Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 5095
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:05 [p.1151]
Expand
moved that Bill C-5, An Act to amend the Bills of Exchange Act, the Interpretation Act and the Canada Labour Code (National Day for Truth and Reconciliation), be read the second time and referred to a committee.
He said: Mr. Speaker, I want to begin by acknowledging that the House sits on the traditional territory of the Algonquin Anishinabe.
It is a great honour to rise today and speak to Bill C-5, an important bill that seeks to create a new federal statutory holiday, a national day for truth and reconciliation. It is important that we recognize and thank Georgina Jolibois for bringing this bill forward in the last Parliament, but more importantly for being a strong advocate for indigenous rights and a voice for indigenous peoples not only in her riding, but across all of Canada. I also want to thank and acknowledge the hon. member for Burnaby South for supporting this important piece of legislation.
I have had the honour to speak in the House on our country's path toward reconciliation, and I know that reconciliation does not belong to a single political party or single individual. It is a shared responsibility for each and every one of us.
This bill is an important step on the journey that we are taking together. I am proud to work with members of all political parties on this legislative measure.
Some members of the House may have had the privilege of hearing the testimony given before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage when it examined Georgina Jolibois's bill in the previous Parliament. The testimony we heard strengthened our conviction that it is important to pass this bill.
Much of that moving and powerful testimony focused on the potential benefits of a national day for truth and reconciliation. For example, National Chief Robert Bertrand of the Congress for Aboriginal Peoples said:
A statutory holiday will be an important opportunity to reflect upon the diverse heritage and culture of our people, which remain so vitally important to the social fabric of this country. In doing so, each and every one of us will be working towards the reality of true reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.
Similarly, Mrs. Theresa Brown, the chair of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation's Survivors Circle, spoke powerfully about the importance of a national day of reflection for residential school survivors. She said:
A special, separate day when our grandchildren could go out and lay a wreath, lay tobacco, pray and remember is important to me and other survivors. It is also a time for this country to remember and say “never again”. We want to know that when we are gone, our spirit of truth and reconciliation will live on in our future generations.
Natan Obed, president of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, testified as follows:
...the creation of a statutory holiday provides a greater weight and allows for more education and a bigger platform for us. If you think about holidays, statutory holidays, and how they've been allocated over time, they have been colonial in nature and they have thought about the founding of this country, not necessarily about indigenous peoples within Canada. This would be a marked departure from that legacy.
He went on to say the following:
This holiday can go a long way to making sure that from a very early age, all Canadians have a positive association with first nations, Inuit and Métis.
Mr. Obed's first point speaks to the importance and status of national holidays in Canada, and I would like to remind this chamber that the act of creating a new statutory holiday is, in itself, quite significant. Right now there are nine federally legislated statutory holidays in Canada. A national day for truth and reconciliation would join in rank of importance with holidays like Labour Day and Remembrance Day, highlighting the significance and scope of this day.
During the testimony we heard, many groups expressed points of view similar to those I just quoted about the meaning and impact of a day of commemoration.
The residential school system was indeed a national tragedy. Over the span of 130 years, more than 150,000 first nations, Inuit and Métis children were placed in residential schools. These children were forcibly separated from their parents, their homes, their culture, their language, their land, their relations and their communities.
This day is important. It is an opportunity to reflect on the harm inflicted on first nations, Inuit and Métis peoples throughout our history and to this day by the legacy of residential schools. We are working to repair that harm by responding the the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's calls to action.
Call to action number 80 calls upon our government to:
establish, as a statutory holiday, a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation to honour Survivors, their families, and communities, and ensure that public commemoration of the history and legacy of residential schools remains a vital component of the reconciliation process.
Today, we want to answer that call to action.
After careful consultations and respectful consideration, September 30 was the date chosen deliberately for its significance. Currently, September 30 is the date of the grassroots movement called Orange Shirt Day, started by the formidable Phyllis Webstad. It was named after the orange shirt that Mrs. Webstad was given by her grandmother on her first day of residential school, only to have it forcibly taken away from her upon her arrival. Her orange shirt is symbolic of the vibrant cultures, languages, traditions, identities and childhoods that were repressed within the residential school system. It is also a symbol of survivors like Phyllis and the monumental efforts by first nations, Inuit and Métis in protecting and revitalizing their cultures and languages for future generations.
From testimony in committee we learned that September is a symbolically painful time for indigenous families and communities. Every year during the month of September children were separated from their loved ones and their community to go back to school. It is important to acknowledge this pain with a solemn day to remember the past, reflect on it and learn together to gain a better knowledge of the history and legacy of residential schools.
It has always been my belief that one of the pillars of reconciliation is education. Establishing a national day for truth and reconciliation is education in action. For all those living in Canada, this would be a day of commemoration, but also a day to learn about a dark chapter of our past. It would serve as a reminder to never forget and never veer from the path toward reconciliation.
Students still go back to school every year in September. The proposed date, September 30, for a national day of truth and reconciliation not only has symbolic importance, but it also provides an opportunity for learning within our schools about our journey toward reconciliation. Teachers across the country will be able to build on discussions about residential schools that are already under way in many schools. Families will have a reason to talk about reconciliation at home. Canadians will have a day to reflect on our history and our values as a society.
I like to think about the day when schools across the country will mark this holiday with ceremonies, as a day of learning. I hope they will invite elders or survivors, indigenous knowledge holders and educators to come into classrooms to talk with the children.
I think of the way that schools across the country use Remembrance Day as an educational tool for children of all ages to learn about the historic conflicts that Canada has been involved in, to understand the horrors of war and, above all, to honour the women and men who have sacrificed so much in serving this country. I believe that a new day for truth and reconciliation is an excellent learning opportunity for this equally important part of Canada's history.
Unfortunately, only half of Canadians know the history of the Indian residential school system and its long-term effects on indigenous peoples.
The final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada states that too many Canadians know little or nothing about the the deep historical roots of these conflicts. This lack of historical knowledge has serious consequences for first nations, Inuit and Métis peoples, and for Canada as a whole. Setting aside a special day each year to take the time to acknowledge this painful history will help everyone learn and understand more about the realities of the residential school era. This is a positive step on our path toward reconciliation. This type of commemoration is a collective, public act of recognition.
This will also be a day of listening and healing for the entire country. Together we can continue our conversation on social justice.
As Dr. Marie Wilson, former commissioner for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, noted in her testimony to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage:
It makes it everybody's call to attention, call to remembrance, and call to respect, and hopefully...there is ongoing education about it. We don't just talk about wars; we talk about peace in the context of talking about wars. In the context of residential schools, we can talk about mistakes of the past and what we are trying to do to address things going forward.
Mr. Tim Argetsinger, political advisor to the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, agreed. He said:
I think there's a way of achieving that balance where the focus of a day could be a focus on the past human rights abuses that indigenous peoples have experienced and have worked to overcome. At the same time, it could be the day to focus on the agency that we all have to take positive actions to address some of the challenges that flow from those past experiences.
I want to underscore that reconciliation and advancing indigenous rights remain a constant priority for our government. Some people will say that a single day will not resolve the horrors of the past and will do nothing to improve the unacceptable living conditions that still exist in some communities to this day. I believe, however, that remembering the past is an effective way to ensure that history is not repeated.
Systemic racism and overt racism exist in Canada. They are not and will never be acceptable. Recently, we were reminded of the horrific consequences they can have. The events that preceded the death of Joyce Echaquan shocked us all. They outraged us, but should not surprise us. They are not isolated events.
Addressing systemic racism in all our institutions requires active listening, strong public policy and making more equitable representation at all levels of society. Honouring the victims of institutional racism, whatever form it may have taken throughout history, is a first step. Making sure that these atrocities against indigenous peoples cease completely is our everyday priority.
This national day for truth and reconciliation will be an opportunity for Canadians to reflect on and question their own individual biases and assumptions. Working on them will require a continuous and collective endeavour beyond September 30.
I implore members of the House to listen carefully to the testimony of the survivors and indigenous leaders who are telling us how a national day of recognition would help heal the wounds of the past, honour survivors and move forward together towards reconciliation.
We must also continue to work tirelessly to quickly resolve the many problems faced by indigenous communities today. Access to drinking water, for example, is vital.
Our government is committed to eliminating all boil water advisories, in the long term, in first nations communities living on reserve. We recognize and affirm the right of communities to have access to safe drinking water. As a result of this commitment, 95 boil water advisories have been lifted since 2015.
In the preceding parliament, we passed an important law to reform child and family services with the goal of reducing the number of indigenous children in care. The law also allows first nations, the Inuit and the Métis to have full authority over child services so they can make the decisions that will ensure the well-being of their children, families and communities. There is a crisis in indigenous communities. Too many children are taken away from their homes and communities.
We are also committed to the reclamation, revitalization and strengthening of indigenous languages. A historic piece of legislation, the Indigenous Languages Act, received royal assent on June 21, 2019. This legislation was developed in collaboration with indigenous peoples. It recognizes the language rights of indigenous peoples and sets out how we will support these languages.
Canadian Heritage is working collaboratively with indigenous partners to implement the Indigenous Languages Act. The department is consulting with indigenous governments, governing bodies and a variety of organizations on the appointment of a commissioner and three directors of indigenous languages, as well as the development of an indigenous languages funding model. These are important successes, yet we can all agree that there is so much more we need to do.
I look forward to continuing to work hard with indigenous peoples across the country to make further progress on these and other crucial issues.
Canada has embarked upon a path to reconciliation. With each step, Canadians are able to better understand the lives, challenges and points of view of indigenous peoples from the past and present.
In introducing this bill to create a national day for truth and reconciliation, the Government of Canada is hoping to encourage people across the country to learn about indigenous history, come together and get involved to support these efforts and help their communities move forward on the path to reconciliation.
Although we all have different journeys and experiences, every Canadian has a unique and essential role to play as we walk together on this path toward reconciliation and a stronger, more resilient Canada.
I think it fitting to close with the words of Ms. Georgina Jolibois, who said, “People in Canada are capable of mourning the past while also celebrating the present and looking toward the future.” I urge all members to support this legislation so that our country can honour survivors and mark the history of residential schools with a day for recognition, reflection, commemoration, education and engagement.
We must recognize that others have come before us to chart this path. The commissioners of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission gave so much of themselves to ensure that the voices of others were heard. Those who testified, leaders and indigenous communities across Canada, as well as current and former parliamentarians, including Georgina Jolibois, called for a national day, as is set out in this bill. I thank them all.
Meegwetch, marsi.
propose que le projet de loi C-5, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les lettres de change, la Loi d’interprétation et le Code canadien du travail (Journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation), soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
— Monsieur le Président, je tiens d'abord à souligner que nous nous trouvons sur les terres ancestrales du peuple algonquin anishinabe.
C'est un grand honneur pour moi de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi C-5, un projet de loi important visant à créer un nouveau jour férié fédéral, la Journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation. Nous devons absolument féliciter et remercier Georgina Jolibois d'avoir présenté ce projet de loi au cours de la législature précédente, mais, surtout, de défendre les droits des peuples autochtones non seulement de sa circonscription, mais de partout au Canada. J'aimerais aussi remercier et saluer le député de Burnaby-Sud de son appui en faveur de cet important projet de loi.
J'ai déjà eu l'honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre au sujet du cheminement de notre pays vers la réconciliation, et je sais que la réconciliation n'est pas la responsabilité d'un seul parti ou d'une seule personne, mais de tous les Canadiens.
Ce projet de loi est un pas important sur le parcours que nous réalisons ensemble. Je suis fier de travailler avec des députés de tous les partis politiques sur cette mesure législative.
Certains députés de la Chambre ont peut-être eu le privilège d'assister aux témoignages présentés au Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien lors de son étude du projet de loi de Georgina Jolibois, durant la dernière législature. Les témoignages que nous avons entendus ont renforcé notre conviction qu'il est important d'adopter ce projet de loi.
Une grande partie de ces témoignages ont évoqué de manière frappante et puissante les retombées potentielles d'une journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation. Par exemple, le chef national Robert Bertrand, du Congrès des peuples autochtones, a dit:
Un jour de fête légale offrira une occasion importante de réfléchir à la diversité des patrimoines et des cultures de notre peuple, ce qui demeure essentiel au tissu social de notre pays. Ce faisant, chacun d'entre nous s'efforcera de parvenir à une véritable réconciliation entre les Autochtones et les non-Autochtones.
Mme Theresa Brown, présidente du cercle des survivants du Centre national pour la vérité et la réconciliation, a elle aussi livré un témoignage éloquent. Elle a évoqué en ces termes l'importance d'une journée nationale de réflexion pour les survivants des pensionnats indiens:
Une journée spéciale et distincte où nos petits-enfants pourraient déposer une couronne, déposer du tabac, prier et se souvenir est importante pour moi et pour les autres survivants. C'est aussi l'occasion pour notre pays de se souvenir et d'affirmer: « plus jamais ». Nous voulons avoir l'assurance que, lorsque nous serons partis, cet esprit de vérité et de réconciliation survivra pour les générations futures.
M. Natan Obed, président de l'Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, a témoigné de ce qui suit:
[...] la création d'un jour férié a plus de poids et permet de sensibiliser davantage les gens à l'aide d'une plus grande tribune. Quand on pense aux congés, aux jours fériés et à la façon dont ils ont été désignés au fil du temps, on constate qu'ils sont de nature coloniale et qu'ils se rapportent au fondement du pays, sans nécessairement tenir compte des peuples autochtones établis au Canada. On se démarquerait ainsi considérablement de cet héritage.
Il a également ajouté:
Ce jour férié peut contribuer dans une grande mesure à garantir que dès leur plus jeune âge, tous les Canadiens auront un lien positif avec les Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis.
Le premier point soulevé par M. Obed souligne l'importance et le statut des jours fériés nationaux au Canada. Je voudrais rappeler à la Chambre que le fait de créer un jour férié est, en lui-même, tout-à-fait significatif. En ce moment, il y a neuf jours fériés sous réglementation fédérale au Canada. Une journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation aurait le même statut que la fête du Travail ou le jour du Souvenir, ce qui soulignerait l'importance et la portée de cette journée.
Durant les témoignages que nous avons pu entendre, de nombreux groupes ont exprimé des points de vue similaires à ceux que je viens de citer sur le sens et les retombées d'une journée de commémoration.
Le système des pensionnats autochtones a été une véritable tragédie nationale. Pendant 130 ans, plus de 150 000 enfants des Premières Nations, des Inuits et des Métis ont été placés dans des pensionnats. On a séparé de force ces enfants de leurs parents, de leur foyer, de leur culture, de leur langue, de leur terre, de leur réseau de relations et de leur communauté.
Cette journée est importante. Elle offre l'occasion de réfléchir aux maux qui ont été infligés aux Premières Nations, aux Inuits et aux Métis tant au fil de notre histoire que de nos jours en raison des séquelles des pensionnats. Ce préjudice, nous nous efforçons de le réparer en mettant en oeuvre les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada.
