Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 30 of 37
View David McGuinty Profile
Lib. (ON)
View David McGuinty Profile
2019-05-13 15:26
Expand
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Good afternoon, colleagues. Thank you for your invitation to appear before your committee. I am joined by Rennie Marcoux, executive director of the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, or NSICOP.
It's a privilege to be here with you today to discuss the 2018 annual report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians.
The committee's first annual report is the result of the work, the dedication and the commitment from my colleagues on the committee. It is intended to contribute to an informed debate among Canadians on the difficult challenges of providing security and intelligence organizations with the exceptional powers necessary to identify and counter threats to the nation while at the same time ensuring that their activities continue to respect and preserve our democratic rights.
NSICOP has the mandate to review the overall framework for national security and intelligence in Canada, including legislation, regulations, policy, administration and finances.
It may also examine any activity that is carried out by a department that relates to national security or intelligence.
Finally, it may review any matter relating to national security or intelligence that a minister refers to the committee.
Members of the committee are all cleared to a top secret level, swear an oath and are permanently bound to secrecy. Members also agree that the nature of the committee, multi-party, drawn from the House of Commons and the Senate, with a broad range of experience, bring a unique perspective to these important issues.
In order to conduct our work, we are entitled to have access to any information that is related to our mandate, but there are some exceptions, namely, cabinet confidences, the identity of confidential sources or protected witnesses, and ongoing law enforcement investigations that may lead to prosecutions.
The year 2018 was a year of learning for the committee. We spent many hours and meetings building our understanding of our mandate and of the organizations responsible for protecting Canada and Canadians. The committee was briefed by officials from across the security and intelligence community and visited all seven of the main departments and agencies. Numerous meetings were also held with the national security and intelligence adviser to the Prime Minister. NSICOP also decided to conduct a review of certain security allegations surrounding the Prime Minister's trip to India in February 2018.
Over the course of the calendar year, the committee met 54 times, with an average of four hours per meeting. Annex E of the report outlines the committee's extensive outreach and engagement activities with government officials, academics and civil liberties groups.
The annual report is a result of extensive oral and written briefings, more than 8,000 pages of printed materials, dozens of meetings between NSICOP analysts and government officials, in-depth research and analysis, and thoughtful and detailed deliberations among committee members.
The report is also unanimous. In total, the report makes 11 findings and seven recommendations to the government. The committee has been scrupulously careful to take a non-partisan approach to these issues. We hope that our findings and recommendations will strengthen the accountability and effectiveness of Canada's security and intelligence community.
The report before you contains five chapters, including the two substantive reviews conducted by the committee.
The first chapter explains the origins of NSICOP, its mandate and how it approaches its work, including what factors the committee takes into consideration when deciding what to review.
The second chapter provides an overview of the security and intelligence organizations in Canada, of the threats to Canada's security and how these organizations work together to keep Canada and Canadian safe and to promote Canadian interests.
Those two chapters are followed by the committee's two substantive reviews for 2018.
In chapter 3, the committee reviewed the way the government determines its intelligence priorities. Why is this important? There are three reasons.
First, this process is the fundamental means of providing direction to Canada's intelligence collectors and assessors, ensuring they focus on the government's, and the country's, highest priorities.
Second, this process is essential to ensure accountability in the intelligence community. What the intelligence community does is highly classified. This process gives the government regular insight into intelligence operations from a government-wide lens.
Third, this process helps the government to manage risk. When the government approves the intelligence priorities, it is accepting the risks of focusing on some targets and also the risk of not focusing on others.
The committee found that the process, from identifying priorities to translating them into practical guidance, to informing ministers and seeking their approval, does have a solid foundation. That said, any process can be improved.
In particular, the committee recommends that the Prime Minister's national security and intelligence advisor should take a stronger leadership role in the process in order to make sure that cabinet has the best information to make important decisions on where Canada should focus its intelligence activities and its resources.
Moving on, chapter 4 reviews the intelligence activities of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. The government's defence policy, “Strong, Secure, Engaged”, states that DND/CAF is “the only entity within the Government of Canada that employs the full spectrum of intelligence collection capabilities while providing multi-source analysis.”
We recognize that defence intelligence activities are critical to the safety of troops and the success of Canadian military activities, including those abroad, and they are expected to grow. When the government decides to deploy the Canadian Armed Forces, DND/CAF also has implicit authority to conduct defence intelligence activities. In both cases, the source of authority is what is known as the Crown prerogative. This is very different from how other intelligence organizations, notably CSE and CSIS, operate. Each of those organizations has clear statutory authority to conduct intelligence activities, and they are subject to regular, independent and external review.
This was a significant and complex review for the committee, with four findings and three recommendations.
Our first recommendation focuses on areas where DND/CAF could make changes to strengthen its existing internal governance structure over its intelligence activities and to strengthen the accountability of the minister.
The other two recommendations would require the government to amend or to consider enacting legislation. The committee has set out the reasons why it formed the view that regular independent review of DND/CAF intelligence activities will strengthen accountability over its operations.
We believe there is an opportunity for the government, with Bill C-59 still before the Senate, to put in place requirements for annual reporting on DND/CAF's national security or intelligence activities, as would be required for CSIS and CSE.
Second, the committee also believes that its review substantiates the need for the government to give very serious consideration to providing explicit legislative authority for the conduct of defence intelligence activities. Defence intelligence is critical to the operations of the Canadian Armed Forces and, like all intelligence activities, involves inherent risks.
DND/CAF officials expressed concerns to the committee about maintaining operational flexibility for the conduct of defence intelligence activities in support of military operations. The committee, therefore, thought it was important to present both the risks and the benefits of placing defence intelligence on a clear statutory footing.
Our recommendations are a reflection of the committee's analysis of these important issues.
We would be pleased to take your questions.
Thank you.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.
Bonjour, chers collègues, et merci de nous avoir invités à comparaître devant votre comité. Je suis accompagné de Mme Rennie Marcoux, directrice générale du Secrétariat du CPSNR.
C'est un privilège pour nous de pouvoir discuter avec vous aujourd'hui du rapport annuel du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement pour 2018.
Ce premier rapport annuel est le fruit du travail, du dévouement et de l'engagement de tous mes collègues faisant partie de ce comité. Nous souhaitons que ce rapport puisse contribuer à un débat éclairé entre Canadiens quant aux difficultés qui nous attendent lorsqu'il s'agit de conférer aux organisations de sécurité et de renseignement les pouvoirs exceptionnels nécessaires pour cerner et contrer les menaces qui pèsent sur la nation tout en veillant à ce que leurs activités soient menées de manière à respecter et à protéger nos droits démocratiques.
Le CPSNR a pour mandat d'examiner l'ensemble du cadre de la sécurité nationale et du renseignement au Canada, soit les lois, les règlements, la stratégie, l'administration et les finances.
Il peut aussi examiner toute activité menée par un ministère lié à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement.
Enfin, il peut examiner toute question se rapportant à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement qu'un ministre nous confie.
Les membres de notre comité possèdent tous une cote de sécurité de niveau « très secret ». Nous prêtons serment et nous sommes astreints au secret à perpétuité. Nous pouvons en outre jeter un éclairage tout à fait particulier sur ces enjeux primordiaux du fait que nous comptons des membres de plusieurs partis, aussi bien à la Chambre des communes qu'au Sénat, qui nous font bénéficier d'une gamme variée d'expériences.
Nous pouvons accéder à tout renseignement se rapportant à notre mandat afin d'exécuter notre travail. Il y a cependant des exceptions. C'est le cas notamment des documents confidentiels du Cabinet, de l'identité de sources confidentielles ou de témoins protégés, et des enquêtes menées par les forces de l'ordre pouvant conduire à des poursuites judiciaires.
L'année 2018 en été une d'apprentissage pour le comité. Nous avons consacré plusieurs heures et réunions au développement d'une meilleure compréhension de notre mandat et du fonctionnement des organismes chargés de protéger le Canada et les Canadiens. Des fonctionnaires des différents secteurs de la sécurité et du renseignement ont informé les membres du comité, et nous avons visité les sept principaux ministères et organismes concernés. Nous avons rencontré plusieurs fois la conseillère à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement auprès du premier ministre. Le comité a également décidé de faire enquête concernant les diverses allégations entourant le voyage du premier ministre en Inde en février 2018.
En 2018, le comité s'est réuni à 54 reprises, en moyenne quatre heures à chaque fois. Vous trouverez à l'annexe C du rapport la liste des représentants du gouvernement, du milieu universitaire et des groupes de défense des libertés civiles que le comité a eu le plaisir de rencontrer en 2018.
Notre rapport annuel est l'aboutissement de nombreuses séances d'information, écrites et orales, d'une analyse de plus de 8 000 pages de documents, de dizaines de rencontres entre les analystes du CPSNR et les représentants du gouvernement, d'un travail approfondi de recherche et d'analyse, et de délibérations réfléchies et détaillées entre les membres du comité.
Il faut aussi préciser que ce rapport est unanime. En tout et partout, nous avons tiré 11 conclusions et formulé sept recommandations à l'intention du gouvernement. Le comité s'est bien assuré d'aborder ces questions en adoptant une approche non partisane. Nous osons espérer que nos conclusions et recommandations contribueront à renforcer la reddition de comptes et l'efficacité au sein de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement au Canada.
Le rapport qui vous est présenté aujourd'hui contient cinq chapitres, dont certains portent sur les deux examens de fond menés par le CPSNR.
Le premier chapitre décrit les origines du CPSNR, son mandat et sa façon d'aborder le travail, y compris les facteurs qu'il examine ou considère au moment de choisir les examens à effectuer.
Le deuxième chapitre présente un aperçu des organismes de la sécurité et du renseignement au Canada et des menaces pour la sécurité du Canada ainsi que la manière dont ces organismes collaborent afin d'assurer la sécurité du Canada et des Canadiens et de promouvoir les intérêts du pays.
Les chapitres suivants présentent les deux examens de fond entrepris par le CPSNR en 2018.
Au chapitre 3, le comité a examiné la façon dont le gouvernement du Canada établit ses priorités en matière de renseignement. Pourquoi est-ce important? Pour trois raisons.
Premièrement, ce processus est le moyen privilégié pour guider le travail des collecteurs et des évaluateurs de renseignement du Canada afin de veiller à ce qu'ils canalisent leurs efforts en fonction des grandes priorités du gouvernement et de notre pays.
Deuxièmement, c'est un processus essentiel pour s'assurer qu'il y a reddition de comptes au sein de l'appareil du renseignement, lequel accomplit un travail hautement confidentiel. Grâce à ce processus, le gouvernement bénéficie de mises à jour régulières sur les opérations de renseignement dans une optique de gestion pangouvernementale.
