Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 150000
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 15:47
Expand
Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. I think this is the last committee meeting for all committees in the 41st Parliament, so the health committee is working right till the end.
We have two panels this afternoon. For our first panel, we have three different groups. As per usual, we'll connect first with Kathleen Cooper by video conference.
Welcome, Kathleen. You're welcome to go ahead with your presentation.
Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Je crois qu'il s'agit de la dernière réunion pour tous les comités de la 41e législature; les membres du Comité de la santé travaillent donc jusqu'à la toute fin.
Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons deux groupes de témoins. Dans notre premier groupe, nous accueillons trois différents organismes. Tout d'abord, nous nous entretiendrons avec Kathleen Cooper, par vidéoconférence.
Bienvenue, Kathleen. Vous pouvez livrer votre exposé.
Collapse
Kathleen Cooper
View Kathleen Cooper Profile
Kathleen Cooper
2015-06-18 15:48
Expand
I thought I was going third, but that's fine.
Je croyais que je serais la troisième, mais je suis d'accord.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 15:48
Expand
You're first today.
Aujourd'hui, vous parlerez en premier.
Collapse
Kathleen Cooper
View Kathleen Cooper Profile
Kathleen Cooper
2015-06-18 15:48
Expand
First of all, to tell you about the Canadian Environmental Law Association, we're a non-profit public interest organization specializing in environmental law. We're also a legal aid clinic within Ontario. We provide legal representation to low-income individuals and vulnerable communities.
Then we have law reform priorities, and in setting our strategic priorities, one of those is environment and human health. In deciding within that large topic how to set priorities, we take a population health approach, the same as Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and public health agencies everywhere do. You set priorities by focusing on issues where large numbers of people are potentially or directly affected or where you have serious outcomes.
You can't get much more serious than a known carcinogen where there's strong science. Radon, as I'm sure you're going to hear later as well, is in a class by itself compared to most other environmental carcinogens. That's why we've focused on radon.
I'm going to speak today to a report we prepared last year, “Radon in Indoor Air: A Review of Policy and Law in Canada”. I believe you've been circulated the media release that was issued the day we released the report. That's all I was able to have translated given the time pressure of meeting with you today.
We canvassed policy and law across Canada at the federal and provincial levels and looked at jurisdictions and roles. We focused on public buildings and building codes, looked at other relevant provincial policy and law and the associated common law, and made a number of recommendations, but I'll focus today on just the recommendations we made with respect to the federal government.
Overall, our findings were that Canadians need better legal protection from radon. We found a patchwork of inconsistent and mostly unenforceable guidance.
For the federal government, we found that really important leadership has occurred, and Kelley Bush from Health Canada will provide some details on that for you today, although we definitely made recommendations for more that can be done. At the provincial and territorial level, where actually most jurisdiction lies, we found a wide range of laws that need to be updated or that contain gaps or ambiguities. There's very limited case law, which points to the need for improving a law or for law reform. I won't get into detail on what's been done at the federal level on radon, although the report does, because Kelley will be doing that for you later on.
Just in summary, under the national radon program there has been very valuable research, testing, and mapping of high -radon areas. The guideline for indoor radon was updated in 2007. The national building code was updated with respect to radon provisions, there's a certification program for radon mitigators, and there has been a national campaign to urge the testing by Canadians of their homes. It's recommended that every home in Canada be tested.
We recommended, to build on that important work, that there really is a logical next step here. Through the work of the Green Budget Coalition this past year, we recommended a tax credit for radon remediation. We recommended that the Income Tax Act add a tax credit for radon mitigation of up to $3,000 for individual Canadians, so long as it's done by a certified expert under the national program. That was not included in the budget, although we think it's still a very good idea. We had some very positive response from the federal officials we spoke to about it.
We also recommended that there be clearer messaging about radon, and that we use words like “radiation” and “radioactivity” because they are accurate and are what people understand more in terms of the risks of radiation and radon. We also recommended that there be better data sharing nationally between the federal government and the provinces and territories in terms of the testing that's done, along with the sharing of information that's paid for nationally, and that information be available publicly.
In terms of recommendations for federal action as well, we note that the David Suzuki Foundation report that came out just last month says the World Health Organization has recommended a lower level of 100 for indoor radon. Currently, our federal level is 200 becquerels per cubic metre. We definitely supported that recommendation and recommend that the federal government reduce the indoor radon guideline to 100.
The other two areas I want to touch on that are relevant to your investigation here have to do with the Canada Labour Code and the need to update it as well, and also the need for improving the uptake across Canada of the naturally occurring radioactive materials guidelines, the NORM guidelines. I'm going to speak to those two areas now.
Under the Canada Labour Code, there is the only legally enforceable limit for radon in Canada that's broadly applicable, but it's only for federally regulated workplaces and it remains at an outdated level of 800 becquerels per cubic metre. We think it should be brought down to the federal reference level of 200 becquerels per cubic metre to begin with, and we think that level should come down to 100 becquerels per cubic metre. On the updating of that level, apparently what was going to happen in 2015 now sounds like it's going to happen in 2016, so it would be great if your committee recommended speeding up that process.
In terms of the NORM guidelines, these are guidelines that were prepared by a federal-provincial-territorial committee. We interviewed occupational health and safety inspectors across Canada and found a lot of confusion and uncertainty about workplace radon rules or whether the NORM guidelines apply. In fact, they apply to every workplace in Canada. In any indoor space that is a workplace, including the room in which you are sitting, those guidelines apply.
However, it's a reactive, complaint-driven system. Inspectors get few or no complaints because there is a lack of awareness, so they don't take enforcement action. Also, some inspectors didn't think that radon was an occupational health and safety issue at all. They said that enforcement action was unlikely because the only agreed-upon levels for radiation are those for radiation-exposed workers. That is just not accurate, so we've made recommendations in response to that situation.
Turning to the recommendations we made with respect to the Canada Labour Code, as I've mentioned, it should be brought up to date swiftly. It's out of date by many years and still at that level of 800 becquerels per cubic metre.
With respect to radon, we recommended that the federal-provincial-territorial radiation protection committee, which deals with far more than radon—it deals with a whole manner of radiation exposure issues—convene a task force for occupational health and safety inspectors across the country so that there is clarity and there is a more generalized consistent application of those NORM guidelines to ensure worker health and safety. The consequences of that inconsistent application are that you're going to have uneven worker protection across the country and the possibility that people are overexposed, both in the workplace and in their homes, if they happen to be unlucky enough to have high radon levels in both of those indoor locations where they live and work. Related to that, we made a range of recommendations about provincial labour codes, which I won't get into.
In another area of occupational exposure, with respect to radon mitigators, we also recommended that CAREX Canada, who you're going to hear from later today, undertake, with the Canadian national radon proficiency program, research and dosimetry monitoring for radon mitigators so that we can make sure their workplaces are safe as well.
Just to recap on the findings in this report and to recommend to you to take up some of these recommendations in your deliberations on this topic, we found a need for greater legal requirements rather than guidance in this area for several reasons, including the need to underscore the seriousness of the problem and to support public outreach messages by the federal government and by other organizations who you're going to hear from today, including the Canadian Partnership for Children's Health and Environment.
Also, there's a need for legal requirements to require testing in public buildings and to ensure public access to that information. As well, there's the need to correct that inconsistent response among both the public health and the occupational health and safety inspectors and to provide them with tools to take action with respect to radon. As I mentioned, we found limited to no case law under either statutes or common law. We also found that improving the law or law reform is a better remedy than costly and situation-specific litigation to resolve radon problems.
Then, as I mentioned, there's a need for specific federal government action, including updating that federal guideline and putting in place a tax credit to help Canadians undertake radon mitigation when they have high levels, updating that Canada Labour Code, and ensuring the NORM guidelines are applied.
We've calculated the health care savings from prevented lung cancer deaths. If all homes in Canada were mitigated to the level of 200 becquerels per cubic metre, you'd see more than $17 million a year in savings through prevented lung cancer deaths. It likely would be double that if you were to reduce the level to 100 becquerels per cubic metre. Then, of course, anyone who works in cancer will tell you that the indirect costs are five times higher than the direct costs, so a lot of savings are possible there, along with the avoidance of the pain and suffering associated with lung cancer.
Tout d'abord, j'aimerais vous parler de l'Association canadienne du droit de l'environnement. Nous sommes un organisme d'intérêt public à but non lucratif spécialisé en droit de l'environnement. Nous avons également une clinique d'aide juridique en Ontario, où nous fournissons des services de représentation juridique aux personnes à faible revenu et aux communautés vulnérables.
Ensuite, nous avons des priorités relatives à la réforme du droit, et parmi nos priorités stratégiques, il y a la santé de l'environnement et des humains. Pour déterminer les priorités dans ce vaste domaine, nous adoptons une approche fondée sur la santé des populations, la même qu'utilisent Santé Canada, l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada et les agences de la santé publique de partout. Il s'agit d'établir des priorités en se concentrant sur les enjeux qui touchent potentiellement ou directement un grand nombre de gens ou qui entraînent de graves conséquences.
Il n'y a pas de conséquence plus grave qu'un produit cancérigène connu et appuyé par de solides preuves scientifiques. Le radon, comme on vous le dira plus tard, j'en suis sûre, est dans une catégorie à part comparativement à la plupart des autres produits cancérigènes dans l'environnement. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous sommes concentrés sur le radon.
Aujourd'hui, je parlerai d'un rapport que nous avons préparé l'an dernier, intitulé Radon in Indoor Air: A Review of Policy and Law in Canada. Je crois qu'on vous a distribué le communiqué de presse qui a été publié le jour où nous avons publié le rapport. C'est tout ce que j'ai pu faire traduire étant donné les contraintes de temps relativement à la réunion d'aujourd'hui.
Nous avons analysé la politique et la législation aux niveaux fédéral et provincial partout au Canada, et nous avons examiné les compétences et les rôles de chacun. Nous nous sommes concentrés sur les édifices publics et sur les codes du bâtiment, nous avons examiné d'autres politiques et lois provinciales pertinentes et les dispositions connexes de la common law, et nous avons formulé plusieurs recommandations, mais aujourd'hui, je me concentrerai seulement sur les recommandations que nous avons formulées au gouvernement fédéral.
Dans l'ensemble, nous avons conclu que les Canadiens avaient besoin d'une meilleure protection juridique contre le radon. Nous avons découvert une série de directives incohérentes et, dans la plupart des cas, impossibles à mettre en oeuvre.
Nous avons conclu qu'un leadership très important avait été assumé au sein du gouvernement fédéral, et Kelley Bush, de Santé Canada, vous fournira des détails à cet égard aujourd'hui, même si nous avons certainement formulé des recommandations sur la prise d'autres mesures. Aux échelons provincial et territorial, où se trouvent la plupart des compétences, nous avons cerné un large éventail de lois qui doivent être mises à jour ou qui contiennent des lacunes ou des ambiguïtés. La jurisprudence est très limitée, ce qui souligne le besoin d'améliorer la loi ou de procéder à une réforme juridique. Je n'entrerai pas dans les détails au sujet de ce qui a été effectué au niveau fédéral en ce qui concerne le radon, même si le rapport contient ces détails, car Kelley vous les fournira plus tard.
En résumé, dans le cadre du programme national sur le radon, on a mené des recherches et des tests très utiles, et on a cartographié les régions à teneur élevée en radon. Les directives liées à la présence du radon dans l'air l'intérieur ont été mises à jour en 2007. Les dispositions sur le radon contenues dans le Code national du bâtiment ont été mises à jour, il y a un programme de certification pour les experts en réduction des quantités de radon, et on a mené une campagne nationale pour fortement encourager les Canadiens à effectuer des tests dans leur logement. En effet, on recommande de mener ces tests dans chaque logement au Canada.
Nous recommandons, pour tirer parti de ces travaux importants, d'amorcer l'étape logique suivante. Par l'entremise du travail accompli par la Coalition du budget vert au cours de l'année dernière, nous avons recommandé un crédit d'impôt pour les mesures de réduction de la concentration de radon. Nous avons recommandé que la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu ajoute un crédit d'impôt pour la réduction de la concentration de radon allant jusqu'à 3 000 $ pour les particuliers canadiens, aussi longtemps que les travaux sont effectués par un expert certifié par le programme national. Cela n'a pas été prévu dans le budget, même si nous pensons qu'il s'agit toujours d'une très bonne idée. Les représentants fédéraux auxquels nous avons parlé de cette initiative ont réagi de façon très positive.
Nous avons également recommandé d'envoyer un message clair au sujet du radon, et d'utiliser des mots tels « radiation » et « radioactivité », car ils sont exacts, et les gens les comprennent davantage lorsqu'il s'agit des risques liés aux radiations et au radon. Nous avons également recommandé un meilleur partage des données à l'échelle nationale entre le gouvernement fédéral et les provinces et les territoires en ce qui concerne les tests effectués, ainsi que le partage des renseignements qui sont payés à l'échelle nationale. Il faudrait également rendre ces renseignements publics.
En ce qui a trait aux recommandations concernant des mesures fédérales, nous avons remarqué que selon le rapport de la David Suzuki Foundation publié le mois dernier, l'Organisation mondiale de la santé recommande une concentration en dessous de 100 pour le radon dans l'air intérieur. Actuellement, au niveau fédéral, le niveau permis est 200 becquerels par mètre cube. Nous avons certainement appuyé cette recommandation et nous recommandons que le gouvernement fédéral réduise ce seuil à 100 dans sa directive sur la concentration du radon dans l'air intérieur.
Les deux autres volets que j'aimerais aborder et qui sont liés à votre étude sont le Code canadien du travail et la nécessité de le mettre à jour, et la nécessité d'améliorer le respect, partout au Canada, des lignes directrices sur les radiations émises par les matières radioactives d'origine naturelle, c'est-à-dire les lignes directrices canadiennes des MRN. Je parlerai donc de ces deux volets.
Le Code canadien du travail prévoit une seule limite exécutoire pour le radon au Canada et elle s'applique de façon générale, mais seulement aux milieux de travail fédéraux réglementés. De plus, à 800 becquerels par mètre cube, elle est désuète. Nous croyons, tout d'abord, qu'elle devrait être réduite au niveau de référence fédéral de 200 becquerels par mètre cube, et ce niveau devrait être ensuite réduit à 100 becquerels par mètre cube. Apparemment, on devait effectuer la mise à jour de cette limite en 2015, mais il semble maintenant que cela se fera en 2016, et ce serait donc formidable si votre comité pouvait recommander l'accélération de ce processus.
Les lignes directrices canadiennes des MRN, quant à elles, ont été préparées par un comité fédéral-provincial-territorial. Nous avons interrogé des inspecteurs en santé et sécurité au travail de partout au Canada et nous avons conclu qu'il y avait beaucoup de confusion et d'incertitude au sujet des règlements sur le radon dans les milieux de travail ou sur l'application des lignes directrices canadiennes des MRN. En fait, elles s'appliquent dans tous les milieux du travail au Canada. Elles s'appliquent dans tous les espaces intérieurs qui sont des milieux de travail, y compris la pièce dans laquelle vous êtes assis.
Toutefois, il s'agit d'un système réactif fondé sur les plaintes. Les inspecteurs reçoivent peu de plaintes — ou aucune —, car il y a un manque de sensibilisation, et ils ne prennent donc pas de mesure d'application. De plus, certains inspecteurs ne croyaient pas que le radon causait un risque pour la santé et la sécurité au travail. Ils étaient même d'avis que la prise de mesures d'application était peu probable, car le seul niveau de radiation sur lequel on s'entend vise les travailleurs exposés aux radiations. Ce n'est tout simplement pas exact, et nous avons donc formulé des recommandations en réponse à cette situation.
Quant à nos recommandations relativement au Code canadien du travail, comme je l'ai mentionné, ce dernier devrait être rapidement mis à jour. Il est dépassé depuis de nombreuses années et il recommande toujours le niveau de 800 becquerels par mètre cube.
En ce qui concerne le radon, nous recommandons que le comité de protection de la radiation fédéral-provincial-territorial, qui s'occupe de nombreux autres problèmes, en plus du radon — par exemple, il s'occupe de toute une série de problèmes liés à l'exposition aux radiations —, mette sur pied un groupe de travail pour les inspecteurs en santé et sécurité au travail de partout au pays, afin d'éclaircir les choses et de favoriser une mise en oeuvre plus cohérente et généralisée des lignes directrices canadiennes des MRN pour assurer la sécurité et la santé des travailleurs. En effet, lorsque ces directives ne sont pas mises en oeuvre de façon uniforme, les travailleurs de partout au pays ne sont pas tous protégés au même degré, et il est possible que des gens souffrent de surexposition, au travail et à la maison, s'ils ont la malchance d'être exposés à des niveaux de radon élevés dans ces deux espaces intérieurs. À cet égard, nous avons formulé une série de recommandations sur les codes du travail provinciaux, mais je ne les aborderai pas aujourd'hui.
Dans un autre volet de l'exposition en milieu de travail, c'est-à-dire les experts en réduction des concentrations de radon, nous avons également recommandé que CAREX Canada, dont vous entendrez les représentants aujourd'hui, entreprennent, dans le cadre du Programme national de compétence sur le radon au Canada, des recherches et des activités de surveillance sur les doses de rayonnement auxquelles sont exposés ces experts, afin de veiller à leur fournir également un milieu de travail sécuritaire.
Pour résumer les conclusions du rapport et pour vous encourager à adopter certaines de ces recommandations au cours de vos délibérations, nous avons conclu qu'il était nécessaire de prévoir plus d'obligations juridiques que de lignes directrices dans ce domaine, et ce pour plusieurs raisons, notamment la nécessité de souligner la gravité du problème et d'appuyer l'envoi de messages de sensibilisation à la population par le gouvernement fédéral et d'autres organismes dont vous entendrez les représentants aujourd'hui, notamment le Partenariat canadien pour la santé des enfants et l'environnement.
De plus, il est nécessaire de prévoir l'obligation juridique de mener des tests dans les édifices publics et de veiller à ce que la population ait accès à ces renseignements. Il faut aussi corriger la réponse non uniforme chez les inspecteurs de la santé publique et les inspecteurs en santé et sécurité au travail, et leur fournir les outils nécessaires pour qu'ils prennent des mesures en ce qui concerne le radon. Comme je l'ai mentionné, nous n'avons pratiquement trouvé aucune jurisprudence dans les lois ou la common law. Nous avons également conclu que l'amélioration ou la réforme de la loi représente une meilleure solution aux problèmes liés au radon que des poursuites coûteuses et visant des situations particulières.
Ensuite, comme je l'ai mentionné, le gouvernement doit prendre des mesures précises, notamment la mise à jour des lignes directrices fédérales, l'octroi d'un crédit d'impôt pour aider les Canadiens à prendre des mesures liées à la réduction des concentrations du radon lorsque les niveaux sont élevés, la mise à jour du Code canadien du travail, et veiller à l'application des lignes directrices canadiennes des MRN.
Nous avons calculé les économies liées aux soins de santé qui découleront des mesures de prévention des décès attribuables au cancer du poumon. Si tous les logements du Canada respectaient la limite de 200 becquerels par mètre cube, on pourrait réaliser des économies de plus de 17 millions de dollars par année, car on éviterait de nombreux décès liés au cancer du poumon. Ce nombre doublerait probablement si on réduisait la limite à 100 becquerels par mètre cube. Manifestement, tous ceux qui travaillent en oncologie vous diront que les coûts indirects sont cinq fois plus élevés que les coûts directs, et il est donc possible d'économiser beaucoup d'argent, en plus d'éviter la douleur et les souffrances liées au cancer du poumon.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:00
Expand
Ms. Cooper—
Madame Cooper...