L'appel à l'action 80, lancé par la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, demande à notre gouvernement
d'établir comme jour férié, en collaboration avec les peuples autochtones, une journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation pour honorer les survivants, leurs familles et leurs collectivités et s'assurer que la commémoration de l'histoire et des séquelles des pensionnats demeure un élément essentiel du processus de réconciliation.
Aujourd'hui, nous voulons répondre à cet appel à l'action.
Après des consultations respectueuses et une mûre réflexion, on a choisi la date du 30 septembre en raison de sa signification. À l'heure actuelle, le 30 septembre est la date du mouvement populaire appelé Journée du chandail orange, créé par la formidable Phyllis Webstad et ainsi nommé en l'honneur du chandail orange que Mme Webstad avait reçu de sa grand-mère pour son premier jour au pensionnat, mais qu'on lui a confisqué dès son arrivée. Son chandail orange symbolise toute la vitalité des cultures, des langues, des traditions, des identités et des enfances qui ont été réprimées au sein du système des pensionnats. Il symbolise également les survivants comme Mme Webstad et les efforts monumentaux déployés par les Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis afin de protéger et de revitaliser leurs cultures et leurs langues pour les futures générations.
Durant les témoignages en comité, nous avons appris que septembre était une période douloureusement symbolique pour les familles et les communautés autochtones. C'est durant ce mois que les enfants étaient séparés de leurs proches et de leur communauté, chaque année pour retourner à l'école. Il convient donc de souligner cette souffrance par une journée solennelle pour se souvenir du passé, y réfléchir et apprendre ensemble à mieux connaître l'histoire et les séquelles des pensionnats.
J'ai toujours été convaincu que l'un des piliers de la réconciliation est l'éducation. L'établissement d'une Journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation est de l'éducation en action. Pour tous ceux et celles qui vivent au Canada, ce serait une journée de commémoration, mais aussi une journée pour apprendre à connaître une partie sombre de notre passé. Ce serait une façon de se souvenir de ne jamais oublier et de ne jamais nous arrêter sur le chemin vers la réconciliation.
Les étudiants retournent encore à l'école chaque année en septembre. Au-delà de l'importance symbolique du 30 septembre, cette date proposée, pour une journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation, est aussi une occasion d'apprentissage au sein de nos réseaux scolaires sur notre parcours vers la réconciliation. Les enseignants et les enseignantes de partout au pays pourront s'appuyer sur des discussions déjà en cours dans de nombreuses écoles sur les pensionnats. Les familles auront une raison de parler de la réconciliation à la maison. Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes auront une journée pour réfléchir à notre histoire et à nos valeurs en tant que société.
J'aime à penser au jour où les écoles de tout le pays marqueront ce jour férié par des cérémonies, une journée d'apprentissage. J'espère qu'elles inviteront des aînés ou des survivants, des détenteurs de savoir et des éducateurs autochtones à venir en classe pour parler avec les enfants.
Je pense à la manière dont les écoles du pays tout entier se servent du jour du Souvenir comme d'un outil d'apprentissage pour les enfants de tous âges afin de les renseigner sur les conflits passés auxquels le Canada a participé, de leur faire comprendre les atrocités de la guerre et, surtout, d'honorer les hommes et les femmes qui ont tant sacrifié au service du pays. J'estime qu'une nouvelle journée de la vérité et de la réconciliation serait une excellente occasion d'apprentissage au sujet de ce chapitre de notre histoire qui est tout aussi important que les autres.
Malheureusement, seule la moitié des Canadiens et des Canadiennes connaissent l'histoire du système de pensionnats autochtones et ses effets à long terme sur les peuples autochtones.
Le rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada affirme qu'un trop grand nombre de Canadiens ne savent pas grand-chose, voire rien du tout sur les racines historiques et profondes de ces conflits. Le manque de connaissances historiques a d'importantes répercussions pour les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits, ainsi que pour l'ensemble du Canada. Le fait d'avoir chaque année une journée pour prendre le temps de reconnaître cette histoire douloureuse nous aidera à connaître et à comprendre les réalités des pensionnats. C'est une façon positive de cheminer vers la réconciliation. Ce type de commémoration est un acte collectif et public de reconnaissance.
Ce sera aussi une journée d'écoute et de guérison pour le pays tout entier. Ensemble, nous pourrons poursuivre notre conversation sur la justice sociale.
Comme l'a dit Mme Marie Wilson, ancienne commissaire de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, lorsqu'elle a comparu devant le Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien:
Ainsi, tout le monde devra y porter attention, se souvenir et faire preuve de respect, et espérons [...] que l'apprentissage à ce sujet le sera également. Nous ne nous contentons pas de parler de guerres; nous parlons de la paix dans la discussion sur les guerres. Dans le contexte des pensionnats, nous pouvons parler des erreurs du passé et de ce que nous tentons de faire pour nous attaquer aux problèmes à l'avenir.
M. Tim Argetsinger, conseiller politique de l'Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, est du même avis lorsqu'il affirme:
[...] je crois qu'il y a une façon de trouver un juste équilibre de sorte que l'attention d'une journée se concentre sur les violations des droits de la personne commises dans le passé à l'encontre des peuples autochtones et que ces derniers cherchent à surmonter. Cette journée pourrait, en même temps, être une occasion de nous concentrer sur notre responsabilité de prendre des mesures positives pour résoudre certaines des difficultés qui découlent des expériences du passé.
Je veux souligner la priorité constante que notre gouvernement accorde à la réconciliation et à la promotion des droits des Autochtones. Certains diront qu'une simple journée ne résoudra pas les horreurs du passé et n'améliorera pas les conditions de vie inacceptables de certaines communautés encore aujourd'hui. Je crois toutefois que ce souvenir du passé est un moyen efficace de s'assurer que l'histoire ne se répète pas.
Le racisme systémique et les actes de racisme sont présents au Canada, mais cela ne les rend pas et ne les rendra jamais acceptables. Nous avons été encore une fois témoins, dernièrement, des conséquences horribles qu'ils peuvent avoir. Les événements qui ont précédé la mort de Joyce Echaquan nous ont tous choqués. Ils nous ont scandalisés, mais ils n'auraient pas dû nous étonner, car il ne s'agissait pas d'événements isolés.
Pour éradiquer le racisme systémique de nos institutions, il faut pratiquer l'écoute active, il faut créer des politiques publiques rigoureuses et il faut que toutes les couches de la société soient également représentées. Rendre hommage aux victimes du racisme institutionnel, quelle que soit la forme qu'il a pu prendre au fil des ans, nous rapproche un tant soit peu de ce but. Tout faire pour que cessent à tout jamais les atrocités dont sont victimes les peuples autochtones sera notre plus grande priorité.
La future journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation sera l'occasion pour les Canadiens de réfléchir à leurs propres préjugés et idées reçues et de les remettre en question. Pour les faire tomber, il faudra toutefois que les efforts collectifs que nous devrons tous déployer s'étendent bien au-delà du 30 septembre.
J'implore les députés de la Chambre d'écouter attentivement les témoignages des survivants et des leaders autochtones qui nous disent comment une journée nationale de reconnaissance aiderait à guérir les blessures du passé, à honorer les survivants et à avancer ensemble vers la réconciliation
Nous devons également continuer à travailler d'arrache-pied pour résoudre rapidement de nombreux problèmes auxquels sont confrontées les communautés autochtones aujourd'hui. L'accès à l'eau potable, par exemple, est essentiel.
Notre gouvernement s'est engagé à mettre fin à tous les avis d'ébullition de l'eau, à long terme, dans les communautés des Premières Nations vivant dans les réserves. Nous reconnaissons et affirmons le droit des communautés à avoir accès à une eau potable et sûre. Dans le cadre de cet engagement, 95 avis d'ébullition d'eau ont été levés depuis 2015.
Au cours de la législature précédente, nous avons adopté une loi importante, afin de réformer le service de protection de la jeunesse et de la famille, dans le but de réduire le nombre d'enfants autochtones pris en charge. Cette loi permet également aux Premières Nations, aux Inuits et aux Métis d'exercer leur pleine autorité sur les services de protection de la jeunesse, afin qu'ils puissent prendre les décisions nécessaires pour le bien-être de leurs enfants, leurs familles et leurs communautés. Une crise est en cours dans les communautés autochtones. Trop d'enfants sont retirés de leurs foyers et de leur communauté.
Nous sommes également engagés vers la réappropriation, la revitalisation et le renforcement des langues autochtones. En effet, la Loi sur les langues autochtones a reçu la sanction royale le 21 juin 2019. Il s'agit d'une loi historique. Elle a été élaborée en collaboration avec les peuples autochtones. Elle reconnaît les droits linguistiques des peuples autochtones et elle indique comment nous allons les soutenir.
Patrimoine canadien s'emploie activement, en collaboration avec ses partenaires autochtones, à la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues autochtones. Il consulte les gouvernements autochtones, les autorités concernées ainsi qu'une panoplie d'organismes concernant, d'une part, la nomination du futur commissaire aux langues autochtones et de ses trois directeurs et, d'autre part, l'élaboration d'un modèle de financement pour les langues autochtones. Il s'agit d'avancées remarquables, mais nous sommes tous conscients qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire.
Qu'il s'agisse de ce dossier ou de nombreux autres tout aussi importants, je suis impatient de poursuivre les progrès entamés, en collaboration avec les peuples autochtones de partout au Canada.
Le Canada est engagé sur la voie de la réconciliation. À chaque pas, les Canadiens et les Canadiennes ont l'occasion de mieux comprendre la vie, les luttes et les points de vue des peuples autochtones d'hier et d'aujourd'hui.
En présentant ce projet de loi visant à créer une Journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation, le gouvernement du Canada souhaite encourager les gens de tout le pays à apprendre leur histoire, à s'engager et à se rapprocher afin de soutenir et d'accélérer la marche vers la réconciliation dans leur communauté.
Bien que nos parcours et nos expériences soient variés, chaque personne au Canada a un rôle unique et vital à jouer sur ce chemin que nous parcourons ensemble vers la réconciliation et l'édification d'un Canada plus fort et plus résilient.
J'estime qu'il est tout naturel pour moi de terminer mon allocution sur les mots de Mme Georgina Jolibois, qui a dit: « Les Canadiens [sont tout à fait capables de] pleurer le passé, [de] célébrer le présent et [de] se réjouir de l'avenir. » Je presse tous les députés d'appuyer ce projet de loi afin que le Canada puisse honorer les survivants et clore l'histoire des pensionnats autochtones par une journée dédiée à la reconnaissance, à la réflexion, à la commémoration, à la conscientisation et à l'entraide.
Enfin, il est important de reconnaître que d'autres sont venus avant nous pour tracer cette voie. Les commissaires de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation ont tant donné d'eux-mêmes pour que les voix des autres puissent être entendues. Ceux qui ont apporté des témoignages, les dirigeants et les communautés autochtones de tout le Canada ainsi que les parlementaires actuels et anciens, notamment Georgina Jolibois, ont demandé que des mesures soient prises pour créer une telle journée, comme le propose ce projet de loi. Je les remercie toutes et tous.
Meegwetch, marsi.
Collapse
View Dane Lloyd Profile
CPC (AB)
View Dane Lloyd Profile
2020-10-23 10:23 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I do not think anyone in this House could disagree that there is an essential need for a day of remembrance, but a lot of concerns have been raised to me by my indigenous constituents that creating a new federal holiday on which civil servants would not be working could hurt indigenous people.
Indigenous people have so many needs that have been listed and I want the minister to assure my indigenous constituents that there will be somebody to pick up the phone when they have a need on the national day of remembrance.
Monsieur le Président, je pense qu'aucun député ne peut contester qu'il faille absolument créer une journée de commémoration, mais cette idée a suscité beaucoup d'inquiétudes parmi les Autochtones de ma circonscription parce qu'ils craignent que ce nouveau jour férié où les fonctionnaires fédéraux auraient congé ne soit préjudiciable à la population autochtone.
Les besoins des populations autochtones sont immenses, et je veux que le ministre donne son assurance aux Autochtones de ma circonscription qu'il y aura bien quelqu'un pour répondre au téléphone pendant la journée nationale de commémoration, s'ils ont besoin d'aide.
Collapse
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:24 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the federal government and the federal system have been working and will continue to work to ensure that we can provide all the necessary services for indigenous peoples across this country.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement fédéral et la fonction publique fédérale travaille pour fournir aux peuples autochtones de ce pays tous les services nécessaires dont ils ont besoin, et elle continuera de le faire.
Collapse
View Kristina Michaud Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech.
I applaud the introduction of this bill. It is important to take time to reflect and remember, but I think that we need to go much further than that. This bill responds to call to action no. 80 in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report.
I would like to draw members' attention to call to action no. 43, which calls upon the federal government to fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. I would like to know whether my colleague agrees that we should implement this declaration to truly achieve reconciliation. Will he ask his government to make that a priority?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de son discours.
Je salue le dépôt de ce projet de loi. Il est important de prendre le temps de réfléchir et de se remémorer, mais je pense qu'il faut aller beaucoup plus loin. Ce projet de loi répond à l'appel à l'action no 80 du rapport de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation.
J'aimerais qu'on porte notre attention sur l'appel à l'action no 43, qui demande au gouvernement fédéral de mettre en œuvre et d'adopter la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. J'aimerais savoir si mon collègue est d'accord pour dire que nous devrions mettre en œuvre cette Déclaration pour véritablement accomplir la réconciliation. Demandera-t-il à son gouvernement d'en faire une priorité?
Collapse
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:25 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for her question.
Obviously, we are committed to doing that. It is a priority for our government, and we will move forward with adopting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon honorable collègue de sa question.
Nous nous sommes évidemment engagés à le faire. C'est une priorité pour notre gouvernement et nous irons de l'avant avec l'adoption de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
Collapse
View Brian Masse Profile
NDP (ON)
View Brian Masse Profile
2020-10-23 10:25 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the minister for recognizing Georgina Jolibois and her work. The way the minister did it was very classy and respectful for Georgina, who worked tirelessly on this and also was, in the spirit of what this day is trying to do, very collaborative. She was very dedicated to reaching out to not only the communities, but also this place.
The bill, as the minister knows, died in the Senate. It is very important that we move this bill forward in unity as a Parliament. I would ask the minister whether he is prepared to work to ensure this bill moves quickly through the House and the Senate.
I again thank him for recognizing Georgina. I saw how hard she worked on this, the effort she put into it and what it meant to her. It means a lot to everyone and it is important that we move forward, but only by recognizing the past and having the past included in our future.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais remercier le ministre d'avoir rendu hommage, avec beaucoup de classe et de respect, à Georgina Jolibois et à son travail. Elle a travaillé sans relâche à ce projet et a aussi fait preuve d'un grand esprit de collaboration, c'est-à-dire l'esprit dont nous voudrions marquer cette journée. Elle a vraiment essayé de convaincre non seulement les communautés, mais aussi les députés.