Troisièmement, ce processus aide le gouvernement à gérer le risque. Lorsque le gouvernement approuve les priorités en matière de renseignement, il accepte le risque de se concentrer sur certaines cibles en même temps que le risque de ne pas mettre l'accent sur d'autres objectifs.
Le CPSNR a conclu que le processus, de la détermination des priorités à l'orientation pratique, et de la transmission de l'information aux ministres à l'obtention de leur approbation, repose sur des bases solides. Cela étant dit, on peut améliorer n'importe quel processus.
En particulier, le CPSNR recommande que la conseillère à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement auprès du premier ministre joue un rôle plus net de chef de file durant le processus afin d'assurer que le Cabinet possède les meilleurs renseignements qui soient pour être en mesure de prendre les décisions importantes, par exemple en ce qui a trait aux secteurs sur lesquels le Canada devrait axer ses activités de renseignement et ses ressources
Je passe maintenant au chapitre 4 qui traite des activités de renseignement du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes. La politique de défense du gouvernement, Protection, Sécurité, Engagement, stipule que ces deux organisations constituent « l'unique entité du gouvernement du Canada à utiliser le spectre complet des activités de collecte de renseignements tout en assurant une analyse multisources. »
Nous reconnaissons que les activités de renseignement de la Défense sont essentielles à la sécurité des troupes et à la réussite des activités militaires canadiennes, y compris celles menées à l'étranger, et qu'elles devraient prendre de l'expansion. Quand le gouvernement décide de déployer les forces armées, le ministère de la Défense et les Forces armées canadiennes ont l'autorité implicite de mener leurs activités de renseignement de défense. Dans les deux cas, c'est la prérogative de la Couronne qui confère cette autorité. Cette structure diffère de celle des autres organismes de renseignement, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications (CST) et le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS), qui mènent leurs activités en vertu de pouvoirs clairs conférés par une loi et sont assujettis à des examens externes indépendants.
C'est donc à l'issue d'un examen complexe que le comité a formulé quatre conclusions et trois recommandations.
Notre première recommandation est axée sur les secteurs où le ministère de la Défense nationale et les Forces armées canadiennes pourraient apporter des changements à l'interne en vue de renforcer la structure de gouvernance de leurs activités de renseignement et la reddition de comptes de la part du ministre.
Nos deux autres recommandations exigeraient du gouvernement qu'il modifie ou adopte des lois. Le comité a expliqué les raisons pour lesquelles il en est venu à la conclusion qu'un examen indépendant régulier des activités de renseignements du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes permettrait une plus grande responsabilisation.
Étant donné que le projet de loi  C-59 est encore devant le Sénat, nous croyons que le gouvernement a ici l'occasion de le modifier afin que l'on fasse rapport chaque année des activités de renseignement ou de sécurité nationale du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes, comme on l'exige du CST et du SCRS.
Le comité est également d'avis que son examen confirme la nécessité pour le gouvernement d'envisager très sérieusement d'accorder un pouvoir législatif explicite en matière d'activités de renseignement de défense. Ce type de renseignement est essentiel aux opérations des Forces armées canadiennes et comporte, comme toutes les activités de renseignement, des risques inhérents.
Dans le cadre de notre examen, nous avons entendu les préoccupations des fonctionnaires du ministère de la Défense nationale quant à l'importance de maintenir une flexibilité opérationnelle suffisante aux fins des activités de renseignement à l'appui des opérations militaires. Nous avons donc jugé nécessaire d'exposer les risques et les avantages de l'établissement d'une assise législative claire pour le renseignement de défense.
Nos recommandations sont le fruit de notre analyse de ces enjeux importants.
C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions.
Merci.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to the Minister and to the officials for being here today.
My questions will focus on Bill C-59 and cybersecurity.
First of all, Minister, you said in your comments when you opened things that cyber-operations “would be subject to strict statutory prohibitions against directing these operations at Canadians, any person in Canada, or the global information infrastructure in Canada, and would require a robust approval process.” To me, that's very much in line with democratic principles, but could you speak to the importance of that, to ensuring that when we have legislation, when we're talking about CSE and its powers, that those powers are consistent with democratic principles?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Merci au ministre et aux fonctionnaires d'être ici aujourd'hui.
Mes questions porteront sur le projet de loi  C-59 et la cybersécurité.
Tout d'abord, monsieur le ministre, vous avez dit dans vos commentaires liminaires que les cyberopérations « seraient assujetties à des interdictions légales strictes qui interdiraient de diriger ces opérations contre des Canadiens, toute personne au Canada ou l'infrastructure globale de l'information au Canada, et nécessiteraient un solide processus d'approbation ». À mon avis, cela est tout à fait conforme aux principes démocratiques, mais pourriez-vous nous parler de l'importance de cette question, de s'assurer que lorsque nous avons une loi, lorsque nous parlons du CST et de ses pouvoirs, que ces pouvoirs sont conformes aux principes démocratiques?
Collapse
View Harjit S. Sajjan Profile
Lib. (BC)
Absolutely, and in fact, this is extremely fundamental. I was trying to address that in the answer that I gave about my responsibility with regard to CSE and the military's focus on foreign threats, and that's where CSE's at.
However, with what CSE currently has and with Bill C-59, we'll have additional ability to provide support for other agencies with judicial authorization. I think what's extremely important is making sure that we as a government leverage all the right resources within our government and within the laws. However, at the same time—and I want to stress this immensely, because Canadians expect this—we must have a process in place that respects privacy and transparency. This is something that hasn't happened before. More importantly, we are the last Five Eyes nation to finally come up to that transparency level.
Greta, do you want to add anything to that?
Absolument, et en fait, c’est extrêmement fondamental. J’essayais de répondre à cette question dans la réponse que j’ai donnée au sujet de ma responsabilité à l’égard du CST et de l’accent mis par l’armée sur les menaces étrangères, et c’est là où en est le CST.
Cependant, avec ce que le CST a actuellement et avec le projet de loi C-59, nous aurons une capacité supplémentaire de soutenir d’autres organismes avec une autorisation judiciaire. Je pense que ce qui est extrêmement important, c’est de s'assurer, en tant que gouvernement, de tirer parti de toutes les ressources appropriées au sein de notre gouvernement et dans le cadre des lois. Cependant, en même temps — et je tiens à le souligner énormément, parce que les Canadiens s’y attendent —, nous devons mettre en place un processus qui respecte la vie privée et la transparence. C’est quelque chose qui ne s’est jamais produit auparavant. Plus important encore, nous sommes le dernier pays du Groupe des cinq à avoir enfin atteint ce niveau de transparence.
Greta, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?
Collapse
Greta Bossenmaier
View Greta Bossenmaier Profile
Greta Bossenmaier
2018-03-22 11:46
Expand
If I take your question, particularly around the foreign cyber-operations, active cyber-operations, and defensive cyber-operations, I'll say that it's very clear in the legislation. There are two pieces that I would draw folks' attention to. One is the strict approval processes that would need to be put in place. Active cyber-operations would require the approval of both the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Foreign Affairs, given that these are operations that would be happening outside of Canada, not in Canada, so there would be Foreign Affairs implications or considerations as well. That's on the approvals side.
Also, in terms of the limitations, there are very clear limitations as to what an active or a defensive cyber-operation could entail. CSE would be prohibited, for example, from directing its active cyber-operations at Canadians, at any person in Canada, or at the global information infrastructure. It would have to be sure that it is not causing death or bodily harm, or wilfully obstructing justice or democracy. There would be significant, serious, senior-level approvals in addition to very clear limitations on what those activities could be.
Si je comprends bien votre question, surtout en ce qui concerne les cyberopérations étrangères, actives et défensives, je dirais que c’est très clair dans la loi. J’attire votre attention sur deux éléments. Il y a d’abord les processus d’approbation stricts qu’il faudrait mettre en place. Les cyberopérations actives exigeraient l’approbation du ministre de la Défense nationale et du ministre des Affaires étrangères, étant donné qu’il s’agit d’opérations qui se dérouleraient à l’extérieur du Canada et non au Canada. Il y aurait donc des répercussions ou des considérations du ministère des Affaires étrangères. C’est du côté des approbations.
De plus, en ce qui concerne les limites, elles sont très claires quant à ce qu’une cyberopération active ou défensive pourrait entraîner. Par exemple, il serait interdit au CST de diriger ses cyberopérations actives auprès des Canadiens, d’une personne au Canada ou de l’infrastructure mondiale de l’information. Il faudrait s’assurer qu’elles ne causent pas la mort ou des lésions corporelles, qu’elles ne fassent pas délibérément obstacle à la justice ou à la démocratie. Il y aurait des approbations importantes, sérieuses et de haut niveau en plus de limites très claires quant à ce que ces activités pourraient être.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-03-22 12:00
Expand
It's the first time I've ever liked daylight saving time.
Voices: Oh, oh!
Mr. Matthew Dubé: Really quickly, I have just one question. I want to get back to the details I asked about on the Cambridge Analytica situation with Facebook.
There's clearly not a situation here of the information having been obtained illegally. It's nebulous, and perhaps dubious and immoral, but it's not quite clear that it's illegal. Information like this that is being obtained and being used by political parties in a variety of countries around the world arguably could fall under the definition of publicly available information. How do you see that, Minister, and how does CSE see that?
C’est la première fois que j’aime tant l’heure avancée.
Voix: Oh, oh!
M. Matthew Dubé: Très rapidement, j’ai une seule question. J’aimerais revenir aux détails de la situation de Cambridge Analytica avec Facebook.
De toute évidence, il n’y a pas de situation où l’information a été obtenue illégalement. C’est nébuleux, peut-être douteux et immoral, mais il n’est pas tout à fait clair que c’est illégal. Des renseignements comme ceux-ci qui sont obtenus et utilisés par des partis politiques dans divers pays du monde pourraient sans doute être visés par la définition de l’information accessible au public. Comment voyez-vous cela, monsieur le ministre ainsi que le CST?
Collapse
View Harjit S. Sajjan Profile
Lib. (BC)
For CSE, the credibility of the great work they do and the credibility of any government to be able to function in a rules-based order is based on working within the law. That's exactly how CSE has been functioning.
More importantly, we're actually putting even more robust measures in place to make sure that CSE's activities and the activities of all our security agencies are done and that we have a mechanism in place for everything from the intelligence commissioner authorizing ministerial authorization to the national security and intelligence review agency and now actually having parliamentarians from all parties.
My answer to you is that CSE will always function within the law.
Pour le CST, la crédibilité de l’excellent travail qu’il accomplit et la crédibilité de tout gouvernement de fonctionner dans un ordre fondé sur des règles reposent sur le respect de la loi. C’est exactement de cette façon que le CST fonctionne.
