons de la motion M-227, une tentative libérale visant à faire une étude en comité. C’est quand même louable de faire une étude au Comité permanent des ressources humaines, du développement des compétences, du développement social et de la condition des personnes handicapées. Il s'agit d'un comité fort important de la Chambre des communes. Un député du Parti libéral propose de mener une étude sur la pénurie de main-d’œuvre relative aux métiers spécialisés au Canada.
Dès que j’ai vu cela, j’ai voulu parler un peu de cette motion. Que ce soit à Québec, à Regina, à Nanaimo ou ailleurs au Canada, il y a une crise en ce moment. La pénurie de main-d’œuvre nous touchera assez rapidement.
On dit que, d’ici quelques années, il manquera 150 000 travailleurs dans la grande région de Québec. Cela est dû à un phénomène assez incroyable: les baby-boomers ont pris leur retraite. En effet, les baby-boomers, y compris mes parents, partent à la retraite, une retraite bien méritée. C’est donc un enjeu très important, et il faut s’y attarder.
D’ailleurs, j’aimerais rappeler que, en janvier, en février et en mars, j’ai posé quelques questions à la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d’œuvre et du Travail. Je lui disais qu’il y avait un grave problème de pénurie de main-d’œuvre au Canada. Chaque fois, elle tournait ma question en dérision en disant que les libéraux avaient créé 600 000 emplois. Aujourd’hui, ils disent en avoir créé 1 million.
Je suis content que la motion ait été déposée, mais il s'agit davantage d'un geste vertueux que d’autre chose. En fait, il s'agit davantage d'un exercice public de communication, bien que je ne remette pas en question le fait que mon collègue souhaite vraiment aborder le problème. Dans six ou sept jours, la 42e législature sera dissoute. En fait, la Chambre va s'ajourner. Pour ce qui est de la dissolution, elle aura lieu dans quelques mois, lors des élections.
Le comité auquel siège mon collègue ne pourra pas faire l'étude de la motion. Nous, les députés qui siégeons au Comité permanent des langues officielles, terminons notre étude sur la modernisation de la Loi sur les langues officielles. Nous nous sommes dit que nous terminerions nos recommandations demain, à midi, pour nous assurer de pouvoir déposer à la Chambre le rapport du Comité permanent des langues officielles.
Bref, il s'agit d'un exercice de communication publique, car le comité ne pourra pas se pencher sur la question. Toutefois, je trouve que ce serait bien de parler de la pénurie de main-d’œuvre relative aux métiers spécialisés aux Canadiens qui nous écoutent. Que sont les métiers spécialisés? Il s’agit du coiffeur, du paysagiste, de l’ébéniste, de l’électricien, du machiniste, du mécanicien, de l’opérateur d’équipement, comme les grues. Ce dernier est un emploi incroyable. Ce n’est pas facile d'obtenir un emploi d’opérateur de grue. Il s'agit aussi du peintre, du plombier, du soudeur et du technicien.
Je vais expliquer pourquoi la pénurie de main-d’œuvre dans les métiers spécialisés est inquiétante. Si les citoyens regardent autour d'eux, ils réaliseront que ces métiers sont essentiels. Ce sont ces travailleurs qui font tout ce qui nous entoure: les autoroutes, les viaducs, les aqueducs, les métros, les réseaux de transport structurants, comme le futur tramway de Québec, dont nous parlons beaucoup dernièrement, les chemins de fer qui traversent le pays, les gratte-ciels dans les grandes villes comme Montréal, Toronto et Vancouver, les usines en région rurale, les tracteurs, les machines, les canaux de la voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, qui ont été construits dans les années 1950, etc.
En Chine, en Inde et aux États-Unis, les investissements en infrastructure sont énormes. Par exemple, dans les dernières années, le gouvernement américain n'a pas rechigné une seconde à investir 5 milliards de dollars pour améliorer les infrastructures du port de New York et du New Jersey, qui a été construit par des hommes et des femmes des corps de métiers spécialisés. De notre côté, à Québec, nous attendons toujours que les libéraux confirment une petite enveloppe de 60 millions de dollars pour le projet Beauport 2020, qui s'appelle aujourd'hui le projet Laurentia et qui vise à assurer la compétitivité maritime du fleuve Saint-Laurent dans les années à venir.
Il y a donc un manque d'investissement dans les infrastructures canadiennes. Les libéraux aiment dire que le projet d'Infrastructure Canada est historique, mais seulement 14 milliards des 190 milliards de dollars annoncés ont été dégagés. Cependant, ce n'est pas tout. Même si les libéraux débloquaient l'argent et faisaient des investissements massifs pour dépasser les autres pays du G20 et du G7, les grandes économies mondiales, ils ne pourraient pas concrétiser leurs projets incroyables sans main-d’œuvre spécialisée. D'ailleurs, au chapitre des investissements en infrastructure, même le Nigeria, qui a 200 millions d'habitants, est en train de nous rattraper.
Il est donc temps que nous, les législateurs, nous attardions à cette question, mais de toute évidence, ce n'est pas ce que les libéraux ont fait au cours des dernières années, même si j'ai entendu parler de certaines mesures saupoudrées d'une province à l'autre. L'annonce de cette étude est tardive.
Par ailleurs, rappelons que cette question relève de la compétence provinciale, puisque c'est la réglementation provinciale qui encadre la formation de la main-d’œuvre spécialisée. Cela dit, le gouvernement fédéral peut quand même être utile en mettant en place différentes mesures par l'entremise des transferts fédéraux, comme des subventions et des prêts aux apprentis, des crédits d'impôt et des programmes de formation de la main-d’œuvre. Tout cela nécessite une relation harmonieuse entre les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral. Non seulement les acteurs politiques doivent bien s'entendre, mais les politiciens eux-mêmes aussi.
Si, par grand malheur, les libéraux obtiennent un autre mandat de quatre ans, les impôts et les taxes vont augmenter considérablement, puisqu'ils voudront combler les grands déficits qu'ils ont accumulés depuis quatre ans. En 2016, ils ont imposé des conditions concernant les transferts en santé. Ensuite, ils ont précipité la légalisation de la marijuana, alors que les provinces voulaient plus de temps. Puis, ils ont imposé la taxe sur le carbone à des provinces comme le Nouveau-Brunswick, qui avait fermé plusieurs centrales au charbon et qui avait réduit ses émissions de gaz à effet de serre substantiellement. Les libéraux lui ont dit qu'ils le considéraient toujours comme un délinquant et qu'il lui imposait la taxe libérale sur le carbone. Finalement, aujourd'hui, ils précipitent l'étude du projet de loi C-69, qui vise à mettre en œuvre une réglementation beaucoup trop rigide qui empêchera l'exploitation des ressources naturelles dans différentes provinces, alors que six premiers ministres ont affirmé que cela suffoquerait leur économie locale.
Comment peut-on espérer que ce gouvernement collabore pour arriver à une entente afin de pallier la pénurie de main-d'œuvre dans les métiers spécialisés, lorsqu'on constate que son bilan en matière de relations intergouvernementales est complètement médiocre?
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-06-05 14:18
Expand
Mr. Speaker, this Liberal government is more centralist, paternalistic and, quite simply, arrogant than any other Liberal government in the history of our federation.
For the past four years, the government has repeatedly shown that it is out of touch with the spirit of federalism. It refuses to honour the tradition of appointing a political lieutenant for Quebec and instead made a minister from Toronto responsible for the economic development of our province. It is imposing political conditions on federal transfers. It refuses to give Quebec greater powers in the area of immigration. It refuses to respond favourably to the National Assembly's request for a single tax return, something all Quebeckers want.
I could go on and on. Following in the footsteps of founding fathers Cartier and MacDonald, we the Conservatives will continue to properly honour federalism. In 2008, we recognized that Quebeckers form a nation within a united Canada.
In 2019, when we form the government, we will respond favourably to the demands of Quebeckers and Quebec.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement libéral, plus que tout autre dans l'histoire de notre fédération, est centralisateur, paternaliste et tout simplement arrogant.
Depuis quatre ans, le gouvernement a démontré à maintes reprises qu'il n'est pas au diapason de l'esprit du fédéralisme. Il refuse de faire honneur à la tradition en nommant un lieutenant politique pour le Québec, et il a nommé un ministre de Toronto responsable du développement économique de notre province. Il impose des conditions politiques à ses transferts fédéraux. Il refuse de donner plus de pouvoirs au Québec en matière d'immigration. Il refuse de répondre favorablement à la demande de l'Assemblée nationale relativement à la déclaration de revenus unique, une demande de tous les Québécois.
La liste est encore longue. Nous, les conservateurs, dans la lignée des pères fondateurs Cartier et MacDonald, allons continuer d'honorer le fédéralisme en bonne et due forme. En 2008, nous avons reconnu que les Québécois forment une nation au sein du Canada-Uni.
En 2019, lorsque nous formerons le gouvernement, nous allons répondre favorablement aux demandes des Québécois et du Québec.
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-06-05 15:08
Expand
Mr. Speaker, everyone remembers the huge mistake the Minister of Official Languages made two years ago when she concluded an agreement with Netflix that did not guarantee any French-language cultural production. Quebeckers and francophones across the country were so frustrated that the Prime Minister removed her from that position and she lost the heritage portfolio.
Here is what she is telling us today. She made a plan for tourism two weeks ago. It contains no guarantees, no investments for the francophone minority communities across Canada. She just made an announcement today and, once again, there is nothing for francophones.
Was this an oversight on the part of the minister or does this government just not take official languages seriously?
Monsieur le Président, tout le monde se rappelle de la gaffe énorme que la ministre des Langues officielles a faite, il y a deux ans, lorsqu’elle a fait, avec Netflix, une entente qui ne prévoyait aucune garantie de production culturelle francophone. Les Québécois et les francophones étaient tellement frustrés partout au pays que le premier ministre l’a démise de ses fonctions et qu'elle a perdu le ministère du Patrimoine canadien.
Voyons ce qu’elle nous dit aujourd’hui. Elle a fait un plan de tourisme, il y a deux semaines. Il n’y a aucune garantie, aucun investissement pour les communautés minoritaires francophones partout au pays. Elle vient de faire une annonce aujourd’hui, et, encore une fois, il n’y a rien pour les francophones.
Est-ce que c’est un oubli de la ministre ou est-ce que tout simplement ce gouvernement ne prend pas au sérieux les langues officielles?
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-30 14:57 [p.28342]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, in 2015, the Prime Minister, surrounded by Liberal candidates, including the member for Orléans and the Minister of National Defence, who are both veterans themselves, made a solemn promise that under his leadership, veterans would never, ever have to go to court to get their due. He broke that promise.
