Hansard
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 337
View Randeep Sarai Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Randeep Sarai Profile
2022-12-06 10:35 [p.10467]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the sixth report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights in relation to Bill C-9, an act to amend the Judges Act.
The committee has studied the bill and has decided to report the bill back to the House with amendments.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai l'honneur de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, le sixième rapport du Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne relativement au projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges.
Le comité a étudié le projet de loi et convenu d'en faire rapport à la Chambre avec des propositions d'amendement.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-28 15:39 [p.10091]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as many of my colleagues already indicated, this is a large and complex bill, and we believe that its individual components are too important for them to be considered as one part of an omnibus bill. I am pleased with the ruling of the Speaker.
There are three separate pieces of legislation to this bill. In part 1, the consumer privacy protection act would repeal and replace decades-old measures concerning personal information protection. In part 2, the personal information and data protection tribunal act would strike a tribunal to administer penalties for violations of the CPPA. In part 3, the artificial intelligence and data act is brand new to the bill and sets up a framework for design and use of AI in Canada, which is almost entirely unregulated.
Long before the widespread use of the Internet, our Supreme Court was clear that privacy is at the heart of liberty in a modern state. The government should be taking every opportunity possible to enshrine privacy in our laws as essential to the exercise of our rights and freedoms in Canada. As Daniel Therrien stated in the Toronto Star earlier this month, “democracies must adopt robust solutions anchored in values, not laws that pretend to protect citizens but preserve the conditions that created the digital Wild West.”
The value of privacy should anchor the bill. Instead, the bill fails right out of the gate. The preamble states:
the protection of the privacy interests of individuals with respect to their personal information is essential to individual autonomy and dignity and to the full enjoyment of fundamental rights and freedoms in Canada
Placing this value in the preamble of the bill where it has no teeth raises distrust rather than confidence that the government truly respects Canadians' privacy rights. The CPPA would require organizations, companies or government departments affected by the bill to develop their own codes of practice for the protection of personal information. While these codes must be approved and certified by the Privacy Commissioner, one can only imagine the variation of protection that would result. This requirement would add significant red tape and would be yet another onerous task borne on the backs of small and medium-sized businesses, which employ most Canadians. It would also create more work for the Privacy Commissioner in parsing through complicated codes created by larger, wealthier, powerful corporations, companies or government departments that have legal teams whose sole purpose is to find creative ways to perhaps game the system.
Although it would take more time and investment up front, the better option, in my mind, would be to create a standard code of practice that all entities have to follow. This could certainly be taken on as one of the first responsibilities of the expanded Office of the Privacy Commissioner in defining the universal code of practices, where confidence in the process would be greatest and where the greatest level of concern for individual privacy actually exists.
This bill states that personal information can be transferred without Canadians' consent for purposes ranging from research to analysis to business purposes, but it must be de-identified before this can take place. At first glance, this is a positive measure until it is compared with anonymization as an alternative. According to the bill, de-identify means “to modify personal information so that an individual cannot be directly identified from it, though a risk of the individual being identified remains.” That leaves much to be desired when compared to the anonymization of personal information. In the bill, anonymize means “to irreversibly and permanently modify personal information, in accordance with generally accepted best practices, to ensure that no individual can be identified from the information, whether directly or indirectly, by any means.”
Any attempt to identify individuals from de-identified information is prohibited, except in approved circumstances. While many of these approved circumstances relate to the ability of an entity to test the effectiveness of its de-identification system, the potential for abuse still exists. This bill would be improved by eliminating those chances for abuse. We should examine replacing de-identification with anonymization wherever possible.
In comparing Bill C-27 to the EU regulations, we see there are several ways in which the CPPA does not live up to what is widely considered to be the international gold standard of privacy protection, which is the European Union's 2016 General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR. There is a glaring example of Bill C-27's inferior protections: The GDPR processes personal data in such a manner that it can no longer be attributed to a specific individual without the use of additional information kept separately, subject to technical and organizational measures. This is a security and privacy-by-design measure of the GDPR.