Comme le ministre le sait, le projet de loi est auparavant mort au Feuilleton du Sénat. Il est très important que nous portions ce projet de loi tous ensemble, au Parlement. J'aimerais savoir si le ministre a l'intention de s'investir pour qu'il soit rapidement adopté à la Chambre et au Sénat.
Je le remercie encore une fois d'avoir rendu hommage à Georgina. J'ai vu tout le travail qu'elle a fait dans ce dossier, les efforts qu'elle a déployés et l'importance que ce projet revêt pour elle. Il s'agit d'une question primordiale pour tout le monde et il est important que nous puissions avancer, mais nous devons prendre conscience du passé et l'inscrire dans notre avenir.
Collapse
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:26 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as we say in English, we should give credit where credit is due. It was absolutely natural for us to do this. I want to assure the member that we will work diligently with all members of this House and the Senate to ensure this bill is adopted as quickly as possible.
Monsieur le Président, il faut rendre à César ce qui appartient à César, comme on dit. C'est un geste tout à fait naturel pour nous. Je tiens à assurer à mon collègue que nous travaillerons assidûment avec tous les députés et tous les sénateurs pour que ce projet de loi soit adopté aussi rapidement que possible.
Collapse
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
2020-10-23 10:27 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is wonderful to see this put forward today and to be up for debate. I was part of the committee that studied the bill put forward by Georgina Jolibois in the last Parliament, and I know how important it is. Having heard from all the witnesses, I know they really are going to be so happy to see we are moving forward and making it a priority.
The minister touched upon this a bit in his speech, but why this chosen date? I know there has been discussion about it, but why is September 30 the most important date for us to use for the national day for truth and reconciliation?
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureuse que ce projet de loi ait été présenté et que nous en débattions aujourd'hui. Je faisais partie du comité chargé d'examiner le projet de loi présenté par Georgina Jolibois, au cours de la législature précédente. Je sais à quel point c'est un projet de loi important. Je suis convaincue que les témoins que nous avons entendus alors seront ravis d'apprendre que nous réalisons des progrès dans ce dossier et que nous en faisons une priorité.
Le ministre en a parlé brièvement dans son discours, mais j'aimerais savoir pourquoi on a choisi cette date. Je sais qu'il y a eu des discussions à ce sujet, mais pourquoi a-t-on convenu que le 30 septembre serait la meilleure date pour tenir la Journée nationale de la vérité et de la réconciliation?
Collapse
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:27 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as part of the consultations done during the last Parliament on this bill and the testimonies we heard through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, it became clear that September 30, Orange Shirt Day, a grassroots movement in Canada led by indigenous peoples across the country, was really the most significant day to create this national federal statutory holiday to remember what happened and what Canada has done to indigenous peoples across the country. We want to work to ensure that Canadians, but especially younger Canadians, understand this part of our past so that never again should this happen in the future.
Monsieur le Président, lorsque des consultations ont eu lieu, au cours de la dernière législature, sur l'ancêtre de ce projet de loi et lorsque des témoignages ont été entendus par l'entremise de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, il est devenu évident que le 30 septembre, qu'un mouvement populaire mené par les peuples autochtones partout au pays a désigné comme la Journée du chandail orange, est véritablement la date la plus significative pour créer ce jour férié national et commémorer l'histoire et le traitement réservé aux Autochtones par les autorités canadiennes dans le passé. Nous voulons faire en sorte que les Canadiens, mais surtout les jeunes Canadiens, comprennent cette période de notre histoire pour que jamais une telle chose ne se reproduise.
Collapse
View Colin Carrie Profile
CPC (ON)
View Colin Carrie Profile
2020-10-23 10:28 [p.1154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, one of the privileges I have seen as a member of Parliament is that it has actually helped me learn more and understand my own ignorance as far as reconciliation and the need for reconciliation.
The minister quite rightly points out the need for education because so many Canadians are unaware of this dark chapter in our history. In the bill, there is really no plan to develop an educational strategy. He did compare how this would be similar to Remembrance Day. On Remembrance Day, the federal government and schools and everybody really put an effort forward to allow young people and all Canadians to learn about these tragic parts of our history.
I was wondering if the minister could comment on whether there are any plans for education. One of the concerns with this bill is there does not appear to be a plan for an educational part of this whole process. When we debated Remembrance Day, I remember people worrying and not wanting it to just becoming a holiday but a learning experience.
Monsieur le Président, l'un des privilèges que j'ai eus en tant que député a été de prendre conscience de ma propre ignorance et de m'instruire sur la réconciliation et la nécessité de se réconcilier.
Le ministre souligne, avec raison, le besoin d'éduquer les Canadiens, car un si grand nombre ne sont pas au courant de cette page sombre de notre histoire. Or, le projet de loi ne prévoit pas la création d'une stratégie en matière d'éducation. Il dit que ce jour serait célébré un peu comme le jour du Souvenir. Le jour du Souvenir, le gouvernement fédéral, les écoles et l'ensemble de la population font véritablement un effort pour permettre aux jeunes et à l'ensemble des Canadiens d'en apprendre davantage sur ces périodes tragiques de notre histoire.
J'aimerais que le ministre me dise ce qui est prévu au chapitre de l'éducation. Je trouve préoccupant que le projet de loi n'ait pas de volet éducationnel. Lorsque nous avons débattu du jour du Souvenir, je me souviens que l'on avait soulevé la même préoccupation. On voulait éviter que cette journée devienne simplement un jour de congé et s'assurer que ce soit une occasion d'apprendre.
Collapse
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:30 [p.1155]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is a very important issue, and in fact, Canadian Heritage does have programs for educational activities as part of this. This is something we want to continue going into the future and maybe even amplify. It is a very good point.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un élément fort important, d'ailleurs, Patrimoine Canada a prévu des programmes d'activités éducatives relatifs à cette journée. Il s'agit d'une chose que nous voulons poursuivre dans l'avenir et même bonifier. C'est un excellent point.
Collapse
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2020-10-23 10:31 [p.1155]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his speech.
I would like to know whether he recognizes that the federal Indian Act is a racist and outdated piece of legislation that needs a complete overhaul.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le ministre de son discours.
J'aimerais savoir s'il reconnaît que la loi fédérale sur les Indiens est une loi raciste et désuète qui doit être complètement changée.
Collapse
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:31 [p.1155]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.
I think there are so many things we need to do on our journey towards reconciliation with indigenous peoples. Also, I am not saying that the bill I am introducing today will solve every problem.
However, this was one of the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and it is something we heard from coast to coast to coast during the consultations held by that commission and by the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.
It is one step towards reconciliation, but there is a lot more work to do.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de sa question.
Je pense qu'il y a énormément de choses que nous devons faire sur le plan de la quête vers la réconciliation envers les peuples autochtones. De plus, je ne prétends pas que le projet de loi que je présente aujourd'hui va régler tous les problèmes.
Toutefois, c'est l'une des recommandations de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada et c'est l'une des choses que nous avons entendues d'un bout à l'autre du pays dans le cadre des consultations de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada et du Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien.
C'est un pas vers la réconciliation, mais il y a beaucoup d'autres pas à franchir.
Collapse
View Alexandre Boulerice Profile
NDP (QC)
View Alexandre Boulerice Profile
2020-10-23 10:31 [p.1155]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for continuing the work started by my former colleague, Georgina Jolibois, and I thank him for the kind words he said about her today.
In this spirit of reconciliation, dialogue and moving forward, I would like to know if he is willing to commit his government to dropping the court challenge of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling on indigenous child welfare.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le ministre d'avoir poursuivi et repris le travail de mon ancienne collègue, Georgina Jolibois, et je le remercie des bons mots qu'il a eus pour elle aujourd'hui.
Dans cet esprit de réconciliation, de dialogue et de pas en avant, je voudrais lui demander s'il est prêt à engager son gouvernement à cesser de contester en cour le jugement du Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne en lien avec les services de protection des enfants autochtones.
Collapse
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven Guilbeault Profile
2020-10-23 10:32 [p.1155]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie for his question.
I said this just now in answer to the member for Joliette, and I will say it again. This bill is one step towards reconciliation with indigenous peoples. There are many other things we have to do.
For example, in my speech, I talked about implementing the Indigenous Languages Act, which is an absolutely crucial element. We are currently holding nationwide consultations about the implementation of that act. I heard one participant say that language is culture and culture is language, and I certainly agree with that.
There is still so much more we need to do. Our government is walking the path of reconciliation with indigenous peoples, and it is a process that will take a lot more time.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie de sa question.
Je l'ai dit tout à l'heure en réponse à la question du député de Joliette et je le répète, ce projet de loi est l'un des éléments vers la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones. Il y a beaucoup d'autres choses que nous devons faire.
Je parlais par exemple dans mon discours de la mise en œuvre de la Loi concernant les langues autochtones, laquelle est un élément absolument nécessaire. Nous tenons des consultations actuellement dans tout le pays sur la mise en œuvre de cette Loi et j'entendais une intervenante dire que les langues, c'est la culture et que la culture, c'est les langues. Je ne peux qu'être d'accord avec cela.
Il y a beaucoup d'éléments que nous devons mettre en place. Notre gouvernement s'est engagé sur cette voie de la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones et c'est un processus qui va prendre encore beaucoup de temps.
Collapse
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2020-10-23 10:33 [p.1155]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to be here. Imagine living beside a home for years and knowing the families who went through there, only to find out, after growing up and moving away, that unspeakable horrors took place in that house. Members should put themselves in that position right now, because for me, that is what we are talking about today.
Orange Shirt Day originated in my hometown of Williams Lake. St. Joseph's Mission was just down the road from where I grew up. I played ball hockey there. I swam there. Later in life, I rode motorbikes, played in the fields and rode horses through there. I played with many of the kids. I know many of the kids who came through there. Orange Shirt Day for me, every year, strikes home the fact that we never know exactly what is going on right beside us.
Over the years I have gotten to know a number of survivors of the residential school program. They tell horrific stories. My wife and my children are from the Esdilagh First Nation. One of my dear friends and mentors, even though he is younger, is Chief Willie Sellars of the Williams Lake Indian Band. St. Joseph's Mission and the remnants of the mission still reside in their community. As people drive by it, every day, it is a constant reminder of the atrocities that took place right there. That is what Orange Shirt Day means to me.
In the House we were talking about Remembrance Day and the significance of remembering, every day, those who serve our country and our community. It is not enough for us to use one day to remember their service. We have to remember it every day. Orange Shirt Day, for me and for many, is similar: Every day we must remember these atrocities.
We have to understand our past. We currently live in an era of a cancel culture. We want to erase all this: Tear down statues and erase the past. What we need is to remember our past. Without our past, we do not know where we have been. Without our past, we have no idea who we are today. Without our past, we do not know where we are going.
I had the honour of speaking during debate on the Indigenous Languages Act. I spoke of an elder in my riding, Lheidli T'enneh elder Mary Gouchie, who was one of the last speakers of the Dakelh language in my riding. I had the honour of being with her and sitting with her, and she would share stories with me. She instilled in me that our past is so important. Culture is so important, and knowing one's culture. As I said, my children, my son and my daughter, are first nations, yet they have very little knowledge of their past or their history. I think that is shameful.
I mentioned my friend, Chief Willie Sellars. He is a mentor who is leading his community to overcome its challenges and to learn from the mistakes of the past. He is leading them to greater opportunities moving forward.
He is an accomplished author, and wrote Dipnetting with Dad and Hockey with Dad. I urge my colleagues in the House and those who are listening to please source those books. They are easy reads, but they are impactful.
Orange Shirt Day is the story of Phyllis Jack. Her grandmother took her to a store and bought her a nice orange shirt for her first day of school. She went on the bus to St. Joseph's Mission, and immediately upon arriving on the mission grounds, she had that orange shirt ripped off of her. The residential school program was designed to eradicate the race: the first nation, or the native, in those children. Over 150,000 first nations, Inuit and Métis children went through that program, and so many did not make it out.
September 30 is a day to honour the survivors: those who came through the program. It is also to remember those who did not make it through. My colleague had a great question for the minister about the teaching of this subject. My worry with the program is that it becomes just another excuse for a holiday. I will go back to my earlier comments: Imagine living beside a house of horrors. We should never forget. We need to learn from that past and ensure that it never happens again. The orange shirt slogan is that every child matters. We need to ensure that we are bringing equity up so that every child truly does matter.
I think we use reconciliation like a buzzword at times. We have seen it with certain programs and policies that have taken place. We have seen that we still have boil water advisories in first nations. I will be the first to admit those boil water advisories have been longstanding and that no one case is the same as another. It is not one-size-fits-all. It is very complex, but we have to work to be better.
We have suicide epidemics, where children as young as four years old are choosing death to get out of their lot in life. One of the first emergency debates that I took part in, in the House, was regarding the Attawapiskat First Nation suicide epidemic. Sadly, today we still have those same concerns and those same challenges are taking place. Reconciliation is about walking a path together, not pitting one first nation against another first nation, picking winners or losers, or pitting first nations against non-first nations. If we are truly devoted and committed to reconciliation, it is about working together and learning from one another.
I spoke to a couple of first nations leaders about my speech today. They have heard me talk before. They have heard my comments about reconciliation being more than a buzzword: more than something for a politician to stand with hand on heart and perhaps a tissue in hand to dab away a fake tear and say, “This is my most important relationship,” while we still have communities that have boil water advisories and that suffer atrocious living conditions.
If we are truly going to walk the path, we have to educate. We cannot develop indigenous policy without indigenous people at the table. We cannot chart a path forward unless we have honest conversation, and honest conversation means we are not always going to agree. In my riding of Cariboo—Prince George, an area that I grew up running through, and fishing, hunting and hiking in, belongs to the Tsilhqot’in Nation, where the Supreme Court decision in the William case took place.
We have challenges with first nations and non-first-nations people who have lived side by side for generations. It is a delicate balance for me always, because I have friends and relations on both sides. We always have to remember that the path forward is through honest conversation and education.
Phyllis Jack, in writing and telling her story, hoped that it would spur a movement and that it would help to educate people. The conversation that we are having today on this, and that we have had over the last number of years, is so important. Our shared history, our connection to our past, is often immediate. The way we understand our heritage is passed down, for the most part, through books, memories and communication among communities. However, our shared history is also influenced by our own race, colour and creed. Although these are shared between people, they are also shared very differently. It is so important, as we walk together, that we understand that we all have different stories. I am sure some of my colleagues are hearing this story for the first time today. Phyllis's story is important, and is but one. I urge my colleagues to listen.
I sat in some of the talking circles when the truth and reconciliation study was going on, and we heard heartbreaking stories. Last September 30 on Orange Shirt Day, I did a healing circle in my hometown, and some survivors were there. The generational effects of residential school still impact those families. Although the last school closed in 1981 or 1984, that generational negative impact is still going on to this day. It is seen in lateral violence. It is seen in substance abuse. It is seen in the abject poverty these communities live in.
I hope my colleagues listening in or who are in the House today are taking pause. We should be looking at some things in the legislation and hopefully making amendments to strengthen it and make it better.