Collapse
Kathleen Cooper
View Kathleen Cooper Profile
Kathleen Cooper
2015-06-18 16:00
Expand
I will stop there. Thank you very much for your time.
Je vais m'arrêter ici. Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre temps.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:00
Expand
You're right on time. Thank you.
Next up will be Erica Phipps from the Canadian Partnership for Children's Health and Environment.
Vous avez terminé juste à temps. Merci.
Nous entendrons maintenant Erica Phipps, du Partenariat canadien pour la santé des enfants et l'environnement.
Collapse
Erica Phipps
View Erica Phipps Profile
Erica Phipps
2015-06-18 16:01
Expand
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Good afternoon. Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to this important discussion.
I'd like to share a few perspectives based on our work to raise public awareness, particularly among families with young children, about the lung cancer risk posed by radon and what can be done to reduce that risk.
My name is Erica Phipps. I serve as executive director of the Canadian Partnership for Children's Health and Environment, CPCHE, a collaboration among public health, medical, legal, and child-focused organizations that have been working together for nearly 15 years to advance children's environmental health protection in Canada. The 10 core CPCHE partners include the Canadian Environmental Law Association—you've just heard from my colleague, Kathleen Cooper—and the Canadian Child Care Federation, which has been actively involved in our work to promote radon action in the child care sector.
Much of our work within CPCHE involves engaging with and learning from service providers, such as public health nurses and child care providers and others, who work with families on a day-to-day basis and empowering them to integrate children's environmental health protection into the support they provide to families.
I thought it would be fitting to start with one of their voices. These are the words of a child care provider in Winnipeg, who was one of the participants in the radon vanguard initiative that CPCHE and the Child Care Federation undertook last year, with support from Health Canada. She said:
I wouldn't want to work in a centre that had [high radon] and didn't do anything about it. I wouldn't want to do that. I wouldn't work there. And I wouldn't put my children in the centre either.
This child care professional had known very little about radon before getting involved, but she, like others in the project, was motivated to learn more because of her dedication to the children in her care and because she desired a healthy workplace. It did not take her or any of the other staff involved in the project very long to get that this is a critical issue and one that demands action.
Through the vanguard project, she and other child care providers shared information on radon with their client families and voluntarily tested their child care centres for radon. Through that process, the project participants made the transition from a group of people who had hardly even heard of radon to being nearly unanimous in rating it as a high priority for health in their centres.
When asked what they thought would need to happen to protect children and staff from this lung cancer risk, most felt that radon testing would somehow need to be made mandatory. In the words of another participant:
...what I see in child care tends to be...people don't take action unless they're forced to, unfortunately.... It's like carbon monoxide detectors, right. We never had them before and then finally we were forced to have them and so everybody got them. And you know meanwhile they're only like $40 dollars or $50, and yet people didn't do that before it was made sort of expected of [them].... I think unless [radon testing] was made mandatory or there was some kind of assistance in ensuring that it was done, I think it would be unlikely to get done...when it should be.
This viewpoint was echoed by others and supported by the results of the vanguard project. Despite good intentions and the fact that radon test devices were supplied directly to the participating day care centres, only two-thirds of them were able to complete the testing. What this suggests is that for a sector in which staff are already stretched, providing them with information—and even providing them with do-it-yourself test devices—is not likely to be enough.
CPCHE has been putting significant effort into radon outreach over the past few years, including developing a plain-language tip card for families and teaming up with Health Canada, the Canadian Lung Association, Parachute, and the Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs in a campaign that links radon testing to the more familiar home safety messages of smoke detector use and carbon monoxide detector use. I've brought copies, which you should have before you.
We have prioritized radon as a focus of our collective work because of the well-established high level of risk posed by radon and because we firmly believe that protecting children is an investment in lifelong health. The harm from radon exposure is cumulative, which means that if we can ratchet down exposures during childhood by promoting radon safety in homes and by zeroing in on those six to eight hours that many children spend per day in child care or other learning environments, we can give Canada's kids a better start towards lifelong health, such that their generation and future generations are less likely to suffer from the devastation of lung cancer.
There's also an equity question here. Radon exposure is a prime example of a housing-related health risk that is beyond the ability of low-income people, especially tenants, to address on their own. Knowing about radon is not enough if you can't afford to buy a test kit, let alone pay for a remediation. It is just this sort of issue that we are seeking to address in a new CPCHE-led initiative called “RentSafe”, which will build social service sector capacity to respond to health concerns in low-income housing.
Reducing the financial barrier to radon mitigation should be a matter of priority if we are to achieve the goal of healthier housing for all Canadians. That would potentially include the Green Budget Coalition ask that Kathy mentioned in her remarks, of having an income tax credit for radon mitigation. Federal leadership to help families get action on avoidable health risks in their housing, including radon, would be a well-targeted investment in the health and well-being of the people of Canada.
In our toxics work within the CPCHE partnership, we frequently bump up against the complexities of scientific evidence, fraught with great debates about cause and effect and proof of harm. Radon, regrettably, is refreshingly simple. Radon causes lung cancer, full stop. We know how to test for it. We know what to do if levels are high. We know that it amplifies the risk posed by the other big lung cancer culprit, tobacco smoke. Now we need the courage and investment to ensure that the homes and buildings where we spend time, and especially where our children spend time, are not a source of this preventable lung cancer risk.
Thank you.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Bonjour. Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de contribuer à cette discussion importante.
J'aimerais vous faire part de quelques points de vue fondés sur nos travaux visant à accroître la sensibilisation au sein de la population, surtout chez les familles avec de jeunes enfants, sur le risque de cancer du poumon posé par le radon et les mesures qui peuvent être prises pour réduire ce risque.
Je m'appelle Erica Phipps. Je suis directrice générale du Partenariat canadien pour la santé des enfants et l'environnement — le PCSEE —, une collaboration d'organismes de santé publique, d'organismes des milieux médical et juridique et d'organismes axés sur les enfants qui travaillent ensemble depuis bientôt 15 ans, afin de favoriser la protection de la santé des enfants et de l'environnement au Canada. Les 10 partenaires principaux du PCSEE sont, entre autres, l'Association canadienne du droit de l'environnement — vous venez juste d'entendre ma collègue, Kathleen Cooper — et la Fédération canadienne des services de garde à l'enfance, qui participe activement à nos travaux pour faire la promotion des mesures de réduction des concentrations du radon dans le secteur des services de garde d'enfants.
La plupart des travaux du PCSEE entraînent une collaboration avec des fournisseurs de services, notamment le personnel infirmier en santé publique et les fournisseurs de services de garde d'enfants et d'autres qui travaillent avec les familles au quotidien. Nous leur fournissons les outils nécessaires pour intégrer la protection de la santé des enfants et de l'environnement au soutien qu'ils offrent aux familles.
J'ai pensé qu'il serait approprié de vous parler d'abord de l'une de ces personnes. J'aimerais donc vous communiquer les paroles d'une fournisseuse de services de garde d'enfants à Winnipeg; elle a participé à l'initiative d'avant-garde contre le radon lancée l'an dernier par le PCSEE et la Fédération canadienne des services de garde à l'enfance, avec l'appui de Santé Canada. Voici son avis:
Je ne voudrais pas travailler dans un centre qui présente des concentrations élevées de radon et ne rien faire à cet égard. Je ne voudrais pas faire cela. Je ne voudrais pas travailler là-bas. Et je n'enverrais pas mes enfants dans ces centres.
Cette professionnelle en services de garde d'enfants connaissait très peu de choses sur le radon avant de participer à cette initiative, mais elle a été motivée, comme d'autres personnes qui ont participé au projet, à en apprendre davantage, en raison de son dévouement envers les enfants confiés à ses soins et parce qu'elle souhaite travailler dans un milieu sain. Il n'a pas fallu longtemps pour qu'elle et d'autres participants au projet comprennent qu'il s'agit d'un problème grave contre lequel il faut prendre des mesures.
Par l'entremise du projet d'avant-garde, elle et d'autres fournisseurs de services de garde d'enfants ont partagé des renseignements sur le radon avec leurs clients, les familles, et ont volontairement effectué des tests de présence du radon dans leur centre de services de garde d'enfants. Par l'entremise de ce processus, les participants au projet sont passés d'un groupe de gens qui n'avaient pratiquement jamais entendu parler du radon à un groupe dont les membres ont admis, presque à l'unanimité, qu'il s'agit d'une priorité en matière de santé dans leur centre.
Lorsqu'on leur a demandé ce qui devrait être fait pour protéger les enfants et le personnel du risque lié au cancer du poumon, la plupart d'entre eux étaient d'avis que les tests de présence du radon devraient être obligatoires. Comme l'a dit un autre participant:
...ce que j'observe dans le milieu des services de garde d'enfants tend à être... les gens ne prennent pas de mesures à moins qu'ils y soient forcés, malheureusement... c'est comme les détecteurs de monoxyde de carbone, n'est-ce pas? Personne n'en avait jamais installé et au bout du compte, on nous a obligés à les installer et tout le monde les a installés. Et en même temps, on sait qu'ils coûtent de 40 à 50 $ chacun, et pourtant, les gens ne les ont pas installés avant qu'on leur dise de le faire... Je crois qu'à moins qu'on rende les tests de présence du radon obligatoires ou qu'on s'assure qu'ils soient effectués, les gens ne les feront probablement pas, même s'ils devraient être faits.
Ce point de vue a été répété par d'autres et appuyé par les résultats du projet d'avant-garde. Malgré de bonnes intentions et le fait que les appareils de test de présence du radon ont été fournis directement aux centres de services de garde participants, les deux tiers d'entre eux seulement ont été en mesure de terminer les tests. Cela laisse croire que dans un secteur dans lequel les membres du personnel sont déjà très occupés, il ne suffit probablement pas de leur fournir les renseignements et les appareils nécessaires pour qu'ils mènent eux-mêmes les tests.
Ces dernières années, le PCSEE a déployé des efforts importants dans la sensibilisation aux effets du radon, notamment par la production d'une carte aide-mémoire écrite en langage simple pour les familles et le lancement d'une campagne en collaboration avec Santé Canada, l'Association pulmonaire du Canada, Parachute et l'Association canadienne des chefs de pompiers dans laquelle on lie les tests de présence du radon aux messages plus familiers sur la sécurité des logements qui visent les détecteurs de fumée et de monoxyde de carbone. J'ai apporté des exemplaires qu'on vous a distribués.
Nous avons donné la priorité au radon dans nos travaux collectifs, en raison du niveau élevé bien établi de risque posé par le radon et parce que nous croyons fermement que la protection des enfants représente un investissement dans la santé pour toute la durée de la vie. Les torts causés par l'exposition au radon sont cumulatifs, ce qui signifie que si nous pouvons réduire l'exposition des enfants en faisant la promotion des mesures de sécurité liées au radon dans les foyers et en visant les six à huit heures qu'un grand nombre d'enfants passent chaque jour dans des centres de garde d'enfants ou dans d'autres milieux d'apprentissage, nous pouvons offrir aux enfants canadiens un meilleur départ vers une vie en santé, afin que leur génération et les générations futures soient moins à risque de souffrir des effets dévastateurs du cancer du poumon.
Il y a également une question d'équité. En effet, l'exposition au radon est un très bon exemple d'un risque de santé lié au logement que les personnes au revenu peu élevé, surtout les locataires, n'ont pas la capacité de régler elles-mêmes. Manifestement, connaître les dangers du radon ne suffit pas lorsqu'on ne peut pas se permettre d'acheter une trousse de tests, et encore moins de payer pour des travaux visant la réduction des concentrations du radon. C'est ce type de problème que nous tentons de résoudre dans le cadre d'une nouvelle initiative du PCSEE appelée « LogementSain », qui renforcera la capacité du secteur des services sociaux de répondre aux préoccupations en matière de santé dans les logements des personnes à revenu peu élevé.
Si nous voulons que les habitations dans lesquelles vivent les Canadiens soient plus salubres, l'élimination des obstacles financiers à la réduction des concentrations de radon devrait constituer une priorité. Cela pourrait inclure la recommandation de la Coalition du budget vert que Kathy a mentionnée dans son exposé, c'est-à-dire l'instauration d'un crédit d'impôt pour l'atténuation du radon. Si le fédéral joue un rôle de premier plan pour aider les familles afin que des mesures soient prises pour réduire des dangers évitables pour leur santé chez eux, dont le radon, ce serait une façon judicieuse d'investir dans la santé et le bien-être des gens au Canada.
Dans les travaux sur les substances toxiques que nous effectuons dans le cadre du PCSEE, nous nous heurtons souvent aux subtilités des données scientifiques suscitant de vifs débats sur les causes et les effets et les preuves d'effets préjudiciables. Hélas, dans le cas du radon, c'est tout à fait simple. Le radon cause le cancer du poumon, point à la ligne. Nous savons comment déterminer sa présence. Nous savons quoi faire si les concentrations sont élevées. Nous savons que sa présence augmente le risque que pose l'autre grande cause du cancer du poumon: le tabac. Nous avons maintenant besoin de courage et d'investissements pour faire en sorte que les logements et les immeubles dans lesquels nous passons du temps — et surtout dans lesquels nos enfants passent du temps — ne sont pas une source du cancer du poumon, qui est évitable.
Merci.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:07
Expand
Thank you very much.
Next up we have Kelley Bush, senior head of radon education and awareness at the Department of Health.
Go ahead, please.
Merci beaucoup.
C'est maintenant au tour de Mme Kelley, chef de section de l'éducation et de la sensibilisation sur le radon du ministère de la Santé.
Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:07
Expand
Good afternoon. My name is Kelley Bush, and I am the head of radon education and awareness under Health Canada's national radon program.
Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee, for inviting me to be here today to discuss radon as a cause of lung cancer and to highlight the work of the Canadian – National Radon Proficiency Program.
Through the ongoing activities of this program, Health Canada is committed to informing Canadians about the health risk of radon, better understanding the methods and technologies available for reducing radon exposure, and giving Canadians the tools to take action to reduce their exposure.
Radon is a colourless, odourless radioactive gas that is formed naturally in the environment. It comes from the breakdown of uranium in soil and rock. When radon is released from the ground in outdoor air, it gets diluted and is not a concern. However, when radon enters an indoor space, such as a home, it can accumulate to high levels and become a serious health risk. Radon naturally breaks down into other radioactive substances called progeny. Radon gas and radon progeny in the air can be breathed into the lungs, where they break down further and emit alpha particles. These alpha particles release small bursts of energy, which are absorbed by the nearby lung tissue and lead to lung cell death or damage. When lung cells are damaged, they have the potential to result in cancer when they reproduce.
The lung cancer risk associated with radon is well recognized internationally. As noted by the World Health Organization, a recent study on indoor radon and lung cancer in North America, Europe, and Asia provided strong evidence that radon causes a substantial number of lung cancers in the general population. It's recognized around the world that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking, and that smokers also exposed to high levels of radon have a significantly increased risk of developing lung cancer.
Based on the latest data from Health Canada, 16% of lung cancers are radon-induced, resulting in more than 3,200 deaths in Canada each year. To manage these risks, in 2007 the federal government in collaboration with provinces and territories lowered the federal guideline from 800 to 200 becquerels per cubic metre. Our guideline of 200 becquerels per cubic metre is amongst the lowest radon action levels internationally, and aligns with the World Health Organization's recommended range of 100 to 300 becquerels per cubic metre.
All homes and buildings have some level of radon. It's not a question of “if” you have radon in your house; you do. The only question is how much, and the only way to know is to test. Health Canada recommends that all homeowners test their home and that if the levels are high, above our Canadian guideline, you take action to reduce.
The national radon program was launched in 2007 to support the implementation of the new federal guideline. Funding for this program is provided under the Government of Canada's clean air regulatory agenda. Our national radon program budget is $30.5 million over five years.
Since its creation, the program has had direct and measurable impacts on increasing public awareness, increasing radon testing in homes and public buildings, and reducing radon exposure. This has been accomplished through research to characterize the radon problem in Canada, as well as through measures to protect Canadians by increasing their awareness and giving them tools to take action on radon.
The national radon program includes important research to characterize radon risk in Canada. Two large-scale, cross-Canada residential surveys have been completed, using long-term radon test kits in over 17,000 homes. The surveys have provided us with a much better understanding of radon levels across the country. This data is used by Health Canada and our stakeholder partners to further define radon risk, to effectively target radon outreach, to raise awareness, and to promote action. For example, Public Health Ontario used this data in its radon burden of illness study. The Province of British Columbia used the data to inform its 2014 changes to their provincial building codes, which made radon reduction codes more stringent in radon-prone areas based on the results of our cross-Canada surveys. The CBC used the data to develop a special health investigative report and interactive radon map.
The national radon program also conducts research on radon mitigation, including evaluating the effectiveness of mitigation methods, conducting mitigation action follow-up studies, and analyzing the effects of energy retrofits on radon levels in buildings. For example, in partnership with the National Research Council, the national radon program conducted research on the efficacy of common radon mitigation systems in our beautiful Canadian climatic conditions. It is also working with the Toronto Atmospheric Fund to incorporate radon testing in a study they're doing that looks at community housing retrofits and the impacts on indoor air quality.
This work supports the development of national codes and standards on radon mitigation. The national radon program led changes to the 2010 national building codes. We are currently working on the development of two national mitigation standards, one for existing homes and one for new construction.
The program has developed an extensive outreach program to inform Canadians about the risk from radon and encourage action to reduce exposure. This outreach is conducted through multiple platforms targeting the general public, key stakeholder groups, as well as populations most at risk such as smokers and communities known to have high radon.
Many of the successes we've achieved so far under this program have been accomplished as a result of collaboration and partnership with a broad range of stakeholder partners. Our partners include provincial and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, health professional organizations, the building industry, the real estate industry, and many more. By working with these stakeholders, the program is able to strengthen the credibility of the messages we're sending out and extend the reach and impact of our outreach efforts. We are very grateful for their ongoing engagement and support.
In November 2013 the New Brunswick Lung Association, the Ontario Lung Association, Summerhill Impact, and Health Canada launched the very first national radon action month. This annual national campaign is promoted through outreach events, website content, social media, public service announcements, and media exposure. It raises awareness about radon and encourages Canadians to take action. In 2014 the campaign grew in the number of stakeholders and organizations that participate in raising awareness. It also included the release of a public service announcement with television personality Mike Holmes, who encouraged all Canadians to test their home for radon.
To give Canadians access to the tools to take action, extensive guidance documents have been developed on radon measurement and mitigation. Heath Canada also supported the development of a Canadian national radon proficiency program, which is a certification program designed to establish guidelines for training professionals in radon services. This program ensures that quality measurement and mitigation services are available to Canadians.
The Ontario College of Family Physicians as well as McMaster University, with the support of Health Canada, have developed an accredited continuing medical education course on radon. This course is designed to help health professionals—a key stakeholder group—answer patients' questions about the health risks of radon and the need to test their homes and reduce their families' exposure.
The national radon program also includes outreach targeted to at-risk populations. For example, Erica already mentioned the three-point home safety checklist that we've supported in partnership with CPCHE. As well, to reach smokers, we have a fact sheet entitled “Radon—Another Reason to Quit”. This is sent out to doctors' offices across Canada to be distributed to patients. Since the distribution of those fact sheets began, the requests from doctors offices have increased quite significantly. It began with about 5,000 fact sheets ordered a month, and we're up to about 30,000 fact sheets ordered a month and delivered across Canada.
In recognition of the significant health risk posed by radon, Health Canada's national radon program continues to undertake a range of activities to increase public awareness of the risk from radon and to provide Canadians with the tools they need to take action. We are pleased to conduct this work in collaboration with many partners across the country.
Thank you for your attention. I look forward to any questions the committee members might have.