Regarding what Bill C-27 considers to be sensitive information, there is nothing to indicate what sensitive information actually entails. It is also limited in its application. Only the personal information of minors is considered to be sensitive. All information Canadians surrender to any entity should be considered sensitive. On the other hand, the GDPR possesses a particular regime for special categories of personal data, including racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, genetic data, biometric data and data concerning health, sex life and sexual orientation.
We are happy to see that consent is better defined in Bill C-27. However, exceptions for activities not requiring consent would remain in place. Some of them are so broad that an entity could interpret them as never requiring consent. These are loopholes that Canadians should not have to endure when they are required to check the box that they have read and accept terms before they are able to interact with a digital site.
For example, legitimate interests in a given situation may be used by companies to disregard consent. There is a danger that these interests will outweigh potential adverse effects on the individual. Attempting to define legitimate interests allows for too much interpretation, and interpretation is not something that lends itself to privacy laws. The use of personal information could also be exempt from consent if a reasonable person would expect the use of their information for business activities. There is no definition as to what a reasonable person is.
The bottom line is that there are far too many loopholes and vague terms. For the savvy, wealthy or well-lawyered, the potential for abuse exists. The GDPR, conversely, is unequivocal on consent. It must be freely given, specific, informed, unambiguous and in an intelligible and accessible form, and is only valid for specific purposes. Canada should have followed that example. Canadians cannot help but wonder why Bill C-27 does not.
Under the proposed CPPA, there is no minimum age for minor consent, nor is “minor” defined. In the EU, the GDPR sets out a minimum age for a minor's consent at 16 years of age. Member states also have the flexibility to allow for a lower age, provided the age is not below 13 years.
If a breach of personal information does take place, Bill C-27 would make Canada slower to respond than its international counterparts. This bill mandates that a notification be made to the Privacy Commissioner of any breach that creates a real risk of significant harm as soon as it is feasible. The individual affected would also need to be informed, but, again, as soon as feasible.
The GDPR sets out that a mandatory notification must be made to the supervisory authority without undue delay, or 72 hours after having become aware of the incident in certain circumstances. Prior to the introduction of this bill, Canada was lagging behind internationally, and it still is, even after. The GDPR is already six years old. That is six years of extra time during which the Liberals have failed to develop this legislation to meet the robust international standard.
In Bill C-27, the Privacy Commissioner would be empowered to investigate any certified organization for contravening the act. The commissioner has been rightly asking for increased powers and responsibilities for some time, and this goes beyond a mere recommendation to violators to stop their actions. The commissioner would be able to recommend greater penalties of no more than $20 million or 4% gross global revenue for a summary offence, and no more than $25 million or 5% gross global revenue for an indictable offence.
These penalties should add more bite to what the Privacy Commissioner can do and impact how Canadians’ personal information will ultimately be treated. The penalties would also apply to a greater number of provisions, such as actions that contravene the establishment and implementation of a privacy management program and failure to ensure equivalent protection for personal information transferred to a service provider.
However, these new powers for the Privacy Commissioner hit a dead end when taken in context with the second part of this bill, which establishes a tribunal. The personal information and data protection tribunal would consist of no more than six members, and only half of those members must have experience in information and privacy law. The Privacy Commissioner would have order-making authority and the ability to make recommendations to this tribunal regarding penalties. However, the tribunal would have the power to apply its own decision instead, which would be final and binding. Except for judicial review under the Federal Courts Act, the tribunal's decisions would not be subject to appeal or to review by any court. These are powers equivalent to a superior court of record.
The existence of this tribunal would dull the new teeth given to the Privacy Commissioner. While the commissioner could recommend that a penalty be levied for violations of the CPPA, it is the tribunal that would have the power to set the amount owed by these organizations.
The cost associated with striking this tribunal is also a concern. Despite the fact that its work would likely be limited to a handful of times per year to determine penalties, it would apparently require a full-time and permanent staff of 20. I am deeply concerned as the government also has a bad habit of striking advisory councils, or so-called arm's-length regulatory bodies, in advance of bills being debated and passed in the House, long before the ink on the legislation is dry.