Plus important encore, nous mettons en place des mesures encore plus rigoureuses pour nous assurer que les activités du CST et de tous nos organismes de sécurité sont menées à bien et nous avons mis en place un mécanisme pour tout, du commissaire au renseignement autorisant l’approbation ministérielle jusqu’à l’agence de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et du renseignement, et que nous avons maintenant des parlementaires de tous les partis.
Je vous réponds que le CST respectera toujours la loi.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-03-22 12:01
Expand
I appreciate that, Minister. If we're talking about operating legally, and this information is obtained legally—although arguably the laws should be changed in that context—doesn't that mean that CSE could obtain that information under publicly available information?
Je comprends cela, monsieur le ministre. Si nous parlons de fonctionnement légal, et que cette information est obtenue légalement — même si on peut soutenir que les lois devraient être modifiées dans ce contexte —, cela ne signifie-t-il pas que le CST pourrait obtenir cette information en vertu de l’information accessible au public?
Collapse
View Harjit S. Sajjan Profile
Lib. (BC)
As I stated, not only from a legal perspective, CSE's activities are designed to make sure that we are protecting Canadians and Canadian interests, and we will continue to do so.
Comme je l’ai dit, non seulement du point de vue juridique, les activités du CST visent à protéger les Canadiens et les intérêts canadiens, et nous continuerons de le faire.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-03-22 12:19
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to go back to the question I asked the minister, but to which I did not get an answer, in my opinion.
In a context where the information can be obtained legally by a company, such as Cambridge Analytica, even if it can be said that it is immoral and that it should be illegal, does that correspond to the definition of publicly available information?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je veux revenir sur la question que j'ai posée au ministre, mais à laquelle je n'ai pas réussi à obtenir de réponse, selon moi.
Dans un contexte où l'information peut être obtenue de façon légale par une entreprise, par exemple Cambridge Analytica, même si on peut dire que c'est immoral et que cela devrait être illégal, est-ce que cela correspond à la définition d'information disponible publiquement?
Collapse
Greta Bossenmaier
View Greta Bossenmaier Profile
Greta Bossenmaier
2018-03-22 12:20
Expand
The whole issue around publicly available information, I understand, has been considered around this table. I'll just try to perhaps add a couple of pieces to it.
For us, mandate is critical. Mandate matters, and it matters throughout the entire piece of legislation that is in front of you, and that includes publicly available information. We can use publicly available information only if it is related to our mandate, our foreign signals intelligence mandate or our cybersecurity mandate. We do not have within our legislation, currently or proposed, any mandate to focus our activities on Canadians, to have an investigative capability, to create dossiers on Canadians. That is not within our current or proposed legislation.
I would start with the fact that mandate matters.
The second piece I would relate is that, as I think has been raised before here, publicly available information—and it's defined in our act—would not comprise information that has been hacked or stolen. This is information that would be publicly available to any Canadians.
Also—
Je remarque que toute la question de l’information accessible au public a été examinée autour de cette table. Je vais essayer d’ajouter quelques éléments.
Pour nous, le mandat est essentiel. Le mandat est important et il en est ainsi dans l’ensemble du projet de loi que vous avez sous les yeux, et cela comprend l’information accessible au public. Nous ne pouvons utiliser l’information accessible au public que si elle est liée à notre mandat, notre mandat relatif aux renseignements étrangers ou notre mandat en matière de cybersécurité. La loi actuelle ou proposée ne nous donne pas le mandat de concentrer nos activités sur les Canadiens, d’avoir une capacité d’enquête, de créer des dossiers sur les Canadiens. Ce n’est pas dans le cadre de notre législation actuelle ou proposée.
Je commencerais par le fait que le mandat est important.
Deuxièmement, comme on l’a déjà dit, je crois, l’information accessible au public — et c’est défini dans notre loi — ne comprendrait pas l’information qui a été piratée ou volée. Cette information serait accessible au public.
Aussi...
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-03-22 12:21
Expand
The part of the bill dealing with publicly available information specifically exempts the prohibition on targeting Canadians. So you might not be actively collecting it, but you are permitted to collect it as part of the research that's being done under clauses 24 and 25, if I'm not mistaken.
You mentioned information that's hacked or stolen, but under the current legislation, arguably, the information that we're discussing in this particular example—I'm sure there are others that we just don't know of—was not obtained unlawfully. So the work Cambridge Analytica—and probably other companies of that sort—was doing for political parties, for example, was obtaining information through Facebook on people, and that's being done legally.
Would that not fall under publicly available information, if a company like that is able to obtain it? There are no legal repercussions because it's not illegal. Could CSE not do the same thing under those dispositions even if incidentally, as laid out in the law, in Bill C-59?
La partie du projet de loi qui porte sur l’information accessible au public exempte précisément l’interdiction de cibler les Canadiens. Donc, vous ne recueillez peut-être pas les données de façon active, mais vous êtes autorisé à les recueillir dans le cadre de la recherche effectuée en vertu des articles 24 et 25, si je ne m’abuse.
Vous avez parlé de renseignements piratés ou volés, mais en vertu de la loi actuelle, on pourrait soutenir que les renseignements dont nous discutons dans cet exemple particulier — je suis sûr qu’il y en a d’autres que nous ne connaissons pas — n’ont pas été obtenus illégalement. Donc, le travail qu'effectuait Cambridge Analytica — et probablement d’autres entreprises de ce genre — pour les partis politiques, par exemple, était d'obtenir de l’information sur les gens par l’entremise de Facebook, et cela, tout à fait légalement.
Cela ne relève-t-il pas de l’information accessible au public, si une entreprise comme celle-là est en mesure de l’obtenir? Il n’y a pas de répercussions juridiques parce que ce n’est pas illégal. Est-ce que le CST ne pourrait pas faire la même chose en vertu de ces dispositions, même si, incidemment, tel qu’il est énoncé dans la loi, dans le projet de loi  C-59?
Collapse
Greta Bossenmaier
View Greta Bossenmaier Profile
Greta Bossenmaier
2018-03-22 12:22
Expand
Mr. Chair, I have to go back to the point that, even on publicly available information, it goes back to our mandate. We would access publicly available information only if it were related to our mandate, and we do not have a mandate that focuses on Canadians or anyone in Canada. For the particular case you're referring to, I understand the Privacy Commissioner is looking into it, and I guess the details around it are still unfolding, so I can speak only to our legislation. Again, it goes back to our mandate. It would be very specific: what's the case for which we would need it? Also, very much, the proposed legislation talks about two other things.
Number one, it says we'd have to have privacy protection measures in place, even for publicly available information. Number two, like every other aspect of the proposed legislation, it would be subject to review by the national Security Intelligence Review Committee. This is not CSE having the authority to go look at any publicly available information. It's very targeted and very focused on fitting within our mandate, and again, with privacy protection measures in place, and finally, with review from an independent review agency looking at all of our activities.
I hope that answers your question.
Monsieur le président, je dois revenir sur le fait que, même en ce qui concerne l’information accessible au public, cela revient à notre mandat. Nous n’aurions accès à l’information accessible au public que si elle était liée à notre mandat et nous n’avons pas de mandat axé sur les Canadiens ou quiconque au Canada. Pour le cas particulier dont vous parlez, je crois savoir que le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée se penche sur la question et j’imagine que les détails à ce sujet sont toujours en cours d’élaboration, alors je ne peux parler que de notre législation. Encore une fois, cela nous ramène à notre mandat. Ce serait très précis: pourquoi en aurions-nous besoin? De plus, le projet de loi propose de deux autres éléments.
Premièrement, il stipule qu’il faudrait mettre en place des mesures de protection de la vie privée, même pour les renseignements publics. Deuxièmement, comme tous les autres aspects du projet de loi, il devrait faire l’objet d’un examen par le Comité national de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité. Le CST n’a pas le pouvoir d’examiner toute information accessible au public. Il est très ciblé et très axé sur le respect de notre mandat et, encore une fois, sur la mise en place de mesures de protection de la vie privée et, enfin, sur l’examen de toutes nos activités par un organisme de surveillance indépendant.
J’espère que cela répond à votre question.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-03-22 12:23
Expand
That's fair enough.
You mentioned the Privacy Commissioner's investigation, but I'm understanding that both your organization and CSIS have also been tasked with looking into that situation, and so in that particular context, when you're doing the research that's prescribed in the legislation where these exemptions exist, notwithstanding section 25, which talks about protecting privacy, would research not be done on, for example, things like Facebook, as part of this information infrastructure? I don't know if that would fall under the definition of information infrastructure, but if you're being tasked with looking into the situation as well, would you not inevitably come across Canadians' information and be allowed to obtain it even if incidentally under what's prescribed in Bill C-59? And under those circumstances, even though it would be in respect of the mandate—I understand that—while I understand you're taking steps to protect privacy, the information nonetheless could be collected over the course of that type of investigation.
Would that not be accurate?
Très bien.
Vous avez parlé de l’enquête de la commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, mais je crois comprendre que votre organisation et le SCRS ont également été chargés d’examiner cette situation. Dans ce contexte particulier, lorsque vous faites les recherches prescrites dans la loi où ces exemptions existent, nonobstant l’article 25, qui parle de la protection de la vie privée, les recherches ne seraient-elles pas faites, par exemple, sur Facebook, dans le cadre de cette infrastructure d’information? J'ignore si cela relèverait de la définition de l’infrastructure de l’information, mais si on vous demande d’examiner la situation également, ne pourriez-vous pas inévitablement trouver des renseignements sur les Canadiens et être autorisé à les obtenir même si, incidemment, c’est ce que prévoit le projet de loi C-59. Et dans ces circonstances, même si ce serait dans le cadre du mandat — je le comprends —, même si je vois que vous prenez des mesures pour protéger la vie privée, l’information pourrait néanmoins être recueillie au cours de ce type d’enquête.
N’est-ce pas exact?
Collapse
Greta Bossenmaier
View Greta Bossenmaier Profile
Greta Bossenmaier
2018-03-22 12:25
Expand
You covered a lot of territory there. Maybe I'll start with the piece about CSE being asked by the Minister of Democratic Institutions to look at this issue around democratic institutions.
I'm thinking back and I'm looking to Scott. About a year ago, in about June 2017, CSE was asked by Minister Gould, the Minister of Democratic Institutions, to look at cyber-threats to Canadians' democratic institutions. For the first time in our history we actually produced a report that's available to this committee, if you haven't seen it, which looked at broad cyber-threats to democratic institutions.
We really looked at three different aspects of that. We looked at the electoral process per se, so how the electoral machine works. We also looked at cyber-threats to politicians and political parties, and we also looked at cyber-threats to the media. We came out with an assessment at that time, about a year ago.