He also promised to restore the pension for life option in the proper way. That was another broken promise. We are not the ones saying so. It is veterans themselves, the ones who are the most affected by this affair, who are saying that the money is just not there for the pension for life option.
Why?
Monsieur le Président, en 2015, le premier ministre, la main sur le cœur et entouré de candidats libéraux, dont le député d'Orléans et le ministre de la Défense nationale, eux-mêmes des vétérans, a promis que jamais, au grand jamais, sous sa gouverne, les anciens combattants n'allaient devoir se battre en justice pour obtenir gain de cause. Il a brisé cette promesse.
Il avait également promis de rétablir l'option de la pension à vie en bonne et due forme. C'est encore une promesse brisée. Ce n'est pas nous qui le disons, ce sont les vétérans eux-mêmes, ceux qui sont les plus concernés par cette histoire, qui disent que l'argent n'est pas au rendez-vous en ce qui concerne l'option de la pension à vie.
Pourquoi?
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-29 14:48 [p.28261]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is the head of the government. He has many roles and responsibilities, but his primary duty consists of two fundamental objectives. First of all, he must ensure our great federation is politically united. Second, he must ensure that the government is there for our military personnel, and that includes giving them the honours they deserve.
Did the Prime Minister share the profound disappointment felt by Canadians and by our troops when they learned that the families of fallen Afghanistan war soldiers were excluded from the war memorial event?
Monsieur le Président, le premier ministre est le chef du gouvernement. Parmi ses fonctions, il a plusieurs responsabilités, mais son devoir premier est composé de deux objectifs fondamentaux. Premièrement, il doit assurer l'unité politique de notre grande fédération. Deuxièmement, il doit s'assurer que l'État est présent pour nos militaires, notamment en leur rendant les honneurs qu'ils méritent.
Le premier ministre a-t-il éprouvé la profonde déception des Canadiens et de nos militaires lorsqu'il a appris que les familles des défunts de l'Afghanistan ont été exclues d'une cérémonie de commémoration de cette guerre?
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-28 14:55 [p.28186]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is inconceivable that the Liberal government, the Canadian government, did not invite the families of fallen soldiers to a memorial here in Canada.
This is highly disrespectful, not only to our fallen soldiers, but also to their families and loved ones.
The minister was there and he was aware of the event details. When did he learn that the families would not be there? He is the minister. He is the boss. He is a veteran.
Why did did he approve this completely disrespectful decision?
Monsieur le Président, c'est tellement inconcevable de constater que le gouvernement libéral, le gouvernement canadien, a osé exclure des familles de militaires morts au combat d'une cérémonie de commémoration, ici, au Canada.
C'est non seulement déshonorant pour nos militaires qui sont tombés au combat, mais c'est irrespectueux au plus haut point pour les familles et leurs proches.
Le ministre était sur place et il connaissait tous les détails de l'événement. Quand a-t-il appris que les familles ne seraient pas présentes? Il est le ministre. C'est le boss. C'est un ancien militaire.
Pourquoi a-t-il approuvé cette décision totalement irrespectueuse?
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-28 17:25 [p.28203]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is always an honour to rise in the House. I would like to begin by saying that I will be sharing my time with my colleague from Mégantic—L'Érable.
I would also like to acknowledge the many residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching this afternoon's proceedings as usual. I would like to thank them for a wonderful riding week last week. I met with several hundred of my constituents, many of whom attended the 17th Beauport business network breakfast. The network is doing very well. We will soon be holding a local press conference to announce that the network is going to have its own independent board of directors. That will give Beauport's business people a strong voice for dialogue with their elected representatives. Back home, I often joke that I am getting my own opposition up and running.
All joking aside, following the three “Alupa à l'écoute” public consultations that I held, I want to tell those watching us today that I will hold a press conference in a few weeks to announce the public policy that I am going to introduce with my leader when we form the government in October. This policy will help seniors return to the labour market, if they so wish, and alleviate the labour shortage.
This evening we are debating the motion moved barely 24 hours ago by the government, which would have us sit until midnight every evening from Monday to Thursday, starting next Monday. The government feels compelled to make up for its complacency over the past few months. It was caught up in several scandals that made the headlines, such as the SNC-Lavalin scandal. It is waking up and realizing that time is passing and it only has 20 days to complete its legislative agenda. There is a sense of panic. Above all, when the session comes to an end, they do not want to be known as the government with the poor legislative track record.
I would like to quickly talk about the government's bills. My colleague from Rivière-des-Mille-Îles talked about the number of bills the government has passed so far. This time three and a half years ago, in the final weeks of the Conservative term under Mr. Harper, we had more than 82 bills that received royal assent, and five or six other bills on the Order Paper. So far, the Liberals have passed only 48 government bills that have received royal assent, and 17 are still on the agenda. They do not have very many bills on their legislative record.
For three and a half years we have heard their grand patriotic speeches and all the rhetoric that entails. During the election campaign, their slogan was “Real change”, but with so few bills on their legislative record, their slogan rings hollow. What is more, their bills are flawed. Every time their bills are referred to committee, the government has to propose dozens of amendments through its own members, something that is rarely done for government bills.
Next, let us talk about electoral partisanship. The Liberals made big promises to minority groups in Canada. Three and a half years ago, the Prime Minister boasted about wanting to advance reconciliation with indigenous peoples. However, the Liberals waited until just a month before the end of the 42nd Parliament to introduce Bill C-91, an act respecting indigenous languages, in the House. Even though the Liberals are always saying that the government's most important relationship is the one it has with first nations, they waited over three and a half years before introducing a government bill on the protection of indigenous languages. I would like to remind members that there are over 77 indigenous languages in Canada. Once again, we see that the Liberals are in a rush and stressed out. They want to placate all of the interest groups that believe in them before October.
What about the leadership of the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons? From the start, three and a half years ago, she said that her approach was the exact opposite of the previous government's, which she claimed was harmful. Nevertheless, she forced sixty-some time allocation motions on us. When it came to reforming the rules and procedures, she wanted to significantly reduce the opposition's power.
We want to stand before Canadians and ask questions and bring to light the reason why debates will go until midnight. The reason is that the Liberals were unable to properly complete their legislative agenda and move forward as they should have.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais d'abord dire que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable.
J'aimerais également saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, comme toujours. J'aimerais les remercier, car la semaine dernière, nous avons eu une très belle semaine dans ma circonscription. J'ai rencontré plusieurs centaines d'entre eux, notamment à l'occasion du 17 déjeuner du réseau des gens d'affaires de Beauport, un réseau qui va très bien. Très bientôt, nous aurons l'occasion d'annoncer, lors d'une conférence de presse locale, que ce réseau se dotera d'un conseil d'administration indépendant. Cela permettra aux entrepreneurs de Beauport d'avoir une réelle voix auprès de leurs élus. Comme je le dis souvent à la blague dans ma circonscription, je suis en train de mettre en branle ma propre opposition.
Blague à part, à la suite des trois consultations publiques que j'ai tenues, une tournée intitulée « Alupa à l'écoute », je tiens à dire aux citoyens et aux citoyennes qui nous écoutent que, dans quelques semaines, je vais faire une conférence de presse pour leur annoncer la politique publique que je tenterai de mettre en avant avec mon chef lorsque nous formerons le gouvernement en octobre. Cette politique aura pour but d'aider les aînés à réintégrer le marché du travail, lorsqu'ils le veulent, et de pallier la pénurie de main-d'œuvre.
Ce soir, nous discutons de la motion présentée il y a à peine 24 heures par le gouvernement. Celle-ci vise à ce que nous siégions jusqu'à minuit tous les soirs, du lundi au jeudi, à compter de lundi prochain. Le gouvernement sent la nécessité de compenser le laisser-aller des derniers mois. Il a été pris dans plusieurs scandales qui ont fait les manchettes, comme celui de SNC-Lavalin. Il se réveille et constate que, plus que jamais, le temps passe et les jours avancent, alors qu'il lui reste à peine 20 jours pour conclure son bilan législatif. Il y a donc une odeur de panique. Il ne veut surtout pas terminer cette session avec l'image d'un gouvernement qui n'a pas très bien réussi sur le plan législatif.
J'aimerais parler rapidement des projets de loi du gouvernement. Ma collègue de Rivière-des-Mille-Îles parlait du nombre de projets de loi qu'il a fait adopter à ce jour. Il y a trois et demi, au cours des dernières semaines du mandat des conservateurs de M. Harper, au même moment, nous avions conclu plus de 82 projets de loi ayant obtenu la sanction royale, et 5 ou 6 autres projets de loi étaient à l'ordre du jour. À ce jour, les libéraux ont seulement conclu 48 projets de loi gouvernementaux ayant obtenu la sanction royale, et 17 projets de loi sont en attente. Ils ont donc un nombre restreint de projets de loi inscrits à leur bilan législatif.
Depuis trois ans et demi, on les voit faire de grands discours très patriotiques avec toutes sortes de rhétorique. De plus, lors de la campagne électorale, leur slogan était « Le vrai changement ». Or, puisqu'ils n'ont pas un bilan législatif comprenant un nombre intéressant de projets de loi, on ne peut pas vraiment dire que ce slogan se soit avéré. De plus, leurs projets de loi sont mal ficelés. Chaque fois que ses projets de loi sont renvoyés en comité, le gouvernement doit déposer des dizaines d'amendements par l'entremise de ses propres députés, ce qui est normalement très rare dans le cas des projets de loi gouvernementaux.
Ensuite, parlons de la partisanerie électorale. Les libéraux avaient fait des promesses très importantes à des groupes minoritaires au Canada. Il y a trois ans et demi, le premier ministre s'est targué de vouloir faire avancer la réconciliation avec les Autochtones. Pourtant, c'est seulement un mois avant la fin de la 42 législature que les libéraux ont déposé à la Chambre le projet de loi C-91, Loi concernant les langues autochtones. Alors qu'ils ne cessent de dire que la relation la plus importante du gouvernement est celle qu'il a avec les Premières Nations, les libéraux ont attendu plus de trois ans et demi avant de déposer un projet de loi gouvernemental sur la protection des langues autochtones. Je rappelle qu'il y en a plus de 77 au pays. Encore une fois, on voit que les libéraux sont pressés et stressés. Ils veulent absolument satisfaire tous les groupes d'intérêt qui croient en eux avant le mois d'octobre.
Qu'en est-il du leadership de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes? Dès le départ, il y a trois ans et demi, elle disait que son approche était complètement opposée à celle de l'ancien gouvernement, qu'elle disait dommageable. Pourtant, elle nous a imposé une soixantaine de motions d'attribution de temps, et lors des réformes des règles et des procédures, elle a voulu amoindrir substantiellement les pouvoirs de l'opposition.