Bonjour, je m’appelle Kelley Bush et je suis la chef de la section de l’éducation et de la sensibilisation concernant le radon du Programme national sur le radon de Santé Canada.
Je vous remercie, monsieur le président et membres du comité, de m'avoir invitée aujourd'hui pour parler du radon en tant que cause du cancer du poumon et pour présenter le travail effectué par le Programme national de compétence sur le radon au Canada.
Dans le cadre des activités de ce programme, Santé Canada s’emploie à informer les Canadiens des risques pour la santé que présente le radon, à mieux comprendre les méthodes et les technologies offertes pour réduire l’exposition au radon et à fournir aux Canadiens les outils leur permettant de prendre des mesures pour réduire leur exposition au radon.
Le radon est un gaz radioactif incolore et inodore qui se forme naturellement dans l’environnement. Il provient de la désintégration naturelle de l’uranium dans les sols et les roches. Lorsque le radon s’échappe dans l’air extérieur, il est dilué et ne pose aucun risque. Toutefois, dans les espaces clos, comme les maisons, il peut parfois atteindre des concentrations très élevées pouvant entraîner un risque pour la santé. Le radon se désintègre naturellement en formant d’autres substances radioactives que l’on appelle descendants ou produits de filiation. Le radon et ses produits de filiation se lient aux particules dans l’air, et s’ils pénètrent dans les poumons, ils émettent un rayonnement ionisant appelé particules alpha lorsqu’ils se désintègrent. Ces dernières libèrent de petits éclats d’énergie absorbés par les tissus pulmonaires environnants, qui détruisent ou endommagent les cellules pulmonaires. Les cellules pulmonaires endommagées peuvent causer un cancer en se reproduisant.
Les risques de cancer du poumon associés au radon sont bien reconnus dans le monde. Comme l’a indiqué l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, des études récentes sur le radon dans l’air intérieur et le cancer du poumon réalisées en Amérique du Nord, en Europe et en Asie démontrent clairement que le radon cause un nombre important de cancers du poumon dans la population générale. On reconnaît à l’échelle mondiale que le radon est la deuxième cause du cancer du poumon après le tabagisme et que les fumeurs qui sont aussi exposés à des concentrations élevées de radon présentent un risque beaucoup plus grand de développer un cancer du poumon.
Selon les plus récentes données de Santé Canada, 16 % des cancers du poumon seraient associés à l’exposition au radon et entraîneraient plus de 3 200 décès chaque année au pays. Afin de gérer ces risques, le gouvernement fédéral, en collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires, a fait passer en 2007 sa directive sur le radon de 800 à 200 becquerels par mètre cube d’air. Cette directive constitue l’une des concentrations prescrites les plus faibles à l’échelle internationale et cadre avec la plage de 100 à 300 becquerels par mètre cube d’air recommandée par l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé.
Une certaine concentration de radon se trouve dans toutes les maisons et les immeubles. La question n'est pas de savoir s'il y en a; c'est un fait qu'il y en a. La question est donc la suivante: quelle est cette concentration? La seule façon de le savoir, c'est de la mesurer. Santé Canada recommande à tous les propriétaires de mesurer la concentration de radon dans leur maison et de prendre des mesures pour la réduire si elle dépasse la directive canadienne.
Le Programme national sur le radon a été lancé en 2007 pour appuyer la mise en oeuvre de la nouvelle directive fédérale sur le radon. Le financement de ce programme provient du Programme de réglementation de la qualité de l’air du gouvernement du Canada. Le budget du Programme national sur le radon est de 30,5 millions de dollars sur cinq ans.
Depuis sa création, le programme a entraîné des effets directs et mesurables en permettant de mieux sensibiliser le public, de mesurer davantage la concentration de radon dans les maisons et les immeubles publics et de réduire l’exposition au radon. Ces activités ont pu être réalisées grâce à des travaux de recherche visant à caractériser le problème du radon au Canada et grâce à des mesures visant à protéger les Canadiens en les sensibilisant davantage et en leur fournissant les outils dont ils ont besoin pour agir à l’égard du radon.
Le Programme national sur le radon comprend d’importants travaux de recherche pour caractériser les risques liés au radon au Canada. Deux enquêtes pancanadiennes à grande échelle sur la concentration de radon dans les résidences ont été réalisées, ce qui comprenait des mesures des concentrations de radon dans 17 000 foyers sur une longue période. Les enquêtes nous ont permis de mieux comprendre ces concentrations dans l’ensemble du pays. Santé Canada et les intervenants partenaires utilisent ces données pour mieux définir les risques associés au radon, orienter efficacement les activités de sensibilisation au radon, sensibiliser le public et promouvoir les mesures à prendre. À titre d’exemple, Santé publique Ontario a utilisé ces données pour réaliser son étude sur le fardeau du radon; la Colombie-Britannique les a utilisées pour guider les changements qui ont été apportés aux codes du bâtiment de la province en 2014, de manière à renforcer les mesures de réduction du radon dans les régions les plus exposées à ce gaz selon l’enquête pancanadienne; et la CBC les a utilisées pour réaliser un reportage d’enquête spécial et une carte interactive concernant le radon.
Dans le cadre du Programme national sur le radon, des travaux de recherche sur les mesures de réduction du radon sont aussi menés, ce qui comprend l’évaluation de l’efficacité des méthodes de réduction, la réalisation d’études de suivi des mesures de réduction et l’analyse des effets des améliorations du rendement énergétique sur les concentrations de radon dans les immeubles. Par exemple, en partenariat avec le Conseil national de recherches, le Programme national sur le radon a effectué de la recherche sur l’efficacité de systèmes courants de réduction du radon dans les belles conditions climatiques canadiennes. Il travaille également avec le Toronto Atmospheric Fund afin que la mesure du radon fasse partie d’une étude portant sur les améliorations du rendement énergétique d’immeubles communautaires et leurs effets sur la qualité de l’air intérieur.
Ces travaux contribuent à l’élaboration de normes et de codes nationaux sur la réduction des concentrations de radon. Le Programme national sur le radon a dirigé les modifications apportées aux codes nationaux du bâtiment de 2010. Nous travaillons présentement à l’élaboration de deux normes nationales à venir sur la réduction des concentrations de radon pour les maisons existantes et les nouvelles constructions.
Le Programme a élaboré un vaste programme de sensibilisation pour informer les Canadiens des risques associés au radon et les encourager à prendre des mesures pour réduire l’exposition à ce gaz. Ce programme de sensibilisation est mis en oeuvre au moyen de divers canaux ciblant le grand public, les principaux groupes d’intervenants ainsi que les populations les plus à risque, comme les fumeurs et les communautés où les niveaux de radon sont élevés.
Bon nombre des réussites du programme résultent de collaborations et de partenariats avec une grande diversité d’intervenants. Nos partenaires comprennent des gouvernements provinciaux et des administrations municipales, des organisations non gouvernementales, des organisations professionnelles de la santé, le secteur de la construction, le secteur de l’immobilier, et j'en passe. Grâce à notre collaboration avec ces intervenants, le programme peut renforcer la crédibilité des messages que nous communiquons et étendre la portée de nos efforts de sensibilisation. Nous leur sommes très reconnaissants de leur participation et de leur soutien continus.
En novembre 2013, l’Association pulmonaire du Nouveau-Brunswick, l’Association pulmonaire de l’Ontario, le groupe Summerhill Impact et Santé Canada ont lancé le tout premier Mois de sensibilisation au radon. Cette campagne nationale annuelle prend la forme d’activités, de contenu Web, de publications dans les médias sociaux, de messages d’intérêt public et de reportages médiatiques. Elle permet de sensibiliser le public à la question du radon et d’encourager les Canadiens à agir. En 2014, la campagne a pris de l’ampleur; le nombre d’intervenants partenaires et d’organismes qui y participent a augmenté, et elle comprenait un message d’intérêt public où Mike Holmes, personnalité de la télévision, encourageait les Canadiens à mesurer les concentrations de radon dans leur maison.
Afin que les Canadiens disposent des outils nécessaires pour prendre des mesures, de nombreux documents d’orientation ont été élaborés concernant la mesure des concentrations de radon et la réduction de celles-ci. Santé Canada a également appuyé l’élaboration du Programme national de compétence sur le radon au Canada, un programme de certification visant à établir des lignes directrices pour la formation des professionnels du radon. Ce programme permet de s’assurer que des services et des produits de mesure et de réduction des concentrations de radon de qualité sont offerts aux Canadiens.
Le Collège des médecins de famille de l’Ontario et l’Université McMaster, avec le soutien de Santé Canada, ont élaboré un cours accrédité de formation médicale continue sur le radon. Ce cours vise à aider les professionnels de la santé à répondre aux questions de leurs patients concernant les risques que présente le radon pour la santé ainsi que la nécessité de mesurer les concentrations de radon dans leur maison et de réduire l’exposition de leur famille à ce gaz.
Le Programme national sur le radon comprend aussi des activités de sensibilisation destinées aux populations à risque. Par exemple, Erica a déjà parlé de la liste de vérification en trois points concernant la sécurité à domicile à laquelle Santé Canada a travaillé avec le PCSEE. De plus, nous avons un feuillet de renseignements à l’intention des fumeurs, intitulé Le radon -— Une autre raison d’arrêter. Il est envoyé dans les cabinets de médecins de partout au Canada afin qu’il soit distribué aux patients. Depuis le début de la distribution de ce document, les demandes provenant des cabinets de médecins ont considérablement augmenté. Le nombre de feuillets demandé est passé de 5 000 à environ 30 000 par mois et il sont envoyés partout au Canada.
Compte tenu du risque important que présente le radon pour la santé, le Programme national sur le radon de Santé Canada continue de mener diverses activités en vue de mieux sensibiliser le public aux risques associés à ce gaz et de fournir aux Canadiens les outils nécessaires pour prendre des mesures à l’égard du radon. Nous sommes heureux d’effectuer ces travaux en collaboration avec de nombreux partenaires de partout au pays.
Je vous remercie de votre attention. Ce sera un plaisir pour moi de répondre à toutes vos questions.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:16
Expand
Very good.
In order to fit everything in for both panels I think we'll have to reduce the length of time for the questions to five minutes instead of seven. That will get everybody through and done in time.
Ms. Moore.
Très bien.
Afin que nous puissions poser des questions à nos deux groupes de témoins, je crois qu'il nous faut réduire le temps d'intervention accordé aux membres du comité; vous disposerez donc tous de cinq minutes plutôt que de sept minutes.
Madame Moore.
Collapse
View Christine Moore Profile
NDP (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I will ask only one question, and then I will yield the floor to Mr. Rankin.
As we know, many homes have never been tested for radon, although a number of them are at risk. Could it be appropriate for CMHC, when processing a file for a home purchase, to require that the new buyer test for radon? That way someone buying a new home would know whether it contains radon or not and whether they have to make improvements to remedy the problem.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je vais poser une seule question et je céderai par la suite la parole à M. Rankin.
Comme on le sait, plusieurs maisons ne sont jamais testées pour le radon, bien que plusieurs d'entre elles présentent un problème à cet égard. Pourrait-il être pertinent que lorsque la SCHL traite un dossier relatif à l'achat d'une maison, elle exige que le nouvel acheteur fasse un test de radon? Ainsi, une personne qui achèterait une nouvelle maison saurait s'il y a du radon ou non et si elle devra apporter des améliorations pour corriger ce problème.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:17
Expand
We are already working with CMHC on the radon issue.
Here is what is being done to remedy the problem. Canada Post has a program called smartmoves, or déménageur in French. Every time someone submits a change of address request, they receive an information kit on everything they need to think about when they move into a new home. Information on radon is part of that kit. That's a way to inform homeowners when they should test radon levels before they move into a new home.
You asked a question about moving, but I forgot what the second part of your question was about.
On travaille déjà avec la SCHL au sujet du problème du radon.
Voici ce qui est fait à ce sujet. Postes Canada a un programme appelé smartmoves ou en français le programme déménageur. Chaque fois que quelqu'un fait une demande de changement d'adresse, il reçoit une trousse d'information sur toutes les choses auxquelles il devrait penser lorsqu'il emménage dans une nouvelle maison. Une des informations qu'il reçoit concerne le radon. C'est une façon d'informer les propriétaires sur le moment où ils doivent mesurer le taux de radon, soit lorsqu'ils emménagent dans une nouvelle maison.
Vous avez posé une question au sujet des déménagements, mais j'ai oublié la deuxième partie de votre question.
Collapse
View Christine Moore Profile
NDP (QC)
That's okay. I'm finished.
Ça va. J'ai terminé.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:18
Expand
Okay.
D'accord.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:18
Expand
I want to just say thank you to everyone for being here, and I want to start by saying thank you to Mr. Lizon, my colleague, for bringing this to the attention of the committee. I confess I've never thought much about radon until the last few days, and it's very sobering. I intend to have my house tested and I want to ask others in my community to do it as well, so thank you for the education.
I just wanted to start with Ms. Cooper about the WHO report. I'm confused because I understood from Ms. Bush, if I heard properly, that there's a 100 to 300 range of becquerels per cubic metre, yet we are at 200 in Canada. I thought I heard you say, Ms. Cooper, that the standard recommended now by WHO is in fact 100. Have I got that right?
Je remercie tous les gens de leur présence. Je veux d'abord remercier mon collègue, M. Lizon, qui a porté cette question à l'attention du comité. J'avoue que je n'avais jamais pensé aux effets du radon avant ces derniers jours, et cela donne beaucoup à réfléchir. J'ai l'intention de faire mesurer les concentrations de radon chez moi, et je veux demander à d'autres membres de ma collectivité de faire de même. Je vous remercie donc de l'information.
Je veux tout d'abord poser des questions à Mme Cooper au sujet du rapport de l'OMS. Je suis un peu perdu, car si j'ai bien compris ce qu'a dit Mme Bush, l'OMS recommande une plage de 100 à 300 becquerels par mètre cube d'air et la directive du Canada est de 200 becquerels par mètre cube d'air. Madame Cooper, je crois vous avoir entendu dire que l'OMS recommande maintenant une norme de 100 becquerels par mètre cube d'air. Ai-je bien compris?
Collapse
Kathleen Cooper
View Kathleen Cooper Profile
Kathleen Cooper
2015-06-18 16:19
Expand
We're both right. The World Health Organization recommends 100 as a guidance level, but they do suggest a range as do some other countries. The 100 level is their recommendation and they also recommended that you try for the lowest as reasonably achievable, so you really try to get even lower than 100.
Nous avons toutes les deux raison. L'Organisation mondiale de la Santé recommande 100 becquerels par mètre cube d'air, mais elle propose une plage comme le font certains pays. Elle recommande également qu'on essaie d'en arriver à la plus basse concentration possible, dans la mesure de ce qui est faisable. Il s'agit donc de vraiment essayer de faire en sorte que la concentration de radon dans l'air soit même inférieure à 100 becquerels.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:20
Expand
All right.
D'accord.
Collapse
Kathleen Cooper
View Kathleen Cooper Profile
Kathleen Cooper
2015-06-18 16:20
Expand
It is a range. The International Atomic Energy Agency, I think, is the other organization that recommends a range, so you get both. We're both right.
C'est une plage. Si je ne me trompe pas, l'autre organisme qui recommande une plage, c'est l'Agence internationale de l'énergie atomique. Nous avons donc toutes les deux raison.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:20
Expand
I understand now.
In order to go down from 200 to 100 becquerels per cubic metre, you indicated—I thought really properly—the direct and indirect costs are enormous given the existing radon. If we had done the work required to reduce that risk we'd save a lot of money. Then you said that we'd probably save twice as much if we went to 100. I'm not sure that's true. To get down from 200 to 100, it wouldn't in fact be a doubling. It might be much more expensive to get to a lower level, isn't that so?
Je comprends maintenant.
Vous avez indiqué — et vraiment à juste titre, à mon avis — que pour ce qui est de la réduction des concentrations, de 200 à 100 becquerels par mètre cube d'air, les coûts directs et indirects sont énormes compte tenu du radon existant. Si nous avions fait ce qu'il faut pour réduire ce risque, nous économiserions beaucoup d'argent. Par la suite, vous avez dit que nous économiserions probablement deux fois plus si les concentrations étaient réduites à 100. Je ne sais pas si c'est vrai. Les faire passer de 200 à 100 équivaudrait à une multiplication par deux. Cela ne coûterait-il pas plus cher de réduire les concentrations davantage?
Collapse
Kathleen Cooper
View Kathleen Cooper Profile
Kathleen Cooper
2015-06-18 16:20
Expand
I was talking about health and prevented lung cancer deaths, not the cost of remediation. I'm not sure if we're talking about the same thing. We just did a rough estimate. We looked at the cost of lung cancer deaths and the number of lung cancer deaths that is expected if you're above 200. That's how we came up with that calculation, so if you lower the guideline to 100, you can probably expect that number to at least double.
Je parlais de la santé et de la prévention des décès causés par le cancer du poumon, et non des coûts liés aux mesures correctives. Je ne pense pas que nous parlons de la même chose ici. Nous n'avons fait qu'une évaluation sommaire. Nous avons examiné le coût des décès attribuables au cancer du poumon et le nombre de décès attribuables à ce cancer prévus si les concentrations sont supérieures à 200. C'est de cette façon que nous en sommes arrivés à ce calcul, de sorte que si la directive est de 100, on peut s'attendre à ce que le chiffre double, au moins.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:21
Expand
Sorry for being short on time. I do understand that now.
Ms. Phipps, I wanted to just ask you to tell us a little bit more about your RentSafe program. How does it work?
Je m'excuse de ne pas vous donner beaucoup de temps. Je comprends maintenant.
Madame Phipps, j'aimerais que vous nous parliez un peu plus de votre programme LogementSain. Comment fonctionne-t-il?
Collapse
Erica Phipps
View Erica Phipps Profile
Erica Phipps
2015-06-18 16:21
Expand
Thanks very much for the question.
RentSafe is the collaboration that we as CPCHE lead but it involves many agencies as well as the legal aid clinics and the public health units. It's based in Ontario because of the funding. We're funded by the Ontario Trillium Foundation and we really look at indoor environmental health risks and what those mean for tenants. If a tenant is experiencing mould, radon, pests, pesticide overuse, or whatever, what recourse do they have? What happens if they pick up the phone and call their public health unit? Will they get a response? Do the public health units work with the legal aid clinics and with the settlement services to try to ensure that at the end of the day a tenant, potentially with young kids and on a very low income, will get a response from social services? We're really trying to network among the social services to make sure that those issues are addressed.
Je vous remercie beaucoup de la question.
Ce programme, c'est la collaboration que nous, dans le cadre du PCSEE, menons, mais cela inclut de nombreux organismes, comme les services d'aide juridique et les services de santé publique. Il est basé en Ontario en raison du financement. Nous sommes financés par la Fondation Trillium de l'Ontario et nous nous penchons vraiment sur les risques pour la santé liés à l'environnement intérieur et ce qu'ils signifient pour les locataires. Si un locataire se rend compte de la présence de moisissure, de radon, d'insectes nuisibles ou d'une trop grande utilisation de pesticide, par exemple, quel recours a-t-il? Qu'arrive-t-il s'il appelle les services de santé publique? Obtiendra-t-il de l'aide? Les services de santé publique collaborent-ils avec les services d'aide juridique et les services d'établissement pour essayer de faire en sorte qu'au bout du compte, un locataire, qui a peut-être de jeunes enfants et un très faible revenu, obtiendra de l'aide des services sociaux? Nous essayons vraiment d'établir un réseautage parmi les services sociaux pour nous assurer que ces problèmes sont réglés.
Collapse
View Murray Rankin Profile
NDP (BC)
View Murray Rankin Profile
2015-06-18 16:22
Expand
Thanks very much.