The Minister of Democratic Institutions now is asking us to review our threat assessment in light of changes that have occurred over the past year. Even when we put out the initial report, we said that this would probably be an evergreened report based on new information and new threat information.
That's the kind of work we expect to be doing over the coming weeks, to review our threat assessment based on information and activities that have occurred over the past year. This is refreshing it.
Vous avez couvert beaucoup de terrain. Je commencerai peut-être par le fait que la ministre des Institutions démocratiques a demandé au CST d’examiner la question des institutions démocratiques.
J'y repense et je me tourne vers Scott. Il y a environ un an, vers juin 2017, la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, Mme Gould, a demandé au CST d’examiner les cybermenaces qui pèsent sur les institutions démocratiques des Canadiens. Pour la première fois de notre histoire, nous avons produit un rapport qui est à la disposition du comité, au cas où vous ne l’auriez pas vu, et qui porte sur les grandes cybermenaces qui pèsent sur les institutions démocratiques.
Nous avons examiné de près trois aspects différents. Nous avons considéré le processus électoral en tant que tel et fonctionnement du mécanisme électoral. Nous nous sommes également penchés sur les cybermenaces pour les hommes et femmes politiques et les partis politiques, ainsi que sur les cybermenaces pour les médias. Nous avons fait une évaluation à ce moment-là, il y a environ un an.
La ministre des Institutions démocratiques nous demande maintenant de revoir notre évaluation de la menace à la lumière des changements survenus au cours de la dernière année. Même lorsque nous avons publié le rapport initial, nous avons dit qu’il s’agirait probablement d’un rapport sans cesse à renouvelé à la lumière nouveaux renseignements, notamment sur les menaces.
C’est le genre de travail que nous nous attendons à faire au cours des prochaines semaines, pour revoir notre évaluation de la menace à la lumière des renseignements et des activités qui ont eu lieu au cours de la dernière année. Il s'agit de la mettre à jour.
Collapse
Scott Newark
View Scott Newark Profile
Scott Newark
2018-02-15 11:10
Expand
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. It's good to see you again.
I'd like to thank the committee for the invitation to appear before you with respect to this very important Bill C-59. I've had the opportunity to follow some of the proceedings and to read some of the transcripts, and it's very encouraging to see the depth and substance of the questions asked of the individual witnesses who are appearing, including with different perspectives.
I've had a long history, and I was thinking about it before I came here today. It's been almost 30 years, I guess, since I first testified before a parliamentary committee. I was a crown prosecutor from Alberta, and as I put it, I got tired of tripping over the mistakes of the parole system in my courtroom, and realized that the only way to try to change it was to change the laws. That meant coming to Ottawa, because we were dealing with federal correctional legislation. I was appearing before parliamentary committees where I exposed what had happened in a couple of cases.
The important work of the legislative branch struck me then, and it has remained with me throughout. That sometimes gets overlooked, and depending on how things are being handled at the executive branch of government, the really important and critical analysis that committees can do is quite significant. A bill like this is a very good example of that, because you can have different opinions about things on different subjects, but you have the ability to ask questions and to try to elicit information to analyze whether or not the intended results are going to be achieved by the legislation in the way that it's drafted or if other things need to be done. That is particularly true, I think, in relation to legislation like Bill C-59, which is obviously pretty complex legislation and deals with a whole lot of subjects.
In fairness, the discussion itself has raised issues that are not contained in Bill C-59. I think a very encouraging sign was the way that the government sent the bill here in advance of second reading so that you could have input and suggestions on other subjects. I have some suggestions to make on things like that. I must admit, though, that I would suggest that it probably is a better idea, simply from a procedural perspective, to confine your recommendations to the specifics of the bill, and perhaps, in an ancillary report, make suggestions on other subjects rather than adding huge new amendments to sections and opening up different issues that are not specifically contained in Bill C-59. There's so much of value in Bill C-59 that it's a good idea to move it forward.
My presentation today will touch on essentially three aspects. The first is just to take some examples of things that I think are notable and quite important in Bill C-59. I also have a couple of comments on things, and one in particular I have a problem with, but I suppose, to put it in a larger sense, they're just ones where I would suggest you may want to ask some questions and make sure you understand that what you are anticipating is the case is, in fact, the case. Then, because the minister has invited suggestions on other issues, if we have time—and probably not in the opening statement, but during questions and answers—I have some suggestions on other issues that I think might be of interest.
Let me just give you a little bit of background as well on my personal experience in this, because it impacts on the insights. As I mentioned, I was a crown prosecutor in Alberta. Ultimately, because of one of the cases I was involved in, in 1992 I became the executive officer of the Canadian Police Association. This is the rank-and-file police officers, the unions. We were involved very heavily from 1992 to 1998 in criminal justice reform, policy advocacy. It was from that, in particular, and my work as a crown prosecutor, that I got the sense of the importance of learning from front-line operational insights how you can then shape legislative or policy tools so as to achieve desired outcomes.
Also, not everything needs to be done by legislation. There are frequently instances—and I was struck by this as I was watching some of the evidence from some of the witnesses that you've had—where we don't necessarily need new laws. We need to enforce the ones we already have, and we need to make sure that the tools are in place to use them appropriately. There are some examples of that, I think, in Bill C-59 specifically.
I ended up working with the Ontario government in 1998 as an order in council appointment. That government had intended to achieve some criminal justice reforms, and they weren't getting it done, so they wanted some people with some understanding of the justice system.
After 9/11, I was appointed as the special security adviser on counterterrorism because of some work I had previously been involved in. I had significant interactions with Americans in relation to that. In the old days, it was the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, which became INSET. I had a role, essentially, in being the provincial representative in some of the discussions, and I saw the inter-agency interactions, or lack thereof, and the impact that potentially had.
Since then, I'm actually one of the guys who did the review that led to the arming of the border officers. I still do work with the union on policy stuff. I also do some stuff with security technology committees. The value of that is that you get an understanding of some of the operational insights and what is necessary to achieve the intended outcomes.
I should add, I suppose, the final thing. Last year, I accepted a position at Simon Fraser University as an adjunct professor. I know you'll be shocked to hear that. It's for a course they offer, a master's program, the Terrorism, Risk, and Security Studies program. The course I teach is balancing civil liberties and public safety and security. To go on from a point that the general made, I think the case is that these are not either-or situations. We are fully capable of doing both, and there is a balance involved in this. As a general principle, it is a very good idea, when you're looking at what is proposed in legislation, especially in legislation like this which has national security implications, to keep in mind the general principles of protecting civil rights.
There are two points about that. You'll notice that in “civil rights”, “rights” is modified by “civil”. In other words, they are rights that exist in the context of a civil society. That has ramifications in the sense, I think, of what citizens are entitled to expect of their government. I don't want government intruding on my privacy, but, at the same time, if government has the capability of accessing relevant information and acting on someone who is a threat to me and my family, I expect, under my civil right, that, in fact, government will do what it needs to do to extend that protection.
The other side of that—and I know, Monsieur Dubé asked many questions about this, as did other members of the committee—is the importance of looking at it generally, at what is proposed, to see that there is, in effect, oversight initially and, as well, appropriate review so that the balancing can take place. In my opinion, and more accurately in my experience, having the executive branch reporting to itself for authorization is something that should raise a red flag. There are provisions within the act that ultimately address that, although there are some that raise some questions about it.
In the very brief time left, let me just say that I think that among the important things in the legislation are the extensive use of preambles and definitions about the importance of privacy and what we would generally call civil rights in consideration of why we're doing things. That, I think, was a deficiency in BillC-51. I can tell you that it is critically important in today's charter world to make sure that is included so that the courts can consider whether or not what was being done by legislative authority in fact took into account the charter issues. A rule of statutory interpretation is “thou shalt consider the preamble in a statute when actually drafting it”.
With one minute left, I think probably the most important operational aspect of this bill is the proactive cyber-activity authorized to CSE. That is a reality of the world in which we live. We are totally cyber-dependent, which also means we have enormous cyber-vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity, in effect, has been an afterthought. This is a step; it is not the complete answer. I do some work in the cyber field as well, and that is something that I think is extremely important.
The one issue I would raise, in closing, which I have a concern about specifically, is in relation to the change in what I think is the evidentiary threshold in the terrorism propaganda offence. I can get into that in more detail, but my concern is, essentially, that it may be making it, for no good reason, no justifiable reason that I can see, harder to use that section, which has extreme relevance now in the changing domestic terrorism environment in which we are living.
I look forward to answering any questions and, hopefully, touching on the other subjects.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux de vous revoir.
Je voudrais remercier le Comité de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant lui en ce qui a trait au très important projet de loi  C-59. J'ai eu l'occasion de suivre certaines des procédures et de lire certaines des transcriptions, et il est très encourageant de voir la profondeur et la qualité des questions posées à chaque témoin qui comparaît, notamment ceux qui ont des points de vue différents.
J'ai une longue expérience, et j'y pensais avant de me présenter ici aujourd'hui. Je pense que la première fois que j'ai témoigné devant un comité parlementaire, c'était il y a près de 30 ans. J'étais procureur de la Couronne de l'Alberta, et, comme je l'ai expliqué, j'en ai eu assez de buter contre les erreurs du système de libération conditionnelle dans ma salle d'audience, et je me suis rendu compte que la seule façon de changer la situation consistait à modifier les lois. Cela signifiait que je devais venir à Ottawa, parce qu'il était question de lois correctionnelles fédérales. Je comparaissais devant des comités parlementaires, où j'exposais ce qui s'était passé dans deux ou trois cas.
À ce moment-là, le travail important de l'organe législatif m'a frappé, et j'ai gardé cette impression depuis. Ce travail passe parfois inaperçu, et, selon la façon dont les choses sont traitées par l'organe exécutif du gouvernement, l'analyse très importante et cruciale que les comités peuvent faire est très importante. Un projet de loi comme celui-ci en est un très bon exemple, car on peut avoir des opinions divergentes sur divers sujets, mais on a la capacité de poser des questions et de tenter d'obtenir des renseignements pour analyser si les résultats escomptés seront obtenus grâce au libellé actuel du projet de loi, ou bien si on doit faire d'autres choses. Selon moi, c'est particulièrement le cas en ce qui a trait à des projets de loi comme le projet de loi  C-59, qui est manifestement très complexe et qui porte sur beaucoup de sujets.
En toute équité, la discussion en soi a soulevé des questions qui ne figurent pas dans le projet de loi  C-59. Selon moi, le fait que le gouvernement l'a envoyé ici avant la deuxième lecture, de sorte que vous puissiez obtenir des commentaires et des suggestions sur d'autres sujets, est très encourageant. J'ai des propositions à faire sur des choses de ce genre. Je dois toutefois admettre que je soutiendrais qu'il serait probablement une meilleure idée, simplement d'un point de vue procédural, de limiter vos recommandations aux particularités du projet de loi, et peut-être présenter dans un rapport complémentaire des suggestions sur d'autres sujets, au lieu d'apporter une énorme quantité de nouveaux amendements aux dispositions et de soulever diverses questions qui ne sont pas abordées précisément dans le projet de loi  C-59. Ce projet de loi a tellement de valeur qu'il serait une bonne idée de le faire avancer.