Devant les Canadiens, nous voulons poser des questions et mettre en lumière la raison pour laquelle des débats se tiendront jusqu’à minuit: c’est parce qu’ils n’ont pas été capables d’avoir un bilan législatif en bonne et due forme et d’aller de l’avant comme ils auraient dû le faire.
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-27 14:32 [p.28092]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the commemoration of the Second World War is tinged with sadness every year, and planning the event itself is stressful. Our cousins in Bernières-sur-Mer, France, where thousands of Canadians landed on June 6, 1944, including some of our very own ancestors, learned in the news that the 40 veterans would simply not be attending the event. This news came just days in advance.
Do we not believe that a more dignified and honourable approach would have been for the minister to call the mayor himself to inform him and then the veterans of the decision?
Monsieur le Président, comme chaque année, les commémorations de la Seconde Guerre mondiale comportent toujours un élément de tristesse, mais également de stress sur le plan de l'organisation des événements. Nos cousins de France à Bernières-sur-Mer, là où des milliers de Canadiens ont débarqué le 6 juin 1944, dont plusieurs de nos aïeux ici même, ont appris par l'entremise de la presse que, cette année, la venue de 40 vétérans était tout simplement annulée. Ils l'ont su seulement à quelques jours d'avis.
Ne pensons-nous pas que le ministre aurait dû, avec plus de dignité et de manière plus honorable, contacter par lui-même le maire de la municipalité afin de l'informer de la décision et d'informer les vétérans eux-mêmes?
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-16 14:43 [p.27990]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, real federalism is what we did. We recognized Quebec as a nation in 2008, something the Liberals never would have done.
Not only that, but we have seen since 2015 that they are anything but transparent. They hide tax hikes and bury objectionable provisions in huge omnibus bills. Surprise, surprise, what do we see? The Liberals refused to properly fund the Office of the Auditor General this year.
Why are they withholding that funding, which the Auditor General needs in order to perform audits to hold this government accountable to Canadians?
Monsieur le Président, le vrai fédéralisme, c'est ce que nous avons fait. Nous avons reconnu la nation québécoise en 2008, ce qu'eux n'auraient jamais fait.
Non seulement cela, mais depuis 2015, on a vu qu'ils sont tout sauf transparents. Ils cachent des augmentations de taxes et, à l'intérieur de grands projets de loi omnibus, ils mettent des dispositions très discutables. Surprise, qu'est-ce qu'on voit? Les libéraux ont refusé cette année de financer convenablement le bureau du vérificateur général.
Pourquoi retiennent-ils ces fonds qui sont très importants pour que le bureau du vérificateur général fasse des audits, pour que ce gouvernement soit responsable devant les Canadiens?
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-15 17:17 [p.27900]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to say hello to the many constituents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching. Today, it is my pleasure to debate Motion No. 170, which reads as follows:
That, in the opinion of the House, a special committee, chaired by the Speaker of the House, should be established at the beginning of each new Parliament, in order to select all Officers of Parliament.
Before I begin, I would like to recognize with all due respect that the motion was moved by the member for Hamilton Centre, who is with the NDP and has been in Parliament for quite a while, but will not seek re-election. If he is listening right now, I would like to acknowledge him and thank him for his work and decades of public service. The member for Hamilton Centre was once an MPP in Ontario, as well, and worked hard on all sorts of causes that were important to his constituents. I would like to congratulate him on his service.
Moreover, he is more than just a good parliamentarian. I remember hearing one of his speeches at the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, if I remember correctly. I took note of his delivery, because he is a fine public speaker with good rhetorical skills. I have always had a great deal of respect for my colleagues with vast parliamentary experience. I try to learn from the best.
I am sure the member for Hamilton Centre wants to leave his mark on Canadian democracy. I too want to improve Canada's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy. Our role as MPs is the cornerstone of parliamentary democracy. It is fundamental. MPs must play a leading role in the workings of Canadian democracy, which includes the selection and appointment of officers of Parliament. That is what this motion is about.
Officers of Parliament are individuals jointly appointed by the House of Commons and the Senate to look into matters on our behalf and help us carry out our duties and responsibilities. For example, Canada has a Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, a position created by Mr. Harper and the Conservative Party.
There is also the Information Commissioner, who ensures that Canadians are able to have access to all government information so that they can get to the bottom of things. Then, there is the Commissioner of Lobbying. We heard a lot about her because of the Prime Minister's trip to the Aga Khan's island. Then there is the Commissioner of Official Languages. I am the official languages critic and I worked on the appointment of the new commissioner, Mr. Théberge. There is also the Auditor General. That position is currently vacant because the former auditor general passed away just a few months ago. God rest his soul. I send my best wishes to his family. Finally, there is the Chief Electoral Officer and the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner.
There are other officers of Parliament, but the ones I mentioned are the main commissioners who have been mandated by Parliament to conduct investigations in order to ensure proper accountability in the Canadian democratic process.
The member for Hamilton Centre wants to improve and strengthen parliamentary democracy with respect to the process for appointing commissioners and other officers of Parliament. Here is why.
During the last election campaign, the Prime Minister made some promises that he mostly did not keep. He promised to make the process for appointing commissioners more democratic. Under the Conservative government, from 2006 to 2015, the process for appointing commissioners was much more democratic from the perspective of a Westminster-style parliamentary system. It was also much more transparent than what we have seen over the past few years with the Prime Minister and the Liberal government.
When the Prime Minister chose the Official Languages Commissioner a year and a half ago, I am sure that the member for Hamilton Centre noticed, as we all did, that the process for appointing officers of Parliament was anything but open and transparent. Note that I am not in any way trying to target the individual who was selected and who currently holds that position.
This was done differently before 2015. For example, the Standing Committee on Official Languages used to send the Prime Minister of Canada a list of potential candidates for the position of Commissioner of Official Languages. The Prime Minister, with help from his advisors and cabinet, selected one of the candidates suggested. That is far more transparent and democratic than what the Prime Minister and member for Papineau is doing.
What has the Prime Minister done these past few years? Instead of having committees with oversight and the necessary skills for selecting commissioners, such as the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics or the Standing Committee on Official Languages, the Prime Minister is no longer relying on committees to send him a list of names of people or experts in the field. They are no longer able to send a list to the Prime Minister. He said to trust him, that he had set up a system involving people in his own office who send him lists of candidates with absolutely no partisan connections or any connections whatsoever to the Liberal list, candidates who were found by virtue of their expertise.
What actually happened? We saw one clearly terrible case with Ms. Meilleur. Far be it from me to badmouth her, but unfortunately, she was part of this undemocratic process. Ms. Meilleur had been a Liberal MPP in Ontario. She donated money to the Liberal Party of Canada, and less than a year later, she was nominated for the position of official languages commissioner. The Prime Minister did not send a list of candidates' names to the opposition parties. He did not start a discussion with the other party leaders to ask who they thought the best candidate was. He sent a single name to the leader of the official opposition and to the then NDP leader, saying that this was his pick and asking if they agreed.
Not only did the committees have no input under the current Liberal Prime Minister, but the Prime Minister actually only sent one name to the opposition leader.
What the member for Hamilton Centre wants to do is set up a process whereby candidates are selected by a committee, which would be chaired by you, Mr. Speaker, amazingly enough. First off, the idea suggested by my colleague, the member for Hamilton Centre, could not be implemented before the session ends. We have only a few weeks left, and I gather that an NDP member will be proposing an amendment to the motion in a few minutes. We will see what happens then.
Personally, I would say we need to go even further than the motion moved by the member for Hamilton Centre. I will speak to my colleagues about this once we are in government, as of October.
Why not be even bolder and give parliamentary committees not just the power to refer candidates to the Prime Minister for him to decide, but also the power to appoint officers of Parliament? I want to point out that I am speaking only for myself here. I began reflecting on this a year and a half ago, after what happened with Ms. Meilleur and the current commissioner.
I have been a member of the Standing Committee on Official Languages for two years now, and I humbly believe that I have learned a lot about official languages issues. I am familiar with the key players on the ground and I am beginning to understand who the real experts are, who the stakeholders are and who might make a good commissioner. I have to wonder why we would not go even further than what my colleague from Hamilton Centre is proposing, and perhaps even give the real power to the committees.
Imagine the legitimacy the process would have if parliamentary committees could one day choose officers of Parliament. These appointments should still be confirmed by both chambers, as is always the case.
Careful reflection is still needed. What is certain is that we are too close to the end of the current parliamentary session for the motion moved by the member for Hamilton Centre to become a reality. This is even less likely to happen under the current Liberal government, which made many promises to please the Canadian left, including a promise for democratic emancipation. All those promises have been broken.
I wish the hon. member for Hamilton Centre continued success.
Monsieur le Président, comme d'habitude, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre. J'ai le plaisir de débattre aujourd'hui de la motion M-170, qui se lit comme suit:
Que, de l'avis de la Chambre, un comité spécial présidé par le Président de la Chambre devrait être constitué au début de chaque législature afin de sélectionner tous les agents du Parlement.
Avant de commencer, j'aimerais reconnaître, avec honneur et justesse, que la motion a été déposée par le député d'Hamilton-Centre, un député du NPD qui siège ici depuis assez longtemps. Il a mentionné qu'il ne se représenterait pas aux prochaines élections, alors s'il nous écoute, j'aimerais le saluer et le remercier pour son travail et ses décennies de service public. Le député d'Hamilton-Centre a également été député provincial de l'Ontario et il a œuvré pour toutes sortes de causes importantes pour ses concitoyens. J'aimerais donc le féliciter.
D'ailleurs, il n'est pas seulement un bon parlementaire. Je l'ai déjà vu faire un discours au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires, si je me rappelle bien, et j'ai noté sa façon de faire, car il est un bon orateur qui a une bonne rhétorique. J'ai toujours beaucoup d'estime pour mes collègues qui ont une très grande expérience parlementaire, et j'essaie d'en tirer les meilleures leçons.
Le député d'Hamilton-Centre veut certainement laisser sa marque sur la démocratie canadienne. Je partage sa volonté d'améliorer la démocratie parlementaire de type Westminster, soit celle que nous avons ici, au Canada. Effectivement, le rôle des députés est à la base même de la démocratie parlementaire. Il est fondamental. Les députés doivent avoir un rôle prépondérant dans l'exercice de la démocratie canadienne, notamment en ce qui a trait à la sélection et à la nomination des agents du Parlement. C'est ce dont il est question dans la motion.
Les agents du Parlement sont des individus que la Chambre des communes et le Sénat nomment conjointement pour qu'ils fassent des vérifications à notre place dans le but de nous aider dans le cadre de nos fonctions et de nos responsabilités. Par exemple, au Canada, nous avons un commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique. D'ailleurs, ce commissariat a été mis en branle par M. Harper et le Parti conservateur.