My memory is drawn to when a bill was being debated in the House, and I inquired about the details of the proposed environmental council. I was told with great zeal that it had already been established, and the members had been appointed before the bill was even debated in the House.
Can the current Prime Minister tell us if this tribunal would be struck only after Parliament has dealt fully with this bill? Will the Liberals be transparent with Canadians on how the appointment process would be undertaken? Can they assure Canadians that a full-time and permanent staff of 20 has not already been determined? After seven years of Liberal power, the level of patronage in this place run deep.
Part 2, which is the personal information and data protection tribunal act, should be removed as it is a bureaucratic middleman with power that would conflict and create redundancy with the Privacy Commissioner's new powers. The new powers would mean little if they were not coupled with quick and effective consequences for violators. It would prolong decisions on fines and harm Canada's reputation of holding violators accountable.
It would also not align with our friends in the EU, U.K., New Zealand and Australia that do not use a tribunal system for issuing fines. It goes to show Canadians that when it comes to making big government needlessly bigger, the Liberals do it well.
The third and final part of this bill is the only entirely new component. The artificial intelligence and data act seeks to regulate an entity, artificial intelligence, that has not been regulated before in this country.
It would set standards for the creation and use of AI systems in Canada by both domestic and international entities. More specifically, international and interprovincial trade and commerce in artificial intelligence systems would be regulated through common requirements for the design and use of those systems.
It would prohibit certain conduct pertaining to AI systems that could lead to harmful results for individuals and their personal data. There is that mention of personal data. This is a massive undertaking, attempting to regulate something that, up to this point, has been almost entirely unregulated.
I also understand that consultations on this were only initiated in June. Logic would dictate that such a bill requires careful scrutiny and time to get it right.
Requiring record keeping and human oversight are positive developments. What we find difficulty with is getting a clear picture of what the final framework would look like, as the minister alone would be empowered to establish these regulations. The minister would be able to act independently of Parliament in making rulings and imposing fines. In an age of uncertainty and new horizons for our relationship with AI, this is unacceptable. Parliament, at the very least, and independent experts and watchdogs should be central to the creation and enforcement of these rules.
It appears that once again the government has chosen to simply tack on a crucial area of concern to Canadians to an already complicated bill, and it wishes to again entrust sweeping powers to a minister to act independently of parliamentary oversight.
My final thoughts today on Bill C-27 are as follows. The Conservatives are considering this bill through a reasoned approach, and appreciate that stakeholders who have been calling for this legislation for years are watching today's debate closely.
It is absolutely clear that modern-day protection for the personal information of Canadians is required. They must have the ability to access and control its collection, use, monitoring and disclosure, and the right to delete it or the right to vanish.
How can we ensure that data is protected through watertight regulations and strict fines for abuse while also realizing that not every business affected by this bill would have the resources of Walmart or Amazon? Small and medium-sized businesses should be shielded from onerous regulation that stifles their growth. This is not to say that business interests should weigh equally with personal privacy, but there is a balance to be had, and I believe the Liberals do not have it right here.
Furthermore, in a cynical attempt to move their legislative agenda forward, the Liberals have bundled changes to privacy laws with a first-of-its-kind framework for artificial intelligence that once again intends to govern through top-down regulation and not through legislation.
The Liberals should commit today to splitting this bill up to allow Canadians a clear view of its intended impact. With that commitment, the Conservatives will be looking to do the hard work at committee to improve the long-awaited but flawed elements of this legislation. Even in an age of convenience, the world in which we live grows even more complicated by the day. Canadians deserve privacy protection worthy of 2022 realities and beyond.
Monsieur le Président, comme bon nombre de mes collègues l'ont déjà dit, il s'agit d'un projet de loi vaste et complexe, et nous pensons que ses composantes individuelles sont trop importantes pour être considérées comme une partie d'un projet de loi omnibus. Je me réjouis de la décision du Président.