L'exposé que je présente aujourd'hui portera essentiellement sur trois aspects. Tout d'abord, je vais simplement utiliser des exemples d'éléments qui, selon moi, sont remarquables et très importants dans le projet de loi  C-59. J'ai aussi deux ou trois commentaires à formuler sur certains aspects, dont un en particulier qui me pose problème, mais je suppose — pour m'exprimer de façon plus générale — que ce ne sont que des éléments au sujet desquels je vous proposerais de poser des questions et de vous assurer que ce que vous prévoyez qui va se produire se produit effectivement. Ensuite, comme le ministre a manifesté son souhait d'obtenir des suggestions sur d'autres questions, si nous avons le temps — et probablement pas dans la déclaration préliminaire, mais durant la période de questions —, j'ai certaines suggestions à faire sur d'autres questions qui, selon moi, pourraient être intéressantes.
Laissez-moi simplement vous présenter un peu le contexte ainsi que mon expérience personnelle à ce sujet, car ces éléments ont une incidence sur les réflexions dont je vais vous faire part. Comme je l'ai mentionné, j'ai été procureur de la Couronne en Alberta. En raison de l'une des affaires auxquelles j'ai pris part, en 1992, j'ai fini par devenir l'agent exécutif de l'Association canadienne des policiers. Il s'agit des agents de police de la base, les syndiqués. De 1992 à 1998, nous avons participé activement à la réforme de la justice pénale, à la défense des politiques. C'est en raison de cette expérience, en particulier, et de mon travail de procureur de la Couronne que j'ai ressenti l'importance d'utiliser les connaissances opérationnelles de première ligne pour apprendre comment on peut ensuite façonner les outils législatifs ou stratégiques de manière à obtenir les résultats souhaités.
En outre, il n'est pas nécessaire que tout soit fait au moyen d'un projet de loi. Il y a souvent des cas — et j'ai été frappé par ce fait au moment où je regardais certaines des déclarations faites par des témoins que vous avez accueillis — où nous n'avons pas nécessairement besoin de nouvelles lois. Nous devons faire appliquer celles dont nous disposons déjà, et nous devons nous assurer que les outils sont en place afin que l'on puisse les utiliser adéquatement. Selon moi, le projet de loi  C-59 en contient des exemples précis.
En 1998, je me suis retrouvé à travailler pour le gouvernement de l'Ontario, après avoir été nommé par décret. Ce gouvernement avait l'intention de réaliser des réformes de la justice pénale, mais il n'y arrivait pas, alors il voulait des personnes ayant une certaine compréhension du système de justice.
Après le 11 septembre, j'ai été nommé conseiller spécial en matière de sécurité et de lutte contre le terrorisme en raison de certains travaux auxquels j'avais déjà participé. J'ai eu des interactions importantes avec les Américains à ce titre. Anciennement, c'était l'Unité mixte d'enquête sur le crime organisé, qui est devenue l'EISN. Essentiellement, mon rôle consistait à être le représentant provincial dans certaines des discussions, et j'observais les interactions entre les organismes, ou l'absence de telles interactions, et les conséquences qu'elles pouvaient avoir.
Depuis, je fais partie des personnes qui ont effectué l'examen qui a mené à l'armement des agents des services frontaliers. Je travaille encore avec le syndicat relativement à des affaires de politique. Je fais également certaines choses avec les comités sur les technologies de sécurité. La valeur de ce travail tient au fait qu'on apprend à comprendre certaines des réalités opérationnelles et ce qui est nécessaire pour obtenir les résultats escomptés.
Je suppose que je devrais ajouter le dernier élément. L'an dernier, j'ai accepté un poste de professeur adjoint à l'Université Simon Fraser. Je sais que vous allez être choqués d'entendre cela. C'est pour un cours offert à cette université, un programme de maîtrise: le programme d'études du terrorisme, des risques et de la sécurité. Le cours que je donne concerne l'établissement d'un équilibre entre les libertés civiles et la sûreté et la sécurité publiques. Pour revenir sur un argument qu'a formulé le général, je pense qu'il ne s'agit pas de situations où on doit faire un choix entre deux options. Nous sommes pleinement capables de faire les deux, et cela suppose l'établissement d'un équilibre. En règle générale, il s'agit d'une très bonne idée, si on regarde ce qui est proposé dans le projet de loi, surtout dans un texte législatif comme celui-ci, qui a des conséquences sur la sécurité nationale, afin de ne pas laisser de côté les principes généraux de la protection des droits civils.
Ce principe comporte deux volets. Vous remarquerez que dans le terme « droits civils », le mot « droits » est modifié par l'adjectif « civils ». Autrement dit, ce sont des droits qui existent dans le contexte d'une société civile. Selon moi, cette signification a des ramifications du point de vue de ce que les citoyens ont le droit d'attendre de leur gouvernement. Je ne veux pas que le gouvernement fasse intrusion dans ma vie privée, mais, en même temps, si le gouvernement a la capacité d'accéder à des renseignements pertinents et de prendre des mesures à l'égard d'une personne qui pose une menace pour ma famille et moi, je m'attends, au titre de mon droit civil, à ce que le gouvernement fasse ce qu'il a à faire pour étendre cette protection.
L'autre volet de ce principe — et, je sais, M. Dubé a posé de nombreuses questions à ce sujet, tout comme d'autres membres du Comité —, c'est l'importance d'étudier ce qui est proposé d'un point de vue général, pour s'assurer qu'il y a effectivement une surveillance initiale ainsi qu'un examen approprié afin que l'équilibre puisse être établi. À mon avis et, plus précisément, d'après mon expérience, le fait que l'autorité exécutive relève d'elle-même pour l'obtention d'une autorisation, c'est quelque chose qui devrait susciter des inquiétudes. Le projet de loi contient des dispositions qui finiront par régler ce problème, quoiqu'il en contient certaines qui soulèvent des questions à ce sujet.
Pour le très peu de temps qu'il nous reste, laissez-moi simplement affirmer que je pense qu'entre autres choses importantes prévues dans le projet de loi, il y a l'utilisation abondante de préambules et de définitions au sujet de l'importance de la vie privée et ce que nous appellerions généralement les droits civils, en ce que cela s'applique aux raisons pour lesquelles nous prenons des mesures. Il s'agissait selon moi d'une lacune du projet de loi C-51. Je peux vous dire qu'il est d'une importance cruciale dans le monde d'aujourd'hui, qui est régi par la Charte, que l'on veille à ce que ce soit inclus, afin que les tribunaux puissent déterminer si les mesures prises par l'autorité législative tenaient effectivement compte des questions liées à la Charte. « Le préambule d'une loi tu examineras au moment même de la rédaction » est une règle relative à l'interprétation des lois.
Il me reste une minute; je pense que l'aspect opérationnel du projet de loi qui est probablement le plus important, c'est l'autorisation de cyberactivité proactive accordée au CST. C'est une réalité du monde dans lequel nous vivons. Nous sommes totalement cyberdépendants, ce qui signifie également que nous avons d'énormes vulnérabilités à cet égard. En réalité, la cybersécurité a été une considération secondaire. Il s'agit d'une première étape; ce n'est pas la réponse complète. Je fais également un certain travail dans le domaine cybernétique, et c'est quelque chose qui, selon moi, est extrêmement important.
La question que je soulèverais pour conclure, qui me préoccupe particulièrement, est liée au changement dans ce que je pense être la norme de preuve associée à l'infraction de propagande terroriste. Je pourrai aborder ce sujet plus en détail, mais ma préoccupation tient essentiellement au fait qu'il pourrait rendre plus difficile — pour aucune bonne raison, aucune raison justifiable que je puisse imaginer — l'utilisation de cette disposition, qui est extrêmement pertinente maintenant, vu l'environnement de terrorisme intérieur dans lequel nous vivons.
J'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions et, je l'espère, d'aborder d'autres sujets.
Collapse
Stephanie Carvin
View Stephanie Carvin Profile
Stephanie Carvin
2017-12-05 8:47
Expand
I'd like to thank the committee for inviting me to speak on Bill C-59, the most comprehensive and far-reaching reform to national security in Canada since 1984. I would like emphasize that I am not a lawyer. However, I do have experience working in national security and intelligence, and I study this area for a living. Indeed, in the interest of transparency, I would like to state that from 2012 to 2015, I worked at the Canadian Security Intelligence Service as a strategic analyst.
My comments are, of course, my own, but they're informed by my research and experience as the national security landscape in Canada has evolved in a relatively short period of time. All of this is to say that today my comments will be focused on the scope of this bill and will address some of the areas that I believe this committee needs to, at the very least, consider as it makes recommendations.
First and foremost, I wish to express my support for this bill. I believe it contains four important steps that are essential for Canadian national security and the functions of our national security agencies.
First, it provides clarity as to the powers of our national security agencies. There's no better example of this than part 3, the CSE act, which gives our national signals intelligence agency statutory standing and spells out its mandate and procedures to a reasonable extent. Given that the first mention of this agency in law was the 2001 Anti-terrorism Act, this bill takes us a long way towards transparency.
Second, Bill C-59 outlines the limits on the power of our national security agencies in a way that will provide certainty to the public and also to our national security agencies. In particular, the bill clarifies one of the most controversial parts of the current legislation formerly known as BillC-51, that is, CSIS' disruption powers.
While it might be argued that this is taking away CSIS' ability to fight threats to Canada's national security, I disagree. Having found themselves embroiled in scandals in recent years, it is little appreciated how conservative our national security agencies actually are. While they do not want political interference in their activities, they no doubt welcome the clarity that Bill C-59 provides as to these measures.
Let there be no doubt that the ability to disrupt is an important one, particularly given the increasingly fast pace of terror investigations, especially those related to the threat of foreign fighters. In this sense, I believe that Bill C-59 hits the right balance, grounding these measures squarely within the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Third, Bill C-59 addresses long-standing problems related to review, and in some cases oversight, in Canadian national security. I will not go over the problems of our current system, which has been described as “stove-piped” by experts and commissions of inquiries. I will, however, state that the proposed national security and intelligence review agency, NSIRA, and intelligence commissioner—in combination with the new National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, NSICOP—create a review architecture that is robust and that I believe Canadians can have confidence in.