Merci beaucoup.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:22
Expand
Thank you.
Ms. McLeod.
Merci.
Madane McLeod.
Collapse
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I too am very appreciative of the witnesses coming here today and sharing. I actually have to agree with my colleague. My background is health care. I was involved in primary health care, public health, and child care licensing, and to be frank, I was completely unaware that this was an issue.
I was elected in 2008, so I guess my first question is: when did this awareness and focus come into being? As I said, I don't recall anything in the early 2000s, or at least anything that I was familiar with. That's my first question. When did we start to really put a bit of focus on this particular initiative?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je suis moi aussi très ravie que les témoins soient venus nous donner leur point de vue. Je dois dire que je suis d'accord avec mon collègue. J'ai étudié dans le domaine des soins de santé. J'ai travaillé dans le secteur des soins de santé primaire, de la santé publique et dans le domaine de la délivrance de permis aux services de garde, et pour être honnête, je n'étais pas du tout au courant de ce problème.
J'ai été élue en 2008, et je poserais d'abord la question suivante: à quel moment cette prise de conscience est-elle apparue? Comme je l'ai dit, je ne me rappelle d'aucun événement à cet égard qui aurait pu se produire au début des années 2000 — ou du moins, je n'étais pas au courant. Voilà ma première question. De plus, quand avons-nous commencé à cibler nos efforts sur cette initiative?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:23
Expand
We'd had the same guideline level since 1988. The original guideline was set based on available research on miners' exposure. It was only in the early 2000s that there was new pooled research that distinctly demonstrated that there was a risk at lower levels in a residential environment, and that research led to Health Canada and our federal-provincial-territorial committee reviewing the guideline and lowering the reference level to 200. We knew at the time that was a significant decrease, and if we were going to decrease the guideline to that extent, we wanted to have a full program to support it to make sure that we educated Canadians about what the guideline meant, and the actions that they could take to reduce their risk.
Nous avions la même concentration indicative depuis 1988. Au départ, elle a été établie en fonction des recherches existantes sur l' exposition des mineurs au radon. Ce n'est qu'au début des années 2000 que de nouveaux travaux de recherche ont révélé qu'il y avait un risque à un plus faible niveau en milieu résidentiel, et ces travaux ont amené Santé Canada et notre comité fédéral-provincial-territorial à réviser la directive et à réduire le niveau de référence à 200. À l'époque, nous savions que c'était une baisse importante, et si nous devions réduire la directive à ce point, nous voulions avoir un programme complet pour le soutenir afin de nous assurer que nous informons les Canadiens sur la signification de la directive et les mesures qu'ils pouvaient prendre pour réduire les risques.
Collapse
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Great. I'm also thinking about something in line with what my colleague was saying. I look at the Mental Health Commission of Canada, and it actually engaged members of Parliament in something it called “308 conversations”, which were focused on suicide prevention. I think all 308 of us have opportunities within our communications. That's just another method. Although it sounds as though a ton of work has been done, I don't know if there's been any research on the level of penetration and awareness of this as an issue.
Ms. Bush, maybe you could talk to the issues of penetration and awareness.
Excellent. Je pense aussi à quelque chose qui correspond à ce que mon collègue disait. La Commission canadienne de la santé mentale a invité les députés à participer à ce qu'elle appelle « 308 conversations », une campagne sur la prévention du suicide. Je crois que nous, les 308 députés, avons des possibilités dans le cadre de nos communications. Ce n'est qu'une méthode parmi d'autres. Bien qu'on dirait qu'une tonne de travaux ont été effectués, je ne sais pas s'il y a eu des recherches sur le niveau de compréhension et de sensibilisation.
Madame Bush, vous pourriez peut-être parler de ces questions.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:24
Expand
Absolutely. We did some public opinion research comparing where we were at the beginning of the program in 2007 to where we were in 2013, and we've definitely seen an increase from about 50% to about 65% in the level of awareness, and a significant increase from 4% to 25% with regard to Canadians' awareness of where they can get detectors and how they can test their homes. The challenge with this issue is that while levels of awareness have definitely increased, our research so far demonstrates that we haven't achieved a significant increase in action, i.e., testing.
The conversation about the challenges around risk communication and radon could be a very interesting one, because you can't blame anyone. There's no immediate health effect, and a lot of people tend to be apathetic towards the issue. We're making good strides, but the point we're at now is that we need to convert awareness to action. We're starting to see that, but there's still more work to be done.
Absolument. Nous avons réalisé des recherches sur l’opinion publique en vue de comparer notre situation au début du programme en 2007 à notre situation en 2013, et nous avons constaté que la sensibilisation des gens était passée de 50 à 65 % et que la sensibilisation des Canadiens au sujet des endroits où ils peuvent se procurer des détecteurs et la façon de mesurer la concentration de radon chez eux a grandement augmenté; elle était passée de 4 à 25 %. Même si la sensibilisation a vraiment augmenté, le défi est que nos travaux montrent jusqu’à présent que cela ne s’est pas traduit par une hausse importante de gestes concrets, notamment les analyses.
Il pourrait être intéressant de discuter des défis relatifs à la communication des risques et au radon, parce que nous ne pouvons jeter le blâme sur personne. Il n’y a aucun effet immédiat sur la santé, et beaucoup de gens ont tendance à être apathiques à la question. Nous réalisons de grands progrès, mais nous sommes maintenant rendus à l’étape de traduire cette sensibilisation en gestes concrets. Nous commençons à le voir, mais il reste encore beaucoup de pain sur la planche.
Collapse
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Let's say you take a neighbourhood of 1,000 homes on average, what percentage of homes do you anticipate would have levels that are above our current standards?
Prenons un quartier moyen de 1 000 maisons. En pourcentage, dans combien de maisons vous attendez-vous à trouver des concentrations qui dépassent nos normes actuelles?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:26
Expand
According to the cross-Canada survey data that I mentioned earlier, it's estimated that across Canada 7% of homes have high levels of radon, but that varies quite significantly across the country. In Manitoba and New Brunswick, it was over 20%, but in every single province there were regions where 10% to 20% and in some places 40% to 50% of homes tested high. The average across the country at 7% of homes is still very significant.
Selon les données de l’enquête pancanadienne dont j’ai parlé plus tôt, nous estimons qu’il y a des concentrations élevées de radon dans 7 % des maisons au Canada, mais cela varie considérablement au pays. Au Manitoba et au Nouveau-Brunswick, c’était plus de 20 %, mais il y a des régions dans chaque province où de 10 à 20 % ou même de 40 à 50 % des maisons présentaient des concentrations élevées de radon. La moyenne au pays est de 7 %, et c’est tout de même très élevé.
Collapse
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
As my last comment or question, I certainly see both a federal and a provincial role. There were some comments in terms of the Canada Labour Code, and I'm just trying to get a sense of to what degree, because obviously the provincial and territorial ministers regularly meet with their federal counterparts. In your awareness, has this issue ever been discussed at those particular meetings?
Comme dernier commentaire ou question, je considère que les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral ont certainement un rôle à jouer. Nous avons entendu des commentaires concernant le Code canadien du travail, et j’essaie d’avoir une idée de l’ampleur, parce que les ministres provinciaux et territoriaux rencontrent bien entendu régulièrement leurs homologues fédéraux. Selon ce que vous en savez, cette question a-t-elle déjà fait l’objet de discussions lors de ces rencontres?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:27
Expand
I can speak to what Health Canada has done there. We have gone to make a presentation about the revised guideline, and we follow up on a very regular basis. It is the intent to have the Canada Labour Code harmonized with our current Canadian guideline. It's just been delayed. The most recent information we have is that it's supposed to be updated by the winter of 2015-16.
Je peux traiter de ce que Santé Canada a fait. Nous avons fait une présentation sur la directive révisée, et nous assurons un suivi de manière très régulière. Nous avons l’intention d’arrimer le Code canadien du travail à notre directive canadienne. Cela a tout simplement été repoussé. Selon nos plus récents renseignements, cela devrait être fait d’ici l’hiver 2015-2016.
Collapse
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
But that would not necessarily translate into what the provinces are doing in terms of their labour codes or workers' compensation.
Par contre, cela ne se traduirait pas nécessairement dans ce que font les provinces en ce qui a trait à leur code du travail et aux indemnités pour accident du travail.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:27
Expand
No.
Non.
Collapse
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you.
Merci.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:27
Expand
Thank you, Ms. McLeod.
Next up is Mr. Hsu. Go ahead, sir.
Merci, madame McLeod.
Monsieur Hsu, allez-y.
Collapse
View Ted Hsu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Ted Hsu Profile
2015-06-18 16:27
Expand
Thank you.
I'd like to start by continuing the questioning from Ms. Moore regarding labelling of homes. As you say in your notes, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies radon in group 1, which means we know it's carcinogenic.
This is a question for everybody. Do you think houses should be labelled once they've been tested and that before and after remediation perhaps one could have a different label?
Merci.
J’aimerais d’abord poursuivre dans la même veine que Mme Moore concernant l’étiquetage des maisons. Comme vous le mentionnez dans vos notes, le Centre international de Recherche sur le Cancer classe le radon dans le groupe 1, ce qui signifie que nous savons que c’est cancérigène.
Je pose ma question à tous les témoins. Selon vous, croyez-vous que nous devrions accoler des étiquettes aux maisons dont la concentration de radon a été mesurée et qu’une maison pourrait avoir une autre étiquette avant et après des travaux d’atténuation?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:28
Expand
I think Kathy would like to respond there.
Je crois que Kathy souhaiterait vous répondre.
Collapse
Kathleen Cooper
View Kathleen Cooper Profile
Kathleen Cooper
2015-06-18 16:28
Expand
We looked at the provincial statutes, which I didn't get into in my presentation, and there is home warranty legislation in several provinces that says new homes are statutorily deemed to come with what are called “implied warranties of habitability”. In that case, it would mean that they had followed the building code, and the building code requirements largely have been or are being updated across the country to incorporate the national building code requirements for radon.
When you talk about existing homes, that's a little trickier, because when you sell a home, you have similar kinds of disclosure statements and requirements, and they may or may not provide information about radon. I think the idea is intriguing.
I think it would be better if we were to increase this awareness. One of the reasons we wanted that income tax credit was for the federal government to send a strong signal to the public to take the issue more seriously, get their homes tested, get them remediated if the levels are high, and have a tax break to be able to accommodate it.
I'm sorry; I'm drifting a little bit from your question.
Nous avons examiné les lois provinciales, ce dont je n’ai pas eu le temps de parler dans ma déclaration, mais plusieurs provinces ont des lois qui portent sur la garantie pour les habitations neuves. Ces lois prévoient d’office que les habitations neuves sont couvertes par une garantie tacite d’habitabilité. Cela signifie que les constructeurs ont respecté le code du bâtiment, et les exigences du code du bâtiment ont en grande partie été révisées ou sont en train de l’être partout au pays pour inclure les exigences du Code national du bâtiment quant au radon.
Dans le cas de maisons existantes, c’est un peu plus compliqué, parce que vous avez aussi l’obligation de communiquer l’information au moment de vendre une maison, et les propriétaires peuvent ou non le faire concernant le radon. Je crois que l’idée est intrigante.
À mon avis, ce serait plus efficace d’accroître la sensibilisation. L’une des raisons pour lesquelles nous voulions un crédit d’impôt, c’était pour que le gouvernement fédéral envoie un message clair à la population, à savoir qu’elle doit prendre cette question plus au sérieux, mesurer la concentration de radon dans les maisons et l’atténuer si la concentration est trop élevée et qu’elles recevront un crédit d’impôt pour ce faire.
Je m’excuse; je m’éloigne un peu de votre question.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:30
Expand
The only thing I can add is that under the national radon program we have worked with the Canadian Real Estate Association, and they now do have guidance that they provide with regard to radon. Based on our discussions with other countries, such as the U.S., that have had a national radon program in place for longer, with regard to.... Every home has radon. It's not a question of whether or not it's in there. I don't know about labelling, but I can tell you—
Tout ce que je peux ajouter, c’est que dans le cadre du programme national sur le radon nous avons collaboré avec l’Association canadienne de l’immeuble, et cette association a maintenant de l’information sur le radon et la diffuse. Selon nos discussions avec d’autres pays, comme les États-Unis, qui ont un programme national sur le radon depuis plus longtemps que nous, en ce qui a trait à... Il y a du radon dans chaque maison. La question n’est pas de savoir s’il y en a ou pas. Je ne sais pas quoi vous répondre au sujet de l’étiquetage, mais je peux vous dire...
Collapse
View Ted Hsu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Ted Hsu Profile
2015-06-18 16:30
Expand
Well, on labelling, if you've done a test, presumably the results of the test are there.
Eh bien, en ce qui concerne l’étiquetage, si vous avez mesuré la concentration de radon, je présume que vous avez les résultats de cette analyse.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:30
Expand
When we get calls from members of the public who have tested their home and are concerned because they want to sell it but they've mitigated it, our response to them is that everything that we've seen in the U.S. in regard to what they can communicate is that they've addressed the issue, they've made their home a healthier home, and it's a value-add. That's what they've seen in the U.S. It doesn't impact it in that way. I don't know if that directly answers your question.
Lorsque nous recevons des appels de contribuables qui ont mesuré la concentration de radon dans leur maison et qui sont inquiets, parce qu’ils veulent vendre leur maison et qu’ils ont atténué la concentration de radon, nous leur répondons que, selon ce que nous constatons aux États-Unis concernant l’information qu’ils peuvent communiquer, ils ont réglé le problème et que leur maison est un milieu plus sain. C’est une valeur ajoutée. C’est la situation aux États-Unis. Cela n’a aucune incidence. Je ne sais pas si cela répond directement à votre question.
Collapse
View Ted Hsu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Ted Hsu Profile
2015-06-18 16:30
Expand
I just wanted to throw it out there.
Mr. Rankin had another question, which I want to ask in a different way. I'm wondering if anybody has thought about it from an economic point of view. If you had an extra dollar to spend, where would you help people the most? Would it be in spending it on reducing smoking or on reducing exposure to radon? Has anybody tried to figure out which one of those two will have a bigger effect on lung cancer? It's an economics question, so maybe it's too hard to calculate or something.
Je tenais simplement à lancer l’idée.
M. Rankin a posé une autre question que j’aimerais vous poser différemment. Je me demande si vous y avez pensé du point de vue économique. Si vous aviez un dollar à investir, qu’est-ce qui pourrait aider le plus les gens? Devrions-nous l’utiliser pour réduire le tabagisme ou l’exposition au radon? Quelqu’un s’est-il déjà demandé lequel des deux aurait le plus grand effet sur le cancer du poumon? C’est une question de nature économique. C’est peut-être trop difficile à calculer.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:31
Expand
I'm not aware of any comparison like that being done within Health Canada. Smoking is definitely a bigger contributor. I think I should make that statement very clearly because we've worked with our colleagues on the tobacco side. With regard to a comparison, from an economic perspective, no.
Je ne sais pas si de telles comparaisons ont été réalisées à Santé Canada. Le tabagisme en est certes une cause importante. Je crois que je me dois de le dire très clairement, parce que nous avons collaboré avec nos collègues du programme de lutte au tabagisme. Nous n’avons pas fait de comparaisons du point de vue économique.
Collapse
View Ted Hsu Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Ted Hsu Profile
2015-06-18 16:32
Expand
Maybe I'll try another question. You mentioned that Health Canada has studied the effects of energy retrofits on radon. My question is about whether there's a synergy. We want to encourage energy retrofits for other reasons, and I'm wondering in terms of these two issues, energy efficiency and exposure to radon, whether there's some synergy in promoting both at the same time.
Je vais peut-être poser une autre question. Vous avez dit que Santé Canada a étudié les effets des rénovations écoénergétiques sur le radon. Je me demande s’il n’y a pas là une certaine synergie. Nous voulons encourager les rénovations écoénergétiques pour d’autres raisons, et je me demande s’il n’y aurait pas là une certaine synergie, à savoir que nous pourrions promouvoir en même temps ces deux éléments, soit l’efficacité énergétique et la diminution de l’exposition au radon.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:32
Expand
That is absolutely what Health Canada's looking at with the research we're doing, from two perspectives. From the perspective of the work that's being done to retrofit a home, is there an opportunity to build radon out in that situation? Secondly, with regard to what's being done to retrofit and seal up the home, is there a risk of increasing the radon level in the home? That research is still ongoing so we don't have all of the results.
C’est exactement la question sur laquelle Santé Canada se penche dans ses travaux à deux volets. Premièrement, en ce qui concerne les travaux pour moderniser une maison, est-il possible d’éliminer le radon? Deuxièmement, pour ce qui est des travaux pour rénover et sceller une maison, y a-t-il un risque d’y augmenter la concentration de radon? Les travaux sont toujours en cours; nous n’en avons donc pas encore tous les résultats.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:33
Expand
Thanks very much. Seeing as how it's Mr. Hsu's final committee meeting, we were generous in giving you an extra 20 seconds, sir. We're very generous on the health committee.
Next up, Mr. Young. Go ahead, sir. We'll have to take it off your time.
Merci beaucoup. Comme c’était la dernière séance de comité de M. Hsu, nous lui avons généreusement donné 20 secondes de plus. Nous sommes très généreux au Comité de la santé.
Monsieur Young, allez-y. Votre temps sera réduit en conséquence.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:33
Expand
Thank you, Chair. Thank you all for being here today.
Kelley Bush, I'm looking at your job title. I'm wondering if it actually fits on your business card because it's so long. I'm assuming you're the go-to person in the Government of Canada on this issue.
Merci, monsieur le président. Merci à tous les témoins de leur présence.
Kelley Bush, je regarde votre titre, et je me demande si vous arrivez à tout inclure sur votre carte professionnelle tellement qu’il est très long. Je présume que vous êtes la personne-ressource au gouvernement du Canada sur cette question.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:33
Expand
I do have a colleague who is responsible for the technical operations side and all the research, so we are both the go-to. It takes a big group to run the program.
J’ai en fait un collègue qui est chargé des aspects techniques et de la recherche. Nous sommes donc les deux personnes-ressources. Il faut une grosse équipe pour administrer le programme.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:33
Expand
Okay, good.
Do new homeowners have obligations to build with building codes across Canada to reduce the radon that gets into the house after the house is built?
D’accord. Parfait.
Les habitations neuves doivent-elles être construites conformément aux codes du bâtiment partout au Canada en vue de réduire le radon qui pénètre dans les maisons après leur construction?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:33
Expand
The way the building code works is that at a national level it's a model code. If it's adopted at the provincial level then it's enforceable. The large majority of the provinces and territories have adopted the codes related to radon. Several of them are now taking them and making them more stringent as they have more data available with regard to the risk of radon in their provinces and municipalities.
La manière dont fonctionne le code du bâtiment, c’est que le code national est un modèle. Si une province l’adopte, il s’applique. La grande majorité des provinces et des territoires ont adopté les codes concernant le radon. Plusieurs provinces et territoires décident maintenant de rendre ces codes plus rigoureux, parce que les autorités ont de plus amples données concernant le risque que pose le radon dans leur province et leur municipalité.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:34
Expand
Thank you. I bought four new houses since I got married. The last one was a few years ago. I don't know what they do. They pour a concrete frame. They put bricks up. What do they do to make the house safer from radon, to reduce the radon in the house? Physically, what do they do, or is it just a matter of ventilation?