Le projet de loi à l'étude consiste, en fait, en trois mesures législatives distinctes. Dans la partie 1, la Loi sur la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs abrogerait et remplacerait des mesures sur la protection des renseignements personnels, qui ont été mises en place il y a des décennies. Dans la partie 2, la Loi sur le tribunal de la protection des renseignements personnels constituerait un tribunal, qui imposerait des pénalités pour des violations de la Loi sur la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs. Dans la partie 3, la Loi sur l'intelligence artificielle et les données, une disposition législative toute nouvelle, établit un cadre pour la conception et l’utilisation des systèmes d’intelligence artificielle, quelque chose qui n'est pratiquement pas réglementé.
Bien avant que l'utilisation d'Internet se généralise, la Cour suprême du Canada a indiqué clairement que la notion de vie privée est au cœur de celle de la liberté dans un État moderne. Le gouvernement devrait saisir toutes les occasions d'inscrire la protection de la vie privée dans nos lois, car elle est essentielle à l'exercice de nos droits et de nos libertés. Comme Daniel Therrien l'a déclaré dans le Toronto Star plus tôt ce mois‑ci, « les démocraties doivent adopter des mesures robustes fondées sur leurs valeurs, et non des lois qui prétendent protéger les citoyens tout en permettant le maintien des conditions qui ont mené à l’actuel far west numérique. »
L'importance du droit à la vie privée devrait être le point d'ancrage du projet de loi. Or, le projet de loi échoue sur ce plan dès le départ. Le préambule dit ce qui suit:
[...] la protection du droit à la vie privée des individus en ce qui a trait à leurs renseignements personnels est essentielle à leur autonomie et à leur dignité et à la pleine jouissance des droits et libertés fondamentaux au Canada [...]
Parler de cette importance dans le préambule du projet de loi, où il n'y a aucun pouvoir exécutoire, suscite la méfiance à l'égard de la volonté du gouvernement de vraiment respecter le droit à la vie privée des Canadiens. La Loi sur la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs exigerait que les organisations, les entreprises ou les ministères touchés par le projet de loi élaborent leurs propres codes de pratique pour la protection des renseignements personnels. Même si ces codes doivent être approuvés et certifiés par le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, on peut facilement s'imaginer les écarts entre les différentes mesures de protection. Cette exigence ajouterait de lourdes formalités administratives et représenterait une autre tâche coûteuse pour les petites et moyennes entreprises, lesquelles emploient la plupart des Canadiens. Elle entraînerait aussi plus de travail pour le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, qui devrait éplucher des codes compliqués établis par de grandes sociétés puissantes et riches ou des ministères ayant des équipes juridiques dont le seul but est de trouver des façons créatives de peut-être déjouer le système.
Même s’il fallait plus de temps et d’investissements dès le départ, la meilleure option, à mon avis, serait de créer un code de pratique standard que toutes les entités devraient suivre. Voilà qui pourrait assurément être considéré comme l’une des premières responsabilités du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée, dont cette loi élargit le mandat, pour ce qui est de définir le code universel de pratiques, qui favoriserait une plus grande confiance envers le processus et qui accorderait la plus grande importance à la protection de la vie privée des individus.
Le projet de loi prévoit que les renseignements personnels peuvent être communiqués sans le consentement des Canadiens à des fins allant de la recherche à l’analyse, en passant par les affaires, mais qu’ils doivent être dépersonnalisés avant que cela puisse se faire. À première vue, cette mesure est positive jusqu’à ce qu’on la compare à l'anonymisation comme solution de rechange. Selon le projet de loi, dépersonnaliser signifie « modifier des renseignements personnels afin de réduire le risque, sans pour autant l’éliminer, qu’un individu puisse être identifié directement ». Cela laisse beaucoup à désirer par rapport à l’anonymisation des renseignements personnels. Dans le projet de loi, anonymiser signifie « modifier définitivement et irréversiblement, conformément aux meilleures pratiques généralement reconnues, des renseignements personnels afin qu’ils ne permettent pas d’identifier un individu, directement ou indirectement, par quelque moyen que ce soit ».