Fourth, in its totality, Bill C-59 is a forward-looking bill in at least three respects. First, the issue of datasets is not narrowly defined in law. While this has been a cause of concern for some, I believe this is the right approach to take. It allows flexibility of the term, but at the same time it subjects any interpretation to the oversight of the intelligence commissioner and the minister. It subjects the use of datasets to the internal procedures of the national security agencies themselves—and limits who may have access—and the review of the NSIRA and NSICOP.
Second, it takes steps to enhance Canada's ability to protect and defend its critical infrastructure. Increasingly, we are seeing the abilities of states and state-sponsored actors to create chaos through the attacks on electrical grids, oil and gas facilities, dams, and hospital and health care facilities. Much of this critical infrastructure is in the hands of the private sector. This bill takes steps to ensure that there is a process in place to address these threats in the future.
Third, Bill C-59 puts us on the same footing as our allies by mandating an active cyber-role for our national signals intelligence agency. I appreciate the legal and ethical challenges this raises, especially should CSE be asked to support a DND operation. However, the idea that Canada would not have this capability is, I think, unacceptable to most Canadians, and would be seen as unfortunate in the eyes of our allies, many of whom have been quietly encouraging Canada to enhance its cyber-presence in the wake of cyber-threats from North Korea, China, and Russia.
To reiterate, I believe this is a good bill, but there's room for improvement. I'm aware that some of my legal colleagues, especially Craig Forcese, Kent Roach, and Alex, of course, will be speaking to certain specific legal issues that should be addressed to make the law more operationalizable and compliant with our Constitution.
I encourage the committee to seriously consider their suggestions. However, I'm going to focus on four areas that may be problematic in a broader sense, which I believe the committee should at least be aware of or consider when it makes recommendations.
First, I think it's important to consider the role of the Minister of Public Safety. To be clear, I believe our current minister does a good job in his current position. However, the mandate of the Minister of Public Safety is already very large, and this bill would give him or her more responsibilities in terms of review and, in some cases, oversight. At some future date, the scope of this ministry may be worth considering.
Having said this, I acknowledge a paradox. Requiring the intelligence commissioner's approval for certain operations, as is clear in proposed subsections 28(1) and 28(2) of the proposed CSE Act, and potentially denying the approval of a minister is, in my view, at odds with the principle of ministerial responsibility in our Westminster system of government.
To be sure, I understand why this authority of the intelligence commissioner is there. Section 8 of the charter insists on the right to be protected from unreasonable search and seizure. The intelligence commissioner's role ensures that this standard is met.
Why is this a problem? Canada has an unfortunate history of ministers and prime ministers trying to shirk responsibility for the actions of our security services, which dates back decades. Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau used the principle of police independence to state that his government could not possibly engage in review or oversight of the activities of the RCMP even though the national security roles of the RCMP are a ministerial responsibility. There is simply a tension here with our constitutional requirements and with what has been the practice of our system for decades. If this bill is to pass through, it will be up to members of Parliament to hold the minister to account, even if he or she tries to blame the intelligence commissioner for actions not taken.
Second, despite the creation of no less than three major review agencies, there's still no formal mechanism for efficacy review of our security services. We will receive many reports as to whether or not our security services are compliant with the law, but we still will not have any idea of how well they are doing it. I'm not suggesting we need to number-crunch how many terrorism plots are disrupted. Such a crude measure would be counterproductive. However, inquiring as to whether the analysis produced supports government decisions in a timely manner is a worthwhile question to ask. Efficacy review is still a gap in our national security review architecture.
Third, while I praise the transparency of Bill C-59, I'm also concerned about what I'm calling “report fatigue”. I note that between last year's BillC-22 and now Bill C-59, there will have been at least 10 new reports generated, not including special reports as required. It is my understanding that some of these reports are very technical and can be automatically generated when certain tasks such as, hypothetically, the search of a dataset is done. However, others are going to be more complex. More briefings will also be required. Having spent considerable time working on reports for the government in my former work, I know how difficult and time-consuming this can be.
Finally, and related to this last point, it is my understanding that the security services will not be receiving any extra resources to comply with the reporting and briefing requirements of either BillC-22 or Bill C-59. This concerns me, because I believe that enhanced communication between our national security services with the government and review bodies is important. As the former's powers expand, this should be well resourced.
In summary, the ability to investigate threats to the national security of Canada is vital. I believe that for the most part, Bill C-59 takes Canada a great step towards meeting that elusive balance between liberty and security. In my view, where Bill C-59 defines powers and process, it should enable our security services to carry out their important work with confidence knowing exactly where they stand. Further, the transparency in the bill will hopefully go some way towards building trust between the Canadian public, Parliament, and our security services.
Thank you for your time. I look forward to your questions.
Je tiens à remercier le Comité de m'avoir invitée à parler du projet de loi  C-59, la réforme liée à la sécurité nationale la plus complète et la plus vaste réalisée au Canada depuis 1984. Je tiens à souligner que je ne suis pas avocate. Cependant, j'ai déjà travaillé dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale et du renseignement et étudier ce domaine est mon métier. En fait, par souci de transparence, j'aimerais préciser que, de 2012 à 2015, j'ai travaillé pour le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité en tant qu'analyste stratégique.
Aujourd'hui, je parle bien sûr, en mon nom, mais ce que je vous dirai est étayé par mes recherches et mon expérience du paysage de la sécurité nationale au Canada, qui a évolué en relativement peu de temps. Tout ça pour dire que, aujourd'hui, mes commentaires porteront sur la portée du projet de loi et concerneront certains des domaines où, selon moi, le Comité doit, au moins, envisager de formuler des recommandations.
Pour commencer, je tiens à exprimer mon soutien à l'égard du projet de loi. Je crois qu'il contient quatre mesures importantes qui sont essentielles à la sécurité nationale du Canada et au fonctionnement de nos organismes responsables de la sécurité nationale.
Premièrement, le projet de loi précise les pouvoirs de nos organismes responsables de la sécurité nationale. Il n'y a pas de meilleur exemple que dans la partie 3, sur la Loi sur le CST, qui donne à notre organisme national du renseignement électromagnétique un statut légal et décrit son mandat et ses procédures de façon raisonnable. Vu que la première mention de cet organisme dans la loi remonte à la loi antiterroriste de 2001, le projet de loi constitue un très bon pas vers la transparence.
Deuxièmement, le projet de loi  C-59 décrit les limites des pouvoirs de nos organismes responsables de la sécurité nationale d'une façon qui assurera une certitude au public et à nos organismes responsables de la sécurité nationale. Plus particulièrement, le projet de loi précise une des parties les plus controversées de la loi actuelle, anciennement appelée projet de loi C-51, je parle ici des pouvoirs de perturbation du SCRS.
Même si certains pourraient faire valoir qu'on retire ainsi au SCRS la capacité de lutter contre des menaces à la sécurité nationale du Canada, je ne suis pas d'accord. Puisque les représentants du SCRS se sont retrouvés dans des scandales au cours des dernières années, on a tendance à négliger à quel point nos organismes de sécurité nationale sont conservateurs, en fait. Même s'ils ne veulent pas d'interférence politique dans le cadre de leurs activités, je suis sûre qu'ils accueillent à bras ouverts les précisions fournies dans le projet de loi  C-59 relativement à ces mesures.
Soyons clairs: la capacité de perturbation est un outil important, particulièrement vu le rythme de plus en plus rapide des enquêtes liées au terrorisme, surtout lorsqu'il est question de la menace des combattants étrangers. Dans cette mesure, je crois que le projet de loi  C-59 trouve le juste équilibre et harmonise avec justesse ces mesures avec la Charte des droits et libertés.
Troisièmement, le projet de loi  C-59 s'attaque aux problèmes de longue date liés à l'examen et, dans certains cas, à la surveillance dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale canadienne. Je ne vais pas passer en revue les problèmes du système actuel, qui a été qualifié de cloisonné par des experts et des commissions d'enquête. Cependant, je vais déclarer que l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignements proposés, l'OSSNR, et le commissaire aux renseignements — de pair avec le nouveau Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, le CPSNR —, constitue un cadre d'examen robuste auquel, selon moi, les Canadiens pourront faire confiance.
Quatrièmement, globalement, le projet de loi  C-59 est un projet de loi tourné vers l'avenir, et ce, au moins à trois égards. Premièrement, l'enjeu des ensembles de données n'est pas défini de façon trop étroite dans la loi. Même si cela en a préoccupé certains, je crois que c'est la bonne approche à adopter. Cela donne une certaine marge de manoeuvre à ce terme, tout en assujettissant toute interprétation à la surveillance du commissaire au renseignement et au ministre. Cette façon de faire assujettit l'utilisation des ensembles de données aux procédures internes des organismes responsables de la sécurité nationale eux-mêmes — et en limite l'accès — et à l'examen de l'OSSNR et du CPSNR.
Ensuite, le projet de loi prend des mesures pour renforcer la capacité du Canada de protéger et défendre ses infrastructures essentielles. De plus en plus, nous constatons les capacités des États et des acteurs parrainés par des États de créer du chaos grâce à des attaques des réseaux électriques, des installations pétrolières et gazières, des barrages, des hôpitaux et des installations de soins de santé. Une bonne partie de ces infrastructures essentielles relèvent du secteur privé. Le projet de loi prend des mesures pour s'assurer qu'il y a un processus en place pour lutter contre ces menaces à l'avenir.
En outre, le projet de loi  C-59 nous met sur un pied d'égalité avec nos alliés en exigeant de notre organisme national chargé du renseignement électromagnétique qu'il joue un rôle actif dans le domaine cybernétique. Je comprends les défis juridiques et éthiques que cela soulève, surtout si on demandait au CST de soutenir une opération du MDN. Cependant, l'idée que le Canada n'ait pas cette capacité est, selon moi, inacceptable pour la plupart des Canadiens et serait jugée malheureuse aux yeux de nos alliés, dont beaucoup ont encouragé tacitement le Canada à renforcer sa cyberprésence dans la foulée des cybermenaces de la Corée du Nord, de la Chine et de la Russie.
Encore une fois, je crois que c'est un bon projet de loi, mais il y a place à l'amélioration. Je sais que certains de mes collègues du milieu juridique, et surtout Craig Forcese, Kent Roach et Alex, bien sûr, vous parleront de certains enjeux juridiques précis auxquels il faudrait s'attacher pour faire en sorte qu'il soit plus facile à opérationnaliser et plus conforme à notre Constitution.
J'encourage le Comité à réfléchir sérieusement aux suggestions qu'il va formuler. Cependant, je vais me concentrer sur quatre domaines qui, de façon générale, peuvent être problématiques, des domaines que le Comité devrait, au moins, connaître ou, sinon, prendre en considération lorsqu'il formulera ses recommandations.