Il y a aussi le commissaire à l'information, qui s'assure que les Canadiens peuvent avoir accès à toutes les informations du gouvernement pour aller au fond des choses. Ensuite, il y a le commissaire au lobbying. On a souvent entendu parler de lui en raison du voyage du premier ministre à l'île de l'Aga Khan. Puis, il y a le commissaire aux langues officielles. Je suis d'ailleurs porte-parole en matière de langues officielles. J'ai moi-même travaillé sur le dossier de la nomination du nouveau commissaire, M. Théberge. En outre, il y a le vérificateur général. Ce poste est actuellement vacant, puisque l'ancien vérificateur général — que Dieu ait son âme — est décédé il y a quelques mois. Je tiens à saluer toute sa famille. Finalement, mentionnons le commissaire aux élections et le commissaire à l'intégrité du secteur public.
Il y a d'autres agents du Parlement, mais ceux que j'ai nommés sont les commissaires principaux que le Parlement a chargés de mener des enquêtes dans le but d'assurer une reddition de comptes adéquate dans le cadre de l'exercice de la démocratie canadienne.
Le député d'Hamilton-Centre veut améliorer et renforcer la démocratie parlementaire en ce qui a trait au processus de nomination des commissaires et des autres agents du Parlement. Voici pourquoi il veut faire cela.
Lors de la dernière campagne électorale, le premier ministre a fait quelques promesses, qu'il n'a pas tenues pour la plupart. Il avait notamment promis de rendre le processus de sélection des commissaires plus démocratique. Sous le gouvernement conservateur, de 2006 à 2015, le processus de nomination des commissaires était beaucoup plus démocratique du point de vue du système parlementaire de type Westminster, et beaucoup plus transparent que ce qu'on a vu au cours des dernières années avec le premier ministre et le gouvernement libéral.
Lorsque le commissaire aux langues officielles a été choisi par le premier ministre, il y a de cela un an et demi, je suis certain que le député d'Hamilton-Centre a constaté, comme nous tous, que le processus de nomination des agents du Parlement était tout le contraire d'un processus ouvert et transparent. Ici, je ne vise pas du tout l'individu qui a été choisi et qui occupe le poste actuellement.
Avant 2015, cela fonctionnait différemment. Par exemple, c'était le Comité permanent des langues officielles qui envoyait au premier ministre du Canada une liste de candidats potentiels au poste de commissaire aux langues officielles. Le premier ministre, avec l'aide de ses conseillers et de son Cabinet, choisissait une candidature parmi celles qui avaient été suggérées. On voit déjà que c'était beaucoup plus transparent et démocratique que ce que fait le premier ministre et député de Papineau.
Qu'a fait le premier ministre au cours des dernières années? Au lieu d'avoir des comités qui ont un droit de regard et des compétences certaines quant à la sélection de commissaires, par exemple le Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique ou le Comité permanent des langues officielles, les comités ne peuvent plus aujourd'hui envoyer au premier ministre une liste de noms de gens ou d'experts dans le domaine. Ils n'ont plus la possibilité d'envoyer une liste au premier ministre. Ce dernier a dit de lui faire confiance, qu'il avait installé, dans son propre bureau, un système où les gens lui envoient des listes de candidats qui ne sont aucunement reliés à la partisanerie, qui ne sont aucunement reliés à la liste libérale et qui sont des gens qui ont été découverts grâce à leur expertise.
Or qu'est-ce qu'on a vu? On a assisté à un cas patent terrible: celui de Mme Meilleur. Je n'ai pas du tout envie de parler contre cette personne, mais, malheureusement, elle a fait partie de cet exercice non démocratique. Mme Meilleur avait été députée libérale en Ontario. Elle était une donatrice du Parti libéral du Canada, et ce, moins d'un an avant d'avoir été choisie pour être commissaire aux langues officielles. Le premier ministre n'a pas envoyé de liste aux partis d'opposition. Il n'a pas ouvert une discussion avec les autres chefs de parti pour connaître leur opinion concernant la meilleure candidature. Il a envoyé un seul nom au chef de l'opposition officielle, au chef du NPD de l'époque, et lui a dit que c'était la candidature qu'il avait retenue. Puis, il lui a demandé s'il était d'accord.
Non seulement les comités n'avaient pas de droit de regard, sous le premier ministre libéral actuel, mais, en plus, ce dernier envoyait une seule candidature au chef de l'opposition.
Ce que veut faire le député d'Hamilton-Centre, c'est faire en sorte qu'il y ait un comité — présidé par vous-même, monsieur le Président, n'est-ce pas incroyable? — qui choisirait des candidatures. Premièrement, l'idée de mon collègue le député d'Hamilton-Centre ne pourra pas être achevée avant la fin des travaux parlementaires. Il ne nous reste que quelques semaines, et je crois avoir compris qu'un député du NPD va proposer un amendement à la motion dans les minutes qui vont suivre. On verra alors ce qui arrivera.
Personnellement, je dirais qu'il faut aller encore plus loin que la motion présentée par le député d'Hamilton-Centre. Je vais en parler à mes collègues lorsque nous allons former le gouvernement, en octobre prochain.
Pourquoi ne redonnerions-nous pas non seulement le pouvoir aux comités parlementaires d'envoyer des candidatures au premier ministre pour qu'il choisisse, mais également — soyons encore plus audacieux — le pouvoir de nomination des agents parlementaires? Je tiens à dire que je parle ici en mon nom. J'ai entamé cette réflexion personnelle il y a un an et demi, à la suite de ce qui s'est passé avec Mme Meilleur et le commissaire actuel.
Cela fait deux ans que je siège au Comité permanent des langues officielles, et je pense humblement que j'ai acquis une certaine connaissance des questions touchant les langues officielles. Je connais les acteurs présents sur place et je commence à avoir une bonne idée de qui sont les experts, de qui sont les personnes intéressées et de qui pourraient être de bons commissaires. Je me demande pourquoi nous n'irions pas encore plus loin que ce que mon collègue d'Hamilton-Centre dit et peut-être même donner le vrai pouvoir aux comités.
Imaginons la légitimité que cela donnerait si, un jour, les comités parlementaires pouvaient choisir les agents du Parlement. Cette nomination devrait quand même être confirmée par les deux Chambres, comme c'est toujours le cas.
Plusieurs réflexions doivent avoir lieu. Chose certaine, nous sommes trop près de la fin de l'actuelle session parlementaire pour que le projet du député d'Hamilton-Centre soit réalisable. C'est encore moins possible que ce soit réalisable sous le gouvernement libéral actuel, qui a fait une multitude de promesses pour plaire à la gauche canadienne, dont des promesses d'émancipation démocratique. Ces promesses ont toutes été rompues.
Je souhaite une bonne continuation au très cher député d'Hamilton-Centre.
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:27 [p.27635]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as always, I would like to salute all the people of Beauport—Limoilou tuning in this afternoon. I would also like to salute my colleague from Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, who just gave a speech on Bill C-91. We worked together for a time on the Standing Committee on Official Languages. I know languages in general are important to him. I also know that, as a Métis person, his personal and family history have a lot to do with his interest in advocating for indigenous languages. That is very honourable of him.
For those watching who are not familiar with Bill C-91, it is a bill on indigenous languages. Enacted in 1969, Canada's Official Languages Act is now 50 years old. That makes this a big year for official languages, and the introduction of this bill on indigenous languages, which is now at third reading, is just and fitting. That is why my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, the Conservative Party's indigenous affairs critic, said she would support the bill when it was introduced back in February. Nevertheless, we do have some criticisms, which I will lay out shortly.
The bill's purpose is twofold. Its primary purpose is to protect indigenous languages and ensure their survival. Did you know that there are 70 indigenous languages spoken in Canada? The problem is that while some languages are still spoken more or less routinely, others are disappearing. Beyond ensuring their survival, this bill seeks to promote the development of indigenous languages that have all but disappeared for the many reasons we are discussing.
The second purpose of the bill, which is just as commendable, is to directly support reconciliation between our founding peoples and first nations, or in other words, reconciliation between federal institutions and indigenous peoples. As the bill says, the purpose is to support and promote the use of indigenous languages, including indigenous sign languages. It seeks to support the efforts of indigenous peoples to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen indigenous languages, especially the more commonly-spoken ones.
Canada's official opposition obviously decided to support the principles of this bill right from the beginning for four main reasons. The first involves the Conservative Party's record on indigenous matters. Our record may not have been the same in the 19th century, and the same could be said of all parties, but during our 10 years in power, Prime Minister Harper recognized the profound tragedy and grave error of the residential schools. He offered an official apology in 2008.
I want to share a quote from Prime Minister Harper, taken from the speech by my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo:
The government now recognizes that the...Indian residential schools policy...has had a lasting and damaging impact on aboriginal culture, heritage and language.
That is why my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo said:
We acknowledged in 2008 that [the Canadian government at the time was] part of the destruction of these languages and cultures. Therefore, the government must be part of the solution in terms of helping to bring the languages [and culture] back, and part of that is Bill C-91.
This is why I said that reconciliation is one of the objectives of this bill, beyond the more tangible objective. That is the first reason the Conservatives will support this bill on indigenous languages.
The second reason is that, under Mr. Harper's fantastic tenure, we created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It was an important and highly enlightening process.
There were some very sad moments. Members of indigenous nations came to talk about their background and share their stories. They put their cards on the table for all to see. They bared their souls and told the Canadian government what they go through today and what their ancestors went through in the 19th century. Not only did the Conservatives offer a formal apology in 2008, but they also created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to promote reconciliation between indigenous peoples and the Government of Canada and all Canadians. Our legacy is a testament to our sincere belief in reconciliation. I am sure that is true for all MPs and all Canadians.
Now I will move on to the third reason we support this bill. I am the critic for Canada's official languages, French and English. That is one of the reasons I am speaking today. When I first saw Bill C-91 on the legislative agenda, I considered the issue and then read the Official Languages Act of 1969. The final paragraph of the preamble to the Official Languages Act states that the act:
...recognizes the importance of preserving and enhancing the use of languages other than English and French while strengthening the status and use of the official languages....
When members examine constitutional or legislative matters in committee or in debates such as this one, we need to take the intent of the legislators into consideration. When the Official Languages Act was introduced and passed in 1969, the legislators had already clearly indicated that they intended the protection of official languages to one day include the promotion, enhancement and maintenance of every other language in Canada, including the 70 indigenous languages. Clearly that took some time. That was 50 years ago.
Those are the first three reasons why we support this bill.