Merci. J’ai acheté quatre maisons neuves depuis que je suis marié. J’ai acheté la dernière il y a quelques années. Je ne sais pas ce que les constructeurs font. Ils ont coulé une fondation de béton. Ils ont posé des briques. Qu’est-ce que les constructeurs font pour protéger davantage les maisons du radon et en réduire la concentration? Que font-ils concrètement ou est-ce uniquement une question de ventilation?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:34
Expand
There are two codes now. One is a sealing application, so it's a vapour barrier, basically, a very thick piece of plastic that goes under the concrete slab, and there's also a rough-in for a radon mitigation system. One of the most significant parts of installing a radon reduction system is having to core through that slab. If you have that four-inch PVC pipe there, capped, and it's available, it's much easier to install a radon reduction system.
Il y a maintenant deux codes. Le premier concerne l’utilisation d’un scellant. Il s’agit d’un pare-vapeur, soit en gros une feuille de plastique très épaisse qui est placée sous la dalle de béton, et il y a aussi l’installation brute en vue de l’installation d’un système d’atténuation du radon. L’une des étapes les plus importantes lors de l’installation d’un système d’atténuation du radon est le perçage de la dalle de béton. Si vous avez déjà un tuyau en PVC de quatre pouces avec un bouchon dans votre dalle, cela facilite grandement l’installation d’un système d’atténuation du radon.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:35
Expand
How would I know if I have one of those?
Comment puis-je savoir si j’en ai un?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:35
Expand
It should be labelled.
Il devrait être identifié.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:35
Expand
It should be labelled. Okay, I'll take a look. Thank you. I also want to get my home checked.
I bought this kit for $35 at Home Depot, and then when I went to use it there were a bunch of reasons I couldn't use it, like the temperature wasn't right in the room. There has to be a certain temperature and you have to leave it somewhere for three months. I found it awkward, and then I made a mental note to bring in a company. I just checked online here. It's $300 to have your house tested—which I'll probably do—but then they want $400 to test the granite counters.
Can you talk about the risks from granite counters, please? In Oakville, every house has a granite counter; otherwise, no one's going to buy it.
Il devrait être identifié. D’accord. Je vais regarder. Merci. J’aimerais aussi mesurer la concentration de radon chez moi.
J’ai acheté une trousse d’analyse à 35 $ chez Home Depot. Lorsque j’ai essayé de l’utiliser, il y avait une panoplie de raisons pour lesquelles je ne pouvais pas l’utiliser; par exemple, la température n’était pas adéquate dans la pièce. Il faut le faire à une certaine température, et il faut laisser l’appareil quelque part durant trois mois. J’ai trouvé cela étrange, puis je me suis dit que je devrais appeler une entreprise. Je viens de vérifier en ligne. Il en coûte 300 $ pour mesurer la concentration de radon dans une maison — ce que je vais probablement faire —, mais l’entreprise demande également 400 $ pour vérifier les comptoirs de granit.
Pourriez-vous nous parler des risques que posent les comptoirs de granit, s’il vous plaît? À Oakville, chaque maison a un comptoir de granit; autrement, personne ne va l’acheter.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:35
Expand
Right. This was a concern that was raised in 2008, so in response Health Canada did a study. We looked at 35 different commonly used granites in Canada. Essentially, the result was that the risk is not from your granite countertops. Enjoy them. Keep them. The risk is in the ground under your home. The best thing you can do is to test your home for radon.
D’accord. En 2008, certains ont soulevé une crainte à cet égard. Donc, Santé Canada a réalisé une étude. Nous avons examiné 35 types de granit couramment utilisés au Canada. En gros, les résultats étaient que le risque ne provenait pas de vos comptoirs de granit. Profitez-en. Gardez-les. Le risque provient du sol sous votre maison. La meilleure chose que vous pouvez faire, c’est de mesurer la concentration de radon dans votre maison.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:36
Expand
Thank you. You just saved me $400.
Voices: Oh, oh!
Merci. Vous venez de me faire épargner 400 $.
Des voix: Oh, oh!
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:36
Expand
My pleasure.
Je vous en prie.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:36
Expand
You said there are two mitigation standards. There are building codes, etc., that they're working on. They're starting to realize them, but there's no line. One of my colleagues on the opposite side was talking about it. Is there a line when you buy a house that has to be there and your lawyer checks for it to make sure?
They used to have urea formaldehyde foam and it would say, “No, this house was never insulated with that foam.” Here, it would maybe be, “Yes, this house had a radon test and here's the result.” There's nothing like that out there, is there?
Vous avez dit qu’il y a deux normes d’atténuation. Les constructeurs doivent respecter notamment des codes du bâtiment, et ils commencent à en tenir compte, mais ce n’est pas visible. L’un de mes collègues d’en face en a parlé. Lorsque vous achetez une maison, y a-t-il une mention à ce sujet dont votre avocat s’assure de la présence?
À une certaine époque, les constructeurs utilisaient la mousse d’urée-formaldéhyde, et il était écrit: « Non. Cette maison n’a jamais été isolée avec cette mousse. » Il est peut-être écrit: « La concentration de radon a été mesurée dans la maison, et voici le résultat. » Il n’y a rien de tel, n’est-ce pas?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:36
Expand
It's in very few communities. They have it in some communities. Those real estate documents differ quite a bit across the country.
Cela se fait dans très peu d’endroits, mais certains le font. Les documents concernant les ventes immobilières varient beaucoup d’un bout à l’autre du pays.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:36
Expand
Is there any measurement of what percentage of lung cancers, or...? What is the contributory factor of radon to lung cancer nationally?
Quel est le pourcentage des cancers du poumon ou...? En pourcentage, combien de cancers du poumon au Canada le radon contribue-t-il à causer?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:36
Expand
I'm not sure I completely understand the question.
It's been estimated that 16% of lung cancers are related to radon exposure, but....
Je ne suis pas tout à fait certaine de comprendre votre question.
Nous évaluons que 16 % des cancers du poumon sont liés à l’exposition au radon, mais...
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:36
Expand
That's helpful. Thank you very much.
Is there any evidence that there are more lung cancers in those communities you mentioned earlier, where there are more houses with an amount of radon that's up to 10% or 20% above normal, where it should not be?
C’est utile. Merci beaucoup.
Avons-nous des données probantes qui démontrent qu’il y a plus de cas de cancers du poumon dans les collectivités dont vous avez parlé plus tôt et où il y a plus de maisons dont la concentration de radon est anormalement jusqu’à 10 ou 20 % plus élevée que la norme?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
I don't know that I can speak to that in detail. There have been some, but there are also communities where that hasn't been demonstrated. Probably the best answer is that it's not consistent.
Je ne sais pas si je peux vous en parler en détail. Il y a des cas, mais il y a également des collectivités où cela n’a pas été prouvé. La meilleure réponse est probablement que ce n’est pas constant.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
There is.
En effet.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
There's only one kind of radon, right?
Il y a seulement un type de radon, n’est-ce pas?
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
Is it a matter of ventilation in the homes or something, or maybe some mitigation the homeowners have done, or maybe some populations aren't as susceptible to it as much as others are? Is there any hint of that?
Est-ce une question de ventilation dans les maisons ou en raison de mesures d’atténuation que prennent des propriétaires ou peut-être que certains ne sont pas aussi sensibles que d’autres au radon? Avons-nous des indications en ce sens?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
Similar to the question of asking a lifelong smoker why they didn't develop lung cancer, it's very hard to explain exactly why some are impacted more than others.
C’est comme si vous nous demandiez pourquoi une personne qui a fumé toute sa vie ne développe pas de cancer du poumon. Il est très difficile d’expliquer exactement pourquoi certains sont touchés plus que d’autres.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
Right.
Perhaps you could take a minute and tell us, so that it's in the record here, the steps that homeowners who are concerned about this should take.
D’accord.
Pourriez-vous prendre une minute pour nous expliquer aux fins du compte rendu les étapes que devraient prendre les propriétaires inquiets à ce sujet?
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
Test their home. They have two options. They can buy a do-it-yourself test kit or they can hire a certified professional. If the levels are high, take action to reduce, because it's easy. The cost is similar to other home maintenance costs. It's similar to a new air conditioner or a new furnace, and it will reduce your radon by up to 80% to 90%.
Ils doivent mesurer la concentration de radon dans leur maison. Les gens ont deux options. Ils peuvent se procurer une trousse d’analyse pour le faire eux-mêmes ou ils peuvent embaucher un professionnel certifié. Si la concentration est élevée, il faut prendre des mesures pour l’atténuer, parce que c’est facile. Le coût est comparable à l’entretien d’autres appareils dans une maison. C’est comparable à l’achat d’un nouveau climatiseur ou d’un nouveau générateur de chaleur. Cela réduira la concentration de radon jusqu’à 80 ou 90 %.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
That's it.
C’est tout.
Collapse
Kelley Bush
View Kelley Bush Profile
Kelley Bush
2015-06-18 16:37
Expand
That's it. They can call Health Canada if they have any questions, because we're more than willing to help.
C’est tout. Les personnes peuvent communiquer avec Santé Canada si elles ont des questions, parce que nous sommes tout à fait disposés à les aider.
Collapse
View Terence Young Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terence Young Profile
2015-06-18 16:38
Expand
Thank you very much.
Do I have any more time, Chair?
Merci beaucoup.
Me reste-t-il du temps, monsieur le président?
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:38
Expand
Only if you're resigning.
Voices: Oh, oh!
The Chair: Unless you have an announcement to make, that's it.
That concludes our first round. We'll suspend for a minute and bring up our next panel.
Thank you for your time.
Seulement si vous ne vous présentez pas aux prochaines élections.
Des voix: Oh, oh!
Le président: À moins que vous ayez une annonce à faire, ce sera tout.
Voilà qui conclut notre première série de questions. Nous allons prendre une pause pour que le prochain panel s’installe.
Merci de votre temps.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:40
Expand
Let's begin. We are on a very tight timeline here.
First up is Tom Kosatsky, scientific director from the National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health.
Go ahead, sir.
Allons-y. Nous avons un horaire très chargé aujourd'hui.
Nous allons d'abord entendre Tom Kosatsky, directeur scientifique du Centre de collaboration nationale en santé environnementale.
À vous la parole, monsieur.
Collapse
Tom Kosatsky
View Tom Kosatsky Profile
Tom Kosatsky
2015-06-18 16:41
Expand
Thank you.
I am Tom Kosatsky, as introduced. Thank you so much for having me and my colleagues Sarah Henderson and Anne-Marie Nicol.
The National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health is one of six such centres funded by the Public Health Agency to increase the game, to up the game of public health practice across the country. We do it by letting people know about what's new, about what's effective, and by working with public health practitioners across Canada to do that. We're housed at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, where I'm also the medical director for environmental health. Radon is one of my interests.
I'll speak to lung cancer—not to smoking, although, as you've heard, it will come into the conversation—and radon in terms of public health policy for Canada. If you can follow the slides, you'll see that the first one looks at the importance of lung cancer across the country. It's the second leading cause of cancer in men, third in women, but the leading cause of death from cancer in both men and women. I'm not sure everybody knows that. It's far more important as a cause of death than breast cancer, as an example, in women, and far more important than rectal cancer, colon cancer, or prostate cancer in men.
The next slide looks at some of the historic evidence linking smoking, which everyone now knows is linked with lung cancer. Even when I was born, around when those studies were done, this was something that was denied. You remember those ads: your doctor smokes Marlboro.
It was found through studies of doctors that they demonstrated that smokers had 25 times the lifetime risk of lung cancer—
Merci.
Comme vous l'avez dit, je m'appelle Tom Kosatsky. Je vous remercie énormément de l'invitation. Je suis accompagné de mes collègues, Sarah Henderson et Anne-Marie Nicol.
Le Centre de collaboration nationale en santé environnementale est l'un des six centres financés par l'Agence de santé publique du Canada afin de renforcer la pratique en santé publique dans l'ensemble du pays. Pour ce faire, nous informons les gens des nouveautés et des solutions efficaces, tout en collaborant avec les professionnels de la santé publique partout au Canada. Nous sommes situés dans les locaux du Centre de contrôle des maladies de la Colombie-Britannique, où je suis également directeur médical de la santé environnementale. Le radon fait partie de mes champs d'intérêt.
Je vais m'attarder sur le cancer du poumon — plutôt que sur le tabagisme, mais comme vous l'avez entendu, ce sujet reviendra sur le tapis —, et j'aborderai la question du radon du point de vue de la politique de santé publique au Canada. Si vous suivez les diapositives, vous verrez que la première fait état de l'ampleur du cancer du poumon à l'échelle nationale. Il s'agit de la deuxième cause de cancer chez les hommes et la troisième chez les femmes, mais c'est la principale cause de décès par cancer chez les deux sexes. Je ne suis pas certain que tout le monde le sache. Le cancer du poumon est beaucoup plus mortel que le cancer du sein, par exemple, chez les femmes, et il s'agit d'une cause de décès beaucoup plus grave que le cancer du rectum, le cancer du côlon ou le cancer de la prostate chez les hommes.
La diapositive suivante présente quelques preuves historiques qui relient le tabagisme, comme tout le monde le sait, au cancer du poumon. Ces études remontent à ma naissance et, même à cette époque, ce fait était nié. On se souvient des fameuses publicités, comme celle qui montre un médecin fumer du Marlboro.
Les études médicales ont révélé que les fumeurs étaient 25 fois plus à risque d'avoir un cancer du poumon au cours de leur vie...
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:43
Expand
Excuse me, Mr. Kosatsky.
Go ahead, Mr. Toet.
Pardonnez-moi, monsieur Kosatsky.
Allez-y, monsieur Toet.
Collapse
View Lawrence Toet Profile
CPC (MB)
View Lawrence Toet Profile
2015-06-18 16:43
Expand
Dr. Kosatsky seems to be referring to a slide deck that I don't seem to have.
I think many of my colleagues are scrambling to find it too.
Le Dr Kosatsky semble parler d'une diapositive que je n'arrive pas à trouver dans la documentation.
Je crois que plusieurs de mes collègues ont le même problème.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:43
Expand
It was the motivation of our committee to be paperless. I think that perhaps is why many members do have it, but just not on paper.
Le comité avait décidé de tenir une séance sans papier. Je crois que c'est la raison pour laquelle de nombreux députés n'ont pas un imprimé.
Collapse
Tom Kosatsky
View Tom Kosatsky Profile
Tom Kosatsky
2015-06-18 16:43
Expand
I think members have it now, from what I can see.
Je crois que les députés ont maintenant la diapositive sous la main, d'après ce que je peux voir.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:43
Expand
Yes, they all received it; it's just in another place.
Oui, ils l'ont tous reçue; c'était simplement à une autre page.
Collapse
Tom Kosatsky
View Tom Kosatsky Profile
Tom Kosatsky
2015-06-18 16:43
Expand
You know, anyway, that smoking causes lung cancer in smokers. You probably also know that to a degree it causes lung cancer in people who live with smokers. I won't really talk about either of those things, but if you can get to the slide that's marked “Lung Cancer in Lifelong Non-Smokers”, you'll see that there is a new thing that's been described only over the last, about, 10 years, which is lung cancer in lifelong non-smokers, something which, before this committee invited me to speak with you, I didn't know much about. It turns out that it's a whole other disease. It has some similarities to smokers' lung cancer but some very important differences.
The geography is different. It's a huge phenomenon in Asia and in Asians in Canada. It has a female predominance, so there are far more lung cancers in female non-smokers than in male non-smokers. The age distribution is different, so it tends to present itself at a much younger age than smokers' lung cancers do. The cell types, the cancer types are different. The typical small cell squamous lung cancer that you see in smokers, you don't get in non-smokers. You get a whole different cell type and cell shape. The genetics are different, so there is some family relationship. It's not very strong, but there's a very strong genetic relationship based on genetic analysis. You can almost predict who's going to get it, which is a really important thing. Further, it tends to be much more symptomatic at diagnosis than is lung cancer in smokers. The five-year survival, oddly, is better, even though it presents later, for non-smokers' lung cancer than for smokers' lung cancer. In many ways it's a different disease.
Radon-related lung cancer is somewhere intermediate, because, as I'm going to say, most radon-related lung cancers occur in smokers. The question of whether it is more cost-efficient to stop smoking was right on the mark.
The next one is called “Principal risk factors (excluding occupational exposure)”, only because you asked. There are a number of conditions, including radon exposure, that are associated with non-smokers' lung cancer, like the history in your family. It's associated with hormone use in women. It's associated with environmental tobacco smoke. It's associated, to a degree, with air pollution. It's associated with cooking-oil fumes, so indoor cooking over a long period of time. It's associated in Asia and Africa with domestic heating by wood and wood products in the home. Those are also associated with lung cancer. Something that I didn't know much about before is that it's associated with lung infections like tuberculosis and other lung infections over a long period of time. It's also, like so many of the other bad things in life, associated with being poor. Getting lung cancer is associated with being poor, even if you eliminate all the other stuff. To a degree it's mitigated or prevented by a diet high in fruits and vegetables, so eat your leafy greens, eat your fruit, and you're less likely to get lung cancer no matter what else you do.
The next one is an American slide. It has a little American flag, and it looks at the attributable percentage of lung cancer by cause. For active smoking, it's 90%. For radon exposure in the U.S., it is between 9% and 15%, and in Canada it's estimated at 15%. For workplace carcinogen exposure, it's 10%. For air pollution, it's 1% to 2%. That adds up to more than 100% because, as you'll see, some of those causes add to or multiply each other. If you're exposed to radon, don't smoke. If you smoke, don't be exposed to radon.
Non-smokers' lung cancer is a really important cause of lung cancer. It's about number six in terms of all the causes. Radon-related lung cancer—this is U.S. data but for Canada it would be the same—is number eight. How could that be? It could be because smoking and radon exposure are interactive, so one multiplies or adds to the effect of the other. That leads, in any case, to non-smokers' lung cancer being a very bad issue.
Any radon exposure is bad news, not just at over 200. An artificial limit, no matter what it is, is not very useful for lowering the whole population's exposure. It would be better if we were all exposed to less radon rather than picking one area, maybe for convenience, or one level. It may be good for convenience, but it's not a really useful population health measure. For the whole population, it would be better if we were all exposed to less radon. It's a linear relationship. The more radon you're exposed to and the longer you're exposed, the more likely you are to get lung cancer.
The other thing is that, as I was saying, the more you smoke the more it interacts. On the last slide, which I made up using Canadian data, most radon-associated lung cancers occur in smokers. If you've never smoked, as you get up to high levels, like interior B.C. levels, of radon about 36 people out of 1,000 exposed to those levels would get lung cancer. On the other hand if there was no radon exposure and you did smoke, about 100 people would get lung cancer. If you add the two together, you're exposed to a high level of radon and you smoke, 270 people exposed to those two for their whole lives, smoking and radon, will get lung cancer. It's 270 out of 1,000 people; that's tremendous.
How can you lower it? The number one way to lower it is to stop smoking or to never have smoked. The number two way to lower it is to lower your radon exposure, and you'll do that for everybody in the population. The less smoking there is, the less radon there is, the less lung cancer there will be, to the point that as we lower the level of smoking exposure, radon will become a more important cause of lung cancer. But there will be a lot less lung cancer. If we eliminate smoking, there will be less lung cancer in general, but all of these other causes other than smoking will increase in focus. The big issue is the interaction, the doubling, tripling, quadrupling, or really octupling effect, because it's an eight-time effect, of smoking and radon will go away.
What's been the Canadian public health stance on radon? Before the year 2007, it was pretty passive and largely seen as a private issue. Health Canada was helpful. They gave advice when people asked for it. That was at the time of the 800 becquerels per metre cubed, or 800 disintegrations per second per metre cubed level, which is what a becquerel is. Then when the level was lowered a more active stance was taken. Health Canada was involved with large-scale testing across the country to establish a radon profile across the country so that we knew what our levels were likely to be. They were much more active in terms of giving advice, and with this lower guideline, they promoted it and they encouraged “test and remediate”. Test and remediate to me is not the way to go. The way to go is to build it out in the first place.