When talk about education, school district 27 in my riding was chosen by the first nations education steering committee to pilot curriculum changes for all grade five and 10 students, reflecting on the residential school experience. The events were designed to commemorate the residential school experience, to witness and honour the healing journey of survivors and their families and to commit to the ongoing process of reconciliation.
Phyllis (Jack) Webstad told her story about the first day at the residential school when the shiny new shirt her grandmother bought her was taken from her. She was six years old.
The minister mentioned September 30 and why it was chosen. For kids right across our country and for parents too, for the most part, that back to school day is a sense of excitement. It is excitement for the parents because they are able to send their kids to school and are free for a few hours every day. They are excited to see their children go off on a journey of learning. However, that time of celebration for many is still one of reflection for others. It is very traumatic, and I have witnessed it first-hand.
While we say every child matters, we need to remember that all children matter even if they are now adults. We have so many people who are still locked in that time when they were in that program.
A first nations leader called me last night. I had reached out to let him know I was speaking on this. He asked much of what my colleague from Sturgeon River asked. Will this do anything to solve the boil water advisories, the systemic racism or the suicide epidemics? No, it will not, but it is a step in the right direction to further educate about this. Education is such a critical component and it needs to be included in the bill.
We cannot just make a holiday for the sake of giving people another long weekend to load up their campers and go away. At the very end, we will be doing a disservice to the original intent of the bill. It is important we build that into the bill to ensure we never forget.
Whether it is September 30, as proposed, or some other day, we must remember the over 150,000 residential school children, the first nations, Inuit and Métis who went through that. We must honour the survivors and never forget the children who never made it home.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un honneur d'être ici. Imaginons la situation: vivre pendant des années à un endroit et connaître toutes les familles qui ont habité dans la maison voisine avant de se rendre compte, une fois qu'on a grandi et déménagé, que des horreurs inimaginables sont survenues dans cette maison. Les députés devraient s'imaginer ce que c'est que de vivre une telle situation, parce que, pour moi, c'est ce qui est arrivé.
La Journée du chandail orange a été créée dans ma ville natale, Williams Lake. Le pensionnat St. Joseph's Mission était au bout de la rue où j'ai grandi. J'ai jouté au hockey-balle là-bas; je suis allé à la piscine. Plus vieux, j'ai fait de la motocyclette, j'ai joué dans les champs et fait de l'équitation là-bas. J'ai joué avec de nombreux enfants et je connais beaucoup de gens qui y sont allés. Pour moi, chaque année, la Journée du chandail orange me rappelle qu'on ne sait jamais vraiment ce qui se passe tout près de chez nous.
Au fil des ans, j'ai appris à connaître un certain nombre de survivants du programme des pensionnats autochtones. Les histoires qu'ils racontent sont atroces. Ma femme et mes enfants sont membres de la Première Nation Esdilagh. De plus, je suis un bon ami du chef Willie Sellars de la bande indienne de Williams Lake. C'est l'un de mes mentors, même s'il est plus jeune que moi. Les vestiges du pensionnat St. Joseph's Mission se trouvent encore dans leur communauté. Les gens passent devant ces lieux tous les jours, et c'est un rappel constant des atrocités qui y ont été commises. Voilà ce que représente pour moi la Journée du chandail orange.
Nous avons parlé à la Chambre du jour du Souvenir, ainsi que de l'importance de se souvenir tous les jours des personnes étant au service de notre pays et de la population. Une journée n'est pas suffisante pour nous souvenir de leur service. Nous devons nous en souvenir tous les jours. Pour moi et bien d'autres, il en est de même pour la Journée du chandail orange. Nous devons nous rappeler les atrocités commises tous les jours.
Nous devons comprendre notre passé. Nous vivons une ère de culture de l'effacement. Nous voulons tout effacer: démolir les statues et effacer le passé. Or, nous avons besoin de nous rappeler notre passé. En effet, sans notre passé, nous ne savons pas ce qui a été fait. Sans notre passé, nous n'avons aucune idée de qui nous sommes aujourd'hui. Sans notre passé, nous ne savons pas où nous allons.
J'ai eu l'honneur de participer au débat sur la Loi sur les langues autochtones. J'ai alors parlé d'une aînée de ma circonscription, Mary Gouchie de la nation Lheidli T'enneh, qui était l'une des dernières personnes à parler le dakelh dans ma région. J'ai eu l'honneur de passer du temps avec elle, d'écouter ce qu'elle avait à raconter et de m'abreuver de son savoir. Elle m'a inculqué toute l'importance de notre passé. La culture a une grande importance, tout comme le fait de connaître sa propre culture. Comme je l'ai dit, mes enfants, mon fils et ma fille, sont membres des Premières Nations. Pourtant, ils connaissent très peu leur histoire. À mon avis, c'est honteux.
J'ai mentionné mon ami le chef Willie Sellars. Ce mentor aide les membres de sa communauté à surmonter les difficultés et à apprendre des erreurs du passé. Il les mène vers un avenir meilleur aux multiples possibilités.
C'est un auteur accompli. Il a écrit Dipnetting with Dad et Hockey with Dad. J'encourage fortement mes collègues à la Chambre et ceux qui sont à l'écoute à lire ces livres. Ce sont des lectures faciles, mais marquantes.
La Journée du chandail orange a été inspirée par l'histoire de Phyllis Jack, dont la grand-mère lui avait acheté un joli chandail orange pour son premier jour d'école. Elle a pris l'autobus vers le pensionnat St. Joseph's Mission. Dès son arrivée, on lui a arraché son chandail orange. Le programme des pensionnats autochtones visait à éradiquer l'identité autochtone, la partie indigène, de ces enfants. Plus de 150 000 enfants des Premières Nations, des Inuits et des Métis ont subi ce programme, et beaucoup ne s'en sont pas sortis.
La journée du 30 septembre est l'occasion de rendre hommage aux survivants de ce programme et d'honorer la mémoire de ceux qui n'y ont pas survécu. Notre collègue a posé une excellente question au ministre à propos de l'enseignement portant sur ce sujet. Pour ma part, je crains que le programme serve seulement de prétexte à un jour de congé. J'en reviens à ce que j'ai déjà dit: imaginons vivre à côté d'une maison des horreurs. Nous ne devons jamais oublier ce qui s'est passé. Nous devons tirer des leçons de ces événements et veiller à ce qu'ils ne se reproduisent jamais. Le slogan associé au chandail orange est que chaque enfant compte. Nous devons veiller à rendre la société plus équitable afin que chaque enfant compte vraiment.
Parfois, le mot « réconciliation » semble n'être utilisé que comme une expression à la mode. On a pu le constater dans certains programmes et certaines politiques. À titre d'exemple, il y a toujours des avis d'ébullition de l'eau dans des communautés des Premières Nations. Je suis le premier à reconnaître que ces avis sont en place depuis longtemps et que chaque situation est différente. Il n'y a pas de solution passe-partout. C'est un enjeu très complexe, certes, mais il faut faire mieux.
Que dire des épidémies de suicides? Que faire quand des enfants d'à peine 4 ans choisissent de se donner la mort pour échapper à leur vie de misère? L'un des premiers débats d'urgence auxquels j'ai pris part portait sur l'épidémie de suicides au sein de la Première Nation d'Attawapiskat. Hélas, les problèmes et les difficultés que nous avions alors déplorés sont encore bien présents aujourd'hui. Pour qu'il y ait réconciliation, nous devons cheminer ensemble et non monter les Premières Nations les unes contre les autres, tenter de départager les gagnants des perdants et semer la division entre les Autochtones et les non-Autochtones. Si les Canadiens croient vraiment et sincèrement à la réconciliation, ils devront unir leurs efforts et apprendre les uns des autres.
J'ai parlé de l'intervention que je m'apprêtais à faire aujourd'hui à quelques chefs autochtones. Ils connaissent ma position. Ils m'ont déjà entendu dire que la réconciliation doit être plus qu'un mot à la mode, plus qu'un concept brandi par le genre de politicien qui affirme, la main sur le cœur et une fausse larme au coin de l'œil, qu'il n'y a rien de plus important que la relation avec les Autochtones, pendant qu'un peu partout au pays, il y a encore des communautés autochtones qui doivent faire bouillir leur eau et qui vivent dans des conditions déplorables.
Si nous avons sérieusement l'intention de cheminer sur la voie de la réconciliation, nous devons conscientiser les gens. On ne peut pas créer de politiques sur les Autochtones si les Autochtones ne participent pas à leur élaboration. On ne pourra pas cheminer si on ne se parle pas franchement, mais il faut aussi se rappeler que les conversations vraiment honnêtes peuvent aussi donner lieu à des désaccords. Dans la circonscription que je représente, Cariboo—Prince George, il y a un secteur où je suis souvent allé pêcher, chasser ou marcher quand j'étais jeune. Ce secteur, c'est celui qui était en cause dans l'arrêt William, de la Cour suprême, et il appartient à la Première Nation Tsilhqot’in.
Là où les Premières Nations et les non-Autochtones cohabitent depuis des générations, les relations peuvent parfois être tendues. Personnellement, je trouve toujours que l'équilibre est difficile à maintenir, parce que j'ai des amis et des connaissances dans les deux groupes, mais on doit toujours se rappeler que la seule façon d'avancer, c'est en se parlant honnêtement et en apprenant à connaître l'autre.
En écrivant son histoire, Phyllis Jack espérait susciter un mouvement et sensibiliser les gens. La discussion que nous avons aujourd'hui, et que nous avons depuis des années, est très importante. Notre histoire commune, notre relation avec le passé, est souvent immédiate. La façon dont nous comprenons notre héritage nous est transmise, en grande partie, par des livres, des souvenirs et des communications entre communautés. Toutefois, notre histoire commune est aussi influencée par notre race, notre couleur et nos croyances. Bien que celles-ci soient communes, elles sont transmises très différemment. Lorsque nous cheminons ensemble, il est très important de comprendre que nous avons tous des histoires différentes. Je suis convaincu que certains députés entendent cette histoire pour la première fois aujourd'hui. L'histoire de Phyllis est importante, mais il ne s'agit là que d'une seule histoire. Je presse mes collègues d'être à l'écoute.
J'ai participé à des cercles de discussion durant l'étude de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Les histoires que nous avons entendues étaient à briser le coeur. Le 30 septembre dernier, la Journée du chandail orange, j'ai tenu un cercle de discussion dans ma localité et certains survivants y ont assisté. Les familles ressentent encore les effets transgénérationnels des pensionnats autochtones. Bien que le dernier pensionnat ait été fermé en 1981 ou 1984, les répercussions négatives se font encore sentir à ce jour. Elles se manifestent par la violence latérale, les problèmes de toxicomanie et la pauvreté abjecte dans laquelle vivent les communautés.
Je souhaite que les députés qui écoutent à distance et ceux qui sont présents à la Chambre prennent le temps de s'arrêter. Nous devons accorder une attention particulière aux dispositions du projet de loi pour, je l'espère, apporter les amendements qui l'amélioreront et le renforceront.
Parlant d'éducation, le district 27 dans ma circonscription a été sélectionné par le Comité de coordination de l'éducation des Premières nations pour mettre à l'essai un programme d'apprentissage modifié pour les élèves de la cinquième année et de la dixième année, de manière à approfondir la réflexion sur l'expérience des pensionnats autochtones. Ce nouveau programme vise à faire connaître ce qui s'est passé dans les pensionnats autochtones, à reconnaître et à honorer le parcours des survivants et de leur famille vers la guérison, et à susciter un engagement envers le processus continu de la réconciliation.
Phyllis (Jack) Webstad a raconté son histoire à propos de sa première journée au pensionnat autochtone, quand on lui a enlevé son tout nouveau chandail offert par sa grand-maman. Phyllis avait 6 ans.
Le ministre a parlé du 30 septembre et des motifs qui ont mené au choix de cette date. Pour les enfants et les parents du pays, du moins pour la plupart d'entre eux, la rentrée des classes est synonyme d'excitation. En envoyant leurs enfants à l'école, les parents peuvent profiter de quelques heures libres chaque jour. Ils sont heureux de voir leurs enfants poursuivre leur parcours d'apprentissage. Cependant, ce moment d'effervescence est aussi un moment de réflexion pour certains. J'ai pu constater par moi-même à quel point cela pouvait être traumatisant.
On dit que tous les enfants sont importants, mais il ne faut pas oublier ceux qui sont maintenant devenus des adultes. Plusieurs se sentent encore prisonniers de ce programme.
Un chef autochtone m'a téléphoné hier soir. Je lui avais fait savoir que j'allais intervenir sur le sujet. Il se demandait à peu près les mêmes choses que mon collègue de Sturgeon River. Cela permettra-t-il de lever les avis de faire bouillir l'eau, de combattre le racisme systémique et d'enrayer l'épidémie de suicides? Non, certainement pas. C'est toutefois un pas dans la bonne direction pour sensibiliser davantage la population. La sensibilisation est primordiale et elle doit faire partie du projet de loi.
On ne peut pas créer un jour férié simplement pour donner une longue fin de semaine de plus aux gens pour sortir l'autocaravane et aller faire un petit voyage. En fin de compte, cela irait à l'encontre du but visé. Il est important que le projet de loi fasse en sorte que nous n'oubliions jamais.
Qu'on choisisse le 30 septembre, comme il est proposé, ou une autre date, nous devons toujours nous souvenir des enfants, au nombre plus de 150 000, qui ont été placés dans des pensionnats autochtones, des membres des Premières Nations, des Inuits et des Métis qui ont vécu cette expérience. Nous devons rendre hommage aux survivants et ne jamais oublier les enfants qui ne sont jamais rentrés chez eux.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-10-23 10:53 [p.1157]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the comments of the minister, I mean the member opposite no doubt come from the heart, and I genuinely appreciate that.
Throughout this debate, it is important for us to recognize that a commission recommended 94 calls to action. The vast majority, 70-plus, indicated that the federal government needed to be more directly involved, and this is one of those.
The general feeling is that the legislation is a positive step forward. It is more than symbolism. The best way to deal with truth and reconciliation is through education. In many ways it is the key in dealing with truth and reconciliation. I think we underestimate the potential of that cross-cultural awareness and education. These things can make be profoundly positive and make a difference.
By recognizing a day to allow civil society to take advantage of that through educational programs, we will all be better as a society. Could the member comment on that?
Monsieur le Président, les paroles du ministre, du député d'en face je veux dire, viennent droit du coeur, je n'en doute pas, et je l'en remercie sincèrement.
Durant le présent débat, il ne faut pas oublier qu'une commission a formulé 94 appels à l'action. La majorité d'entre eux, plus de 70, demandaient une intervention plus directe du gouvernement fédéral. Il est question d'un de ceux-là aujourd'hui.
De façon générale, on trouve que cette mesure législative constitue un pas dans la bonne direction. Ce n'est pas une simple mesure symbolique. La sensibilisation est le meilleur outil dont nous disposons pour en arriver à la vérité et à la réconciliation. À bien des égards, elle est au coeur de la démarche. Je pense que nous sommes portés à sous-estimer le pouvoir de la sensibilisation transculturelle. Elle peut avoir un effet profondément positif et faire changer les choses.