Il est interdit de tenter d’identifier des personnes à partir de renseignements dépersonnalisés, sauf dans des circonstances approuvées. Bien que bon nombre de ces circonstances approuvées aient trait à la capacité d’une entité à tester l’efficacité de son système de dépersonnalisation, le risque d’abus existe toujours. On pourrait améliorer ce projet de loi en éliminant ces risques d’abus. Nous devrions envisager de remplacer autant que possible la dépersonnalisation par l’anonymisation.
En comparant le projet de loi C‑27 à la réglementation européenne, on constate que la Loi sur la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs n'est pas à la hauteur, à plusieurs égards, de ce qui est généralement considéré comme la norme internationale par excellence en matière de protection de la vie privée, soit le Règlement général sur la protection des données de 2016 de l’Union européenne. Voici un exemple flagrant des protections inférieures du projet de loi C‑27: le Règlement général sur la protection des données traite les données personnelles de sorte qu’elles ne puissent plus être attribuées à une personne en particulier sans l’utilisation de renseignements supplémentaires conservés séparément, sous réserve de mesures techniques et organisationnelles. Il s’agit d’une mesure de sécurité et de protection de la vie privée du Règlement général sur la protection des données.
En ce qui concerne ce que le projet de loi C‑27 considère comme des renseignements de nature délicate, rien n’indique en quoi consistent ces renseignements. Il est aussi limité dans son application. Seuls les renseignements personnels des mineurs sont considérés comme de nature délicate. Tous les renseignements que les Canadiens fournissent à une entité devraient être considérés comme étant de nature délicate. D’autre part, le Règlement général sur la protection des données dispose d’un régime particulier pour les catégories spéciales de données personnelles, dont l’origine raciale ou ethnique, les opinions politiques, les croyances religieuses ou philosophiques, l’adhésion à un syndicat, les données génétiques et biométriques, ainsi que les données concernant la santé, la vie sexuelle et l’orientation sexuelle.
Nous sommes heureux de constater que le consentement est mieux défini dans le projet de loi C‑27. Cependant, les exceptions pour les activités ne nécessitant pas de consentement seraient maintenues. Certaines d'entre elles sont si larges qu'une entité pourrait les interpréter comme faisant en sorte qu'une activité ne nécessite jamais de consentement. Ce sont des échappatoires que les Canadiens ne devraient pas avoir à subir lorsqu'ils doivent cocher la case indiquant qu'ils ont lu et accepté les conditions avant de pouvoir interagir avec un site numérique.
Par exemple, les entreprises peuvent invoquer des intérêts légitimes dans une situation donnée pour ne pas tenir compte du consentement. Il y a un risque que ces intérêts l'emportent sur les effets négatifs potentiels sur l'individu. Tenter de définir les intérêts légitimes laisse place à trop d'interprétation, et l'interprétation n'est pas une chose à laquelle se prêtent les lois sur la protection de la vie privée. L'utilisation des renseignements personnels pourrait également être exemptée du consentement si une personne raisonnable s'attend à ce que ses renseignements soient utilisés aux fins d'activités d'affaires. Il n'y a pas de définition de ce qu'est une personne raisonnable.
Au bout du compte, il y a beaucoup trop de termes vagues et d'échappatoires. Pour les individus astucieux, mieux nantis ou bien représentés par un avocat, le potentiel de contourner la loi est très présent. À l'inverse, le Règlement général sur la protection des données est catégorique sur le consentement. Ce dernier doit être donné de façon libre, spécifique, éclairée et univoque, en plus d'être présenté de manière facile à comprendre et accessible. Le consentement est valable seulement pour un but précis. Le Canada aurait dû suivre cet exemple. Les Canadiens ne peuvent s'empêcher de se demander pourquoi le projet de loi C‑27 ne suit pas cet exemple.
Dans la version actuelle de la Loi sur la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs, aucun âge minimum n'est prévu pour le consentement d'une personne mineure et aucune définition n'est prévue pour déterminer ce qu'on entend par personne mineure. Dans l'Union européenne, le Règlement général sur la protection des données établit que l'âge minimum pour le consentement d'une personne mineure est de 16 ans. Les pays signataires ont également la possibilité d'abaisser ce seuil, pourvu que l'âge déterminé ne soit pas inférieur à 13 ans.