The fourth reason goes without saying. We have a duty to make amends for past actions. Those who are familiar with Canada's history know that both French and English colonizers lived in relative harmony with indigenous peoples for the first two or three centuries after Jacques Cartier's arrival in the Gaspé in 1534 and Samuel de Champlain's arrival in Quebec City in 1608. Indigenous peoples are the ones who helped us survive the first winters, plain and simple. They helped us to clear the land and grow crops. Unfortunately, in the late 19th century, when we were able to thrive without the help of indigenous peoples, we began implementing policies of cultural alienation and residential schools. All of that happened in an international context involving cultural theories that have since been debunked and are now considered preposterous.
Yes, we need to make amends for Canada's history and what for what the founding peoples, our francophone and anglophone ancestors, did. It is a matter of justice. The main goal of Bill C-91 is to ensure the development of indigenous languages in Canada, to keep them alive and to prevent them from disappearing.
In closing, for the benefit of Canadians watching us this afternoon, I would like to summarize what Bill C-91 would ultimately achieve. Part of it is about recognition. The bill provides that:
(a) the Government of Canada recognizes that the rights of Indigenous people recognized and affirmed by section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 include rights related to Indigenous languages.
This is a bit like what happened with the Official Languages Act, which, thanks to its section 82, takes precedence over other acts. It is also related to section 23 on school boards and the protection of anglophone and francophone linguistic minorities across the country. This bill would create the same situation with respect to section 35 and indigenous laws in Canada.
The legislation also states that the government may enter into agreements to protect languages. The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism may enter into different types of agreements or arrangements in respect of indigenous languages with indigenous governments or other indigenous governing bodies or indigenous organizations, taking into account the unique circumstances and needs of indigenous groups, communities and peoples.
Lastly, the bill would ensure the availability of translation and interpretation services like those available for official languages, but probably not to the same degree. Federal institutions can cause documents to be translated into an indigenous language or provide interpretation services to facilitate the use of an indigenous language.
Canadians listening to us should note one important point. I myself do not speak any indigenous languages, but for the past year, anyone, especially indigenous members, can speak in indigenous languages in the House. Members simply need to give translators 24- or 48-hour notice. That aspect of the bill is about providing translation and interpretation services, but those services will not be offered to the same standard as services provided under the Official Languages Act. However, it is patently clear that an effort is being made to encourage the development of indigenous languages, not only on the ground or in communities where indigenous people live, but also within federal institutions.
I would also point out that the bill provides for a commissioner's office. I find that a little strange. As my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo said, for the past four years, the Liberals have been telling us that their most important relationship is the one they have with indigenous peoples. I understand that as a policy statement, but I think it would be more commendable for a government to say that its most important relationship is the one it has with all Canadians.
Now I will talk briefly about the current Commissioner of Official Languages. Many will understand the link I am trying to make with the new indigenous languages commissioner position that will be created. Right when all official language minority communities across the country are talking about the need to modernize the act, today the Commissioner of Official Languages released his annual report and his report on modernizing the act. Most Canadians want bilingualism that is even more vibrant and more wide-spread across Canada. At the same time, there are clearly important gaps in terms of implementing the Official Languages Act across the entire government apparatus.
I have a some examples. A few months ago, the National Energy Board published a report in English only in violation of the OLA. At the time, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie said that was unacceptable. The government's job is not to simply say so, however. She should have taken action to ensure that the National Energy Board complies with the Official Languages Act. Then, there were the websites showing calls for tender by Public Services and Procurement Canada that are often riddled with mistakes, grammatical, syntax, and translation errors and misinterpretation. Again, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie told us that this was unacceptable.
There is also the Canada Infrastructure Bank, in Toronto. The Conservatives oppose such an institution. We do not believe it will produce the desired results. In its first year, the Canada Infrastructure Bank struggled to serve Canadians in both official languages. Again, the minister stated that this is unacceptable.
These problems keep arising because of cabinet's reckless approach to implementing, as well as ensuring compliance with and enforcement of, the Official Languages Act across the government apparatus. It has taken its duties lightly. The minister responsible is not showing any leadership within cabinet.
When cabinet is not stepping up, we should be able to count on the commissioner. I met with the Commissioner of Official Languages, Mr. Théberge, yesterday, and he gave me a summary of the report he released this morning. He said that he had a lot of investigative powers, including the power to subpoena. However, he said that he has no coercive power. This is one of the main issues with enforcement. For example, the majority of Canadians abide by the Criminal Code because police officers exercise coercive powers, ensuring that everyone complies with Canadian laws and the Criminal Code.
The many flaws and shortcomings in the implementation of the Official Languages Act are due not only to a lack of leadership in cabinet, but also to the commissioner not having adequate coercive power. The Conservatives will examine this issue very carefully to determine whether the commissioner should have coercive power.
The provisions of Bill C-91, an act respecting indigenous languages, dealing with the establishment of the office of the commissioner of indigenous languages are quite vague. Not only will the commissioner not have any coercive power, but he or she will also not have any well-established investigative powers.
The Liberals waited until the end of their four-year term to bring this bill forward, even though they spent those four years telling us that the relationship with indigenous peoples is their most important relationship. Furthermore, in committee, they frantically rushed to table 20-odd amendments to their own bill, as my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo pointed out.
How can the Liberals say their most important relationship is their relationship with indigenous peoples when they waited four years to table this bill? What is more, not only did they table the bill in a slapdash way, but they had to get their own members to propose amendments to improve it. It is not unusual for members to propose amendments, but the Liberals had to table a whole stack of them because the bill had all kinds of flaws.
In closing, I think this bill is a good step towards reconciliation, but there are no tangible measures for the commissioner. For instance, if members have their speeches to the House translated into an indigenous language and the translation is bad, what can the commissioner do? If an indigenous community signs an agreement with the federal government and then feels that the agreement was not implemented properly, who can challenge the government on their behalf?
There is still a lot of work to be done, but we need to pass this bill as quickly as possible, despite all of its flaws, because the end of this Parliament is approaching. Once again, the government has shown its lack of seriousness, as it has with many other bills. To end on a positive note, I would like to say that this bill is a step toward reconciliation between indigenous peoples and the founding peoples, which is very commendable and necessary.
Monsieur le Président, comme d’habitude, j’aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. J’aimerais également saluer mon collègue de Saint-Boniface—Saint-Vital, qui vient de faire un discours sur le projet de loi C-91. Nous avons siégé ensemble au Comité permanent des langues officielles. Je sais que les langues sont importantes pour lui en général. Je sais aussi qu'en tant que Métis, son histoire familiale et personnelle contribue énormément à cet intérêt qu'il porte à la défense des langues autochtones. C’est très honorable de sa part.
Pour les citoyens qui nous écoutent et qui ne connaissent pas le projet de loi C-91, il s’agit d'un projet de loi sur les langues autochtones. Au Canada, nous avons une loi sur les langues officielles depuis 1969. Cette année, c’est le 50 anniversaire de la Loi sur les langues officielles. C’est donc une grande année pour les langues officielles, et le dépôt de ce projet de loi sur les langues autochtones, qui en est à la troisième lecture, est de bon aloi et juste. C’est pourquoi ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, qui est porte-parole du Parti conservateur en matière d'affaires autochtones, a mentionné qu'elle appuierait le projet de loi dès qu'il a été déposé, en février. Cependant, nous avons quelques critiques, que je vais mentionner un peu plus tard.
L'objectif du projet de loi est double. Il s’agit d’abord de protéger les langues autochtones et d’assurer leur survie. Sait-on qu’il y a 70 langues autochtones parlées? Le problème, c’est que, tandis que certaines d'entre elles sont plus ou moins parlées, voire courantes, d'autres sont en voie de disparition. Ce projet de loi vise non seulement à assurer la protection et la survie de toutes ces langues qui existent, mais aussi à favoriser l'épanouissement des langues autochtones qui, pour de nombreuses raisons dont nous discuterons, sont presque disparues.
Le deuxième objectif du projet de loi, qui est tout aussi louable, c'est de contribuer directement à la réconciliation entre les peuples fondateurs et les Premières Nations. En d'autres mots, il s'agit de la réconciliation entre les institutions qui forment le gouvernement fédéral et les Autochtones. Comme le projet de loi le dit, l'objectif est de soutenir et de promouvoir l’usage des langues autochtones, y compris les langues des signes autochtones. Par ailleurs, il veut soutenir les peuples autochtones dans leurs efforts visant à se réapproprier les langues autochtones, à les revitaliser, à les maintenir et à les renforcer, notamment ceux qui visent une utilisation courante.
De toute évidence, dès le départ, l’opposition officielle du Canada a décidé d’appuyer tous les principes énoncés dans ce projet de loi, pour quatre raisons principales. D’abord, il s'agit du bilan du Parti conservateur du Canada en ce qui concerne les Autochtones. Ce bilan n'était peut-être pas le même au XIXe siècle — on pourrait en dire autant de tous les partis —, mais lors de nos 10 dernières années au pouvoir, le premier ministre Harper a reconnu la grande tragédie et la grave erreur des pensionnats autochtones. Il a donné des excuses officielles en 2008.
Voici une citation du premier ministre Harper tirée du discours de ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo:
Le gouvernement reconnaît [...] que cette politique [c'est-à-dire les pensionnats autochtones] a causé des dommages durables à la culture, au patrimoine et à la langue autochtones.
C'est pourquoi ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo a dit:
En 2008, nous avons reconnu que nous avions participé à la destruction de ces langues et cultures [elle parle du gouvernement canadien de l’époque]. Par conséquent, le gouvernement doit faire partie de la solution pour aider à les raviver [c’est-à-dire les langues et la culture autochtones]. Le projet de loi C-91 est une partie de la solution.
Voilà pourquoi j’ai dit que l'un des objectifs de ce projet de loi, au-delà de ce qu’il tente de faire de manière tangible et palpable, est la réconciliation. C’est la première raison pour laquelle nous, les conservateurs, appuierons le projet de loi sur les langues autochtones.
La deuxième raison, c’est que sous le règne formidable de M. Harper, nous avons mis en place la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Cela a été un exercice non seulement important, mais très révélateur.
Il y a eu des moments extrêmement tristes. Des individus des nations autochtones se sont présentés pour raconter leur parcours et leur histoire. Ils ont publiquement mis cartes sur table. Ils se sont vidé le coeur et ont expliqué au gouvernement canadien ce qu'ils avaient vécu en ces temps modernes et ce qu'avaient vécu leurs aïeux au XIXe siècle. Non seulement les conservateurs ont-ils offert des excuses en 2008, mais ils ont également mis sur pied la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, entre les peuples autochtones et le gouvernement du Canada et tous les Canadiens. La marque que nous avons laissée témoigne de notre bonne foi envers la réconciliation. C'est également le cas de tous les députés et de tous les Canadiens, j'en suis certain.