Premièrement, je crois qu'il est important de tenir compte du rôle du ministre de la Sécurité publique. Pour être clair, je crois que notre ministre actuel fait du bon travail à ce poste. Cependant, le mandat du ministre de la Sécurité publique est déjà important, et ce projet de loi lui donnerait plus de responsabilités liées au contrôle et, dans certains cas, à la surveillance. À une date ultérieure, il faudrait peut-être revoir la portée de ce ministère.
Cela dit, je reconnais un paradoxe. Exiger l'approbation du commissaire au renseignement pour certaines opérations, comme on le propose clairement aux paragraphes 28(1), 28(2) de la Loi sur le SCT proposée, et possiblement refuser l'approbation d'un ministre est, selon moi, contraire au principe de responsabilité ministérielle dans notre système de gouvernement de type Westminster.
Assurément, je comprends pourquoi ce pouvoir du commissaire au renseignement existe. L'article 8 de la Charte insiste sur le droit d'être protégé contre des fouilles, perquisitions et saisies abusives. Le rôle du commissaire au renseignement veille à ce qu'on respecte cette norme.
Pourquoi est-ce problématique? Malheureusement, il est arrivé que, au Canada, des ministres et des premiers ministres tentent d'éviter une responsabilité liée aux actions de nos services de sécurité, des situations qui remontent à des décennies. Le premier ministre Pierre Trudeau a utilisé le principe de l'indépendance de la police pour déclarer que son gouvernement ne pouvait pas possiblement procéder à un examen ou à une surveillance des activités de la GRC, même si les rôles de la GRC en matière de sécurité nationale relèvent d'une responsabilité ministérielle. Il y a tout simplement une tension, ici, entre nos exigences constitutionnelles et ce qu'on fait en pratique dans le cadre de notre système depuis des décennies. Si le projet de loi a été adopté, ce sera aux députés de tenir le ministre responsable, même s'il tente de blâmer le commissaire au renseignement pour certaines mesures qui n'ont pas été prises.
Deuxièmement, malgré la création de pas moins de trois organismes d'examen majeur, il n'y a toujours pas de mécanisme officiel pour examiner de façon efficace nos services de sécurité. Nous allons recevoir de nombreux rapports quant à savoir si nos services de sécurité respectent la loi, mais nous n'aurons toujours pas d'idée de la mesure dans laquelle ils sont efficaces. Je ne laisse aucunement entendre qu'il faut calculer le nombre de complots terroristes déjoués. Une telle mesure brute serait contre-productive. Cependant, se poser des questions afin de déterminer si les analyses produites soutiennent en temps opportun les décisions prises par le gouvernement serait à propos. L'examen de l'efficacité reste une lacune de notre architecture d'examen lié à la sécurité nationale.
Troisièmement, même si je louange la transparence du projet de loi  C-59, je suis aussi préoccupée par ce que j'appelle « la lassitude liée aux rapports ». Je note que, entre le projet de loi C-22 de l'année dernière et, maintenant, le projet de loi  C-59, il y aurait au moins 10 nouveaux rapports produits, et cela n'inclut pas les rapports spéciaux produits au besoin. Je crois savoir que certains de ces rapports sont très techniques et peuvent être générés automatiquement lorsque certaines tâches, comme, c'est une hypothèse, une recherche dans un ensemble de données, sont réalisées. Cependant, d'autres rapports seront plus complexes. Il faudra aussi plus de séances d'information. Ayant travaillé longuement sur des rapports pour le gouvernement dans mon ancien rôle, je sais à quel point cela peut être difficile et chronophage.
Enfin, et c'est lié au dernier point soulevé, je crois comprendre que les services de sécurité ne recevront pas de ressources supplémentaires pour se conformer aux exigences redditionnelles et d'information des projets de loi C-22 et C-59. Cela me préoccupe, parce que je crois qu'une meilleure communication entre nos services responsables de la sécurité nationale et le gouvernement et les organismes d'examen est importante. À mesure que les pouvoirs des services de sécurité nationale seront élargis, il faudra fournir les ressources connexes nécessaires.
En bref, la capacité de mener des enquêtes sur des menaces liées à la sécurité nationale au Canada est cruciale. Je crois que, en grande partie, le projet de loi  C-59 fait faire au Canada un grand pas en avant en ce qui concerne le besoin de trouver le juste équilibre entre la liberté et l'examen. Selon moi, lorsque le projet de loi  C-59 définit des pouvoirs et des processus, il devrait permettre aux services de sécurité de s'acquitter de leur travail important et en sachant avec confiance exactement là où ils en sont. De plus, la transparence du projet de loi, espérons-le, aidera, dans une certaine mesure, à renforcer le lien de confiance entre le public canadien, le Parlement et nos services de sécurité.
Merci du temps que vous m'avez accordé. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.
Collapse
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Hello, Ms. Carvin.
In your presentation, you said that Bill  C-59 would change the powers of CSIS officers. It is often said that Bill C-51 gave CSIS too many powers. There have been many calls to change that, and I would like to better understand the reason for those requests. Since you worked for that organization, you are familiar with the field. I would like to know more about that.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Bonjour, madame Carvin.
Dans votre présentation, vous avez mentionné que le projet de loi  C-59 modifierait les pouvoirs des agents du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. On dit souvent que le projet de loi C-51 a attribué trop de pouvoirs au SCRS. De nombreuses demandes ont été exprimées pour que cela change, et j'aimerais comprendre un peu mieux les raisons de ces demandes. Comme vous avez travaillé dans cet organisme, vous connaissez un peu le domaine. J'aimerais en savoir davantage.
Collapse
Stephanie Carvin
View Stephanie Carvin Profile
Stephanie Carvin
2017-12-05 9:14
Expand
Thank you for your question.
I will respond in English. Thank you.
I think one of the issues is that, without guidance, the security services do not know where to step. There is concern, for example, that with the broad scope of BillC-51, knowing where the limits were was a challenge. One of the things that the service always worries about is another commission of inquiry. This is the number one thing you want to avoid because of the drain on manpower, resources, and these kinds of things. Without adequate oversight, without clear guidance as to where the lines are, the service becomes very scared about where it can actually proceed.
We've seen that, of course. Michel Coulombe and the new director have stated that they haven't really gone for the warranted powers in BillC-51 that allow it to violate the charter, as far as I'm aware. You want powers that are clearly defined in law and that you know have the backing of the government and the backing of the courts, or else a kind of paralysis develops, in the sense that you don't want to do anything that could eventually end up with a commission of inquiry again. This is why I strongly support clearly defined disruption powers.
I believe disruption is important. One of the things I saw during my time was just the speed at which terrorism investigations sped up. They could go from being over two years to being a couple of weeks, when people saw the propaganda and would make the decision to leave.
These disruption powers are important, but I think grounding them in the charter and in interpretations of the law is absolutely vital to the actual operations of the agency.
Je vous remercie de la question.
Merci.
L'un des problèmes, selon moi, tient au fait que les services de sécurité ne savent pas à quoi s'en tenir sans lignes directrices. Une source de préoccupations, entre autres, provenait du fait que la vaste portée du projet de loi C-51 rendait les limites floues. Le service redoute constamment de subir une autre commission d'enquête. C'est quelque chose qu'il veut éviter à tout prix, vu le fardeau que cela impose sur le personnel, les ressources et ce genre de choses. Sans supervision adéquate, sans ligne directrice claire quant aux limites, le service craint énormément de dépasser sa compétence.
Nous en avons bien sûr des exemples concrets: Michel Coulombe et le nouveau directeur ont déclaré ne pas vraiment avoir usé des pouvoirs qui lui ont été conférés par le projet de loi C-51, à savoir les pouvoirs qui lui permettent de violer la Charte, du moins, autant que je sache. Il faut que les pouvoirs soient clairement définis dans la loi. Il faut que le service sache qu'il a l'appui du gouvernement et des tribunaux. Autrement, il se retrouve en quelque sorte paralysé, puisque personne n'ose faire quoi que ce soit qui risquerait de mener à une nouvelle commission d'enquête. C'est pour cette raison que je suis fortement en faveur d'une définition claire des pouvoirs de mener des activités de perturbation.
Selon moi, les activités de perturbation sont importantes. L'une des choses que j'ai constatées, à l'époque où je travaillais au service, c'est la vitesse à laquelle les enquêtes se sont accélérées. Des enquêtes qui prenaient plus de deux ans pouvaient aboutir en deux ou trois semaines, dès qu'une personne était exposée à la propagande et prenait la décision de faire défection.
Les pouvoirs de mener des activités de perturbation sont importants, et je crois qu'il serait absolument vital, concrètement, pour les activités de l'organisation, de les ancrer dans la Charte et dans l'interprétation de la loi.
Collapse
Alex Neve
View Alex Neve Profile
Alex Neve
2017-12-05 9:18
Expand
In a very complementary way, I was going to highlight that we too absolutely agree that the need for a much more careful delineation of CSIS's powers, when it comes to threat reduction, is essential. That's why there is this need to enshrine a clear prohibition—and the line absolutely needs to be drawn—to make it clear that actions that will violate the Charter of Rights.... Very importantly, we would add that Canada's international human rights obligations, which are binding and which take our actions into a global context, play a very important role there.
Je veux tout simplement ajouter quelque chose: je voulais souligner que nous sommes aussi entièrement en accord avec le fait qu'il est nécessaire de définir beaucoup plus rigoureusement les pouvoirs du SCRS. C'est essentiel en ce qui concerne la réduction de la menace. C'est aussi pourquoi il est nécessaire d'établir une interdiction claire — une ligne qu'il ne faut absolument pas franchir — en ce qui concerne les activités qui violent la Charte des droits... J'ajouterai aussi, et c'est extrêmement important, que les obligations internationales du Canada relativement aux droits de la personne, lesquelles doivent être respectées puisqu'elles donnent un contexte international à nos activités, jouent un rôle très important.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2017-12-05 9:21
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'm going to try to get through all these points quickly because I only have the seven minutes.
Dr. Carvin, on the intelligence commissioner issue, I'm just wondering about the length of the term and whether five years is enough to have some kind of independence from the government apparatus. Given the fact that, potentially, they can be reappointed for a second term, would there not be incentive to have some kind of job security in that sense?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je vais essayer de faire vite, puisque je n'ai que sept minutes pour poser toutes ces questions.
Madame Carvin, à propos du commissaire au renseignement, je voulais seulement savoir si un mandat de cinq ans est suffisant pour lui donner suffisamment d'autonomie par rapport à l'appareil gouvernemental. Puisqu'il est aussi possible de nommer le même commissaire pour un deuxième mandat, je me demandais si une forme ou une autre de sécurité d'emploi pourrait être un genre d'incitatif.