En cas de violation des renseignements personnels, le projet de loi C‑27 fait en sorte qu'il faudra plus de temps au Canada pour agir comparativement à ses homologues à l'étranger. Ce projet de loi prévoit d'aviser dès que possible le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée de toute violation susceptible de créer un risque réel de préjudice grave. Il est aussi prévu d'informer les personnes concernées, mais — là encore — seulement le plus tôt possible.
Selon le Règlement général sur la protection des données, il est obligatoire d'aviser l'autorité de contrôle dans les meilleurs délais, ou au plus tard 72 heures après avoir pris connaissance de l'incident dans certaines circonstances. Le Canada affichait déjà un retard sur les autres pays, et le projet de loi présenté n'y change rien. Le Règlement général sur la protection des données a déjà six ans et, pendant tout ce temps, les libéraux n'ont pas élaboré la mesure législative qu'il nous faudrait pour répondre à la norme internationale robuste qui existe actuellement.
Le projet de loi C‑27 donnerait au commissaire à la protection de la vie privée le pouvoir de mener une enquête sur toute organisation certifiée qui contrevient à la loi. Depuis un certain temps, le commissaire demande à juste titre plus de pouvoirs et de responsabilités, pour pouvoir faire autre chose que recommander aux contrevenants de cesser leurs agissements. Le projet de loi propose que le commissaire puisse recommander des sanctions plus importantes ne dépassant pas 20 millions de dollars ou 4 % des recettes globales brutes en cas de procédure sommaire, et 25 millions ou 5 % des recettes globales brutes lorsqu'on procède par mise en accusation.
Ces sanctions devraient donner plus de mordant aux mesures que le commissaire peut prendre et changer, au final, la façon dont les renseignements personnels des Canadiens seront traités. Les sanctions s'appliqueraient également à plus de dispositions, notamment aux actions qui nuisent à l'établissement et à la mise en œuvre d'un programme de gestion de la protection des renseignements personnels, et au fait, pour une organisation, de ne pas veiller à ce qu'un fournisseur de services auquel elle transfère des renseignements personnels offre à leur égard une protection équivalente.
Toutefois, ces nouveaux pouvoirs du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée se heurtent à une impasse lorsqu'on les met en relation avec la deuxième partie du projet de loi, qui établit un tribunal. Le tribunal de la protection des renseignements personnels et des données serait composé d'un maximum de six membres, dont la moitié seulement devrait avoir de l'expérience dans le domaine du droit à l'information et à la protection des renseignements personnels. Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée aurait le pouvoir de rendre des ordonnances et de faire des recommandations à ce tribunal concernant les sanctions. Toutefois, le tribunal aurait le pouvoir d'appliquer plutôt sa propre décision, qui serait définitive et exécutoire. À l'exception du contrôle judiciaire prévu par la Loi sur les Cours fédérales, les décisions du tribunal ne feraient pas l'objet d'appels ou de contrôle par une cour quelconque. Il s'agit de pouvoirs équivalents à ceux d'une cour supérieure d'archives.
L'existence de ce tribunal affaiblirait quelque peu les nouveaux pouvoirs accordés au commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Certes, le commissaire pourrait recommander qu'une pénalité soit imposée pour des violations de la Loi sur la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs, mais c'est le tribunal qui aurait le pouvoir de fixer le montant dû par les organisations fautives.
Le coût associé à la création de ce tribunal est également une préoccupation. Malgré le fait que son travail se limiterait probablement à quelques réunions par année pour déterminer les pénalités, il nécessiterait apparemment un effectif permanent et à temps plein de 20 personnes. Je suis très préoccupée parce que le gouvernement a aussi la mauvaise habitude de créer des conseils consultatifs ou de prétendus organismes de réglementation indépendants avant que les projets de loi ne soient débattus et adoptés à la Chambre et bien avant que l'encre sur ces projets de loi ne soit sèche.
Je me souviens de l'époque où un projet de loi était débattu à la Chambre et où j'ai demandé des détails sur le conseil environnemental proposé. On m'a dit avec beaucoup d'empressement qu'il avait déjà été établi et que les membres avaient été nommés avant même que le projet de loi ne soit débattu à la Chambre.
