Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 8 of 8
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-21 7:02
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to begin by acknowledging and thanking all of the staff of the House of Commons and the interpreters for joining us today, bright and early, at seven in the morning. Today, in this province, it is Family Day, and they are here spending the day with us. I am grateful and want to thank them and acknowledge them, as well as everyone who is here with us today. We thank them for their time and for everything they are doing as we discuss a matter that I think is very impactful for our families and, really, for our family of Canada.
I also want to take this occasion to wish Her Majesty the very best and a speedy recovery. I had the honour of meeting Her Majesty. I had an audience with her the year of Canada's sesquicentennial. As one of her medalists, it was the honour of my life to have had that opportunity.
Continuing where I left off last evening, flags matter. Symbols matter, just like how our Canadian flag is a beacon of hope for so many people here at home and abroad. I was distraught, as a person who has proudly worn our flag and the uniform of our country, to see people wrap themselves in our flag and use it as a shield for their behaviour, which sometimes was anything but honourable.
What I have commented on thus far, beginning last evening and this morning, unfortunately describes in detail what I believe lay at the heart of some of those who came to Ottawa. They did not come here to register valid concerns. They certainly did not need three weeks to pretend to try to do so, and the rhetoric that spewed from their leaders did not signal a desire for dialogue. They were trying to impose their views on the nation. They were fed up with mandates, vaccines and not being able to do whatever it is they wanted. They wanted to dictate. Some even wanted to govern.
Forget about the will of the people; it was the protesters own will they wanted to impose. That is not expressing freedom. It is also a grossly uneducated view of Canadian democracy and an extremely poor attempt at implementing a coup. Our rights to freedom of expression and assembly should not and must not include the oppression of another's.
I wonder if the protesters were equally fed up with the 35,000 Canadians who died as a direct result of COVID‑19 and its variants? Did those who are no longer with us die because of the common cold? Did they lose their lives because of the actions of draconian governments to stop the spread of the virus? It is disrespectful and nonsense.
This is what happens when some people are glued to Fox News and attend the university of social media. In fact, it was a Fox News commentator who went so far as to share disinformation about a protester getting hurt and dying, only to later delete the erroneous post but, by then, the damage had been done. I would like to commend the members of the Toronto Police Service's mounted unit for their professionalism, their work and the exemplary manner in which they conducted themselves. I commend all of the police services that came to Ottawa to assist in the restoration of peace and order.
Much will be said of the last three weeks and the targeted use of a portion of the Emergencies Act to peacefully end the occupation of our capital and to protect Canada's foreign trade link to our largest and strongest trading partner. People should remember that our country cannot live on beautiful scenery alone. We need good jobs. We need to protect the health of our people and the viability of our economy and our health care system.
Moreover, with every passing day, the protest was sending a signal globally that the rule of law in Canada was weak. It is not often that Canada makes the podcast on The Economist, never mind be the main topic of discussion, but we did. Instead of it being about our world-class arts and culture, our leading tech and innovation, and the many things that make our Canada, our country, great, it was about the protest. It was destroying our global reputation.
I would like now to focus my comments on what lies at the basis of what is being debated in this House, that being the rule of law. Unfortunately, I know a little of what it is like to be denied the rule of law. I also know what it is like to be judged by the court of public opinion, where facts are often cast aside as pesky annoyances.
To the issue at hand, does the limited implementation of certain provisions of the Emergencies Act deny Canada and Canadians the rule of law? Does the act remove one's charter rights? Are the police and the military going to start searching people's homes and arresting anyone they do not like? Will Canadians have all of their civil liberties stripped away at a moment's notice by a nefarious federal government? Of course not.
In listening to some of my colleagues, it would seem that the federal government is on the verge of a military dictatorship. I have heard stories from my parents and others who actually escaped oppression. I spent hours in Yad Vashem reading, listening and learning about the systemic horrors that were endured during the Holocaust. In Ottawa, I heard protesters draw parallels between their experience in the occupation and what different oppressed communities have endured, and some, sadly, still do. I implore people who continue to do that to please stop, because they are cheapening the suffering of those who have endured oppression and much worse.