Je vais parler de la troisième raison pour laquelle nous appuyons ce projet de loi. Je suis porte-parole des langues officielles du Canada, le français et l'anglais. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je prends la parole aujourd'hui. Lorsque j'ai vu pour la première fois le projet de loi C-91 inscrit à l'ordre du jour législatif, j'ai réfléchi et j'ai lu la Loi sur les langues officielles de 1969. Dans le dernier paragraphe du préambule de la Loi sur les langues officielles, on dit que la Loi:
[...] reconnaît l’importance, parallèlement à l’affirmation du statut des langues officielles et à l’élargissement de leur usage, de maintenir et de valoriser l’usage des autres langues [...]
Quand les députés étudient des questions constitutionnelles ou législatives, en comité ou lors de débats comme celui-ci, il est important de prendre en considération l'intention des législateurs. Quand la Loi sur les langues officielles a été déposée et votée, en 1969, les législateurs avaient déjà clairement exprimé leur intention que la protection des langues officielles inclue, un jour ou l'autre, la promotion, la valorisation et le maintien de toutes les autres langues qui existent au Canada, dont les 70 langues autochtones. On s'entend que cela a pris du temps. Cela se fait 50 ans plus tard.
Ce sont donc les trois premières raisons pour lesquelles nous appuyons ce projet de loi.
Je dirais que la quatrième raison va de soi. Il s'agit du devoir que nous avons de réparer l'histoire. Quand on lit l'histoire canadienne, on constate, dans les cas de Jacques Cartier, qui est arrivé en 1534 en Gaspésie, et de Samuel de Champlain, qui est arrivé à Québec en 1608, que, dans les deux ou trois premiers siècles de coexistence entre les peuples autochtones et les colonisateurs français ou anglais, il y avait quand même une harmonie. Ce sont les Autochtones qui nous ont aidés à survivre aux premiers hivers, ni plus ni moins. Ce sont les Autochtones qui nous ont aidés à cultiver et à défricher la terre. Bien malheureusement, à la fin du XIXe siècle, lorsque nous étions à même de nous épanouir sans l'aide des Autochtones, nous avons commencé à mettre en place des politiques d'aliénation culturelle et des pensionnats autochtones. Tout cela s'est passé dans la foulée d'un contexte international où des théories culturelles n'avaient aucun sens et qui sont aujourd'hui complètement contredites.
Oui, il faut réparer l'histoire du Canada et ce qu'ont fait les peuples fondateurs, nos aïeux francophones et anglophones. C'est une question de justice. Le projet de loi C-91 vise d'abord et avant tout à garantir l'épanouissement des langues autochtones au Canada et à maintenir leur existence pour ne pas qu'elles disparaissent.
En terminant, j'aimerais indiquer de manière sommaire aux Canadiens qui nous écoutent ce que le projet de loi C-91 fera au bout du compte. D'abord, il y a un aspect de reconnaissance. De par ce projet de loi:
a) le gouvernement du Canada reconnaît que les droits des peuples autochtones reconnus et confirmés par l’article 35 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982 comportent des droits relatifs aux langues autochtones;
C'est un peu comme ce qui est arrivé dans le cas de la Loi sur les langues officielles, qui, grâce à son article 82, prime sur les autres lois. De plus, elle est reliée à l'article 23 sur les commissions scolaires et la protection des minorités linguistiques francophones et anglophones de partout au pays. Ce projet de loi vise à créer la même situation en ce qui a trait à l'article 35 et aux lois autochtones au Canada.
La loi prévoit également que le gouvernement peut faire des accords pour protéger les langues. Le ministre du Patrimoine canadien et du Multiculturalisme peut conclure divers types d'accords concernant les langues autochtones avec des gouvernements autochtones, d'autres dirigeants autochtones et des organismes autochtones, tout en tenant compte de la situation et des besoins propres aux groupes, aux collectivités et aux peuples autochtones.
Finalement, le projet de loi prévoit offrir des services de traduction et d'interprétation, comme c'est le cas pour les langues officielles, mais sûrement pas au même niveau que celles-ci. Les institutions fédérales peuvent veiller à ce que les documents soient traduits dans une langue autochtone et à ce que des services d'interprétation soient offerts afin de faciliter l'usage d'une telle langue.
Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes qui nous écoutent devraient noter un fait important. Personnellement, je ne parle aucune langue autochtone, mais depuis un an, n'importe qui, et surtout les députés autochtones, peut s'exprimer en langue autochtone à la Chambre. Le député n'a qu'à envoyer un avis de 24 ou de 48 heures aux traducteurs. Cet élément du projet de loi prévoit offrir des services de traduction et d'interprétation, mais ils ne seront pas au même niveau que ceux prévus par la Loi sur les langues officielles. Cependant, on voit de manière très nette qu'il y a une tentative de permettre l'épanouissement des langues autochtones, pas seulement sur le terrain ou dans les communautés où vivent les Autochtones, mais également au sein des institutions fédérales.
De plus, on peut constater que le projet de loi prévoit un bureau de commissaire. Je trouve cela un peu particulier. Comme ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo le disait, depuis quatre ans, les libéraux nous disent que leur relation la plus importante est celle qu'ils entretiennent avec les peuples autochtones. Je peux comprendre cet énoncé politique, mais je pense qu'il serait plus louable de dire que la relation la plus importante du gouvernement est celle qu'il entretient avec tous les Canadiens.
Maintenant, je vais parler brièvement du commissaire aux langues officielles actuel. On pourra comprendre le lien que je tente de faire avec le nouveau commissariat aux langues autochtones qui sera créé. Au moment où l'ensemble des communautés linguistiques officielles en situation minoritaire, d'un océan à l'autre, discute de l'importance de moderniser la loi, le commissaire aux langues officielles a déposé aujourd'hui son rapport annuel ainsi que son rapport sur la modernisation de la loi. De plus, la plupart des Canadiens ont la volonté de voir un bilinguisme plus vivant et plus répandu partout au Canada. Au même moment, on constate qu'il y a des lacunes importantes en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental.
Je vais donner quelques exemples. Il y a quelques mois, l'Office national de l'énergie a publié un rapport uniquement en anglais, ce qui va à l'encontre de la Loi. À l'époque, la ministre du Tourisme, des Langues officielles et de la Francophoniea dit que c'était inacceptable. Cependant, il ne revient pas au gouvernement de dire cela. Elle aurait dû agir et s'assurer que l'Office national de l'énergie applique la Loi sur les langues officielles. On a aussi vu que les sites Internet sur lesquels sont publiés les appels d'offres de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada sont plus souvent qu'autrement truffés d'erreurs, de fautes grammaticales et de syntaxe et d'erreurs de traduction et d'interprétation. Encore une fois, la ministre du Tourisme, des langues officielles et de la Francophonie nous a dit que cela était inacceptable.
Il y a aussi la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, à Toronto. Nous, les conservateurs, sommes contre ce type d'institution. Nous pensons qu'elle ne donnera pas les résultats escomptés. Dans sa première année d'existence, la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada a eu peine à servir dans les deux langues officielles les Canadiens qui la contactaient. Encore une fois, la ministre a dit que cela était inacceptable.
Ces problèmes surviennent constamment parce que le Cabinet, dans un contexte délétère, ne prend pas au sérieux la mise en œuvre, le respect et l'application de la Loi sur les langues officielles au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental. La ministre qui est en poste n'applique pas son leadership au sein du Cabinet.
Quand cette réalité n'existe pas au sein du Cabinet, on voudrait pouvoir compter sur le commissaire. J'ai rencontré le commissaire aux langues officielles, M. Théberge, hier, et il m'a fait le compte rendu du rapport qu'il a déposé ce matin. Il a dit qu'il possédait une tonne de pouvoirs d'enquête, dont celui d'émettre une citation à comparaître. Il peut donc forcer des gens à comparaître dans le cadre d'une enquête. Cependant, il a dit qu'il n'avait aucun pouvoir coercitif. C'est l'un des gros problèmes en ce qui a trait à l'application d'une loi. Par exemple, si le Code criminel est respecté par la majorité des Canadiens, c'est bien parce qu'il y a un pouvoir coercitif, c'est-à-dire les forces policières, qui assurent le respect du droit canadien et du Code criminel.
Si on observe autant de manquements et de lacunes en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles, c'est non seulement à cause d'un manque de leadership au sein du Cabinet, mais également parce que le commissaire n'a pas de pouvoir coercitif adéquat. Nous, les conservateurs, allons nous pencher très sérieusement sur cette question afin d'évaluer si le commissaire devrait avoir un pouvoir coercitif.
Quand je lis la partie du projet de loi C-91, Loi concernant les langues autochtones, qui porte sur la mise en place du Bureau du commissaire aux langues autochtones, je constate qu'il y a très peu de détails. Non seulement il n'aura pas de pouvoir coercitif, mais il n'aura pas non plus de pouvoirs d'enquête bien établis.
Les libéraux ont attendu jusqu'à la fin de leur mandat de quatre ans pour déposer ce projet de loi, alors qu'ils nous disent depuis autant d'années que la relation avec les peuples autochtones est la relation la plus importante qu'ils entretiennent. De plus, en comité, ils ont déposé à la hâte et d'une manière chaotique une vingtaine d'amendements à leur propre projet de loi, comme ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo l'a si bien dit.
Alors, comment est-ce possible que la relation la plus importante des libéraux soit celle qu'ils entretiennent avec les Autochtones, alors qu'ils ont attendu quatre ans pour déposer ce projet de loi? De plus, non seulement ils ont déposé le projet de loi de façon chaotique, mais ils ont dû dire eux-mêmes à leurs députés de déposer des amendements afin de renforcer le projet de loi. Il est normal que des députés proposent des amendements, mais les libéraux ont dû en déposer une multitude, parce que le projet de loi avait toutes sortes de lacunes.
En terminant, je trouve que ce projet de loi est un bon pas vers la réconciliation, mais il n'y a aucune mesure tangible pour le commissaire. Par exemple, si des députés font traduire leur discours en langue autochtone à la Chambre et que le travail est mal fait, qu'est-ce que le commissaire va pouvoir dire? Si jamais des communautés autochtones concluent des accords avec le gouvernement fédéral et qu'ils ne sont pas mis en place convenablement, qui pourra se battre contre le gouvernement en leur nom?
Il restait donc encore beaucoup de travail à faire, mais nous allons devoir adopter ce projet de loi le plus rapidement possible, malgré toutes ses lacunes, puisque la fin de la législature approche. Encore une fois, le gouvernement a fait preuve d'un manque de sérieux, comme dans le cas de plusieurs projets de loi. Pour terminer sur une bonne note, je dirai que ce projet de loi contribue effectivement à la réconciliation entre les peuples autochtones et les peuples fondateurs, ce qui est très louable et nécessaire.
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:48 [p.27637]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the member is right. We are celebrating 50 years of having two official languages in Canada. They are official languages in terms of status and institutionalization of the facts, because historically, there were two languages three centuries ago. They were part of our identity in Canada, and they are still part of it.