Désigner un jour où la société civile pourra tirer parti de programmes de sensibilisation ne peut qu'améliorer notre société. Le député peut-il nous dire ce qu'il en pense?
Collapse
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2020-10-23 10:55 [p.1157]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for the promotion he gave me by calling me “minister”; hopefully someday.
I agree that education is critically important. I spent a lifetime overseas working with other countries. I always used to say that we spent millions upon millions of dollars, billions likely, to figure out other cultures and how to do work and do business with them, but we have failed to do that at home. We have not sat down and learned our lessons. As I said in my comments, that educational component is vital and it is lacking in the current act. We need to ensure that education is critically important.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de la promotion qu'il m'a accordée en m'appelant « ministre »; j'aurai peut-être cette chance un jour.
Je conviens que la sensibilisation est extrêmement importante. J'ai passé énormément de temps à travailler à l'étranger avec des représentants d'autres pays. J'ai toujours dit que nous dépensons des millions de dollars, voire des milliards, pour tenter de comprendre d'autres cultures et comment faire affaire avec ces gens, mais nous n'avons pas fait la même chose dans notre pays. Nous n'avons pas tiré de leçons. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes observations, la sensibilisation est un aspect essentiel qui n'est pas pris en compte dans la loi actuelle. Nous devons faire en sorte qu'elle joue ce rôle crucial.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2020-10-23 10:56 [p.1157]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech.
I would like him to comment further on something he touched on earlier, which is the fact that this statutory holiday must not be just another day off. It is meant to be an opportunity to fulfill our duty to commemorate and educate.
I would like to know what he expects from parliamentarians in particular.
For example, what would he like us all to do in our ridings to honour this day?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de son discours.
J'aimerais l'entendre davantage sur quelque chose qu'il avait déjà abordé, soit le fait que cette journée fériée ne doit pas être juste une journée de congé, mais une journée où l'on en profite pour faire notre devoir de mémoire et d'éducation.
J'aimerais savoir à quoi il s'attend spécifiquement de la part des parlementaires.
Par exemple, qu'aimerait-il que nous puissions tous faire dans nos circonscriptions pour honorer cette journée?
Collapse
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2020-10-23 10:56 [p.1157]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I fear that it becomes just another excuse for people, for families, to load up their trailers, go camping and be together.
We, as the 338 members of Parliament who were elected to be here, have to act as examples. We try to do our very best in my riding to participate in events. Sometimes we are here and we acknowledge that day in the House of Commons.
There are many things we could do. I urge my colleagues to reach out to their local first nations communities, to truly find the elders within those communities and see if they are willing to openly talk about the impacts they may have experienced with residential schools programs.
Monsieur le Président, je crains que cela ne devienne qu'une autre excuse pour que les gens et les familles aillent faire du camping ensemble.
Les 338 personnes élues comme députés doivent montrer l'exemple. Dans ma circonscription, nous faisons de notre mieux pour participer à ces événements. Parfois, nous soulignons cette journée à la Chambre des communes.
Nous pourrions faire bien des choses. J'exhorte mes collègues à joindre les nations autochtones de leur collectivité, à véritablement tenter d'amener les aînés à parler ouvertement de ce qu'ils ont subi à cause des programmes des pensionnats autochtones.
Collapse
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2020-10-23 10:57 [p.1157]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, my colleague's comments were heartfelt and they did move me today.
I am a teacher by training, so listening to the member talk about the value of education is very important to me. I am also a mother, so thinking about what happened to children and their parents with residential schools is very important to me. I shudder at what they have gone through.
This week in Alberta, there were some leaked curriculum documents in which the education on residential schools was pulled from the curriculum. At a time when we all need to be doing more to ensure Canadians know about what happened with residential schools, it is being taken out of our curriculum in Alberta.
Remembering history is important, acknowledging harm done is important and recognizing what was done to indigenous peoples is important.
I wonder if the member could let us know if he will support the expedited passage of the bill to the Senate.
Monsieur le Président, les propos sincères du député m'ont beaucoup émue aujourd'hui.
Je suis enseignante de formation, donc il est très important pour moi d'entendre le député parler de la valeur de l'éducation. Je suis aussi mère de famille, alors il est également très important pour moi de réfléchir au sort des enfants placés dans les pensionnats autochtones et de leurs parents. J'ai des frissons rien qu'à imaginer ce qu'ils ont vécu.
En Alberta, des documents ayant fait l'objet d'une fuite cette semaine révèlent que la question des pensionnats autochtones serait retirée du programme d'études de la province. À une époque où nous devons tous faire de notre mieux pour que les Canadiens connaissent l'histoire des pensionnats autochtones, on veut retirer cette question du programme d'études en Alberta.
Il est important de nous rappeler de l'histoire, d'être conscient des torts causés aux Premières Nations et de souligner ce qu'ils ont subi.
Le député pourrait-il nous dire s'il appuiera l'étude accélérée du projet de loi à la Chambre pour l'adopter et l'envoyer rapidement Sénat?
Collapse
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2020-10-23 10:59 [p.1158]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, there was a lot in that question. This is the second time we have discussed this bill. I have expressed some of my concerns on it. Obviously, I think my colleagues can see where I and my party stand on this.
We want to ensure that due diligence is done, and not just with this bill. We want to ensure that what has taken place in Alberta does not take place elsewhere. We want to ensure we work with our provincial colleagues and with those in the House and in the other place to ensure the bill receives royal assent and becomes possible, so we have a national day of recognition. However, we have to ensure that the significance of this day is never lost, that we remember that every child matters and that we strive to do better.
I will be working hard with our shadow minister on this issue and with those across the way.
Monsieur le Président, il y a beaucoup d'éléments dans cette question. C'est la deuxième fois que nous discutons du projet de loi. J'ai exprimé certaines de mes préoccupations à son sujet. Je pense que ma position et celle de mon parti à l'égard du projet de loi ne sont pas un secret pour mes collègues.
Nous voulons que la diligence raisonnable ne se limite pas seulement au projet de loi qui nous occupe. Nous voulons que ce qui s'est passé en Alberta ne se produise pas ailleurs. Nous voulons travailler avec les députés provinciaux et fédéraux ainsi qu'avec les sénateurs pour que le projet de loi reçoive la sanction royale afin que nous ayons une journée nationale de reconnaissance. Cependant, il ne faut jamais oublier la signification de cette journée; nous devons nous rappeler que chaque enfant compte et nous efforcer de faire mieux.
Je vais travailler fort dans ce dossier avec notre ministre du cabinet fantôme et les députés d'en face.
Collapse
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2020-10-23 11:00 [p.1158]
Expand
We will need to leave that for the moment. The hon. member for Cariboo—Prince George will have three minutes remaining for questions and comments when the House gets back to debate on this matter.
Nous devrons en rester là pour le moment. Le député de Cariboo—Prince George disposera de trois minutes pour les questions et observations lorsque la Chambre reprendra le débat sur cette question.
Collapse
View Irek Kusmierczyk Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Irek Kusmierczyk Profile
2020-10-23 11:01 [p.1158]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, tomorrow is World Polio Day and I would like to thank all rotary clubs in Canada, including local rotary clubs at our binational Rotary District 6400, for their efforts to help end polio around the world. I congratulate Jennifer Jones, a fellow Windsorite, on her historic appointment as the first woman president in Rotary International's 115-year history.
The global polio eradication initiative has helped vaccinate 2.5 billion children since 1988, but we know that the job is not yet done. In May, our government announced $190 million in funding over four years for GPEI and I am proud of Canada's strong leadership on the global health stage.
Around the world, efforts to eradicate polio have already prevented 18 million cases of paralysis. This is one of the great global health success stories of the last 30 years and our government will remain a partner every step of the way as we move closer to eradication.
Monsieur le Président, demain sera la Journée mondiale contre la polio. Je tiens à remercier tous les clubs Rotary du Canada, y compris ceux qui font partie du district binational 6400, pour les efforts qu'ils ont déployés dans le but d'éradiquer la poliomyélite partout dans le monde. Je félicite en outre Jennifer Jones, une compatriote windsoroise, de sa nomination à la présidence du Rotary international. En 115 ans d'histoire, c'est la première fois qu'une femme prendra la tête de cette organisation.
L'Initiative mondiale pour l'éradication de la poliomyélite a facilité la vaccination de 2,5 milliards d'enfants depuis 1988, mais nous savons que le travail n'est pas encore terminé. En mai, le gouvernement a d'ailleurs annoncé qu'il investira dans l'Initiative 190 millions de dollars sur quatre ans. Je suis fier du grand leadership dont le Canada fait preuve à l'échelle internationale dans le dossier de la santé.
Partout sur la planète, les efforts déployés pour éradiquer la poliomyélite ont déjà permis de prévenir 18 millions de cas de paralysie. Il s'agit de l'une des plus grandes réussites en matière de santé mondiale des 30 dernières années. Le gouvernement du Canada demeurera un partenaire à chaque étape de cette lutte pour l'éradication de cette maladie.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2020-10-23 11:02 [p.1158]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate Mark Arcand for being re-elected tribal chief of the Saskatoon Tribal Council on October 15.
The Saskatoon Tribal Council represents 11,000 people in seven distinct first nations, including the Muskeg Lake Cree Nation, where Chief Arcand hails from. Chief Arcand is committed to helping youth excel and build their dreams through developing the gifts of each child. As the leader of the Saskatoon Tribal Council, he is a tireless advocate for improved facilities and programming, especially for vulnerable people in Saskatoon.
The Saskatoon Tribal Council operates family health and wellness programs, a legal advocate centre, a job training centre, and affordable housing, as well as the White Buffalo Youth Lodge, a facility that takes youth off the street and offers them alternatives to homelessness and addiction. The Saskatoon Tribal Council seeks to develop economic capacity within indigenous communities. It helps create business and industry partnerships in promoting sustainable wealth creations for first nation communities.
Once again, I congratulate the Saskatoon Tribal Council and Chief Mark Arcand.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à féliciter Mark Arcand pour sa réélection en tant que chef du Conseil tribal de Saskatoon le 15 octobre dernier.
Le Conseil tribal de Saskatoon représente 11 000 personnes issues de sept Premières Nations différentes, dont la nation crie du lac Muskeg, d'où vient le chef Arcand. Le chef Arcand est déterminé à aider les jeunes à exceller et à réaliser leurs rêves en développant les dons de chaque enfant. À titre de chef du Conseil tribal de Saskatoon, il se bat inlassablement pour l'amélioration des installations et des programmes, surtout pour les personnes vulnérables de Saskatoon.
Le Conseil tribal de Saskatoon administre des programmes de santé familiale et de bien-être, un centre d'aide juridique, un centre de formation professionnelle, des logements abordables ainsi que le White Buffalo Youth Lodge, un établissement qui permet aux jeunes de sortir de la rue et qui leur offre des solutions de rechange à l'itinérance et à la toxicomanie. Le Conseil tribal de Saskatoon vise à renforcer la capacité économique des communautés autochtones. Il contribue à la création de partenariats avec les entreprises et les industries en faisant la promotion de la création d'une richesse durable pour les communautés des Premières Nations.
Je félicite une fois de plus le Conseil tribal de Saskatoon et le chef Mark Arcand.
Collapse
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Julie Dabrusin Profile
2020-10-23 11:03 [p.1158]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, small businesses are the heartbeat of my community. They are lively social hubs, which bring my community together. They are the economic drivers and employers for my community, and they have been hard hit by this pandemic. I have spoken with so many local business owners and BIAs. I want to thank them for reaching out and sharing with me their insights, which have helped to shape our government's policies. I am committed to continuing to work with them.
I want to thank my community for stepping up and showing support for local businesses in this difficult time because together we will get through this. We will be stronger, and we will have lively, strong main streets in our community.
Monsieur le Président, les petites entreprises sont le moteur de la collectivité que je représente. Elles constituent des carrefours communautaires dynamiques et contribuent à souder la collectivité. Bien que ces petites entreprises représentent des vecteurs économiques et des employeurs importants, elles ont été durement touchées par la pandémie actuelle. Je me suis entretenu avec bon nombre de propriétaires et de représentants d'associations vouées à l'amélioration des entreprises. Je tiens à les remercier d'avoir pris contact avec moi et de m'avoir fait part de leurs points de vue, lesquels ont contribué à façonner les politiques de notre gouvernement. Je suis déterminé à continuer de collaborer avec tous ces intervenants.
Je tiens à remercier ma collectivité de s'être mobilisée et d'avoir apporté son soutien aux entreprises locales en cette période, car c'est ensemble que nous allons nous en sortir. Nous en ressortirons plus résilients, et nous pourrons éventuellement retourner nous promener sur les rues principales à la fois animées et dynamiques de notre communauté.
Collapse
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
View Richard Cannings Profile
2020-10-23 11:04 [p.1159]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, in my riding, the wine industry is an important part of the economy, and it has been directly affected by COVID. Most of the smaller wineries here rely on sales to restaurants, direct-to-consumer online sales and sales to visitors. When restaurants closed and tourists stopped coming, these wineries were significantly impacted. While online sales increased, the B.C. wine industry still faces interprovincial trade barriers that ban that practice. That must change.
In the middle of the pandemic, the federal government removed one of the most critical supports for the industry by cancelling the excise tax exemption for Canadian wines. It must quickly replace that with trade legal support, such as that proposed by Wine Growers Canada.
I want to close by mentioning the untimely passing of David Wilson, the former chair of the Canadian Vintners Association. Mr. Wilson always brought intelligent conversation and fine Okanagan wines to our meetings in Ottawa. He left us too soon, and he will be missed.
Monsieur le Président, l'industrie vinicole joue un rôle important dans l'économie de ma circonscription et elle a été directement touchée par la COVID. La plupart des petites entreprises vinicoles dépendent des ventes aux restaurants, des ventes en ligne directes aux consommateurs et des ventes aux visiteurs. Elles ont subi un important contrecoup lorsque les restaurants ont fermé et que les touristes ont cessé de les visiter. Bien que les ventes en ligne aient augmenté, l'industrie vinicole de la Colombie-Britannique est toujours confrontée à des barrières commerciales interprovinciales qui interdisent cette pratique. Cela doit changer.
En plein milieu de la pandémie, le gouvernement fédéral a annulé l'exemption de la taxe d'accise sur les vins canadiens et a ainsi éliminé une aide essentielle à l'industrie. Il doit rapidement combler le vide laissé au moyen d'un soutien juridique au commerce, comme celui proposé par Vignerons Canada.
Je termine en soulignant le décès prématuré de David Wilson, l'ancien président de l'Association des vignerons du Canada. Je pouvais toujours compter sur M. Wilson pour tenir une conversation intelligente et apporter de bons vins de l'Okanagan à nos réunions à Ottawa. Il nous a quittés trop tôt et nous manquera.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
2020-10-23 11:05 [p.1159]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I rise to honour the remarkable life of Fania “Fanny” Goose, a constituent and long-time business leader in London who passed away in her 99th year this April.