The rule of law is just that: The law rules. It rules insofar as the same laws apply to everyone, regardless of their personal circumstances, their race, their orientation or anything else.
The definition of the rule of law employed by the United Nations is quite lengthy. The term refers to “a principle...in which all persons, institutions and entities, public and private, including the State itself, are accountable to laws that are publicly promulgated, equally enforced and independently adjudicated, and which are consistent with international human rights norms and standards.” Interestingly, the UN definition goes on to state, “It requires, as well, measures to ensure adherence to the principles of supremacy of law, equality before the law, accountability to the law, fairness in the application of the law, separation of powers, participation in decision-making, legal certainty, avoidance of arbitrariness and procedural and legal transparency.”
The government's decision to implement certain targeted aspects of the Emergencies Act within a duration of just 30 days is certainly transparent and ensures adherence to the principles of the supremacy of the law. At no point does the implementation of the act remove the rights and freedoms guaranteed under the charter. At no point does the act usurp the powers of Parliament. At no point does the act impose some unconstitutional period of martial law.
In conclusion, what is being done with the temporary, targeted use of certain provisions of the Emergencies Act is to restore peace, order and good government through legitimate and constitutional measures to ensure that the people of Ottawa, the economy and the people of Canada are able to function without further unlawful interference and interruption.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens d'abord à saluer et à remercier tout le personnel de la Chambre des communes et tous les interprètes de s'être levés de bonne heure aujourd'hui pour se joindre à nous à sept heures du matin. Aujourd'hui, en Ontario, c'est le jour de la famille et ils sont ici pour passer la journée avec nous. Je leur suis reconnaissant et je tiens à les remercier et à les saluer, ainsi que tous ceux qui sont ici avec nous aujourd'hui. Nous les remercions de leur temps et de tout ce qu'ils font tandis que nous discutons d'une question qui, à mon avis, a une grande incidence sur nos familles, de même que sur la famille canadienne.
Je profite également de cette occasion pour souhaiter à Sa Majesté la meilleure des chances et un prompt rétablissement. J'ai eu l'honneur de rencontrer Sa Majesté. J'ai eu une audience avec elle l'année du 150e anniversaire du Canada. En tant qu'un de ses médaillés, ce fut l'honneur de ma vie d'avoir eu cette occasion.
Je vais reprendre là où je me suis arrêté hier soir. Un drapeau, c'est important. Les symboles sont importants et le drapeau du Canada est une source d'espoir pour un grand nombre de personnes au pays et à l'étranger. Ayant moi-même porté fièrement le drapeau et l'uniforme de notre pays, j'ai été consterné de voir des gens se draper dans notre drapeau et s'en servir comme d'un bouclier pour défendre leur comportement qui, parfois, était tout sauf honorable.
Ce que j’ai commenté jusqu’à présent, depuis hier soir et ce matin, décrit malheureusement en détail ce qui, à mon avis, est au cœur des motivations de certains manifestants venus à Ottawa. Ils ne sont pas venus ici pour exprimer des préoccupations valables. Ils n’avaient certainement pas besoin de trois semaines pour faire semblant d’essayer de le faire, et les discours de leurs dirigeants n'exprimaient pas un désir de dialogue. Ces gens essayaient d’imposer leur opinion à la nation. Ils en avaient assez des restrictions, des vaccins et de ne pas pouvoir faire ce qu’ils voulaient. Ils voulaient dicter. Il y en a même qui voulaient gouverner.
Sans égard à la volonté du peuple, c’est leur propre volonté que les manifestants voulaient imposer. Ce n’est pas l’expression de la liberté. C’est aussi l'illustration d'une vision grossièrement inculte de la démocratie canadienne et une piètre tentative de mettre en œuvre un coup d’État. Nos droits à la liberté d’expression et de réunion ne devraient pas et ne doivent pas inclure l’oppression de la volonté d’autrui.
Je me demande si les manifestants en avaient également assez d'entendre parler des 35 000 Canadiens qui sont morts en conséquence directe de la COVID-19 et de ses variants? Ceux qui nous ont quittés sont-ils morts à cause d’un simple rhume? Ont-ils perdu la vie à cause des mesures draconiennes prises par les gouvernements pour arrêter la propagation du virus? C’est un manque de respect et un non-sens.