Collapse
Stephanie Carvin
View Stephanie Carvin Profile
Stephanie Carvin
2017-12-05 9:21
Expand
It's interesting, in that you want someone who is familiar enough with what's happening and doesn't lose touch, but you're right, there is that potential conflict. I think a lot of it is also going to depend on the people around the intelligence commissioner and the support staff they actually have.
The intelligence commissioner is going to have considerable responsibilities on review and oversight. I believe the advantage is going to be having someone who has recent experience and understands the context and things like that, but even more importantly, I think ensuring that the people around this individual are well staffed and well funded is going to make a difference.
Ce qui est intéressant, c'est qu'il faut une personne qui s'y connaisse assez pour comprendre et suivre ce qui se passe, mais vous avez raison, il y a un conflit potentiel. Je crois que les personnes autour du commissaire au renseignement ainsi que le personnel de soutien vont peser aussi dans la balance.
Le commissaire au renseignement va avoir d'énormes responsabilités en ce qui concerne les activités d'examen et de surveillance. Je crois qu'il sera avantageux d'avoir quelqu'un qui a une expérience récente et qui comprend le contexte et tout le reste, mais, fait plus important encore, je crois qu'il faut veiller à ce que les gens autour du commissaire soient bien encadrés et aient accès à suffisamment de fonds, parce que c'est cela qui aura le plus d'incidence.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2017-12-05 9:22
Expand
In terms of independence, does it cause potential conflicts by keeping the person as non-reliant on the executive branch as possible for their job security?
En matière d'autonomie, cela pourrait-il causer des conflits si la sécurité d'emploi de la personne dépend le moins possible de l'organe exécutif?
Collapse
Stephanie Carvin
View Stephanie Carvin Profile
Stephanie Carvin
2017-12-05 9:22
Expand
I have to believe that our judges are sufficiently pensioned such that this is probably not going to be that much of an issue. I'm going to refer to my friend Emmett Macfarlane, who has written considerably on the courts in Canada and has written passionately that the judges actually are independent. I'm going to base my expertise on him and the conclusions of his research.
Je n'ai d'autre choix que de croire que nos juges ont une pension de retraite suffisante pour que cela ne soit jamais un élément probable. Je vais reprendre ce qu'a dit mon ami Emmett Macfarlane, qui a écrit énormément de choses sur les tribunaux canadiens. Il est passionnément convaincu que les juges sont véritablement indépendants. Je veux donc me fier à son expertise et aux conclusions de ses études.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2017-12-05 9:23
Expand
Okay, great.
The last question is on the intelligence commissioner. Given that it's oversight and not review, there's obviously something novel in that, and that's important. I want to make sure I'm understanding correctly that we're looking more at general authorizations as opposed to specifics, in terms of the actions being carried out by different agencies. I want to make sure I'm understanding that right. They're not actually looking at a specific action being posed but rather at the reasonableness of a general direction that an agency might be going in. Am I understanding that correctly?
D'accord, très bien.
Ma dernière question concerne le commissaire au renseignement. Puisqu'on parle ici de surveillance et non d'examen, il est clair que c'est quelque chose de nouveau, et c'est important. Je veux m'assurer de bien comprendre: il est question ici d'autorisations de nature générale et non de nature précise, en ce qui concerne les mesures prises par les différents organismes. Je veux m'assurer de bien comprendre cela. Le rôle du commissaire consiste à surveiller non pas les mesures précises qui sont prises, mais plutôt le caractère raisonnable de l'orientation générale prise par un organisme. Est-ce que je comprends bien?
Collapse
Stephanie Carvin
View Stephanie Carvin Profile
Stephanie Carvin
2017-12-05 9:24
Expand
Right. I don't know if you've been referred to Craig Forcese, who will be on the next panel. He has developed a decision tree. It's actually more complicated than your daily Sudoku. He might be better placed to answer that question.
It's my understanding that, yes, it is general, but there are some very specific cases where the intelligence commissioner will have to make calls, in particular, in defence of critical infrastructure. This is where some of my concerns about ministerial oversight arise.
Oui. Je ne sais pas si on vous a parlé de Craig Forcese, mais il fait partie du prochain groupe de témoins. Il a mis au point un arbre de décision. En réalité, les choses ne sont pas aussi simples que le Sudoku du jour. Il sera probablement mieux placé pour vous répondre.
D'après ce que j'en sais, oui, il s'agit de surveillance générale, mais il existe des cas très précis où le commissaire au renseignement devra prendre des décisions, en particulier en ce qui concerne la défense des infrastructures essentielles. C'est de ce côté que j'éprouve quelques préoccupations relativement à la surveillance ministérielle.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2017-12-05 9:27
Expand
Thank you very much.
There is one last question I wanted to ask. You talked about the importance of having legal grounds for the operations that CSE does. There are different parts that I've been looking at. I don't have enough time to get into some of those details, but there is one I was asking them about with proposed section 24, about testing and studying information infrastructure. There's also proposed section 28, which is about the minister authorizing cybersecurity—essentially, authorization to protect federal infrastructure and non-federal infrastructure.
Could the bill benefit from more clarity as to what exactly CSE can be doing in those particular contexts?
Merci beaucoup.
Il y a une dernière question que je voulais poser. Vous avez mentionné qu'il est important que les activités du CST reposent sur des bases juridiques. J'ai étudié différentes parties du projet de loi, et je n'ai pas assez de temps pour aller voir le détail, mais il y a une question que j'ai posée à propos de l'article 24 qui concerne la mise à l'essai ou l'évaluation des infrastructures de l'information. Il y a aussi l'article 28 du projet de loi qui habilite le ministre à délivrer des autorisations de cybersécurité, c'est-à-dire, essentiellement, des autorisations de protéger les infrastructures fédérales et non fédérales.
Le projet de loi pourrait-il être renforcé si on clarifiait exactement ce que le CST peut faire dans ces contextes particuliers?
Collapse
Stephanie Carvin
View Stephanie Carvin Profile
Stephanie Carvin
2017-12-05 9:28
Expand
Very briefly, I would say I am happy for the intelligence commissioner to have a good review and oversight discretion, particularly with the defence of critical infrastructure, because that is a very vague concept and our idea of what it is actually changes over time.
With regard to proposed section 24, I'm going to leave that to Craig Forcese, given the time.
Très rapidement, je dirais que je suis contente que le commissaire au renseignement dispose de pouvoirs discrétionnaires forts en matière d'examen et de surveillance, en particulier en ce qui concerne la défense des infrastructures essentielles, puisqu'il s'agit d'un concept plutôt vague et que notre conception des infrastructures essentielles évolue au fil du temps.
Pour ce qui est de l'article 24 du projet de loi, je vais laisser Craig Forcese répondre, compte tenu du temps qu'il nous reste.
Collapse
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2017-12-05 9:44
Expand
Rest assured that I completely agree with the principle you have just stated. Yet we also have to look at the practical application. In practice, the texts are not always adaptable.
Ms. Carvin, you said there are more reports and that there is a need for transparency. How does it help people to inform them of the current level of security or danger? I am not referring to security professionals and legislators, but to people who work in a store, a restaurant, a factory, and so forth.
Soyez rassuré: je suis tout à fait d'accord sur le principe que vous venez d'évoquer. Cependant, nous devons aussi examiner l'application pratique de la chose. Sur le terrain, il arrive que les textes ne soient pas toujours adaptables.
Madame Carvin, vous avez dit qu'il y avait un plus grand nombre de rapports et qu'il fallait être transparent. Or quel service rend-on aux gens en leur détaillant le niveau de sécurité ou de dangerosité en cours? Je ne parle pas ici des professionnels de la sécurité et des législateurs, mais des gens qui travaillent dans un magasin, dans un restaurant, dans une usine ou ailleurs.
Collapse
Stephanie Carvin
View Stephanie Carvin Profile
Stephanie Carvin
2017-12-05 9:45
Expand
Thank you for your question.
Again, I would refer you to the worldwide threat assessment. It is a 10- to 15-page report written in very basic language that provides guidance as to the priorities and concerns of the U.S. national intelligence committee. It's there for anyone to read, and I think Canadians would benefit. Certainly someone like me, who teaches threats to critical infrastructure, would certainly be using any kind of document like that in teaching. I am sure I'm not alone.
There are a lot of university campuses now that are teaching terrorism and national security. We need to educate students about the kinds of threats they will be working on if they choose to go into a law enforcement career or a national security career.
Je vous remercie de votre question.
Encore une fois, je fais allusion à l'évaluation des menaces à l'échelle mondiale. Il s'agit d'un rapport de 10 à 15 pages très facile à comprendre, qui explique les priorités et les préoccupations du comité national du renseignement des États-Unis. Tout le monde y a accès, et je crois qu'il serait utile aux Canadiens. Les spécialistes comme moi, qui donnent des cours sur les menaces aux infrastructures essentielles, utiliseraient certainement un tel document dans leur programme d'enseignement. Je suis convaincue que je ne suis pas la seule intéressée.
Beaucoup d'universités offrent maintenant des cours sur le terrorisme et la sécurité nationale. Nous devons montrer aux étudiants les types de menaces sur lesquels ils se pencheront s'ils choisissent de mener une carrière dans le domaine de l'application de la loi ou de la sécurité nationale.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
Mr. Wark, I want to quote a couple of things here.
This is a sentence from an article you wrote in The Globe and Mail shortly after BillC-51 was introduced. You say, “Strengthened accountability may well be our best bet to ensure that new security powers are balanced against rights protections.”
After Bill C-59 was released, you wrote, “Canada may have restored its place in the world as it pertains to national security review and democratic controls, a place we gave up after 1984.”
This is a general question. I think it shows that Bill C-59 has made an important advance, but I wonder whether you could give us your thoughts on where we were and where we are now as a result of Bill C-59.
Merci beaucoup.
Monsieur Wark, je veux citer deux ou trois éléments.
Il s'agit d'une phrase tirée d'un article que vous avez rédigé dans le Globe and Mail peu après la présentation du projet de loi C-51. Vous avez affirmé ce qui suit: « Une responsabilité renforcée pourrait très bien être notre meilleure chance de nous assurer que les nouveaux pouvoirs en matière de sécurité sont équilibrés par rapport à la protection des droits. »
Après la publication du projet de loi  C-59, vous avez écrit ce qui suit: « Le Canada a peut-être récupéré sa place dans le monde en ce qui a trait à l'examen de la sécurité nationale et aux mesures de contrôle démocratique, place que nous avions abandonnée après 1984. »
C'est une question d'ordre général. Je pense que cette citation montre que le projet de loi  C-59 a constitué un progrès important, mais je me demande si vous pourriez nous faire part de vos réflexions sur la situation dans laquelle nous étions à l'époque et sur notre situation actuelle, en conséquence de ce projet de loi.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 30 of 37 | Page: 1 of 2

1
2
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data