Fanny, or the first lady of downtown, as she was also known, was a remarkable woman who experienced the best and worst our world can offer. A Holocaust survivor who came to Canada in 1949, Fanny and her husband realized the Canadian dream by founding a retail business that became a pillar of London's downtown for over 50 years.
Fanny was sought out for her direct and savvy advice. Always politically engaged, she had her finger on the pulse of the community. Fanny was kind, confident and thoughtful, and always had a positive outlook. Predeceased by her husband Jerry, she was mother to Steve Goose Garrison and Martin Goose, and loving bubbie to three grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
May Fanny rest in eternal peace. Her legacy will live on for generations to come.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole pour souligner la vie remarquable de Fania « Fanny » Goose, une habitante et chef d'entreprise de longue date de London, qui est décédée en avril à l'âge de 99 ans.
Fanny — ou la première dame du centre-ville, comme on l'appelait — était une femme exceptionnelle qui a vécu le meilleur et le pire de ce que le monde peut offrir. Arrivés au Canada en 1949 après avoir survécu à l'Holocauste, Fanny et son époux ont réalisé le rêve canadien en fondant un commerce de détail qui a été l'un des piliers du centre-ville de London pendant plus de 50 ans.
On consultait Fanny pour son opinion directe et avertie. Toujours engagée politiquement, elle était au courant de ce qui se passait dans la collectivité. Fanny était bienveillante, assurée, attentionnée et toujours optimiste. Précédée dans la mort par son époux Jerry, elle laisse dans le deuil ses fils Steve Goose Garrison et Martin Goose, ainsi que trois petits-enfants et six arrière-petits-enfants bien-aimés.
Que Fanny repose en paix éternellement. Son héritage se perpétuera pendant de nombreuses générations.
Collapse
View Richard Bragdon Profile
CPC (NB)
View Richard Bragdon Profile
2020-10-23 11:06 [p.1159]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, today I would like to pay tribute and give congratulations to one of the most important individuals in my life, my father. My dad, Gary Bragdon, after more than 50 years of dedicated hard work, will be retiring from the Nackawic pulp mill this weekend. He worked tirelessly to provide for his wife and his four children.
His metal lunch bucket became an important symbol for me during my campaign to be a member of this House. It serves as a constant reminder of those I represent. They are the ones who carry the buckets, work in our mills and our factories, wait on our tables, truck our food, harvest our natural resources, run small businesses, fish our waters, grow our food, and literally keep our land. They are the people who in large part make Canada what it is, and the people who will drive Canada's economy into recovery and back into prosperity.
I keep my father's bucket in my office in Ottawa as a constant reminder of who sent me here as their representative.
I congratulate my dad on his retirement, and I assure him that on this side of the House we will remember those who carry the buckets.
Monsieur le Président, aujourd'hui, je tiens à rendre hommage et à offrir mes félicitations à l'une des personnes les plus importantes dans ma vie, mon père. En fin de semaine, Gary Bragdon, mon père, prendra sa retraite. Après plus de 50 ans de loyaux services, il quittera l'usine de pâte Nackawic, où il a travaillé sans relâche pour subvenir aux besoins de sa femme et de ses quatre enfants.
Sa boîte à lunch en métal est devenue un symbole important pour moi au cours de ma campagne pour me faire élire à la Chambre. Elle me rappelle constamment les personnes que je représente. Ce sont elles qui portent une boîte à lunch, qui travaillent dans les usines, qui servent aux tables, qui transportent la nourriture par camion, qui exploitent les ressources naturelles, qui dirigent une petite entreprise, qui pêchent dans nos eaux, qui cultivent les aliments et qui veillent littéralement sur nos terres. Ce sont ces personnes qui, en grande partie, font du Canada ce qu'il est et qui relanceront l'économie du pays pour qu'il retrouve la prospérité.
Je garde la boîte à lunch de mon père dans mon bureau à Ottawa pour me rappeler en permanence qui sont les gens qui m'ont élu pour les représenter.
Je félicite mon père pour sa retraite et je lui assure que, de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous nous souviendrons de ceux qui portent une boîte à lunch.
Collapse
View Wayne Long Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Wayne Long Profile
2020-10-23 11:08 [p.1159]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the development of small modular reactor technology is key to building Atlantic Canada's economy back better. SMRs are safe, reliable, transportable and emissions-free, and the science is clear that we simply cannot achieve net-zero by 2050 without them.
Atlantic Canada's strategic geographic position, skills base and transportation infrastructure position it to become a world leader in SMR development and manufacturing. Our region's SMR sector, which is based in my riding of Saint John—Rothesay, has the potential to create thousands of highly skilled, well-paying and sustainable green jobs across our region.
That is why I am proud to be part of a federal government that is committed to making the investments necessary to fully leverage the economic potential of our SMR sector. It is also why I am working closely with my federal colleagues across Atlantic Canada, as well as my provincial counterparts in New Brunswick, to deliver the federal and provincial investments necessary to seize this historic opportunity for our region.
Monsieur le Président, le développement de la technologie du petit réacteur modulaire est la clé pour non seulement rebâtir l'économie du Canada atlantique, mais la rendre meilleure. Les petits réacteurs modulaires sont sécuritaires, fiables et transportables et ils ne produisent pas d'émissions; de plus, la science dit clairement que nous n'arriverons pas à atteindre la cible de zéro émission nette d'ici à 2050 sans eux.
Avec sa position géographique stratégique, son bassin de compétences et ses infrastructures de transport, le Canada atlantique a tout pour devenir un chef de file mondial dans le développement et la fabrication des petits réacteurs modulaires. Notre secteur régional du petit réacteur nucléaire, qui est situé dans Saint John—Rothesay, a le potentiel de créer des milliers d'emplois hautement spécialisés, bien rémunérés et axés sur la durabilité environnementale répartis dans toute la région.
C'est pourquoi je suis fier de faire partie d'un gouvernement fédéral qui s'est engagé à consacrer tous les investissements nécessaires pour optimiser le potentiel de notre secteur du petit réacteur modulaire. C'est aussi pourquoi je collabore étroitement avec mes collègues fédéraux du Canada atlantique, ainsi que mes homologues provinciaux au Nouveau-Brunswick, afin de concrétiser les investissements aux échelons fédéral et provinciaux qui permettront de saisir cette occasion sans précédent pour notre région.
Collapse
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
2020-10-23 11:08 [p.1159]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to talk about Small Business Week, which ends tomorrow. This week is an opportunity to show our support for small businesses across Canada, especially those in my riding of Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation.
Things have been particularly tough for small businesses lately, but owners have responded with resilience, determination and innovation. Our government is here to support them. We introduced various measures, such as the Canada emergency rent subsidy, we extended the Canada emergency wage subsidy, and we expanded the Canada emergency business account.
I want to acknowledge the business owners in my riding, including Félix Marcoux, the owner of La boulangerie du P'tit chef; Alain Boyer, the owner of Fromagerie Montebello; Charles-Alain Carrière, the owner of Orientech; and Carole and Martin Lajeunesse, the owners of Lala Bistrot.
I encourage everyone to support the local businesses that help our communities thrive.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais souligner la Semaine de la petite entreprise, qui se terminera demain. C'est l'occasion de démontrer notre soutien aux petites entreprises du pays et, surtout, de ma circonscription, Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation.
Ces derniers temps ont été particulièrement difficiles pour les petites entreprises, mais les propriétaires ont su faire preuve de résilience, de détermination et d'innovation. Notre gouvernement est là pour les soutenir, au moyen des différentes mesures que nous avons mises en place, comme la Subvention d'urgence du Canada pour le loyer, la prolongation de la Subvention salariale d'urgence du Canada et l'élargissement du Compte d'urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes.
J'ai une pensée spéciale pour les propriétaires de ma circonscription, comme Félix Marcoux, de La boulangerie du P'tit chef; Alain Boyer, de la Fromagerie Montebello; Charles-Alain Carrière, d'Orientech; et Carole et Martin Lajeunesse, du Lala Bistrot, pour ne nommer que ceux-là.
J'encourage tout le monde à appuyer les entreprises locales qui font rayonner nos communautés.
Collapse
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2020-10-23 11:11 [p.1160]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honour a trailblazer, a role model and an inspiring leader who has achieved heights never reached before. I extend my heartfelt congratulations to Lieutenant-Colonel Riel Erickson from my riding of Foothills for being named the commander of the Canadian Forces Flying Training School in Moose Jaw.
A farm girl raised in Millarville, Erickson is the first woman to take command of 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School, the centre of pilot training in the country. Erickson was inspired to join the military by her uncle, who was a fighter pilot in the Gulf War.
A graduate of Oilfields High School, Riel earned her wings in 2005 and became just the fifth woman in the history of the Royal Canadian Air Force to become a CF-18 pilot. In her impressive career, she has faced many obstacles, including Russian bombers, but in doing so, she earned the nickname “Guns”.
From her humble roots in southern Alberta, she has turned into a strong leader and a fierce pilot. She has proven the sky is the limit. Her parents, her husband, her sons and her community are extremely proud. She has said, “I can't wait until we run out of firsts”. Through her leadership, she is proving that to be true.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour rendre hommage à une pionnière, un modèle et une leader inspirante qui a conquis des sommets jamais atteints auparavant. Je tiens à offrir mes plus sincères félicitations à la lieutenante-colonelle Riel Erickson, de ma circonscription, Foothills, pour sa nomination à titre de commandante de l'école de pilotage des Forces canadiennes de Moose Jaw.
Élevée sur une ferme de Millarville, Mme Erickson est la première femme à prendre le commandement de la 2e École de pilotage des Forces canadiennes, qui est au cœur de la formation au pilotage du pays. C'est son oncle, un pilote de chasse durant la guerre du Golfe, qui l'a inspirée à s'enrôler dans l'armée.
Diplômée de l'école secondaire Oilfields, Riel a gagné son insigne de pilote en 2005 et elle est seulement la cinquième femme à devenir pilote de CF-18 dans toute l'histoire de l'Aviation royale canadienne. Au cours de son impressionnante carrière, elle a dû surmonter de nombreux obstacles, y compris des bombardiers russes, mais ce faisant, elle s'est valu le surnom de « Guns ».
Issue d'un milieu modeste du Sud de l'Alberta, elle s'est transformée en véritable leader et en pilote redoutable. Elle a démontré que tout est possible. Ses parents, son époux, ses fils et sa communauté sont extrêmement fiers d'elle. Elle a déclaré avoir hâte d'être à court de premières. Par son leadership, elle prouve toute la véracité de ses propos.
Collapse
View Larry Bagnell Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Larry Bagnell Profile
2020-10-23 11:11 [p.1160]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, tomorrow is World Polio Day, a day to celebrate the world's progress against polio and our resolve to end this horrible disease once and for all. Recently, Africa was certified as free of the wild polio virus, which is a big milestone, but COVID-19 has caused 50 million children to miss their polio vaccinations, so sustained action is critical to protect global health. If we stop now, 200,000 children a year could be paralyzed.
In May, Canada committed $190 million to the global polio eradication initiative, building on past contributions. It is something all Canadians can be proud of.
Please join me in marking World Polio Day by thanking all who contribute to polio eradication, including rotary clubs across Canada and the Whitehorse Rotary Club, which sponsored polio survivor Ramesh Ferris' epic fundraising hand-cycling tour of 7,140 kilometres across Canada.
It is because of all these actions that 18 million people, who could otherwise have been paralyzed, are now walking. Let us keep it up.
Monsieur le Président, nous célébrerons demain la Journée mondiale contre la polio, un événement destiné à célébrer les progrès réalisés dans le monde contre la polio, et à prendre conscience de notre détermination à mettre fin à cette horrible maladie une fois pour toutes. Récemment, l'Afrique a été reconnue comme exempt du virus sauvage de la polio, ce qui constitue une étape importante, mais la COVID-19 a fait en sorte que 50 millions d'enfants n'ont pas été vaccinés contre la polio. Par conséquent, il est impératif de mettre en place des mesures soutenues afin de protéger la santé des populations à l'échelle mondiale. Si nous baissons les bras maintenant, 200 000 enfants par an pourraient se retrouver paralysés.
En mai, le Canada s'est engagé à verser 190 millions de dollars à l'Initiative mondiale pour l'éradication de la poliomyélite, capitalisant ainsi sur les contributions passées. Tous les Canadiens peuvent être fiers de cette initiative.
J'invite les députés à se joindre à moi pour célébrer la Journée mondiale contre la polio et remercier toutes les personnes qui contribuent à l'éradication de cette maladie, notamment les clubs Rotary de partout au Canada et le Rotary Club de Whitehorse, qui a parrainé la tournée épique de collecte de fonds à vélo manuel de Ramesh Ferris, survivant de la polio, sur 7 140 kilomètres à travers le Canada.
C'est grâce à l'ensemble de ces gestes que 18 millions de personnes, qui autrement auraient pu être paralysées à vie, sont aujourd'hui de nouveau capables de marcher. Continuons le bon travail.
Collapse
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
2020-10-23 11:12 [p.1160]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as Remembrance Day and the commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain approach, it is important that we recognize, remember and honour the contributions of all who have served and continue to serve this nation as members of our Canadian Armed Forces.
Monsieur le Président, à l'approche du jour du Souvenir et de la commémoration du 80e anniversaire de la bataille d'Angleterre, il est important de reconnaître, de se souvenir et de souligner les contributions des membres des Forces armées canadiennes qui ont servi et qui continuent de servir le pays.
Collapse
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
2020-10-23 11:12
Expand
This November 11, we will remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. We will not, nor shall we ever, forget the contributions of those heroes who never made it home.
As such, I would like to bring attention to the important recovery work of a World War II bomber, a British Short Stirling, which is now happening in the Netherlands. That bomber was lost in 1943 returning from a raid over Germany. On board was a crew of seven, including two Canadians: Sergeant John Francis James McCaw, 20, the youngest crew member, from Belleville, Ontario; and Flying Officer Harry Gregory Farrington, 24, from Niagara Falls, Ontario.
We must and we will continue to remember them. They sacrificed their tomorrows so that we could enjoy the peace and freedoms of today.
Ce 11 novembre, nous nous souviendrons de ceux qui ont fait le sacrifice ultime. Nous n'oublierons jamais les contributions de ces héros qui ne sont pas revenus.
Dans cette optique, j'attire l'attention sur l'important travail de récupération d'un bombardier de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, un Short Stirling britannique, qui a lieu actuellement aux Pays-Bas. Le bombardier est disparu en 1943 alors qu'il revenait d'un raid au-dessus de l'Allemagne. Il avait à son bord un équipage de sept personnes, dont deux Canadiens: le sergent John Francis James McCaw, âgé de 20 ans et le plus jeune membre de l'équipage, de Belleville, en Ontario, et le lieutenant d'aviation Harry Gregory Farrington, âgé de 24 ans, de Niagara Falls, en Ontario.