L'actuel premier ministre peut-il nous dire si ce tribunal sera seulement constitué après que le Parlement aura examiné à fond le projet de loi? Les libéraux seront-ils transparents avec les Canadiens concernant la façon dont le processus de nomination sera mené? Peuvent-ils assurer aux Canadiens qu'un effectif permanent et à temps plein de 20 personnes n'a pas déjà été constitué? Étant donné que les libéraux sont au pouvoir depuis sept ans, leurs habitudes de favoritisme sont bien ancrées.
La partie 2, qui édicte la Loi sur le Tribunal de la protection des renseignements personnels et des données, devrait être retirée, étant donné qu'il s'agit d'un intermédiaire bureaucratique ayant des pouvoirs redondants qui entreraient en conflit avec les nouveaux pouvoirs du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Les nouveaux pouvoirs ne vaudront pas grand-chose s'ils ne s'accompagnent pas de conséquences immédiates et importantes pour les contrevenants. Ce tribunal prolongerait le processus décisionnel pour les amendes et nuirait à la réputation du Canada comme pays capable de tenir les contrevenants responsables de leurs actes.
Le tribunal ne cadre pas non plus avec la façon de faire de nos amis de l'Union européenne, du Royaume‑Uni, de la Nouvelle‑Zélande et de l'Australie, qui n'ont pas recours à un tribunal pour donner des amendes. Voilà qui montre aux Canadiens que les libéraux sont excellents pour augmenter inutilement la taille de l'État, qui est déjà trop gros.
La troisième et dernière partie du projet de loi est le seul élément entièrement nouveau. La Loi sur l’intelligence artificielle et les données vise à réglementer une entité, l'intelligence artificielle, qui n'a jamais été réglementée au Canada.
Elle établirait des normes pour la création et l'utilisation de systèmes d'intelligence artificielle au Canada par des entités tant canadiennes qu'étrangères. Plus précisément, les échanges et le commerce internationaux et interprovinciaux en matière de systèmes d’intelligence artificielle seraient réglementés par l’établissement d’exigences communes pour la conception et l’utilisation de ces systèmes.
La loi interdirait certaines conduites relativement aux systèmes d’intelligence artificielle qui pourraient causer un préjudice aux individus ou à leurs données personnelles. On mentionne les données personnelles. Tenter de réglementer quelque chose qui, jusqu'à maintenant, ne l'était presque pas est une tâche colossale.
Je crois également comprendre que les consultations à ce sujet n'ont débuté qu'en juin. La logique veut qu'un tel projet de loi nécessite un examen approfondi et suffisamment de temps pour bien faire les choses.
Les exigences relatives à la tenue de documents et à la surveillance humaine sont des éléments positifs. Ce qui nous préoccupe, c'est qu'il semble difficile d'obtenir une image claire du cadre final, car seul le ministre aurait le pouvoir de prendre des règlements. Le ministre pourrait, sans consulter le Parlement, établir des règles et imposer des amendes. À une époque où l'avenir de notre relation avec l'intelligence artificielle est rempli d'incertitude, une telle chose est inacceptable. À tout le moins, le Parlement ainsi que des experts et des chiens de garde indépendants devraient être au cœur de la création et de l'application de ces règles.
Il semble que le gouvernement a une fois de plus choisi de simplement greffer à un projet de loi déjà complexe un dossier qui préoccupe énormément les Canadiens et, encore une fois, il accorde à un ministre de vastes pouvoirs afin d'agir de façon indépendante, sans surveillance parlementaire.
Mes dernières pensées d'aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi C‑27 sont les suivantes. Les conservateurs examinent ce projet de loi selon une approche raisonnée et sont conscients que les parties prenantes qui réclament cette mesure législative depuis des années regardent attentivement le débat d'aujourd'hui.
Il est tout à fait clair qu'il faut une mesure de protection moderne pour les renseignements personnels des Canadiens. Ils doivent pouvoir avoir accès à leur collecte, à leur utilisation, à leur surveillance et à leur divulgation et pouvoir les contrôler et les supprimer ou disparaître.