There are a few ways to ensure that the Commissioner of Official Languages has more powers. As legislators, we have to do our due diligence and look at this carefully. Specialists have said that we should have pecuniary and administrative sanctions. For example, some governmental agencies and private enterprises go against the law. Only one private enterprise in Canada is under the law, which is Air Canada. Some of them constantly go against the law in their behaviour and actions, on a monthly basis sometimes. Although the commissioner is constantly making recommendations, 20% of his recommendations are never followed, as was said this morning. Why? It is because he does not have the power to tell organizations to stop or they will pay a fine.
Another option is to have an executory deal. It is less coercive. The governmental agency or private enterprise could be asked to make a deal, such as being in accordance with the law within five months.
If my colleague is interested, he can look into how it is done in Wales, England. It has a commissioner who has huge coercive powers.
Monsieur le Président, le député a raison. Nous célébrons les 50 ans de l'établissement des deux langues officielles au Canada. Ce sont des langues officielles pour ce qui est de leur statut et de leur institutionnalisation; en effet, elles étaient également présentes il y a de cela trois siècles. Elles faisaient et font toujours partie de notre identité canadienne.
Il y a plusieurs façons de faire en sorte que le commissaire aux langues officielles ait un pouvoir accru. En tant que législateurs, nous devons faire preuve de diligence raisonnable et examiner la question attentivement. Les spécialistes ont dit que nous devrions prévoir des sanctions pécuniaires et administratives. Par exemple, certains organismes gouvernementaux et certaines entreprises privées — et il y en a une seule au Canada qui est assujettie à la loi, soit Air Canada —, vont à l'encontre de la loi. Ils enfreignent constamment la loi dans leur comportement et leurs actions, et ce, parfois sur une base mensuelle. Malgré les recommandations constantes du commissaire, 20 % de celles-ci ne sont pas suivies, comme on l'a dit ce matin. Pourquoi? Parce qu'il n'a pas le pouvoir de dire aux organismes d'arrêter sous peine de devoir payer une amende.
Une autre option est de conclure un accord exécutoire, ce qui est moins coercitif. L'entreprise privée ou l'organisme gouvernemental pourrait être invité à conclure un accord, par exemple d'accepter de se conformer à la loi dans un délai de cinq mois.
Si mon collègue est intéressé, il peut se renseigner sur la façon de faire au pays de Galles, en Angleterre, où se trouve un commissaire qui détient un énorme pouvoir de coercition.
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:51 [p.27638]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, if I correctly understood what the member said, there is, in fact, a part at the beginning of the law that speaks about the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, UNDRIP, which does not bind the government to this law, and maybe she finds that unfortunate. However, I voted against UNDRIP.
There were some indigenous people in my riding who came to my office, and with courage and pride I sat in front of them and explained to them why it was actually a courageous act as a legislator in 2018 to vote against the ratification of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by Canada. Why? It is because most constitutionalists would say that it goes against some of our own constitutional conventions and laws, and I think that a courageous legislator must tell the truth to Canadians.
Although we might like UNDRIP, it is not in accordance with Canadian law. What is most important for a legislator is not to protect United Nations accords; it is to protect the Canadian law. I explained that to my constituent, who was an indigenous person, and I think we had huge respect for each other. Although he did not agree with me, I understand why he could not agree with me, which was because of the history he had with us and the founding people. Maybe that is why UNDRIP is not so clearly enshrined in this law.
Monsieur le Président, si j'ai bien compris la députée, il y a une partie au début du projet de loi qui porte sur la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Cependant, cette partie n'a pas force exécutoire, ce que la députée trouve peut-être regrettable. J'ai toutefois voté contre la Déclaration.
Quelques Autochtones de ma circonscription sont venus à mon bureau, et je leur ai expliqué fièrement et courageusement pourquoi il était courageux pour un législateur de voter contre la ratification de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones par le Canada en 2018. Pourquoi? C'est parce que la plupart des constitutionnalistes estiment que la Déclaration va à l'encontre de certaines de nos propres conventions et lois constitutionnelles, et je pense qu'un législateur courageux doit dire la vérité aux Canadiens.
Bien que nous puissions aimer la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, elle n'est pas conforme au droit canadien. Il est plus important pour un législateur de protéger les lois canadiennes que de protéger les accords des Nations unies. J'ai expliqué cette réalité à mon concitoyen autochtone et je pense que nous avions énormément de respect l'un pour l'autre. Il n'était pas d'accord avec moi, mais je comprends pourquoi il ne pouvait pas l'être. C'est en raison de son passé par rapport à nous et aux peuples fondateurs. C'est peut-être pour cette raison que la Déclaration n'est pas si clairement inscrite dans le projet de loi.
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:54 [p.27638]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, to the first question on the importance of language, I know what it means, because I am a Quebecker. I am a French Canadian, and I am able to speak in French in this institution, but I like to show respect and answer in English when someone talks to me in English. My father is an anglophone, by the way.
When my daughter was born five years ago, I intended to speak to her in English, and I told my wife that she could speak to her in French, but I could not do it, because when I speak in English to my daughter, it is not from my heart. I do not feel the connection. Therefore, yes, a language is fundamental to a person's identity. It is fundamental to carry the culture we are from. It is impossible for me to speak to my kids in English. I do not see them that much, because I am here, but when I speak to my kids, I want my heart to be speaking.
Second, it is obvious that there were a lot of mistakes in the bill, because the government had to present more than 20 amendments. We should be afraid that there are other mistakes in the bill, which we did not have time to discuss or analyze correctly. I think that could be something troublesome that the next government, which will be Conservative, will have to repair.
Monsieur le Président, pour ce qui est de la première question, concernant l'importance de la langue, je sais ce que cela veut dire parce que je suis Québécois. Je suis un Canadien français et je peux m'exprimer en français dans cette institution, mais, par respect, je réponds en anglais lorsque quelqu'un m'adresse la parole en anglais. Mon père est anglophone, en passant.
Lorsque ma fille est née, il y a cinq ans, j'avais l'intention de lui parler en anglais et j'ai dit à ma femme qu'elle pourrait lui parler en français. Cependant, je n'y suis pas arrivé parce que lorsque je parlais à ma fille en anglais, ce n'était pas aussi senti que lorsque je lui parle en français. Je ne ressentais pas de connexion. Une langue est donc effectivement fondamentale dans l'identité d'une personne. Porter la culture dont nous sommes issus est fondamental. Je suis simplement incapable de parler à mes enfants en anglais. Je ne les vois pas très souvent parce que je suis ici, mais lorsque je parle à mes enfants, je veux que cela vienne du coeur.
Ensuite, il est évident que le projet de loi comportait de nombreuses erreurs parce que le gouvernement a dû présenter plus de 20 amendements. On est en droit de craindre qu'il y ait d'autres erreurs, que nous n'aurons pas le temps d'aborder et d'analyser comme il se doit. Je crois qu'il s'agira d'un problème que le prochain gouvernement — qui sera conservateur — devra régler.
Collapse
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:09 [p.27531]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as always, I am very honoured to rise in the House today. I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching. I saw them late last week at the Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, the Patro Roc-Amadour community centre and the 52nd Salon de Mai craft fair, which was held at Promenades Beauport mall. Congratulations to the organizers.
I would also like to say that we are all very sad to hear that our colleague from Langley—Aldergrove is fighting a serious cancer. He just gave a powerful speech that reminded us how fragile life is. I even spoke to my wife and children to tell them that I love them. Our colleague gave a very poignant speech about that. I thank him for his years of service to Canada and to the House of Commons, and for all the future years that he will devote himself to his community.
Before I say anything about the Conservative Party motion now before us, I would like to say a quick word about what U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said yesterday. At a meeting of the Arctic Council in Finland, he had the gall to say that Canada’s claim of sovereignty over the Northwest Passage is illegitimate. He even compared us to Russia and China, referring to their behaviour and their propensity to annex territories, like Russia did in Ukraine. Personally, I find that shameful.
I would like to remind the U.S. government that we have been their allies for a long time. President Reagan and Prime Minister Mulroney reached an agreement, which both parties signed, and which stipulated that Canada indeed has sovereignty over the Northwest Passage. In the 19th century, we launched a number of expeditions and explorations supported by the British Crown, and Canadian sovereignty over the Northwest Passage and in the Arctic Archipelago is entirely legitimate.
Today we are discussing the importance of the oil industry and the importance of climate change. These two issues go hand in hand. They are key issues today and will continue to be in the future. Of course, I believe that the environment is extremely important. It is important for all Conservatives and for all Canadians. I remember collecting all sorts of bottles and cans along the roadside as a boy. I often did that with my father. He is an example for me in that respect. Throughout my life, I have always wanted to be a part of community organizations where people pick up garbage.
I am also very proud of most Canadian governments' environmental record. They have always endeavoured to meet the expectations of Canadians, for whom the environment is extremely important. Most of the time, the Liberals try to paint the Conservatives as anti-environment. I can assure my colleagues that I have never seen anything to support that in the Conservative Party. On the contrary, under Mr. Harper, we took important steps to lower greenhouse gas emissions in Canada by 2.2% between 2006 and 2015. I will come back to that later.
There are two approaches being proposed in the current debate on climate change. This applies to several western countries. I say western countries because those are the countries affected, given that our industrial era has been well established for two centuries. There are some industries that have been polluting rather significantly for a long time. We have reached a point in our history where we realize that greenhouse gas emissions from human activity are playing a very significant role in climate change.
Yes, we must act, but there are two possible approaches. One is the Liberal Party approach of taxing Canadians even more. The Liberals are asking Canadians to bear the burden of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. The approach the Conservatives prefer is not to create a new tax or to tax the fuel that Canadians put in their cars to go to work every day.
Our approach is rather to help Canadians in their everyday lives and to help the provinces implement their respective environmental plans.
For example, I always like to remind the Canadians listening to us, as well as all environmentalists, that we set up the Canada ecotrust in 2007-08. This $1.3-billion program was meant to allocate funds to the provinces so that they could deal in their own way with the major concerns associated with climate change and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. That is a fine example of how we want to help people.
Jean Charest was premier of Quebec at the time. We provided $300 million to help Quebec implement its GHG emissions reduction plan. Mr. Harper and Mr. Charest gave a joint press conference, and even Mr. Guilbeault from Greenpeace said that the Canada ecotrust was a significant, important program.
We did the same thing for Ontario, British Columbia and all the other provinces that wanted to join the ecotrust. It is very likely that the program allowed the Government of Ontario to implement its own program and close its coal-fired power plants.