Nous devons nous souvenir d'eux et nous ne les oublierons jamais. Ils ont sacrifié leur vie pour que nous puissions aujourd'hui jouir de la paix et de la liberté.
Collapse
View Brad Vis Profile
CPC (BC)
View Brad Vis Profile
2020-10-23 11:13 [p.1160]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is Small Business Month, and I want to give a shout-out to a business in my riding: Bear Country Bakery in Mission, British Columbia.
I am highlighting Bear Country Bakery because the owners, the Potma family, heard that our Royal Canadian Legions were hurting this year and wanted to do something about it. The Potma family stepped up and held a doughnut fundraiser on October 17, which saw over $1,100 in doughnut sales plus individual donations going to Legion Branch #57.
They continue to raise funds, and their next outdoor fundraiser for veterans is on Saturday, November 7. I encourage everyone in Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon to buy a box of doughnuts and support Bear Country Bakery and our Royal Canadian Legion. It is community-minded businesses like these whose contributions make a real difference and keep our towns and cities strong.
I thank the people at Bear Country Bakery. I thank our veterans and committed members of our legions across Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon.
Monsieur le Président, en ce Mois de la petite entreprise, je tiens à féliciter une entreprise de ma circonscription, Bear Country Bakery, à Mission, en Colombie-Britannique.
Je veux rendre hommage à Bear Country Bakery parce que les propriétaires, la famille Potma, ont entendu dire que la Légion royale canadienne avait besoin d'aide cette année et ils ont décidé de passer à l'action. La famille a pris l'initiative d'organiser, le 17 octobre, une vente de beignes au profit de la filiale 57 de la Légion. Elle a recueilli 1 100 $ avec la vente des beignes, en plus de nombreux dons personnels.
La famille continue de recueillir des fonds. Sa prochaine collecte en plein air au profit des anciens combattants se tiendra le samedi 7 novembre. J'invite tous les habitants de Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon à acheter une boite de beignes pour soutenir Bear Country Bakery et la Légion royale canadienne. La contribution des entreprises communautaires altruistes comme celle-ci est vraiment utile pour renforcer nos collectivités.
Je remercie les propriétaires de Bear Country Bakery. Je remercie également nos anciens combattants et les membres des filiales de la Légion de l'ensemble de Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon.
Collapse
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2020-10-23 11:14 [p.1161]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as a proud Albertan and an alumnus of the University of Alberta, it is my great honour to rise in recognition of University of Alberta virologist Dr. Michael Houghton. Earlier this month, Dr. Houghton was awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of the hepatitis C virus.
Hepatitis C is a global pandemic, but now, thanks to Dr. Houghton and his subsequent work developing blood tests and therapeutics for the disease, millions of people have a new lease on life and our blood supply is safer. It is an incredible achievement and a wonderful story, and it does not end there. Dr. Houghton has created a vaccine against hepatitis C, which is now being tested, and he is leading efforts to create a COVID-19 vaccine.
I congratulate Dr. Houghton. He has made us all proud. We are very thankful for his work.
Monsieur le Président, en tant que fière Albertaine et ancienne étudiante de l'Université de l'Alberta, j'ai le grand honneur de prendre la parole pour rendre hommage au virologiste de l'Université de l'Alberta, Michael Houghton. Au début de ce mois, M. Houghton a reçu le prix Nobel 2020 dans la catégorie physiologie ou médecine pour sa découverte du virus de l'hépatite C.
Nous avons une pandémie mondiale d'hépatite C, mais aujourd'hui, grâce à Michael Houghton et à ses travaux ultérieurs sur la mise au point de tests sanguins et de traitements pour la maladie, des millions de personnes peuvent prendre un nouveau départ et notre approvisionnement en sang est plus sûr. C'est une réalisation incroyable et une histoire merveilleuse, et cela ne s'arrête pas là. M. Houghton a créé un vaccin contre l'hépatite C, qui en est au stade des essais, et il dirige les efforts en vue de trouver un vaccin contre la COVID-19.
Félicitations à M. Houghton. Il nous a tous rendus fiers et nous lui sommes très reconnaissants pour son travail.
Collapse
View Caroline Desbiens Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the myriad professions in the cultural industry have been honoured during the 24th edition of Journées de la culture au Québec, which runs from September 25 to October 25. This month-long celebration is devoted to showcasing the big, beautiful arts community, which provides our people with inspiration, identity, prestige and meaning and earns us global recognition and renown.
All too long ago, a large part of the cultural world was abruptly shut down. The entire creative industry has demonstrated remarkable resilience. I commend all those sustaining Quebec's magnificent culture and keeping it alive. I thank the artists and creators from all fields who continue to create stories, dreams and beauty for us. I know they are very worried. I want them to know that, now more than ever, they are an essential source of social and economic strength for Quebec.
On behalf of myself and all my Bloc Québécois colleagues, I send this message to this great group of wonderful human beings who are making life beautiful: Our happiness depends on you, the cultural industry.
Monsieur le Président, ce sont les 1001 métiers de la culture qui ont été mis à l'honneur lors de la 24e édition des Journées de la culture au Québec, du 25 septembre au 25 octobre. Ce mois a été consacré à mettre en lumière tout ce beau monde artistique, qui anime un peuple, qui l'identifie, le distingue, le définit et le fait rayonner et reconnaître partout dans le monde.
Depuis trop de mois, une large part du monde culturel s'est éteinte brusquement. À cet égard, toute l'industrie créative nous démontre une résilience remarquable. Je salue tous ceux et celles qui portent à bout de bras et maintiennent en vie notre belle culture québécoise. Je remercie les artistes et les créateurs de toutes sphères qui continuent de nous inventer des histoires, des rêves et de la beauté. Je les sais très préoccupés. Je veux qu'ils sachent que, pour le Québec, ils sont plus que jamais une force sociale et économique essentielle.
En mon nom et au nom de tous mes collègues du Bloc québécois, je dis à toute cette belle gang de beaux humains qui font que la vie est belle: industrie culturelle, le bonheur a besoin de toi.
Collapse
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
2020-10-23 11:17 [p.1161]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, since the Prime Minister was slow to act back in January, the virus was allowed to infiltrate and spread across Canada for several months unchecked. While the government focused on cases and deaths, it completely ignored other types of casualties.
TD Bank, while declared an essential service, used the pandemic as an excuse to close its branch in Petawawa. Petawawa is home to Canada's largest community of veterans and their widows. Seniors, careful to avoid being defrauded by electronic banking, prefer to deal with human tellers. The tellers are predominately women, so those who worked at the Petawawa branch have lost their postings at that location.
Whether groping a reporter, elbowing a female MP in the chest, firing female cabinet members and now this failure in dealing with the pandemic, costly symbolic gestures aside, this self-proclaimed feminist Prime Minister has failed Canadian women at every turn.
Monsieur le Président, le premier ministre ayant été lent à la détente en janvier, le virus a pu se propager pendant plusieurs mois partout au Canada. Occupé à compter les cas et les morts, le gouvernement a laissé de côté d'autres victimes collatérales.
La Banque TD, bien que déclarée service essentiel, s'est servie de la pandémie comme excuse pour fermer sa succursale à Petawawa. Petawawa abrite la plus grande communauté d'anciens combattants du Canada et de veuves d'anciens combattants. Les personnes âgées, qui craignent d'être escroquées en utilisant les services bancaires en ligne, préfèrent traiter avec des caissiers en chair et en os. Comme il s'agit en majorité de femmes, celles qui travaillaient à la succursale de Petawawa ont donc perdu leur poste là-bas.
Qu'il s'agisse de peloter une journaliste, de donner un coup de coude dans la poitrine à une députée, de virer des femmes du Cabinet ou maintenant, de s'occuper de la pandémie — abstraction faite des gestes symboliques coûteux — ce premier ministre féministe autoproclamé a tourné le dos aux Canadiennes à la moindre occasion.
Collapse
View Tim Louis Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Tim Louis Profile
2020-10-23 11:17 [p.1161]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to highlight that just before Thanksgiving, a new local newspaper joined Kitchener—Conestoga. The Wilmot Post was started and is run by a group of active members in our community who volunteer their time to deliver local news, family milestones, local sports and more, sharing stories with our community and amplifying our voices. I want to extend a warm welcome to The Wilmot Post, and I look forward to seeing the paper grow in the coming months.
I would like to share that Radio Television Digital News Association has offered Kitchener's 570 News with the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award for outstanding newscast in small market radio. I congratulate them. I look forward to supporting local journalism, whether reading, watching, listening at home or standing in the House of Commons and advocating its merits for our community in Kitchener—Conestoga and communities throughout Canada.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à souligner que la circonscription de Kitchener—Conestoga a accueilli un nouveau journal local juste avant l'Action de grâces. Le Wilmot Post a été créé et est géré par un groupe de membres actifs de la collectivité qui donnent de leur temps bénévolement pour diffuser des nouvelles locales, faire des annonces relatives à des événements familiaux marquants, communiquer des renseignements sur le sport dans la région et fournir d'autres informations afin de partager des histoires avec les gens de la collectivité et d'amplifier leur voix. Je souhaite la bienvenue au Wilmot Post et suivrai avec intérêt l'évolution du journal au cours des mois à venir.
J'aimerais aussi souligner que l'Association des nouvelles radio, télévision et numériques a décerné le prestigieux prix Edward R. Murrow à la station de radio 570 News de Kitchener pour ses bulletins d'information exceptionnels diffusés sur un petit marché. Je la félicite. Je me réjouis à la perspective d'appuyer le journalisme local, que ce soit en lisant, regardant ou écoutant les nouvelles chez moi ou en prenant la parole à la Chambre des communes pour faire valoir ses mérites pour la circonscription de Kitchener-Conestoga et l'ensemble des circonscriptions du Canada.
Collapse
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
2020-10-23 11:18 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, a COVID-19 testing centre recently had to close due to staff burnout in Coquitlam. This left residents in the area waiting for days for results to their COVID-19 test.
It is unfortunate that the member for Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam spent the week trying to prevent Canadians from getting answers on COVID-19 rapid tests, as he did in his speech to the House yesterday and as he did in the health committee when he oversaw Liberals trying to gut our motion on the same.
I have a very simple question, because I do not think any Liberal has raised this in the House yet. When will COVID-19 rapid tests be widely available in Coquitlam?
Monsieur le Président, un centre de dépistage de la COVID-19 de Coquitlam a dû fermer ses portes récemment parce que le personnel était épuisé. Des résidants de la région ont donc dû attendre des jours avant d'obtenir les résultats de leur test de dépistage.
Il est malheureux que le député de Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam ait passé la semaine à tenter d'empêcher les Canadiens d'obtenir des réponses au sujet des tests de dépistage rapide de la COVID-19, comme il l'a fait dans le discours qu'il a prononcé hier, à la Chambre, et comme il l'a fait au comité de la santé quand il a veillé à ce que les libéraux vident de sa substance notre motion sur le même sujet.
J'ai une question très simple à poser, car je pense qu'aucun libéral n'en a parlé aujourd'hui. Quand les tests de dépistage rapide de la COVID-19 seront-ils largement accessibles à Coquitlam?
Collapse
View Darren Fisher Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Darren Fisher Profile
2020-10-23 11:19 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we have said from day one that testing is one of the most important tools we have to respond to COVID-19. We are working around the clock to review and approve new testing technologies every day.
We have already approved several of these tests, and we can expect more as the technology develops. Rapid tests have arrived, and rapid tests will be disseminated throughout the provinces and the rest of the country very soon.
Monsieur le Président, nous disons depuis le tout début que les tests de dépistage sont l'un des outils les plus importants à notre disposition pour lutter contre la COVID-19. Nous travaillons sans relâche pour examiner et approuver de nouvelles technologies de dépistage chaque jour.
Nous avons déjà approuvé plusieurs tests, et nous pouvons nous attendre à ce que d'autres soient approuvés à mesure que la technologie évoluera. Nous avons reçu les tests de dépistage rapide, et nous les distribuerons sous peu aux provinces et au reste du pays.
Collapse
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
2020-10-23 11:20 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, “very soon”, that is great. That is that guy.
This week, in Richmond Hill, people were being prevented from travelling to reunite with family members abroad because they do not have access to COVID-19 rapid tests. Rapid tests are now often needed to board flights to international destinations, especially for family reunification, but people cannot get their results because the Liberals have failed to get rapid tests. They are not widely available.
I have a very simple question for the residents in Richmond Hill. When will rapid tests be widely available to them?
Monsieur le Président, « sous peu ». Quelle réponse formidable du secrétaire parlementaire. Cela lui ressemble bien.
Cette semaine, à Richmond Hill, des gens ont été empêchés de se rendre à l'étranger pour être réunis avec des membres de leur famille parce qu'ils n'avaient pas accès à des tests de dépistage rapide de la COVID-19. En effet, il est maintenant souvent nécessaire de passer un test de dépistage rapide avant de pouvoir monter à bord d'un vol international, surtout à des fins de réunification familiale, mais les personnes ne peuvent pas savoir si elles ont contracté le virus parce que les libéraux n'ont pas su garantir l'accès à des tests de dépistage rapide. Ces tests ne sont pas facilement accessibles.
Je veux poser une question très simple au nom des habitants de Richmond Hill. Quand auront-ils facilement accès à ces tests?
Collapse
View Darren Fisher Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Darren Fisher Profile
2020-10-23 11:20 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as we have said, we know the importance of having quick access to test results. We are fast-tracking the review of COVID-19 tests across the country, including rapid response test kits.
We will continue to work with the provinces and territories to ensure that the people who need to be tested are able to be tested and will get these rapid tests.
Monsieur le Président, comme nous l'avons dit, nous savons qu'il est important d'avoir rapidement accès aux résultats des tests. Nous accélérons l'examen des tests de dépistage de la COVID-19 partout au pays, y compris pour les tests de dépistage rapide.
Nous allons continuer de travailler avec les provinces et les territoires pour nous assurer que les personnes qui ont besoin d'un test de dépistage puissent l'obtenir et bénéficier de ce dépistage rapide.
Collapse
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
2020-10-23 11:21 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I believe it is the member for Gatineau who is actually responsible for helping to procure rapid tests, and yet in Gatineau there are some of the longest lines for COVID-19 tests. People are waiting for days for this.
I believe the member for Gatineau also has some role in procurement, which means that he would have known that plum Liberal insider Frank Baylis would have gotten this great contract instead of getting rapid tests for the people of Gatineau.
I have a question for the member's colleague. When will rapid tests be widely available to the people of Gatineau?
Monsieur le Président, je pense que c'est le député de Gatineau en fait qui est chargé de travailler à l'acquisition de tests de dépistage rapide, c'est pourtant à Gatineau qu'on voit des files d'attente parmi les plus longues pour le dépistage de la COVID-19. Les gens attendent pendant des jours.
Je pense que le député de Gatineau joue également un rôle dans l'approvisionnement, ce qui veut dire qu'il était au courant qu'on a attribué un beau contrat juteux à Frank Baylis, ce proche du Parti libéral, alors qu'on aurait pu à la place obtenir des tests de dépistage rapide pour les gens de Gatineau.