Voilà ce qui arrive lorsque certaines personnes sont rivées sur Fox News et fréquentent l’université des médias sociaux. En fait, un commentateur de Fox News est allé jusqu’à annoncer à tort qu’une personne parmi les manifestants était blessée et mourante, pour ensuite se rétracter, mais le mal était déjà fait. Je tiens à féliciter les membres de l’unité montée du service de police de Toronto pour leur professionnalisme, leur travail et la manière exemplaire dont ils se sont comportés. Je félicite tous les services de police venus à Ottawa pour prêter main forte afin de rétablir l’ordre et la paix.
On parlera beaucoup des trois dernières semaines et de l’utilisation ciblée d’une partie de la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence pour mettre fin pacifiquement à l’occupation de la capitale et pour protéger le lien commercial du Canada avec notre plus grand et plus fort partenaire commercial. Les gens devraient se rappeler que le Canada ne peut pas vivre uniquement de beaux paysages. Nous avons besoin de bons emplois. Nous devons protéger la santé de la population et la viabilité de l'économie et du système de soins de santé.
En outre, à mesure que les jours passaient, la manifestation signalait au reste du monde la faiblesse de la primauté du droit au Canada. Il n’est pas fréquent que le Canada fasse l’objet d’un balado dans l’Economist, et encore moins qu’il soit le principal sujet de discussion, mais c'est arrivé. Au lieu de parler de nos arts et de notre culture, de notre technologie et de notre innovation de pointe, et de toutes les choses qui sont de calibre mondial et font la grandeur du Canada, de notre pays, il a été question de la manifestation. Cette situation a terni notre réputation mondiale.
Je voudrais maintenant concentrer mes observations sur ce qui est au cœur du présent débat, à savoir le principe de la primauté du droit. Malheureusement, je sais un peu ce qu'est le fait d’être privé de la primauté du droit. Je sais aussi ce que c’est que d’être jugé par le tribunal de l’opinion publique, où les faits sont souvent mis de côté parce qu'ils sont considérés comme embêtants.
Pour en revenir à la question qui nous occupe, la mise en œuvre limitée de certaines dispositions de la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence prive-t- elle le Canada et les Canadiens de la primauté du droit? La loi supprime-t-elle les droits garantis par la Charte? Les policiers et les militaires vont-ils commencer à fouiller les maisons des gens et à arrêter ceux qui ne leur plaisent pas? Les Canadiens se verront-ils retirer toutes leurs libertés civiles à un moment donné par un gouvernement fédéral malveillant? Bien sûr que non.
En écoutant certains de mes collègues, j’ai l’impression que le gouvernement fédéral est sur le point de devenir une dictature militaire. J’ai entendu les histoires de mes parents et d’autres personnes qui ont réellement échappé à l’oppression. J’ai passé des heures au Yad Vashem à lire, écouter et apprendre les horreurs systémiques qui ont été endurées pendant l’Holocauste. À Ottawa, j’ai entendu des manifestants établir des parallèles entre leur expérience de l’occupation et ce que différentes communautés opprimées ont enduré, et certains, malheureusement, le font encore. J’implore les personnes qui continuent de tenir ce genre de discours d’arrêter, car elles minimisent la souffrance de ceux qui ont véritablement enduré l’oppression et bien pire encore.
La primauté du droit est le principe selon lequel l'application de la loi est la règle prépondérante. Autrement dit, les mêmes lois s’appliquent à tous, indépendamment de leur situation personnelle, de leur race, de leur orientation ou de toute autre circonstance.