As a result, under the Harper government, GHG emissions in Canada dropped by 2.2%. It bears repeating, since that is the approach we will adopt with our current leader, the hon. member for Regina—Qu'Appelle. In a few weeks, we will announce our environmental plan, which has been keenly anticipated by all Canadians, and especially by the Liberal government. It will be a serious plan. It will include environmental targets that will allow Canada and Canadians to excel in the fight against climate change. In particular, we will maintain our sound approach, which is to help the provinces. By contrast, the government prefers to start constitutional squabbles with them by imposing taxes on Canadians, overstepping its jurisdiction in the process, since environmental matters fall under provincial jurisdiction.
I would like to use Quebec as an example, as my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent did this morning. I have here a report on Quebec's inventory of greenhouse gas emissions in 2016 and their evolution since 1990. It was tabled by the new CAQ government last November, and it is very interesting. In 2016, greenhouse gas emissions increased in Quebec, despite the fact that the carbon exchange made its debut in 2013. That is ironic. Despite the implementation of a fuel tax to cut down on fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, emissions actually went up.
The same report also indicates that between 1990 and 2015, greenhouse gas emissions in Quebec decreased even though the carbon exchange had not been fully implemented. The conclusion explains how this happened:
The decrease in GHG emissions from 1990 to 2016 is mainly due to the industrial sector. The decrease observed in this sector resulted from technical improvements in certain processes, increased energy efficiency and the substitution of certain fuels.
That is exactly what we, the Conservatives, want to do. Instead of imposing a new tax on Canadians, we want to maintain a decentralized federal approach. We want to help the provinces adopt greener energy sources to stimulate even greener economic growth and the deindustrialization of certain sectors, create new technologies and increase innovation in the Canadian economy. That is the objective of a Conservative approach to the environment.
The objective of the Conservative approach to the environment is not to come down hard on the provinces and impose new taxes on Canadians. As we saw with Quebec, that did not have the desired effect. Our objective is to provide assistance while ensuring that our oil industry can grow in a healthy way. That is what Norway did. If I had 10 more minutes, I could talk more about that wonderful country, which has increased its oil production and exports and is one of the fairest and greenest countries in the world.
Monsieur le Président, comme toujours, je suis très honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais dire bonjour à tous les citoyens et citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre actuellement. Je les ai rencontrés la fin de semaine dernière, que ce soit au Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, au Patro Roc-Amadour ou au 52e Salon de Mai, qui a eu lieu aux Promenades Beauport. Félicitations aux organisateurs!
J'aimerais également souligner le fait que nous ressentons tous une grande tristesse à l'égard de notre collègue de Langley—Aldergrove, qui combat un cancer très important. Il vient de faire un discours percutant qui nous a rappelé à quel point la vie est fragile. J'ai moi-même contacté ma femme et mes enfants pour leur dire que je les aimais. La mort nous guette tous, un jour ou l'autre. Notre collègue a prononcé un discours très poignant à cet égard. Je le remercie pour toutes ses années de service envers le Canada et la Chambre des communes, et pour toutes les années futures au cours desquelles il pourra s'investir dans sa communauté.
Avant de parler de la motion actuelle, qui a été mise en avant par le Parti conservateur, j'aimerais rapidement revenir sur les propos de Mike Pompeo, le secrétaire d'État américain. Hier, lors d'une réunion du Conseil de l'Arctique en Finlande, il a osé dire que la revendication de la souveraineté canadienne sur le passage du Nord-Ouest était illégitime. Il nous a même comparés à la Russie et à la Chine, en faisant référence à leurs comportements et aux annexions de territoires, comme on a vu la Russie le faire en Ukraine. Personnellement, j'ai trouvé cela honteux.
J'aimerais rappeler à l'administration américaine que nous sommes leurs alliés depuis très longtemps. Une entente a été établie entre le président Reagan et le premier ministre Mulroney. Une convention avait été signée et elle stipulait que le passage du Nord-Ouest était bel et bien sous la souveraineté canadienne. Au XIXe siècle, on a fait plusieurs expéditions et explorations soutenues par la Couronne britannique, ce qui fait que la souveraineté canadienne dans le passage du Nord-Ouest et dans l'archipel Arctique est tout à fait légitime.
Nous discutons aujourd'hui de l'importance de l'industrie pétrolière et de l'importance des changements climatiques. Ce sont deux enjeux qui vont de pair. Ce sont deux choses qui sont structurantes aujourd'hui et qui vont demeurer comme telles. Bien entendu, je crois que l'environnement est extrêmement important, et ce l'est aussi pour tous les conservateurs et pour tous les citoyens du Canada. Je me rappelle avoir participé, dès mon jeune âge, à des ramassages de bouteilles et de cannettes de toutes sortes aux abords des routes et des autoroutes. Je faisais souvent cela avec mon père; il est un exemple pour moi à cet égard. Tout au long de ma vie, j'ai toujours voulu faire partie d'organisations communautaires où les gens ramassent les déchets.
Je suis également très fier du bilan de la majorité des gouvernements canadiens en matière d'environnement. Ils ont toujours voulu répondre aux attentes des Canadiens pour qui l'environnement est important. Les libéraux tentent, la plupart du temps, de dépeindre les conservateurs comme étant un groupe anti-environnement. Je peux assurer à mes collègues que je n'ai jamais perçu cela en côtoyant mes collègues du Parti conservateur. Bien au contraire, sous M. Harper, on a pris des mesures très intéressantes qui nous ont permis de faire baisser les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada de 2,2 % entre 2006 et 2015. J'en reparlerai plus tard.
En fait, il y a deux approches proposées dans le débat actuel sur les changements climatiques. C'est vrai pour plusieurs pays occidentaux. Je parle des pays occidentaux parce que ce sont ces pays qui sont concernés, vu que notre ère industrielle est bien installée depuis deux siècles. Il y a des industries qui polluent de manière assez substantielle depuis longtemps. Nous sommes arrivés à un moment de notre histoire où nous avons pris acte du fait que l'humain, en raison de son apport de gaz à effet de serre dans le monde, a un rôle très important dans les changements climatiques.
Oui, il faut agir, mais il y a deux approches. Une de ces approches provient du Parti libéral. Elle vise à taxer davantage les Canadiens. En fait, les libéraux tentent de mettre sur les épaules des Canadiens le poids d'en arriver à une baisse des émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada. L'approche que privilégient les conservateurs n'est pas de créer une nouvelle taxe ou de taxer davantage l'essence que les Canadiens mettent à la pompe tous les jours pour aller au travail en voiture.
Notre approche vise plutôt à aider les Canadiens dans leur vie de tous les jours et à aider les provinces à mettre en oeuvre leurs plans environnementaux respectifs.
À titre d'exemple, j'aime toujours rappeler aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes qui nous écoutent et à tous les écologistes qu'en 2007-2008, nous avons mis en place l'ÉcoFiducie. Ce programme d'environ 1,3 milliard de dollars visait à envoyer des enveloppes budgétaires à toutes les provinces pour qu'elles puissent répondre, chacune à leur façon, aux grandes préoccupations liées aux changements climatiques et diminuer leurs émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Voilà un bel exemple qui démontre que nous voulons aider les gens.
À l'époque, le premier ministre du Québec était M. Charest. Nous avions octroyé une enveloppe budgétaire de 300 millions de dollars au Québec pour l'aider à mettre en oeuvre son plan de diminution des GES. Il y avait eu une conférence de presse conjointe avec M. Harper et M. Charest, et même M. Guilbeault, de Greenpeace, avait dit que l'ÉcoFiducie était un programme substantiel et important.
Nous avons fait la même chose pour l'Ontario, la Colombie-Britannique et toutes les provinces qui voulaient souscrire à l'ÉcoFiducie. Il est fort probable que ce programme ait permis au gouvernement de l'Ontario de mettre en place son propre programme. Il a d'ailleurs eu la possibilité de fermer des centrales électriques au charbon.
Grâce à tout cela, sous le gouvernement de M. Harper, les GES ont diminué de 2,2 % au Canada. Il faut le répéter, puisque c'est l'approche que nous adopterons avec notre chef, le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle. Dans quelques semaines, nous allons annoncer notre plan environnemental, qui est très attendu par tous les Canadiens et, surtout, par le gouvernement libéral. Notre plan sera très sérieux. Il comprendra des cibles environnementales visant à ce que le Canada et les Canadiens excellent en matière de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Surtout, nous allons maintenir notre approche saine qui consiste à aider les provinces plutôt qu'à commencer des bagarres constitutionnelles avec celles-ci en imposant aux Canadiens des taxes, ce qui va à l'encontre du partage des champs de compétence, puisque les questions environnementales relèvent des provinces.
J'aimerais prendre l'exemple du Québec, comme mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent l'a fait ce matin. J'ai entre les mains un rapport qui s'intitule « Inventaire québécois des émissions de gaz à effet de serre en 2016 et leur évolution depuis 1990 ». Celui-ci a été déposé par le nouveau gouvernement de la CAQ en novembre dernier, et il est fort intéressant. En 2016, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre ont augmenté au Québec. Pourtant, la bourse du carbone a été instaurée en 2013 au Québec. C'est paradoxal. Malgré la mise en place d'une taxe sur l'essence pour réduire la consommation d'essence et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, celles-ci ont augmenté.
Le même rapport indique aussi qu'entre 1990 et 2015, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Québec ont diminué, alors qu'il n'y avait pas de bourse du carbone totalement en vigueur. Dans la conclusion, on nous explique pourquoi:
La diminution des émissions de GES de 1990 à 2016 est principalement attribuable au secteur industriel. La baisse observée dans ce secteur provient de l'amélioration technique de certains procédés, de l'amélioration de l'efficacité énergétique et de la substitution de certains combustibles. 
C'est exactement ce vers quoi nous, les conservateurs, voulons tendre. Au lieu d'imposer une nouvelle taxe aux Canadiens, nous voulons maintenir une approche fédérale décentralisatrice. Nous voulons octroyer de l'aide aux provinces, que ce soit pour aller vers des énergies plus vertes, pour stimuler une croissance économique plus verte, pour stimuler la désindustrialisation de certains secteurs, pour créer de nouvelles technologies ou pour faire croître l'innovation dans l'économie canadienne. Voilà l'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement.
L'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement n'est pas de taper sur les provinces et d'imposer de nouvelles taxes aux Canadiens. Comme on l'a vu dans le cas du Québec, cela n'a pas eu l'effet escompté. Notre objectif est d'apporter de l'aide, tout en faisant en sorte que notre industrie pétrolière puisse croître de manière saine. C'est ce que fait la Norvège, d'ailleurs. Si j'avais eu 10 minutes de plus, j'aurais pu parler davantage de ce merveilleux pays, qui, tout en augmentant sa production et son exportation de pétrole, est l'une des sociétés les plus équitables et les plus vertes au monde.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 415 | Page: 1 of 28

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|