J'ai une question pour le collègue du député. Quand les gens de Gatineau vont-ils avoir facilement accès à des tests de dépistage rapide?
Collapse
View Darren Fisher Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Darren Fisher Profile
2020-10-23 11:21 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, early diagnosis is critical to slowing and reducing the spread of COVID-19 in Canada.
We have made emergency changes to allow faster access to COVID-19 tests in Canada. Through the safe restart program, we have provided billions to provinces to help them build their capacity.
We are on this.
Monsieur le Président, il est essentiel de pouvoir diagnostiquer rapidement la maladie si nous voulons ralentir et réduire la propagation de la COVID-19 au Canada.
Nous avons apporté des changements d'urgence pour accélérer l'accès aux tests de dépistage de la COVID-19 au pays. Dans le cadre du programme de relance sécuritaire, nous avons versé des milliards de dollars aux provinces pour les aider à se doter d'une plus grande capacité.
Nous nous en occupons.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-10-23 11:21 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, “we are on this”, okay.
Okay. Let us see if the government is telling the truth. Is it being honest, yes or no?
This government got elected five years ago by saying that it was going to make the judicial appointment process cleaner than clean, but obviously there are still some red Liberal spots that did not come out.
My question is very simple. In three days, the minister has not given a clear and honest answer. Can the Minister of Justice, who is an honourable man and an esteemed academic, assure the House that the Liberal Party has never interfered with the judicial appointment process in any way, yes or no?
Monsieur le Président, « nous allons nous en occuper », d'accord.
D'accord, je vais prendre le gouvernement au jeu. Est-il honnête, oui ou non?
Ce gouvernement s'est fait élire il y a cinq ans en disant qu'il allait laver plus blanc que blanc concernant la nomination des juges. Force est d'admettre que le blanc est pas mal taché de taches rouges libérales.
Ma question est fort simple. En trois jours, le ministre n'a jamais donné de réponse claire et honnête. Est-ce que le ministre de la Justice, qui est un homme honorable et un universitaire raffiné, peut assurer à cette Chambre que, jamais, lors du processus de la nomination des juges, il n’y a eu quelque intervention du Parti libéral que ce soit, oui ou non?
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-10-23 11:22 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.
I can assure the member opposite that, as the minister himself said, he has never experienced any political pressure with regard to the appointment of judges. Judges are appointed on a strong, merit-based process designed to increase diversity among Canada's judges. We made changes to the process, good changes that are taking us in the right direction.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de sa question.
Je peux assurer au député d'en face, comme le ministre l'a mentionné lui-même, qu'il n'a reçu aucune pression partisane concernant la nomination des juges. Les juges sont nommés selon un processus fort, basé sur le mérite et dont l'objectif est de diversifier le nombre de juristes au Canada. Nous avons apporté des changements au processus. Il s'agit de bons changements qui vont dans la bonne direction.
Collapse
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
View Gérard Deltell Profile
2020-10-23 11:23 [p.1162]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Radio-Canada's sources contradict the parliamentary secretary's claim.
A former employee in the PMO said that the infamous Liberalist database was used. This database held the names of Liberal Party friends and indicated whether they had put up lawn signs during election campaigns or donated money to the Liberal Party.
Can the Minister of Justice assure Canadians that the Liberalist database was not used in any step of the process, yes or no?
Monsieur le Président, selon les témoignages recueillis par Radio-Canada, c'est exactement le contraire.
Voilà qu'un ancien employé du cabinet du ministre dit que, au contraire, on faisait référence à la fameuse « Libéraliste », c'est-à-dire à la liste des amis du Parti libéral, pour savoir s'ils avaient, oui ou non, posé des pancartes pendant les élections ou encore donné de l'argent au Parti libéral.
Le ministre de la Justice peut-il donner l'assurance aux Canadiens que jamais, dans tout le processus, de A à Z, la « Libéraliste » n’a été utilisée, oui ou non?
Collapse
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2020-10-23 11:23 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I can tell the member opposite that partisan pressure was in no way involved in the appointment of a judge by the Minister of Justice.
As I said, we take this situation very seriously. We base appointments on merit and qualifications. The objective is to diversify the judiciary, and we have been successful in that regard. For example, more than 50% of judges appointed by our government were women. That figure is much higher than the Conservative Party's record.
Monsieur le Président, ce que je peux souligner au député d'en face, c'est que la pression partisane n'a jamais eu d'impact sur la nomination d'un juge par le ministre de la Justice.
Comme je l'ai mentionné, nous prenons la situation très au sérieux. Nous traitons du mérite et du calibre des candidats. L'objectif est de diversifier nos cours. Grâce à cet objectif, nous avons eu de bons résultats. Par exemple, le nombre de femmes nommées par notre gouvernement est de plus de 50 %. C'est un taux vraiment beaucoup plus élevé que celui du Parti conservateur dans le passé.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2020-10-23 11:24 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois is deeply grateful to the guardian angels who are saving lives in our long-term care facilities. Among them are hundreds of refugee protection claimants who have risked their lives for Quebec's seniors.
The Bloc Québécois supports the will of the government and that of Quebec to grant them permanent resident status for exceptional services rendered. Two months after it was announced, the program is still not in place and the department is suggesting that it could still take months.
When will the guardian angels be able to apply?
Monsieur le Président, le Bloc québécois remercie du fond du cœur les anges gardiens qui sauvent des vies dans nos CHSLD. Parmi eux se trouvent des centaines de demandeurs d'asile qui ont risqué la leur pour les aînés du Québec.
Le Bloc québécois soutient la volonté du gouvernement et celle du Québec de leur octroyer la résidence permanente pour services exceptionnels rendus. Or deux mois après son annonce, le programme n'existe toujours pas et le ministère laisse entendre que cela pourrait prendre encore des mois.
Quand les anges gardiens pourront-ils enfin faire une demande?
Collapse
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
2020-10-23 11:25 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we recognize the extraordinary work being done by the guardian angels, the men and women who have been working diligently from day one, making a difference for so many people by accompanying, helping, feeding and washing them and accomplishing many different tasks. The government recognizes this work and stands by them.
Monsieur le Président, nous reconnaissons le travail extraordinaire réalisé par les anges gardiens, c'est-à-dire par les hommes et les femmes qui sont dévoués depuis le tout début et qui ont su faire une différence pour tant de gens, en les accompagnant, en les aidant, en les nourrissant, en les lavant et en faisant mille et une choses. Le gouvernement reconnaît ce travail et chemine avec eux.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2020-10-23 11:25 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we fully support this, but we are simply asking the government to show the same kind of dedication to the guardian angels as they have shown to Quebec's seniors.
We are concerned because, even before COVID-19, Ottawa was taking years to process immigration requests. People had time to settle in Quebec, find a job and start a family before they heard back from the federal government, and then when they did, it was often bad news.
When will the guardian angels finally be able to apply for permanent residence?
Monsieur le Président, nous soutenons la démarche, et nous la soutenons de tout cœur, mais nous souhaitons simplement que le fédéral fasse preuve d'autant de dévouement à l'égard des anges gardiens que ceux-ci en ont eu pour les aînés du Québec.
Nous sommes inquiets, parce que, déjà avant la COVID-19, Ottawa prenait des années à traiter les différentes demandes en matière d'immigration. Les gens ont le temps de s'installer au Québec, de trouver un emploi et de fonder une famille avant d'avoir des nouvelles du fédéral, et ce sont souvent des mauvaises nouvelles.
Quand les anges gardiens pourront-ils enfin demander leur résidence permanente?
Collapse
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Pablo Rodriguez Profile
2020-10-23 11:26 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, once again, we acknowledge the work of these guardian angels. I know many of them because they come from my region of eastern Montreal.
I am pleased that the Bloc Québécois raised this issue because it is extremely important to recognize all that these people have done from the very start and the personal and family-related sacrifices they have made. That has not gone unnoticed, and the Government of Canada will work with them.
Monsieur le Président, encore une fois, nous soulignons le travail de ces anges gardiens. D'ailleurs, j'en connais plusieurs, car plusieurs d'entre eux viennent de mon coin, l'Est de Montréal.
Je suis content que le Bloc québécois soulève ce point, parce que c'est extrêmement important de reconnaître tout ce qu'ils ont fait depuis le tout début et les sacrifices qu'ils ont faits tant sur le plan personnel que familial. Cela n'est pas passé inaperçu, et le gouvernement du Canada va travailler avec eux.
Collapse
View Rachel Blaney Profile
NDP (BC)
View Rachel Blaney Profile
2020-10-23 11:26 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, in Nova Scotia, Mi'kmaq fisheries have faced violence and had their property destroyed. In Ontario, Haudenosaunee land defenders had guns turned on them. There are reports that some have been shot by police with rubber bullets. Despite their love of talking about the right thing, Liberals have failed to negotiate in good faith and do the right thing.
The federal government has the power to ensure a peaceful resolution and ensure that we move forward and that no one else is hurt. Why do indigenous people have to fight the government for their very rights every step of the way?
Monsieur le Président, en Nouvelle-Écosse, les pêcheries mi'kmaq ont été victimes de violence, et leurs biens ont été détruits. En Ontario, des membres de la nation Haudenosaunee, des défenseurs des terres autochtones se sont fait braquer par des armes à feu. On rapporte même que certains Autochtones se seraient fait tirer dessus par les forces de l'ordre avec des balles en caoutchouc. Malgré toutes leurs belles paroles, les libéraux ne sont pas parvenus à entamer des négociations de bonne foi et à faire ce qui s'impose.
Le gouvernement fédéral a le pouvoir de garantir un règlement pacifique du conflit, et de veiller à ce que personne d'autre ne subisse des blessures. Pourquoi les peuples autochtones doivent-ils lutter contre le gouvernement pour faire respecter leurs propres droits à chaque étape du processus?
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2020-10-23 11:27 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, our government believes the best way to resolve outstanding issues is through a respectful and collaborative dialogue that is vital to building stronger relationships and advancing reconciliation for the benefit of indigenous communities and all Canadians. We deeply value our relationship with Six Nations. We are committed to continuing to work collaboratively to address historical claims and land rights issues. Our government is actively working with the community and look forward to meeting at the earliest opportunity.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement est convaincu que la meilleure manière de résoudre certains enjeux est d'engager un dialogue respectueux et empreint de collaboration, essentiel à la consolidation de nos relations avec les Autochtones, et à une réconciliation au profit des communautés autochtones et de l'ensemble des Canadiens. Notre relation avec les Six Nations revêt une grande importance à nos yeux. Nous nous engageons à continuer à collaborer afin de régler les revendications territoriales historiques. Le gouvernement collabore activement avec la communauté des Six Nations, et attend avec impatience de rencontrer ses représentants à la première occasion.
Collapse
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
View Matthew Green Profile
2020-10-23 11:27 [p.1163]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, that is not good enough. This week an Ontario court sided with private developers and applied a permanent injunction against the Haudenosaunee people on their own traditional territory at 1492 Land Back Lane. Last night, the OPP opened fire on land defenders with rubber bullets, setting the stage for a sharp escalation in violence there. This conflict is not new. It is the direct result of the government's refusal to negotiate these land claims in good faith, resulting in this violence. When will the government finally get back to the table with the Haudenosaunee Confederacy council and allow these claims to be peacefully settled?
Monsieur le Président, ce n'est pas suffisant. Cette semaine, un tribunal ontarien a donné gain de cause à des promoteurs privés et prononcé une injonction permanente contre les Haudenosaunee sur leur territoire traditionnel, au 1492, Land Back Lane. Hier soir, la police provinciale de l'Ontario a tiré des balles de caoutchouc sur des défenseurs des terres, ce qui a créé des conditions propices à une vive escalade de la violence. Le conflit n'est pas nouveau. La violence découle directement du refus du gouvernement de négocier de bonne foi les revendications territoriales. Quand le gouvernement retournera-t-il enfin à la table de négociation avec le conseil de la Confédération Haudenosaunee et permettra-t-il de faire aboutir ces revendications pacifiquement?
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2020-10-23 11:28 [p.1164]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canada deeply values its relationship with Six Nations and is committed to continuing to work collaboratively to address the Six Nations historical claims and land issues. We have put in place flexible processes to allow for the exploration of new ways to achieve these goals such as those identified in the Coyle report. This independent report by the fact-finders marked an important first step in opening lines of communication at that time and also helped build understanding of negotiations and discussions that followed.
Monsieur le Président, le Canada accorde une grande importance à sa relation avec les Six Nations et est déterminé à poursuivre sa collaboration avec elles pour répondre à leurs revendications historiques et territoriales. Nous avons mis en place des processus souples afin de trouver de nouveaux moyens d'atteindre ces objectifs, comme ceux dont fait état le rapport Coyle. Ce rapport indépendant produit par des enquêteurs a constitué un premier pas important pour ouvrir les voies de communication à ce moment-là ainsi que pour favoriser la compréhension des négociations et des discussions qui ont suivi.
Collapse
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
View James Bezan Profile
2020-10-23 11:29 [p.1164]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, on numerous occasions the Prime Minister boasted that Canada is back in the business of peacekeeping, but like everything else, it was just another empty promise. In February 2019, the government's officials told the Standing Committee on National Defence the quick reaction force had been entered into the UN capability registry. Now, according to Global Affairs and the United Nations, Canada never registered the quick reaction force. Why did the Liberal government mislead the defence committee?
Monsieur le Président, à maintes reprises, le premier ministre s'est vanté du fait que le Canada allait rétablir ses opérations de maintien de la paix, mais c'était, une fois de plus, une fausse promesse. En février 2019, des fonctionnaires ont dit au Comité permanent de la défense nationale que la force d'intervention rapide avait été ajoutée au registre des ressources des Nations unies. On apprend maintenant que, d'après Affaires mondiales et les Nations unies, le Canada n'a jamais inscrit sa force d'intervention rapide au registre. Pourquoi le gouvernement libéral a-t-il induit en erreur le comité de la défense?
Collapse
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
2020-10-23 11:29 [p.1164]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we very much regret that it was an honest mistake before the committee, but I do reassure the member that we did promise Canadians that we would renew our commitment to peacekeeping and that is exactly what we are doing. Our aviation task force in Mali provided life-saving medical evacuation and tactical airlifts to the United Nations forces in Mali and, following a temporary operational pause due to COVID-19, the tactical detachment in Uganda completed its mission in Entebbe, Uganda.
Monsieur le Président, nous regrettons beaucoup ce témoignage erroné. Je peux toutefois affirmer au député que, comme nous l'avions promis aux Canadiens, nous renouvelons l'engagement du Canada envers le maintien de la paix. Au Mali, notre force opérationnelle aérienne a mené des évacuations médicales qui ont sauvé des vies. Elle a aussi fait du transport aérien tactique pour les forces onusiennes déployées dans ce pays. De plus, après une pause temporaire due à la COVID-19, le détachement tactique à l'oeuvre en Ouganda a mené à bien sa mission à Entebbe.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 5095 | Page: 1 of 85

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data