La définition de primauté du droit employée par les Nations unies est assez longue. Elle renvoie à « […] un principe […] en vertu duquel l’ensemble des individus, des institutions et des entités publiques et privées, y compris l’État lui-même, ont à répondre de l’observation de lois promulguées publiquement, appliquées de façon identique pour tous et administrées de manière indépendante, et compatibles avec les règles et normes internationales en matière de droits de l’homme. » Il est intéressant de noter que la définition de l’ONU se poursuit ainsi: « Il implique, d’autre part, des mesures propres à assurer le respect des principes de la primauté du droit, de l’égalité devant la loi, de la responsabilité au regard de la loi, de l’équité dans l’application de la loi, de la séparation des pouvoirs, de la participation à la prise de décisions, de la sécurité juridique, du refus de l’arbitraire et de la transparence des procédures et des processus législatifs. »
La décision du gouvernement de mettre en œuvre certains aspects particuliers de la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence pendant 30 jours seulement est certainement transparente et garantit le respect des principes de la suprématie de la loi. À aucun moment la mise en œuvre de la loi ne supprime les droits et libertés garantis par la Charte. En aucun cas, la loi n’usurpe les pouvoirs du Parlement. À aucun moment la loi n’impose une période inconstitutionnelle de loi martiale.
En conclusion, l’utilisation temporaire et ciblée de certaines dispositions de la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence vise à rétablir l’ordre, la paix et le bon gouvernement au moyen de mesures légitimes et constitutionnelles, afin que les citoyens d’Ottawa, l’économie et la population du Canada puissent fonctionner sans autre ingérence ou interruption illégale.
Collapse
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-21 7:13
Expand
Madam Speaker, yesterday I was in Ottawa and wanted to patron a local restaurant, as I hope anyone would want to do if my own city of Toronto had gone through the same thing that Ottawa had. It took me 20 minutes of walking before I could find a local restaurant to support here in Ottawa.
Even a fast casual dining restaurant will have a minimum complement of staff of seven to 10 people, so imagine how many hundreds of workers were out of work. I imagine that is an opinion my Conservative colleague and I would share: the importance of supporting local businesses. How many jobs and livelihoods were impacted? How many millions in business revenue were lost? These are revenues to the treasury that support the important services that make our country what it is.
This has been a black eye on our country, and it is so vital that we move forward.
Madame la Présidente, hier, j’étais à Ottawa et je voulais aller au restaurant, comme j'imagine quiconque voudrait le faire si Toronto, ma ville, vivait la même situation qu’Ottawa. Il m’a fallu 20 minutes de marche avant de trouver un restaurant où aller.
Même un restaurant ordinaire a un effectif minimum de sept à dix personnes, alors imaginez combien de centaines de travailleurs se sont retrouvés sans emploi. J’imagine que mon collègue conservateur et moi-même convenons qu’il est important de soutenir les entreprises locales. Combien d’emplois et de moyens de subsistance ont été touchés? Combien de millions de dollars de revenus commerciaux ont été perdus? Ce sont des recettes pour le trésor public qui soutiennent les services importants qui font de notre pays ce qu’il est.
Cette occupation est une honte pour notre pays, et il est essentiel qu’on avance.
Collapse
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-21 7:15
Expand
Madam Speaker, again, one of the real issues I have observed walking through the streets of Ottawa is how the people have been impacted. For example, the National Arts Centre has been closed. To give members a sense of the scope, I will provide a statistic from my riding. Ms. Kendra Bator of Mirvish Productions comes from my riding, which is our country's largest theatre production company. Every dollar spent generates $10 in the local economy. How many millions were lost as a result of the disruption by the occupation? It is so vital that we move forward so we can support Ottawa's businesses and people's livelihoods.
Madame la Présidente, encore une fois, l’un des problèmes réels que j’ai observés en marchant dans les rues d’Ottawa est la façon dont les gens ont été touchés. Par exemple, le Centre national des arts a été fermé. Pour donner aux députés une idée de l’ampleur de la situation, je vais fournir une statistique de ma circonscription. Mme Kendra Bator, de Mirvish Productions, vient de ma circonscription. C’est la plus grande société de production théâtrale du pays. Chaque dollar dépensé génère 10 $ dans l’économie locale. Combien de millions ont été perdus en raison des perturbations causées par l’occupation? Il est essentiel que nous avancions pour soutenir les entreprises d’Ottawa et les moyens de subsistance des gens.
Collapse
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-21 7:17
Expand
Madam Speaker, just last evening as we were closing down the chamber, I had the opportunity to personally thank members of the York Regional Police who are here, just like the members from the Toronto Police Service and police services across the country.