If you look at this complicated Ontario slide, Ontario looked at levels of radon across the province and how many cases of lung cancer could be saved by doing something for those above 200 becquerels per metre cubed, by adopting 100 becquerels per metre cubed, by adopting 50 becquerels per metre cubed—all of which are attainable—or by going to as low a level possible and getting close to outdoor air levels, which are relatively benign. At 200 becquerels per metre cubed, if every Ontario resident got their house from that point down to outdoor levels, 2% of all the lung cancers in Ontario would be averted. If you got down from current levels above 200, if everybody tested and remediated and they successfully got their house down to background or no radon, it would avert 2% of all lung cancers. If all houses in Ontario with any level of radon in them could get down to outdoor levels, we'd get rid of 13% of all Ontario lung cancer deaths. If there were a way to do it, why not do that? Why not get it down lower?
The next slide looks at the change in levels of radon over time. This is Dutch data. Canada would be the same. Yes, as we've made our buildings tighter, radon levels have increased. This is even more reason to look at the joint effects of building changes on radon.
De toute façon, vous savez que le tabagisme cause le cancer du poumon chez les fumeurs. Vous savez sans doute également que l'exposition au tabac entraîne le cancer du poumon chez les personnes qui vivent avec des fumeurs. Je ne m'attarderai pas vraiment là-dessus, mais si vous allez à la diapositive intitulée « Cancer du poumon chez ceux qui n'ont jamais fumé », vous verrez qu'une nouvelle notion fait l'objet d'études depuis seulement une dizaine d'années, à savoir la prévalence du cancer du poumon chez les non-fumeurs permanents. J'avoue qu'avant d'être invité à témoigner devant le comité, je ne savais pas grand-chose à ce sujet. Il se trouve que c'est là une tout autre maladie. Elle comporte des similitudes avec le cancer du poumon chez les fumeurs, mais il y a quelques différences très importantes.
D'abord, le facteur géographique est différent. C'est très prévalent en Asie et chez les Asiatiques au Canada. Il y a aussi une prédominance féminine, ce qui signifie que le cancer du poumon est beaucoup plus prévalent chez les non-fumeuses que chez les non-fumeurs. Autre différence: la répartition selon l'âge. Les non-fumeurs semblent développer le cancer du poumon à un âge beaucoup plus jeune que les fumeurs. Ensuite, les types de cellules ou les types de cancer sont différents. Les non-fumeurs n'ont pas de cancer du poumon épidermoïde à petites cellules, qui est caractéristique des fumeurs. C'est un type et une forme de cellules complètement différents. La génétique diffère aussi, car il y a un certain lien familial. Ce n'est pas très marqué, mais il y a une très forte relation génétique, selon les analyses génétiques. On peut presque prédire qui sera susceptible d'avoir cette maladie, ce qui est vraiment important. De plus, il y a généralement plus de symptômes au moment du diagnostic que dans le cas du cancer du poumon chez les fumeurs. Assez étrangement, les chances de survie après cinq ans sont meilleures pour les non-fumeurs que les fumeurs, même si cela se présente plus tard. À bien des égards, il s'agit d'une autre maladie.
Le cancer du poumon lié au radon se trouve quelque peu entre les deux, car, comme je vais l'expliquer, la plupart des cancers du poumon liés au radon surviennent chez les fumeurs. La question de savoir s'il est plus rentable d'arrêter de fumer n'aurait pu être plus juste.
La diapositive suivante s'intitule « Principaux facteurs de risque (exposition professionnelle exclue) », et je l'ai ajoutée uniquement parce que vous en aviez fait la demande. Il y a un certain nombre de conditions qui sont associées au cancer du poumon chez les non-fumeurs, comme l'exposition au radon, les antécédents familiaux, l'utilisation d'hormones chez les femmes, l'exposition à la fumée de tabac ambiante et, dans une certaine mesure, la pollution atmosphérique. À cela s'ajoute la fumée d'huiles à friture, c'est-à-dire la cuisson d'aliments à l'intérieur sur une longue période. Il y a aussi le chauffage domestique par bois ou par produits de bois en Asie et en Afrique. Voilà autant de facteurs qui sont associés au cancer du poumon. Il y a aussi un lien avec les infections pulmonaires comme la tuberculose à long terme, chose que je connaissais peu. Comme pour bien d'autres mauvaises choses dans la vie, la pauvreté entre aussi en ligne de compte. Le cancer du poumon est associé à la pauvreté, même si on exclut tous les autres facteurs. Dans une certaine mesure, un régime alimentaire riche en fruits et légumes peut atténuer ou prévenir cette maladie. Donc, mangez vos fruits et vos légumes verts, et vous serez moins susceptibles d'avoir le cancer du poumon, indépendamment des autres facteurs.
Passons maintenant à la diapositive suivante, qui porte sur les États-Unis, comme en témoigne le drapeau américain. Ce graphique présente le pourcentage de cas de cancer du poumon selon la cause. Le tabagisme actif compte pour 90 % des cas. L'exposition au radon représente entre 9 et 15 % des cas aux États-Unis et environ 15 % au Canada. En ce qui concerne l'exposition aux substances cancérogènes en milieu de travail, le pourcentage est de 10 %. Quant à la pollution atmosphérique, c'est de 1 à 2 %. Le total dépasse 100 % parce que, comme vous le verrez, certaines de ces causes interagissent ou créent ensemble un effet multiplicateur. Si vous êtes exposés au radon, ne fumez pas. Si vous fumez, ne vous exposez pas au radon.
Le cancer du poumon chez les non-fumeurs est une cause très importante, plus précisément la sixième en importance parmi toutes les causes. Pour ce qui est du cancer du poumon lié au radon — n'oubliez pas qu'on parle ici des États-Unis, mais le résultat serait le même pour le Canada —, c'est la huitième cause en importance. Comment est-ce possible? C'est peut-être parce que le tabagisme et l'exposition au radon sont interactifs, c'est-à-dire que l'un multiplie l'effet de l'autre. Dans tous les cas, cela signifie que le cancer du poumon chez les non-fumeurs est un problème très grave.
Peu importe la concentration, le radon est mauvais pour la santé, et ce, pas seulement au-dessus du seuil de 200. Une limite artificielle, quelle qu'elle soit, n'est pas très utile pour réduire l'exposition de l'ensemble de la population. Il serait préférable que nous soyons tous exposés à moins de radon, au lieu de sélectionner une zone, peut-être par souci de commodité, ou un niveau. C'est peut-être pratique, mais ce n'est pas vraiment utile comme mesure de santé publique. Il vaudrait mieux que l'ensemble de la population soit exposé à moins de radon. C'est une relation linéaire. Plus vous êtes exposés à une grande quantité de radon sur une longue période, plus vous êtes susceptibles de développer le cancer du poumon.
Par ailleurs, comme je le disais, plus on fume, plus il y a interaction. Sur la dernière diapositive, que j'ai préparée en utilisant des données canadiennes, on voit que la plupart des cancers du poumon liés au radon surviennent chez les fumeurs. Si 1 000 personnes qui n'ont pas jamais fumé étaient exposées à des concentrations élevées de radon, comme les niveaux enregistrés dans la partie intérieure de la Colombie-Britannique, environ 36 d'entre elles développeraient un cancer du poumon. En revanche, si les personnes qui fument étaient exposées au radon, environ 100 d'entre elles développeraient un cancer du poumon. Si on ajoute les deux facteurs, c'est-à-dire si les personnes étaient exposées à la fois au tabagisme et à une concentration élevée de radon, 270 d'entre elles développeraient un cancer. On parle là de 270 sur 1 000 personnes; c'est énorme.
Comment réduire les risques? Premièrement, il faut arrêter de fumer, voire ne jamais fumer. Deuxièmement, il faut réduire l'exposition au radon, et cela vaut pour l'ensemble de la population. Moins il y a de tabagisme, moins il y a de radon et, par ricochet, moins il y aura de cancer du poumon. En fait, si nous réduisons le niveau d'exposition au tabagisme, le radon deviendra une cause plus importante du cancer du poumon. Mais il y aura beaucoup moins de cas de cancer du poumon. Si nous éliminons le tabagisme, le nombre de cas de cancer du poumon diminuera en général, et ce, de façon considérable, mais toutes les autres causes gagneront en importance. Le noeud du problème, c'est l'interaction entre le tabagisme et le radon, qui peut aggraver les effets de deux, trois, quatre ou même huit fois; bref, cette interaction sera ainsi éliminée.
Quel a été le point de vue du secteur canadien de la santé publique sur le radon? Avant 2007, on avait adopté une approche plutôt passive, car c'était considéré, en grande partie, comme un dossier d'intérêt privé. Santé Canada a été d'un grand secours. Le ministère a fourni des conseils aux gens qui en demandaient. À cette époque, la directive était fixée à 800 becquerels par mètre cube, c'est-à-dire 800 désintégrations par seconde par mètre cube. Par la suite, lorsque la concentration prescrite a été révisée à la baisse, le secteur public a pris une position plus active. Santé Canada a participé à des tests à grande échelle partout au pays afin d'établir un profil du radon à l'échelle nationale, de sorte que nous ayons une idée de nos concentrations. Santé Canada a joué un rôle beaucoup plus actif sur le plan des conseils et, grâce à cette ligne directrice préconisant un niveau inférieur, le ministère a encouragé la détection et les mesures correctives. Mais, selon moi, ce n'est pas la voie à suivre. La solution consiste, dès le départ, à éliminer la présence de radon dans les bâtiments.
Examinons cette diapositive compliquée, qui présente des données sur l'Ontario. La province a examiné les concentrations de radon partout sur son territoire afin de déterminer combien de cas de cancer du poumon pourraient être évités grâce à des mesures pour les concentrations supérieures à 200 becquerels par mètre cube, notamment en adoptant une ligne directrice préconisant 100 ou 50 becquerels par mètre cube — ce qui est faisable — ou en réduisant les concentrations le plus possible pour les amener aux niveaux de radon à l'extérieur, qui sont relativement bénins. À 200 becquerels par mètre cube, si toutes les résidences en Ontario étaient rénovées pour atteindre les niveaux de radon à l'extérieur, on éviterait 2 % de tous les cas de cancer du poumon en Ontario. Autrement dit, par rapport à la ligne directrice actuelle fixée à 200 becquerels par mètre cube, si tout le monde mesurait les concentrations de radon dans sa maison et prenait des mesures correctives pour les amener au niveau de radon à l'extérieur ou même pour éliminer complètement le radon, on éviterait 2 % de tous les cas de cancer du poumon. Si toutes les résidences en Ontario, peu importe les niveaux de radon détectés, étaient rénovées de sorte que les concentrations de radon dans l'air intérieur soit égale aux niveaux de radon à l'extérieur, nous éviterions 13 % de tous les décès causés par le cancer du poumon en Ontario. S'il y a moyen d'y arriver, pourquoi ne pas le faire? Pourquoi ne pas réduire davantage ces taux?
La diapositive suivante porte sur la modification des concentrations de radon au fil du temps. Ces données proviennent des Pays-Bas. Les résultats pour le Canada seraient les mêmes. Oui, les concentrations de radon ont augmenté à mesure qu'on a construit des immeubles plus étanches. Raison de plus d'examiner les effets combinés des rénovations sur le radon.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:53
Expand
Mr. Kosatsky, we're a bit over time. I'm just wondering if you could wrap it up.
Thank you.
Monsieur Kosatsky, nous avons un peu dépassé la limite de temps. Je vous invite à conclure.
Merci.
Collapse
Tom Kosatsky
View Tom Kosatsky Profile
Tom Kosatsky
2015-06-18 16:53
Expand
I can finish in one minute.
Even if everybody tested, and everybody whose house was over 200 did remediation, we'd only touch lung cancer in Canada in a minor way. So what should we do? We should and we can build radon out. The new building code, the guidance levels, and provincial adoption help but only in a minor way. It would really help if we installed fans along with this dead-end piece of plastic that's part of the new building code, vent the radon out, and have very low levels in people's houses. People wouldn't tamper with it. You'd live in a low radon house. You wouldn't have to label it. You would know it when you moved in.
It will take years before every new house in Canada has a low radon level, but at least our children and grandchildren won't have this scourge. It's much more cost-effective to do that than it is to mitigate. The cost is much lower per house, and it will have long-lasting effects on the house itself.
What should we do? We should adopt a population approach, look at the whole population and not just the people who have a lot of radon in their houses. We should question the current guideline and lower it to as low as reasonably possible. We should legislate radon-resilient building stock, so we could build radon out of new buildings. People who live in existing houses will say, “How come my neighbour has this house? I want that too.” That would be the best encouragement for people themselves to test and remediate.
We should use provincial authorities for day care centres, schools, and workplaces to emulate what goes on there in our own houses, and we should integrate the anti-smoking and radon-lowering messages, because if we have no smoking and no radon, we will have almost no lung cancer, the number one cause of cancer deaths in this country.
That's the message. Thank you for hearing me.
Je peux conclure en une minute.
Même si tout le monde effectuait les tests et que chaque habitation où on avait détecté une concentration de plus de 200 était rénovée, nous ne ferions qu'effleurer le problème du cancer du poumon au Canada. Alors, quoi faire? Nous devrions et nous pouvons éliminer la présence du radon dans les bâtiments. Le nouveau code du bâtiment, les concentrations prescrites et l'appui provincial sont certes utiles, mais seulement de façon mineure. Il serait vraiment utile d'installer des ventilateurs, en plus du bout de plastique recommandé dans le nouveau code du bâtiment, afin d'évacuer le radon à l'extérieur de sorte que les concentrations à l'intérieur des maisons soient très faibles. Les gens n'auraient pas à s'en faire. On vivrait dans des maisons à faible concentration de radon. On n'aurait pas besoin d'étiquette. On le saurait dès l'emménagement.
Il faudra attendre des années avant que chaque nouvelle maison au Canada ait une faible concentration de radon, mais au moins, nos enfants et nos petits-enfants ne seront pas aux prises avec ce fléau. Il est beaucoup plus rentable de procéder ainsi que de mettre en place un système d'atténuation. Le coût par maison est bien moindre, et cela aura des effets à long terme sur la maison elle-même.
Que devrions-nous faire? D'abord, nous devrions adopter une approche axée sur la population, c'est-à-dire examiner l'ensemble de la population au lieu de s'en tenir aux gens qui habitent dans une maison à forte concentration de radon. Ensuite, nous devrions remettre en question la directive actuelle et réviser à la baisse la concentration prescrite, dans la mesure du raisonnable. De plus, nous devrions légiférer pour un inventaire d'immeubles résistants au radon afin que nous puissions éliminer le radon dans les nouveaux bâtiments. Les gens qui vivent dans des maisons déjà construites voudront emboîter le pas en se disant: « Comment se fait-il que la maison de mon voisin soit construite ainsi? Je veux la même chose, moi aussi. » Ce serait la meilleure façon d'encourager les gens à faire des tests et à prendre des mesures correctives.
Par ailleurs, nous devrions faire appel aux autorités provinciales pour que les garderies, les écoles et les lieux de travail reproduisent le modèle résidentiel. Enfin, il faudrait intégrer la baisse du radon aux mesures antitabac, parce que si nous vivons dans un monde sans tabac et sans radon, il n'y aura presque aucun cas de cancer du poumon, la première cause de décès par cancer au pays.
Voilà. Merci de votre attention.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 16:55
Expand
Okay. Thanks very much.
Next up from the BC Centre for Disease Control is Sarah Henderson.
D'accord. Merci beaucoup.
C'est maintenant au tour de Sarah Henderson, du BC Centre for Disease Control.
Collapse
Sarah Henderson
View Sarah Henderson Profile
Sarah Henderson
2015-06-18 16:55
Expand
Good afternoon.
There is a slide deck for me as well. The first page of that slide deck should say, “Radon risk areas and lung cancer mortality trends in British Columbia”. I hope that you all have it. I will try to speak to the slides as I go along for those who don't have them.
I want to start by saying thank you so much for inviting me to be here. It's a real honour.
My title at the BC Centre for Disease Control is senior scientist, and I'm really a research scientist. The mandate of my role is to conduct applied public health research in support of good environmental health policy for the province, and that's how I first became interested in radon in British Columbia.
I'm going to show you some real, hard numbers today that come directly from the population data for British Columbia, and that's a bit different from what everybody else has been talking about so far.
If you move to the first slide, it's just a recap of the current guideline values for radon in Canada. We've heard about the number 200 all day, and any concentration lower than that is below the Health Canada guideline. Then if you measure your home and the concentration is between 200 and 600 becquerels per metre cubed, Health Canada currently recommends that you try to remediate that within the next couple of years, whereas if your measurement if over 600 becquerels per metre cubed, they really recommend that you remediate right away. That is the high-danger area for radon.
We've used these values in British Columbia to sort of break up the province into areas that we consider to be low, moderate, and high radon areas. If you are not seeing this in colour, the darkest areas there are coloured in red, and those are the high radon areas.
We're very lucky right now in British Columbia. We have a database of over 4,000 residential radon measurements, including measurements from Health Canada national surveys as well as from a bunch of surveys that have happened in the province, so we were really able to use the data that we have observed in the province to break things up this way. These geographic regions are called local health areas. They're the smallest health geographic unit that we use in British Columbia. We are able to look at deaths that have occurred in this province at this geographic scale, which is why we've used this geographic scale.
We did something quite simple, but I hope you'll agree, also quite effective. We looked at the province by those regions, and over the course of 25 years we summed up all of the deaths attributed to lung cancer in the low, moderate and high regions, and all deaths attributed to all natural causes, and then we divided the number of lung cancer deaths by the number of deaths from all natural causes, and in general, we expect about 7% of all deaths in B.C. to be attributed to lung cancer, which is probably true for most of Canada.
Slide number 4 shows the hypothetical situation. If there were no lung carcinogens in the world other than radon, we would expect lung cancer to be high and steady in the higher radon areas, somewhat lower and steady over time in the moderate radon areas, and then lower still and steady over time in the low radon areas. That's the framework I want you to think about when we go to this next slide.
When we looked at all deaths in British Columbia, we saw something quite different from what one would expect to see under that hypothetical scenario. The bottom line there shows the low radon areas. You might not be able to see that if you're not looking at it in colour. The middle line, which is just a little bit higher than the bottom line, shows the moderate radon areas. Then that line that is sloping upward over time and is quite distinct from the low and moderate lines is the lung cancer mortality proportion that we see in high radon areas over the past 25 years in British Columbia.
We don't have a lot of data about these people. We're doing this with only administrative data. We don't know whether or not they smoked. We don't know whether or not they lived their entire lives in those high radon areas. There are a whole lot of limitations here that we simply can't speak to.
When we split up these data by the higher and lower smoking regions of the province—we know that smoking rates can be up to 30% in some areas and down to 12% in some areas of B.C.—we still see these same persistent trends. It does seem to be that radon is an important factor here.
Another important distinction, and I think it's probably why I was asked to be here today, is what we see when we look at the trends for men versus women.
To look at men, the low line shown on the slide is the low radon areas, the middle line is the moderate radon areas, and the top line is the high radon areas. There's not as big a difference among those three lines as there was when we were looking at everybody together. In general, the lung cancer rates are going down. That's what we expect as the population stops smoking. When we go ahead and look at women, as shown on the next slide, we see the low and moderate lines towards the bottom there, and then the line for women is just taking off and is quite divergent from the other regions.
We're seeing a pretty big difference with respect to the two sexes here when we split up these data. Speaking anecdotally, it's not very scientific, but those of us who are interested in radon in British Columbia hear so many stories from people who say, “My wife died of lung cancer and she never smoked a day in her life.” This matches up with what we hear anecdotally, although that's not very scientific.