As I said during my comments, it is constitutional and measured. It is a targeted use of but a portion of the Emergencies Act, which gives me confidence, as does the fact that it is only for 30 days and can be ended sooner. What is vital is that the occupation was ended so that we can move forward as a country, and so that this city can move forward. More importantly is what it means for the rest of this country, because if we do not end what happened here then it just as easily could happen in even more municipalities and communities across this country.
Madame la Présidente, hier soir, alors que nous fermions la Chambre, j’ai eu l’occasion de remercier personnellement les membres de la police régionale de York qui sont ici, tout comme les membres du service de police de Toronto et d'autres services de police de tout le pays.
Comme je l’ai dit dans mes remarques, ce recours est mesuré et respecte la Constitution. Il s’agit d’une utilisation ciblée d’une partie seulement de la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence, ce qui me donne confiance, tout comme le fait que la loi ne sera en vigueur que 30 jours et que son application peut prendre fin plus tôt. Ce qui est vital, c’est que l’occupation ait pris fin pour que le Canada et la ville d'Ottawa puissent aller de l’avant. Ce qui est plus important, c’est ce que cela signifie pour le reste du pays, car si le gouvernement ne met pas fin à ce qui s’est passé ici, cela pourrait bien se reproduire dans d’autres municipalités et collectivités du pays.
Collapse
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-21 7:18
Expand
Madam Speaker, if anything, I think that is where my colleague and l clearly share the importance of taking action to ensure that trade can resume and can move unabated. He would know better than many how vital that connection is. Just as important as that connection is to our strongest and largest trading partner, so too is our reputation and the stain that this protest has had on it. It is so vital for foreign investment and jobs that we move forward. That is why the targeted use of a certain portion of the Emergencies Act is something I support.
Madame la Présidente, je pense que c’est là qu'il ressort clairement que mon collègue et moi convenons de l’importance de prendre des mesures pour faire en sorte que le commerce puisse reprendre et se poursuivre sans interruption. Il sait mieux que quiconque à quel point ce lien est vital. Notre réputation que cette manifestation a entachée est tout aussi importante que ce lien avec notre principal et plus fort partenaire commercial. Il est vital pour les investissements et les emplois étrangers que nous avancions. C’est pourquoi j’appuie l’utilisation ciblée d’une certaine partie de la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence.
Collapse
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-21 7:20
Expand
Madam Speaker, as I emphasized during my comments, it was very vital that action was taken so that not just our neighbours and communities here in Ottawa, but our country could move forward, with certainty and confidence in communities that have already been impacted, like Windsor, as my colleague was referring to, and others, because people's livelihoods and businesses are at stake. As a former entrepreneur and business owner, I cannot imagine what that experience has been like for those whose livelihoods and dreams have been impacted. Again, that is why I support the targeted, measured, time-limited use of the Emergencies Act.
Madame la Présidente, comme je l’ai précisé dans mes remarques, il était essentiel que des mesures soient prises pour que non seulement nos voisins et nos collectivités ici à Ottawa, mais aussi notre pays, puissent aller de l’avant, avec certitude et confiance dans les collectivités qui ont déjà été touchées, comme Windsor, dont parlait mon collègue, et d’autres, car les moyens de subsistance et les entreprises des gens sont en jeu. En tant qu’ancien entrepreneur et propriétaire d’entreprise, je peux imaginer ce que cette expérience a pu représenter pour ceux dont le gagne-pain et les rêves ont été touchés. Encore une fois, voilà pourquoi j’appuie l’utilisation ciblée, mesurée et limitée dans le temps de la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence.
Collapse
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-21 7:21
Expand
Madam Speaker, what is essential is people's livelihoods. What is essential is people's ability to afford rent, put food on the table and take care of their families. For three weeks, there were people who did not feel safe going home. For three weeks businesses were closed and disrupted. People's livelihoods are essential. That is why it is essential for the Emergencies Act to be implemented in a measured, limited, targeted way.
Madame la Présidente, ce qui est essentiel, ce sont les moyens de subsistance des gens. Ce qui est essentiel, c’est la capacité des gens à payer leur loyer, à mettre de la nourriture sur la table et à prendre soin de leur famille. Pendant trois semaines, des gens ne se sentaient pas en sécurité lorsqu’ils rentraient chez eux. Pendant trois semaines, des entreprises ont été fermées et perturbées. Les moyens de subsistance des gens sont essentiels. C’est pourquoi il est essentiel que la loi sur les urgences soit mise en œuvre de manière mesurée, limitée et ciblée.
Collapse
View Kevin Vuong Profile
Ind. (ON)
View Kevin Vuong Profile
2022-02-20 23:54
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am not pleased to be rising in the House tonight. The reason for my disappointment is due to subject matter that I wish the House did not have to be debating. Nonetheless, tonight's debate is on a very serious subject, the implementation of the Emergencies Act. I would like to believe that all hon. members of this place, irrespective of their political party, would also wish not to be here debating this subject. Unfortunately, we are.
I believe that the events that have transpired at various Canadian border crossings and in our nation's capital over the last three weeks converge to provide few alternatives. Some may not see it that way, and I encourage them to take a hard, long second look.
I appreciate that emotions remain high. I would like to do an objective, factual level-set. To do that, I want to take the location out of it and take the city where the protest has occurred out of the debate. Let us put aside that the protest was in Ottawa and ask ourselves how we would feel if it was a hon. member's city and their community that had its main streets and downtown core barricaded by trucks and crowds. Imagine if it was an hon. member's constituents and their neighbourhoods effectively held hostage in their own city, their own community and their own homes. Imagine if people from their community were being harassed and intimidated, with some actually fearing for their own personal safety. What about their right to protection and their right to freedom of movement?
In our community of Spadina—Fort York, we are no stranger to protests. Toronto City Hall is in our riding. The provincial legislature at Queen's Park is just outside of it. In fact, the route people take to these places to exercise their democratic rights often means they would literally be driving by my home. When they do, they would often be honking. My girlfriend and I would look out, see who they were and even look up and see what they were advocating.
However, my rights to freedom of expression and assembly should not, must not, include the oppression of others.
As the son of refugees, I know that my family knew terror and injustice. They endured two years in a refugee camp to find a new home that shared their values, a place that valued democracy and the rule of law. I am sad to say that I did not see those values when I looked at the streets of Ottawa or at the Ambassador Bridge.
What we did see was our national monument to Canada's fallen disgraced and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier being jumped on and urinated upon. It is tragically ironic that the soldier inside the tomb was once a person who knew well what fighting for freedom was all about. The same applies to the statue of a remarkable young man. Terry Fox raised more money than anyone in this country for those fighting an insidious disease, including those who are immunocompromised. The monument and the statue are precious symbols of the best of who we are as a country. That they were defiled is a disgrace.
Some of the most impactful symbols are flags. Sadly, we saw protesters walk around with the flags of evil and racism. Even in the country where Nazism started, anyone who parades around with that flag today gets arrested.
Then there was the Confederate flag, which some protesters chose to fly, a flag that continues to conjure up hatred and intolerance and celebrates a time when people were placed in chains and human slavery. My colleague, the hon. member for Hull—Aylmer, recently eloquently reminded the House of what that flag represents. It does not mean freedom. It does not mean inclusion. It represents intolerance and human slavery.
Flags matter and symbols matter. Our Canadian flag is a beacon of hope for so many people here at home and abroad. I was distraught, as a person who had also proudly worn the flag and the uniform of our country, to see people wrap themselves in our flag and use it as a shield for behaviour that was often anything but honourable.
What I have commented upon thus far is described in revolting detail and I think lies at the heart, the very foundation, of those who came to Ottawa. They did not—
Monsieur le Président, je ne suis pas heureux de prendre la parole aujourd'hui. Je suis déçu parce que la Chambre n'aurait jamais dû avoir à débattre du sujet dont elle débat. Malgré tout, le débat de ce soir porte sur une question très grave, l'invocation de la Loi sur les mesures d'urgence. J'ose croire que l'ensemble des députés, peu importe leurs allégeances, auraient préféré que nous n'ayons pas à débattre de cette question. Malheureusement, nous devons le faire.
Je crois que les événements survenus aux postes frontaliers et dans la capitale nationale au cours des trois dernières semaines nous ont forcé la main. Certains croient peut-être que ce n'est pas le cas, mais je les invite à y réfléchir deux fois plutôt qu'une.