Somebody asked about the burden of radon-related lung cancer in high- and low-risk areas according to the current Health Canada guidelines. On this next slide, what we see is from data published by Jing Chen from Health Canada. There's an estimate of 6% of the housing stock currently being over the 200 becquerels value, and that's related to 28% of lung cancers in Canada, versus 94% of the housing stock being under the guideline value and 72% of all radon-related lung cancers being attributable to homes in that range. The bulk of the burden really remains below what we're currently talking about in terms of the Health Canada guideline.
This very point is something that we've addressed in a new paper. I want to make it clear that this work has not been published yet. It's currently under review, but it's not in the scientific literature and it has not been peer-reviewed. We looked at a bunch of different threshold values. It's really just a line in the sand that we're drawing when we say that 200 is the level or 100 is the level. We took that line in the sand and drew it at 600, 500, 400, 200, 100, and 50 becquerels to see whether or not we could still see a clear distinction between high and low radon areas in B.C. with respect to lung cancer mortality trends when we drew that line in the sand in different places.
Indeed, if you look at the far right-hand side, that top plot shows you lung cancer mortality trends in men and in women at a threshold value of 50 becquerels per metre cubed, and you can see that the trends are still distinct from one another. We still see that sharp increase in lung cancer mortality in women in the high radon areas.
In the final slide, the key message again is that these are very limited administrative data. This is something we've done as a surveillance exercise. It was really an exercise we undertook because a lot of the evidence we use in Canada to build our policy comes from places other than Canada. We're pulling together studies that have happened in Europe, the U.S., and elsewhere. We really wanted to show some hard-hitting data from the Canadian context.
Again, most radon-related lung cancers in Canada happen below the current guideline of 200 becquerels per metre cubed. We see clear temporal trends by radon risk areas of British Columbia. We have not repeated similar analyses elsewhere in Canada, but I wouldn't be surprised to see similar results. The trends that we see at 200 becquerels per metre cubed persist when we drop that threshold to 50 becquerels per metre cubed. This is really supportive of that idea of ALARA, or “as low as reasonably achievable”. As Tom said, the way to pursue ALARA in Canada is really through widespread changes to our national building code to protect the population into the future.
We have estimated that it would take about 75 years to turn over the entire residential building stock in Canada, or most of it, but at the end of that 75 years, you would have a radon-resistant building stock and a population that was well protected.
Finally, there does appear to be a difference between men and women in terms of risk.
Thank you very much for your time.
Bonjour.
Je vous ai remis, moi aussi, un jeu de diapositives. La première page s'intitule « Zones où il existe un risque d'exposition au radon et tendances relatives à la mortalité par cancer du poumon en Colombie-Britannique ». J'espère que vous en avez tous reçu une copie. Je vais essayer de commenter le texte des diapositives pour ceux qui ne les auraient pas reçues.
J'aimerais commencer par vous remercier infiniment de m'avoir invitée. C'est un véritable honneur.
Je travaille pour le BC Centre for Disease Control, à titre de préposée principale à la recherche, mais je suis en réalité une chercheuse scientifique. Mon rôle consiste à effectuer des recherches appliquées sur la santé publique en vue d'appuyer l'élaboration de politiques judicieuses sur la santé environnementale dans la province, et c'est ainsi que j'ai commencé à m'intéresser au dossier du radon en Colombie-Britannique.
Aujourd'hui, je vais vous présenter des chiffres concrets tirés directement des données démographiques de la Colombie-Britannique, ce qui diffère un peu des questions que les autres témoins ont abordées jusqu'ici.
La première diapositive se veut simplement une récapitulation des valeurs prescrites pour le radon au Canada, selon la directive actuelle. Nous avons entendu parler du seuil de 200 tout au long de la journée, et une concentration au-dessous de cette limite est inférieure la directive établie par Santé Canada. Ensuite, si vous mesurez la concentration de radon dans votre maison et que vous détectez une concentration entre 200 et 600 becquerels par mètre cube, Santé Canada recommande actuellement que vous preniez des mesures correctives dans un délai de deux ans, alors que si la concentration est supérieure à 600 becquerels par mètre cube, le ministère recommande que vous preniez des mesures correctives sur-le-champ. C'est alors une zone où le risque d'exposition au radon présente un grand danger.
Nous avons utilisé ces valeurs en Colombie-Britannique pour, en quelque sorte, diviser la province en zones où le risque d'exposition au radon est faible, modéré ou élevé. Si vous ne voyez pas les couleurs sur la carte, les zones les plus foncées sont en rouge, et elles représentent les zones où il existe un risque élevé d'exposition au radon.
Nous sommes très chanceux en Colombie-Britannique. Nous avons une base de données de plus de 4 000 mesures du radon dans le contexte résidentiel, y compris des mesures provenant des enquêtes nationales de Santé Canada ainsi que d'une foule de sondages réalisés dans la province. Nous pouvons donc utiliser les données que nous avons observées dans la province pour présenter ce genre d'information. Ces régions géographiques sont appelées des zones sanitaires locales. Il s'agit de la plus petite unité géographique sanitaire en Colombie-Britannique. Nous sommes en mesure d'examiner les décès survenus dans la province à l'échelle géographique; c'est d'ailleurs pourquoi nous avons utilisé cette échelle géographique.
Nous avons fait quelque chose d'assez simple, mais qui est assez efficace, et j'espère que vous en conviendrez. Nous avons examiné la province selon ces régions et, sur une période de 25 ans, nous avons additionné tous les décès attribuables au cancer du poumon dans les zones où le risque est faible, modéré et élevé, ainsi que tous les décès attribuables à des causes naturelles, puis nous avons divisé le nombre de décès attribuables au cancer du poumon par le nombre de décès attribuables à des causes naturelles. En général, nous nous attendons à ce que 7 % de tous les décès en Colombie-Britannique soient attribuables au cancer du poumon, ce qui est probablement vrai pour la majeure partie du Canada.
La quatrième diapositive montre une situation hypothétique. Si le radon était le seul cancérogène pulmonaire dans le monde, la prévalence du cancer du poumon serait élevée et constante dans les zones où le risque d'exposition au radon est élevé; elle serait quelque peu moins élevée, mais constante au fil du temps dans les zones où le risque est modéré, et encore moins élevée, mais constante au fil du temps dans les zones où le risque est faible. J'aimerais que vous ne perdiez pas cela de vue lorsque nous passerons à la prochaine diapositive.
Lorsque nous avons examiné le total des décès en Colombie-Britannique, nous avons observé une situation assez différente de celle prévue dans ce scénario hypothétique. La ligne qui se trouve au bas représente les zones où le risque d'exposition au radon est faible. Vous ne la verrez peut-être pas si votre imprimé n'est pas en couleur. La ligne au milieu, qui est un peu plus au-dessus de la ligne du bas, représente les zones où il existe un risque modéré d'exposition au radon. Ensuite, la ligne qui est inclinée vers le haut au fil du temps et qui se démarque des deux autres lignes désigne la proportion de mortalité liée au cancer du poumon que nous avons observée dans les zones où il existe un risque élevé d'exposition au radon au cours des 25 dernières années en Colombie-Britannique.
Nous n'avons pas beaucoup de données sur ces gens. Nous nous servons uniquement de données administratives. Nous ignorons s'ils étaient des fumeurs ou des non-fumeurs. Nous ne savons pas si ces gens ont vécu ou non toute leur vie dans ces zones à risque élevé. Il y a donc une foule de contraintes qui limitent nos observations.
Lorsque nous divisons ces données selon les régions de la province où la prévalence du tabagisme est élevée et celles où la prévalence est faible — nous savons que les taux de tabagisme peuvent s'élever jusqu'à 30 % dans certaines zones de la Colombie-Britannique et qu'ils peuvent être aussi bas que 12 % dans d'autres —, nous observons quand même les mêmes tendances de prévalence. Il semble donc que le radon soit un facteur important.
Il y a une autre distinction importante lorsque nous comparons les tendances entre les hommes et les femmes, et je crois que c'est probablement pour cela qu'on m'a invitée à comparaître aujourd'hui.
Commençons par les hommes. La ligne du bas montre les zones où le risque d'exposition au radon est faible, celle du milieu représente les zones où le risque est modéré et celle du haut, les zones où le risque est élevé. Il n'y a pas une grande différence entre ces trois lignes, comparativement à l'ensemble de la population. En général, le cancer du poumon est à la baisse. C'est ce que nous prévoyons à mesure que les gens arrêteront de fumer. Chez les femmes, comme on peut le voir à la diapositive suivante, les lignes qui représentent les zones à faible risque et les zones à risque modéré se trouvent vers le bas, mais la ligne du haut est une courbe ascendante assez prononcée qui se démarque beaucoup des autres régions.
Nous observons donc ici une différence très marquée entre les deux sexes lorsque nous divisons ces données. Soit dit en passant, ce n'est pas très scientifique, mais ceux d'entre nous qui s'intéressent à la présence du radon en Colombie-Britannique entendent beaucoup de témoignages de gens qui disent, par exemple: « Ma femme est morte du cancer du poumon, mais elle n'a jamais fumé de toute sa vie. » Ces données correspondent à ce que nous entendons dire, même si ce n'est pas très scientifique.
Quelqu'un a posé une question sur le fardeau du cancer du poumon lié au radon dans les zones à risque élevé et à faible risque, selon les lignes directrices actuelles de Santé Canada. La diapositive suivante présente les données publiées par Jing Chen, de Santé Canada. Environ 6 % de l'inventaire de logements ont actuellement une concentration de radon supérieure à la valeur de 200 becquerels, et c'est lié à 28 % des cas de cancer au Canada, alors que 94 % de l'inventaire des logements ont une concentration inférieure à la valeur prescrite, et 72 % de tous les cas de cancer du poumon lié au radon sont associés aux maisons qui se trouvent dans cette gamme. Le gros du fardeau demeure donc dans les valeurs inférieures à la directive de Santé Canada.
C'est justement un point que nous avons abordé dans un nouvel article. Je tiens à préciser que ce travail n'a pas encore été publié. Il est en cours de révision, mais il ne fait pas partie des publications scientifiques, n'ayant pas été soumis à un examen par des pairs. Nous avons tenu compte d'une foule de valeurs limites. Nous ne faisons que tracer une ligne dans le sable lorsque nous fixons le seuil à 200 ou à 100. Nous avons examiné cette valeur à 600, 500, 400, 200, 100 et 50 becquerels pour voir si nous pouvions établir une distinction claire entre les zones en Colombie-Britannique où le risque d'exposition au radon est élevé et celles où le risque est faible en ce qui concerne les tendances relatives à la mortalité par cancer du poumon. Pour ce faire, nous avons examiné différentes limites et différents endroits.
En effet, si vous regardez à droite, la partie supérieure montre les tendances relatives à la mortalité par cancer du poumon chez les hommes et les femmes lorsque la valeur limite est fixée à 50 becquerels par mètre cube, et force est de constater que les tendances sont quand même distinctes. Nous voyons quand même une augmentation marquée de la mortalité par cancer du poumon chez les femmes dans les zones où il existe un risque élevé d'exposition au radon.
Sur la dernière diapositive, le message clé est, encore une fois, qu'il s'agit de données administratives très limitées. Nous avons fait ce travail dans le cadre d'un exercice de surveillance. Nous l'avons entrepris parce que la plupart des preuves que nous utilisons au Canada pour élaborer notre politique proviennent de l'étranger. Nous rassemblons des études menées en Europe, aux États-Unis et ailleurs. Nous tenions à montrer quelques données percutantes dans le contexte canadien.
Je le répète, la plupart des cancers du poumon découlant d'une exposition au radon au Canada surviennent à un seuil inférieur à la directive actuelle de 200 becquerels par mètre cube. Nous observons des tendances temporelles nettes dans les zones où il existe un risque d'exposition au radon en Colombie-Britannique. Nous n'avons pas reproduit des analyses semblables ailleurs au Canada, mais je ne serais pas surprise de voir des résultats similaires. Les tendances que nous constatons à un seuil de 200 becquerels par mètre cube persistent lorsque nous abaissons la limite à 50 becquerels par mètre cube. Cela appuie vraiment l'idée du niveau le plus bas que l'on peut raisonnablement atteindre. Comme Tom l'a dit, pour poursuivre cet objectif au Canada, il faut modifier radicalement notre Code national du bâtiment afin de protéger la population à l'avenir.
Nous avons évalué qu'il faudrait environ 75 ans pour changer tout l'inventaire des bâtiments résidentiels au Canada, ou du moins la majeure partie, mais au bout de ces 75 ans, il y aurait un inventaire d'immeubles résistants au radon, et la population serait bien protégée.
Enfin, il semble y avoir une différence entre les hommes et les femmes sur le plan des risques.
Merci de votre temps.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 17:06
Expand
Thank you very much.
Anne-Marie Nicol, go ahead.
Merci beaucoup.
Anne-Marie Nicol, allez-y.
Collapse
Anne-Marie Nicol
View Anne-Marie Nicol Profile
Anne-Marie Nicol
2015-06-18 17:06
Expand
You should also have a slide deck from me. It says “Radon and Lung Cancer” on it. I recognize I am the very last person, and I appreciate your persistence. Luckily many people have also spoken to a number of the points that I wish to discuss, so I will go very quickly over the first few slides.
I am an assistant professor at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. I also work at the National Collaborating Centre with Tom and Sarah, and I also run CAREX Canada, which is the carcinogen surveillance system funded by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. I am here because we prioritized Canadians' exposure to environmental carcinogens and the leading causes of cancer-related deaths from environmental exposures, and radon gas was by far the most significant carcinogen. I admit that when I started my research at CAREX, I had never heard of radon gas either. When I went back into the literature, I realized that over time Canada has actually played a very important role in understanding radon and lung cancer.
The data from many of the studies that were done on uranium miners, at Eldorado and even here in Ontario, has been used to determine the relationship between exposure and lung cancer. We've actually been on the forefront of this issue but very much in an academic context rather than in a public health context.
We've already discussed the fact that the WHO notes that this is a significant carcinogen. I would also like to point out that agencies around the world are coming to the conclusion that radon is more dangerous than they had previously thought. In 1993 we had a certain understanding about the relationship between radon gas and lung cancer. That's doubled. The slope that Tom was talking about used to go like this and now it goes like this. Radon is now known to be much more dangerous than we had originally thought. The reason for that is that radon is actually an alpha-particle emitter.
We are a uranium-rich country. Uranium is in the soil and as it breaks down there is a point at which it becomes a gas. That means it becomes movable within the soil. That gas itself gives off alpha radiation, which is a very dangerous form of radiation that can damage DNA. On the next slide you'll see both direct and indirect damage to DNA. This information is compliments of Dr. Aaron Goodarzi. We actually have a Canada research chair studying this at the moment in Alberta.
The next slide, on radiation and DNA damage, shows that alpha radiation is powerful. It doesn't penetrate very far, so if it hits our skin, it doesn't do as much damage as it does if it gets into our lungs. Our lungs are very sensitive. The lining of our lungs is sensitive and when the cells in them are irradiated, they get damaged. Alpha particles are very destructive. The damage is akin to having a cannon go through DNA. That kind of damage is hard to repair, and as a result the probability of genetic mutations and cancer goes up.
The next slide is on strategies for reducing risk. Just to recap, the kind of damage done by the radiation emitted from radon is significant. The damage is difficult for the body to repair once radon is in the lungs.
The next slide is on education and priority setting. Radon does exist across the country. People have developed radon-potential maps. This one is compliments of Radon Environmental where they've looked at where uranium exists and where the potential for higher-breakdown products is, although we do recognize that every home is different. Also there's a map of the United States to show that we are not alone in this and that the states that are on the border have a similar kind of radon profile to that found in Canada. We know that under our current Canadian strategies, we need to educate not just the public but ourselves. Most public health professionals have never heard of radon. When we do work out in public health units, environmental health inspectors, public health inspectors, and medical health officers are still unaware that radon is dangerous. Many bureaucrats and ministries of health are unaware that radon is dangerous.
Also health researchers are only really beginning to do work in this area across the country. In order to have building codes changed, people need to know why you're changing them. We need testing and remediation training. People need to understand why they're actually doing this kind of work.
Kelley Bush alluded to the fact that they've been tracking awareness among the population. This is done by Statistics Canada. The next slide shows a representative Canadian sample. It's been done since 2007 actually, but these are results for 2009 onward. You can see that about 10% of the population were aware of radon. That's gone up to about 30%. This is the number of people who know what radon is and can accurately describe it. We're still at around 30% of the population who know that radon can cause lung cancer.
Health Canada does recommend that everybody test their homes. The next slide, which is also using data collected by Statistics Canada, clearly shows that very few people have tested their homes. Less than 10% of Canadians across the country have tested their homes. We have had a radon awareness program since 2007, so why aren't people testing? We don't have regulatory requirements, as Kathleen Cooper stated earlier. People need to be aware and motivated to change. It's up to the consumer. We have left it up to the consumer to test their own home.
I believe things like denial, the invisible nature of the gas, and people simply being unaware contribute to this. Test kits are still not that readily available across the country. You can phone and ask where you can find them, but they're not always there. In rural regions it's much harder for people to get access to test kits. People then fear the downstream costs of remediating—i.e., I don't want to go in there because I don't know how much it's going to cost me to fix my basement. In some cases the costs can be somewhat considerable, depending on the structure of the home.
Turning to the next slide, I believe to reduce the lung cancer risk from radon gas we need more leadership. The government can legitimate this as a risk. It's something that people don't know about, and we need to take a stronger role in getting people more engaged in this topic. It's not just Health Canada; it's all levels of government—ministries of health, provinces, municipalities. We need to be training people in the trades so they know what they're doing when they're building those radon-resistant homes, and why. Why is that pipe important? Why is that fan important? Again, we need to build radon out, going forward.
Other countries have shown that providing financial assistance works. People will energy-retrofit their home because they get a rebate, but the energy retrofit does increase radon levels. There is clear evidence that this exists. The tighter your home, the more the radon gas remains in your home. In Manitoba they're doing research to look at that at the moment. In Manitoba, though, you can also now get a rebate through Manitoba Hydro to do radon remediation. Some parts of the country are starting, but we need to be offering some kind of incentive for citizens to do this.
I would also like to put in a plug for workplace exposure, because I do study workplace exposure and radon. There are places in the country where people work underground, or in basements and even ground-level buildings, where radon levels are high. Some of these are federal government workers. We need more testing and remediation for workplaces.
That's it. Thank you.
Vous devriez également avoir reçu un imprimé du jeu de diapositives, qui s'intitule Le radon et le cancer du poumon. Je sais que je suis la toute dernière personne à témoigner, et je vous remercie de votre patience. Heureusement, beaucoup de personnes ont déjà parlé de certains points que je souhaite aborder; je ferai donc un bref survol des premières diapositives
Je suis professeure adjointe à l'Université Simon Fraser en Colombie-Britannique. Je travaille également au Centre de collaboration nationale en santé environnementale avec Tom et Sarah, et je dirige CAREX Canada, le système de surveillance des substances cancérogènes financé par le Partenariat canadien contre le cancer. Je suis ici parce que nous avons accordé la priorité à l'exposition des Canadiens aux agents cancérogènes présents dans l'environnement et aux causes principales des décès par cancer attribuables aux expositions environnementales. Le radon est, de loin, l'agent cancérogène le plus important. Je dois admettre que lorsque j'ai commencé ma recherche auprès de CAREX, je n'avais jamais entendu parler du radon. Après avoir passé en revue la documentation, je me suis rendu compte que le Canada avait joué un rôle très important, au fil du temps, pour comprendre le lien entre le radon et le cancer du poumon.