Je comprends que ce débat suscite de vives émotions. Je voudrais faire une mise au point objective et factuelle. Pour ce faire, il convient de faire abstraction du lieu et de la ville où la manifestation a eu lieu. Faisons abstraction du fait que la manifestation a eu lieu à Ottawa et demandons-nous comment nous nous sentirions si c'était la ville et la collectivité d'un député qui voyait ses rues principales et son centre-ville paralysés par des camions et des manifestants. Imaginons que les citoyens de la circonscription d'un député et leurs quartiers soient, à toutes fins pratiques, pris en otage dans leur propre ville, leur propre collectivité et leurs propres habitations. Imaginons que des membres de cette collectivité soient harcelés et intimidés, et que certains craignent pour leur propre sécurité. Qu'en est-il de leur droit à la protection et de leur droit à la liberté de mouvement?
Dans ma circonscription, Spadina—Fort York, nous avons l'expérience des manifestations, car l'hôtel de ville de Toronto s'y trouve, et Queen's Park, l'assemblée législative provinciale, se trouve dans la circonscription voisine. En fait, le trajet que les gens empruntent pour s'y rendre afin d'exercer leurs droits démocratiques passe souvent devant ma porte. Ce faisant, ils klaxonnent souvent. Ma copine et moi avons pour habitude de regarder dehors pour savoir qui ils sont et savoir ce qu'ils revendiquent.
Cependant, les droits à la liberté d'expression et de réunion de certains ne sauraient être revendiqués en opprimant les autres.
Mes parents sont des réfugiés, alors ils ont connu la terreur et l'injustice. Ils ont passé deux ans dans un camp de réfugiés avant de trouver un endroit conforme à leurs valeurs, qui était attaché aux principes démocratiques et où régnait la primauté du droit. Je suis navré de dire que ce ne sont pas les valeurs que je vois quand je repense à ce qui s'est passé dans les rues d'Ottawa ou sur le pont Ambassador.
Le monument en hommage aux Canadiens tombés au champ d'honneur a été profané, et des gens sont montés et ont uriné sur la Tombe du Soldat inconnu. C'est d'autant plus dérangeant que le soldat qui est enterré là savait mieux que quiconque ce que c'est que de se battre pour la liberté. On peut en dire autant d'un jeune homme remarquable en l'honneur de qui une statue a été érigée. Terry Fox a recueilli plus d'argent que quiconque dans l'histoire du Canada pour venir en aide à ceux qui luttent contre une maladie insidieuse, y compris les personnes immunodéprimées. Ce monument et cette statue symbolisent ce qu'il y a de mieux dans notre pays. Que des gens aient pu les profaner de la sorte est une honte.
Les drapeaux figurent parmi les symboles les plus forts qui soient. Hélas, certains manifestants ont décidé d'arborer des drapeaux symbolisant le mal et le racisme. Même dans le pays où le nazisme a pris naissance, quiconque se promène avec ce drapeau est arrêté.
C'est sans parler du drapeau confédéré, que certains manifestants ont choisi de brandir. Encore aujourd'hui, ce drapeau appelle à la haine et à l'intolérance et célèbre une époque où on enchaînait les humains et en faisait des esclaves. Mon collègue de Hull—Aylmer a rappelé avec éloquence tout ce que ce drapeau peut représenter. Il n'est pas synonyme de liberté ni d'inclusion. Il incarne l'intolérance et l'esclavage.
Un drapeau, c'est important et les symboles sont importants. Le drapeau du Canada est une source d'espoir pour tant de gens au pays et à l'étranger. Ayant moi-même porté fièrement le drapeau et l'uniforme de notre pays, j'ai été consterné de voir des gens se draper dans notre drapeau et s'en servir comme d'un bouclier pour défendre un comportement qui, souvent, était tout sauf honorable.
Tout ce dont j'ai parlé jusqu'à présent est décrit en détail dégoûtant et résume, selon moi, l'essentiel, le fondement même, du mouvement qui est venu s'installer à Ottawa. Ces manifestants ne sont pas...
Collapse
Results: 1 - 8 of 8

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data