Les données tirées de nombreuses études menées auprès d'ouvriers dans les mines d'uranium, à Eldorado et même ici, en Ontario, ont servi à déterminer le rapport entre l'exposition et le cancer du poumon. Nous avons été à l'avant-plan de ces recherches, mais c'était surtout dans un contexte universitaire plutôt que dans un contexte de santé publique.
Comme nous l'avons déjà dit, l'OMS affirme qu'il s'agit d'un cancérogène important. J'aimerais également signaler que des organismes partout dans le monde en sont arrivés à la conclusion que le radon est plus dangereux qu'ils ne le pensaient. En 1993, nous avions une certaine idée de la relation entre le radon et le cancer du poumon. Ces chiffres ont doublé. La courbe dont Tom a parlé ressemblait à cela et, maintenant, elle a l'air de cela. Aujourd'hui, le radon est reconnu comme étant beaucoup plus dangereux que prévu initialement. La raison, c'est que le radon est un émetteur de particules alpha.
Le Canada est un pays riche en uranium. L'uranium se trouve dans le sol et, lorsqu'il se désintègre, il se transforme en un gaz. Cela signifie qu'il peut se déplacer dans le sol. Ce gaz émet un rayonnement alpha, qui est une forme très dangereuse de rayonnement susceptible d'endommager l'ADN. Sur la diapositive suivante, vous verrez les lésions directes et indirectes de l'ADN. Cette information est une gracieuseté de M. Aaron Goodarzi. D'ailleurs, une chaire de recherche canadienne étudie actuellement cette question en Alberta.
La diapositive suivante, qui porte sur le rayonnement et les lésions de l'ADN, montre que le rayonnement alpha est puissant. Ces particules sont dotées d'un faible pouvoir de pénétration; donc, si elles touchent notre peau, il n'y aura pas autant de lésions que si elles parviennent à nos poumons. Nos poumons sont très sensibles. La paroi des poumons est vulnérable et, lorsque les cellules pulmonaires absorbent ces particules, elles sont endommagées. Les particules alpha sont très destructrices. Elles se répercutent sur l'ADN comme un coup de canon. Il est difficile de réparer de telles lésions, d'où la probabilité accrue de mutations génétiques et de cancer.
La prochaine diapositive concerne les stratégies destinées à réduire les risques. Pour récapituler, le rayonnement émis par le radon cause des lésions considérables. Il est difficile pour le corps de réparer les lésions une fois que le radon s'infiltre dans les poumons.
Passons maintenant à la diapositive suivante, qui porte sur l'éducation et l'établissement des priorités. Le radon est présent partout au pays. Les chercheurs ont élaboré des cartes sur les sites potentiels de radon. Celle-ci nous a été fournie par Radon Environmental, qui a tenu compte des emplacements de l'uranium et des sites potentiels de produits à forte capacité de désintégration, même si nous reconnaissons que chaque maison est différente. Nous avons ajouté une carte des États-Unis pour montrer que nous ne sommes pas les seuls et que les États situés à la frontière ont un profil de radon semblable à celui du Canada. Nous savons qu'aux termes des stratégies canadiennes actuelles, il faut sensibiliser non seulement la population, mais aussi les intervenants du domaine. La plupart des professionnels de la santé publique n'ont jamais entendu parler du radon. Quand nous travaillons auprès d'unités de santé publique, nous observons que les inspecteurs en hygiène du milieu, les inspecteurs en santé publique et les médecins hygiénistes ne savent toujours pas que le radon est dangereux. De nombreux fonctionnaires et ministères de la Santé ne sont pas non plus au courant.
De plus, les chercheurs en santé partout au pays commencent à peine à se pencher sur ce domaine. Pour modifier les codes du bâtiment, les gens doivent en connaître les raisons. Nous devons offrir de la formation sur les tests de détection et les mesures correctives. Les gens doivent comprendre pourquoi ils font ce genre de travail.
Kelley Bush a fait allusion aux efforts qui sont déployés pour surveiller la sensibilisation au sein de la population. Ce travail est effectué par Statistique Canada. La diapositive suivante présente un échantillon canadien représentatif. Cette enquête est réalisée depuis 2007, mais ce graphique montre les résultats à partir de 2009. On peut voir qu'environ 10 % de la population était au courant du radon. Ce taux est passé à près de 30 %. Cela représente le nombre de personnes qui savent en quoi consiste le radon et qui peuvent le décrire avec précision. Donc, environ 30 % des Canadiens savent que le radon peut causer le cancer du poumon.
Santé Canada recommande à tous les propriétaires de mesurer les concentrations de radon dans leur maison. La diapositive suivante, qui repose également sur les données recueillies par Statistique Canada, montre clairement que très peu de gens ont soumis leur maison à des tests de détection. Moins de 10 % des Canadiens partout au pays ont mesuré les concentrations de radon dans leur maison. Le programme de sensibilisation au radon existe depuis 2007. Alors pourquoi les propriétaires ne font-ils pas ces tests? Parce qu'il n'y a pas d'exigences réglementaires, comme Kathleen Cooper l'a expliqué tout à l'heure. Non seulement les gens doivent être renseignés, mais ils doivent aussi être motivés à apporter des modifications. La décision appartient aux consommateurs. Nous leur avons laissé le soin de mesurer les concentrations de radon dans leur maison.
Je crois que plusieurs facteurs contribuent à cette situation, comme le déni, la nature invisible du gaz et la méconnaissance. Les trousses de détection ne sont toujours pas facilement accessibles dans l'ensemble du pays. On peut appeler pour savoir où les trouver, mais elles ne sont pas toujours disponibles. Dans les régions rurales, les gens ont plus de mal à y avoir accès. Par ailleurs, les gens craignent les coûts ultérieurs liés à la mise en oeuvre des mesures correctives — par exemple, je ne veux pas m'en mêler parce que je ne sais pas combien j'aurai à débourser pour rénover mon sous-sol. Dans certains cas, les coûts peuvent être assez considérables, selon la structure de la maison.
Passons à la diapositive suivante. Selon moi, pour réduire le risque de cancer du poumon associé à l'exposition au radon, nous devons renforcer le leadership. Ainsi, le gouvernement peut reconnaître qu'il s'agit d'un risque légitime. Les gens ne sont pas au courant, et nous devons jouer un rôle accru pour amener les gens à s'intéresser davantage à ce sujet. Cela ne concerne pas seulement Santé Canada, mais tous les ordres de gouvernement — ministères de la Santé, provinces, municipalités. En outre, nous devons former les gens de métier pour qu'ils sachent quoi faire, en toute connaissance de cause, au moment de construire des maisons résistantes au radon. Pourquoi ce tuyau est-il important? Pourquoi ce ventilateur est-il important? Encore une fois, nous voulons éliminer le radon dans les bâtiments de demain.
D'autres pays ont montré que les incitatifs financiers fonctionnent. Les gens sont disposés à apporter des améliorations éconergétiques à leur maison parce qu'ils obtiennent un remboursement, mais ces rénovations font augmenter la concentration de radon. Ce fait a été clairement établi. Plus la maison est bien isolée, plus le radon demeure à l'intérieur. Au Manitoba, des chercheurs se penchent sur cette question. Par contre, au Manitoba, on a maintenant droit à un remboursement par l'entremise de Manitoba Hydro lorsqu'on prend des mesures correctives contre le radon. Certaines régions du pays emboîtent le pas, mais nous devons offrir une sorte d'incitatif aux citoyens.
Enfin, j'aimerais dire un mot sur l'exposition au radon en milieu de travail, parce que j'étudie cette question. Certaines personnes travaillent dans des installations souterraines ou dans des sous-sols, et même dans des bâtiments au niveau du sol, où les concentrations de radon sont élevées. Certains de ces travailleurs sont des employés du gouvernement fédéral. Il faut renforcer les exigences relatives à la détection et à la mise en oeuvre des mesures correctives en milieu de travail.
C'est tout. Merci.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 17:13
Expand
Thank you very much.
Mr. Sullivan, sir.
Merci beaucoup.
Monsieur Sullivan.
Collapse
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
View Mike Sullivan Profile
2015-06-18 17:14
Expand
Thank you, sir. Thank you to the witnesses.
This is amazing information. If I take this home and talk to the folks in my riding, they'll get more scared than they already are. We've been fighting for the past 10 years to reduce the level of exposure to diesel exhaust, which the WHO has reclassified as a class A or class 1 carcinogen.
How does this compare with 464 diesel trains a day going past your house in terms of danger to the individual? Is this something we can wait on, or is it something we should be acting on immediately in a riding such as mine?
Merci, monsieur. Merci aux témoins.
Vous nous avez fourni des renseignements incroyables. Voilà de quoi alarmer encore plus les gens de ma circonscription. Nous nous battons depuis 10 ans pour réduire le niveau d'exposition aux gaz d'échappement des diesels, que l'OMS a reclassés parmi les cancérogènes de catégorie A ou de catégorie 1.
Du point de vue des dangers pour la personne, comment cela se compare-t-il aux 464 trains diesel qui passent près des maisons chaque jour? Peut-on se permettre d'attendre avant de régler ce problème, ou faut-il agir immédiatement, surtout dans une circonscription comme la mienne?
Collapse
Tom Kosatsky
View Tom Kosatsky Profile
Tom Kosatsky
2015-06-18 17:14
Expand
Diesel exhaust has a number of important health effects, primarily cardiovascular and respiratory. It increases the burden of emphysema. It makes you more likely to have heart disease. It makes you more likely to have a heart attack if you do have heart disease. It also can cause lung cancer. Radon only causes lung cancer. Effectively, it doesn't do anything else.
In terms of the impact, I don't know what the concentrations of diesel are by people's houses, but you don't live next to a locomotive or with a locomotive. I grew up in a basement in Winnipeg that had high levels of radon. And I don't blame my mother for that.
Voices: Oh, oh!
Dr. Tom Kosatsky: In any case, the intimacy of exposure to radon is more important than the intimacy or the regularity of exposure to diesel fumes. Between the two, in terms of the contribution to the population burden of lung cancer itself, radon would be far more important. Diesel fumes should be gotten rid of as much as possible as well.
L'échappement des diesels a un certain nombre d'effets indésirables importants sur la santé, principalement sur les appareils cardiovasculaire et respiratoire. Il aggrave le stress de l'emphysème. Il augmente la prédisposition aux maladies cardiaques, et la prédisposition aux infarctus chez les gens qui souffrent d'une maladie cardiaque. Il peut causer le cancer du poumon. Le radon ne cause que le cancer du poumon. En pratique, le radon ne fait rien d'autre.
Pour ce qui est de l'impact, nous ne connaissons pas les concentrations de diesel dans les maisons, mais personne ne vit près d'une locomotive ou avec une locomotive. J'ai grandi dans un sous-sol, à Winnipeg, où les concentrations de radon étaient élevées. Et je n'en veux pas à ma mère pour autant.
Des voix: Oh, oh!
Dr Tom Kosatsky: Quoi qu'il en soit, l'exposition rapprochée au radon est plus grave que l'exposition rapprochée ou la régularité de l'exposition aux fumées de diesel. Entre les deux, la contribution du radon à la prévalence du cancer du poumon dans la population est beaucoup plus importante que celle du diesel. On devrait néanmoins éliminer également les émanations de diesel, autant que faire se peu.
Collapse
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
View Mike Sullivan Profile
2015-06-18 17:15
Expand
I agree.
The charts and graphs you showed us had two striking pieces to them. One, this seems to affect women more than men. I'll jump to the conclusion that maybe it's because their lungs are smaller; I don't know. Second, this seems to be on the increase since 1985, yet people lived in homes with radon many more years prior to that.
What is driving those two things? Are there any guesses from the panel?
Je suis d'accord avec vous.
Les tableaux et les graphiques que vous nous avez montrés avaient deux éléments particulièrement surprenants. Premièrement, le cancer du poumon semble toucher davantage les femmes que les hommes. Je vais sauter à la conclusion que c'est parce que les poumons des femmes sont plus petits que ceux des hommes; je ne sais pas. Deuxièmement, le phénomène semble aller en augmentant depuis 1985, alors que les gens ont vécu dans des maisons contenant du radon pendant de nombreuses années avant cela.
Comment expliquez-vous ces deux phénomènes? Quelqu'un veut-il risquer une réponse?
Collapse
Sarah Henderson
View Sarah Henderson Profile
Sarah Henderson
2015-06-18 17:16
Expand
Everything would be speculation at this point. There does seem to be a bigger effect on women. We do know that if you took a population of non-smoking women and a population of non-smoking men, there would be more lung cancer in the non-smoking women. It might be that being female is, in and of itself, a risk factor for developing lung cancer, and that might be a genetic thing. There are lots of different ways that could go.
Also you have to think about this in the context of what the temporal trends were in smoking over the period of the analyses. Men took up smoking earlier and stopped smoking earlier on sort of a population scale. Women took it up later and stopped smoking later, so we're definitely seeing some of that interaction between smoking and radon in that upward trend. We do hope that over time it will plateau and start to come down again, and we'll keep paying attention in B.C. to evaluate whether or not that happens.
There's also the question of other environmental lung carcinogens. What is the interaction between radon and diesel exhaust? We don't know. What is the interaction between radon and something like asbestos or another lung carcinogen? We just don't know. There are all of these things happening in the environment and your lungs are the first things that the environment comes in contact with, so it's quite possibly interaction between radon and other stuff as well.
Pour l'instant, tout n'est que spéculation. Il est vrai que l'impact semble être plus grand sur les femmes. Nous savons par ailleurs qu'entre une population de femmes non-fumeuses et une population d'hommes non-fumeurs, l'incidence de cancer du poumon sera plus élevée chez les femmes non-fumeuses. La raison en est peut-être que le fait d’être une femme est en soi un facteur de risque en ce qui a trait au développement du cancer du poumon, et qu’il pourrait s’agir d’un phénomène génétique. Il y a de nombreuses façons d’envisager la chose.
Il importe aussi d’examiner la question en tenant compte des tendances qui ont marqué le tabagisme durant la période où ces analyses ont été faites. À l’échelle de la population, les hommes commençaient à fumer plus tôt et arrêtaient de fumer plus tôt, alors que les femmes commençaient plus tard et arrêtaient plus tard. La tendance haussière illustrée dans les graphiques rend assurément compte de cette interaction entre le tabagisme et le radon. Nous espérons qu’un plateau sera atteint avec le temps, puis que le nombre de cas commencera à diminuer. Et je suivrai la situation de près en Colombie-Britannique afin d’évaluer si c’est effectivement ce qui se produira ou non.
Il y a aussi la question des autres agents cancérogènes présents dans l’environnement. Quelle est l’interaction entre le radon et l’échappement des diesels? Nous ne le savons pas. Quelle est l’interaction entre le radon et une chose comme l’amiante ou un autre agent cancérogène pour le poumon? Nous ne le savons tout simplement pas. Il y a toutes sortes de choses qui sont dans l'environnement et nos poumons sont les premiers à entrer en contact avec ces choses, alors il est très possible que le radon interagisse aussi avec d’autres éléments.
Collapse
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
View Mike Sullivan Profile
2015-06-18 17:17
Expand
You mentioned that only less than 10% have tested their homes and Manitoba is the only place where there is some kind of government position, through Manitoba Hydro, or aggressive position, I guess, on this whole notion of testing and remediation.
Are you recommending that the federal government also enter the fray and start to provide funding? I can think of many in my riding who couldn't even afford the test, let alone remediation. Is there something the panel is suggesting as something we ought to be doing nationally?
Vous avez dit que moins de 10 % des personnes ont fait tester leur maison et que le Manitoba était le seul endroit où le gouvernement avait une certaine position sur le sujet, par l’intermédiaire de Manitoba Hydro, ou une démarche dynamique relativement à cette notion selon laquelle il faut faire des tests et prendre des mesures correctives.
Recommandez-vous que le gouvernement fédéral se mette de la partie et commence à offrir du financement? Je peux penser à bien des gens de ma circonscription qui ne pourraient même pas se permettre le test, et encore moins les mesures correctives. Le groupe a-t-il quelque chose à suggérer quant à ce que nous devrions faire à l’échelle nationale?
Collapse
Anne-Marie Nicol
View Anne-Marie Nicol Profile
Anne-Marie Nicol
2015-06-18 17:18
Expand
Kathleen Cooper's work has suggested a tax credit and there also are tax credits or different kinds of financial incentives that can be done through loans for renovation. Quebec does have a loan renovation program for which one can apply. They've just added radon to that as well, so if you have up to $3,000 of renovation costs and over, you can apply for radon remediation within that work.
There are different models for doing it, but I do believe that financial incentives are what get people to change. I changed my hot water heater because I got a financial incentive to do it. Otherwise, I don't think I would have done that. If we think about it, if we're offered just a little bit, all of us might take that extra step, plus it shows a leadership role.
Les travaux de Kathleen Cooper penchent en faveur d'un crédit d'impôt. Il serait aussi possible d'avoir des crédits d'impôt et une certaine forme d'incitatif financier par l'intermédiaire de prêts à la rénovation. Le Québec a un programme de prêts à la rénovation. On vient tout juste d'ajouter le radon à la liste des motifs admissibles. Ainsi, si vos rénovations s'élèvent à 3 000 $ ou plus, vous pouvez demander que des mesures correctives soient incluses dans vos travaux pour remédier à un problème de radon.
Il y a différentes façons de procéder, mais je suis d'avis que les incitatifs financiers sont ce qui motive le mieux les gens à réagir. J'ai changé mon chauffe-eau parce qu'on m'a incité à le faire en me promettant des sous. Sans cela, je ne crois pas que je l'aurais fait. Quand on y pense, le simple fait qu'on nous offre quelque chose — même si ce n'est pas beaucoup — est peut-être tout ce qu'il faut à la majorité d'entre nous pour passer aux actes. Du reste, c'est une façon pour le gouvernement de montrer son leadership.
Collapse
View Mike Sullivan Profile
NDP (ON)
View Mike Sullivan Profile
2015-06-18 17:19
Expand
Thank you.
Merci.
Collapse
Tom Kosatsky
View Tom Kosatsky Profile
Tom Kosatsky
2015-06-18 17:19
Expand
Also, we all agree that radon should be built out in the first place. That is the most important thing to do. Test and remediate should also be directed to priority areas. If you're living in interior B.C., your risk of having a higher level of radon in your house, never mind whether you test or not, is definitely higher. The chance if you live in Victoria or Vancouver is low. You might possibly have a slightly higher level, but the risk of that, based on tons of evidence, tons of tests that have been done so far, is very low.
Really, if we want to get a message across to Canadians about testing and remediation, it should really be directed to those areas where it's highest. But we'd all be protected if we built it out in the first place.
Aussi, nous convenons tous que le radon devrait avant tout être éliminé au moment de la construction. C'est ce qui est le plus important. Les tests et les mesures correctives devraient également être orientés sur les régions prioritaires. Si vous vivez dans la partie intérieure de la Colombie-Britannique, les risques que vous ayez des niveaux élevés de radon dans votre maison sont assurément plus grands, alors qu'ils seront plutôt bas si vous vivez à Victoria ou à Vancouver. Il se peut que le niveau soit un peu plus élevé, mais la probabilité que cela se produise est très basse, comme en font foi une pléthore de preuves, et les innombrables tests qui ont été faits jusqu'ici.
Si vous voulez vraiment inciter les Canadiens à faire tester leur maison et à prendre des mesures correctives, vos efforts devraient être axés sur les régions où les risques sont les plus grands. Mais, nous serions tous protégés si nous tenions compte de ce phénomène dès l'étape de la construction.
Collapse
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2015-06-18 17:20
Expand
Mr. Lizon.
Monsieur Lizon.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 100 of 150000 | Page: 1 of 1500

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data