Comment pouvons-nous garantir que les données sont protégées par des règlements étanches et des amendes strictes en cas d'abus tout en prenant en compte le fait que les entreprises touchées par ce projet de loi n'ont pas toutes les ressources de Walmart ou d'Amazon? Les petites et moyennes entreprises devraient être protégées contre une réglementation onéreuse qui étouffe leur croissance. Cela ne veut pas dire que les intérêts commerciaux devraient avoir la même valeur que la protection de la vie privée, mais il faut trouver un équilibre, et je crois que les libéraux ne l'ont pas trouvé ici.
De plus, dans une tentative cynique de faire avancer leur programme législatif, les libéraux ont regroupé les modifications apportées aux lois sur la protection de la vie privée avec un cadre sans précédent relatif à l'intelligence artificielle, qui vise une fois de plus à gouverner par réglementation descendante et non par voie législative.
Les libéraux devraient s'engager aujourd'hui à scinder ce projet de loi pour permettre aux Canadiens d'avoir une vision claire de ses répercussions prévues. Avec cet engagement, les conservateurs chercheront à faire le travail difficile au comité pour améliorer les éléments tant attendus mais imparfaits de ce projet de loi. Même à l'ère de la commodité, le monde dans lequel nous vivons devient de plus en plus complexe. Les Canadiens méritent une protection de leur vie privée digne des réalités de 2022 et au-delà.
Collapse
View Jamie Schmale Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I rise today to speak to Bill S-4, an act to amend the Criminal Code and the Identification of Criminals Act and to make other related amendments. While I have much to say on this bill, I want to briefly talk about some the failures of the Liberal government on crime in general and crime specifically.
Rural crime is a serious issue, and one that has been ignored by the Liberal government for far too long. In my area, in Haliburton County for example, incidents increased from 526 back in 2017 to 758 in 2021. Police are now trying to keep up with more people charged than in any of the previous four years.
The crime severity index, or CSI, is a measure of police-reported crime in which more serious crimes are given a higher weight in the overall measurement of all crimes. The index provides a picture of regional crime trends. In the case of Kawartha Lakes, specifically in Lindsay, the picture is not as good. Like Haliburton County, the CSI numbers for Lindsay in 2021 showed a significant increase compared to previous years. Lindsay's overall CSI was 93.1 last year, which is a jump of more than 20% over 2020, and is significantly higher than the country's CSI of 73.7 and nearly double the province's CSI of 56.21 for the same period.
Kawartha Lakes Police Service Chief Mark Mitchell described the increase as “death by 1,000 cuts”, referring to the lack of murders but an overall increase in other non-violent crimes. He further added, “Our calls for service were up 20% in 2021, our criminal charges were up 25%, break and enters, frauds were all significantly higher, and our theft charges were up 80% compared to the year before and the current year.”
I have spoken with residents who are afraid to walk in their community. They are afraid to basically be inside their own homes. They are frustrated and angry. These concerns came to a boiling point about a year ago at a community meeting I attended that was hosted by the Kawartha Lakes Police Service.
At the meeting, residents learned that the Ross Memorial Hospital's mental health program had already received roughly 1,700 referrals just this year. Concerns were raised about the impact the Central East Correctional Centre is having on the community. The John Howard Society noted the challenge given the number of those who have come to the area to support the incarcerated and those who are released into the community on their own recognizance, bail or after completing their sentence.
The Kawartha Lakes Police Service is doing everything it can, but the government is sadly making its job harder. While it was distressing to hear the first-hand stories shared by many in attendance, it was evident to me that Canada's justice system has failed those law-abiding citizens. Lindsay resident Al Hussey raised concerns about the victims of crime, asking, “When does the support start flowing to us?” He was speaking of the victims of crime such as the residents living next to known drug houses, the business and property owners who are being robbed and the people who are afraid to walk near certain areas of town.
It is true a small number of people are creating a disproportionate amount of work for our law enforcement agencies, the court system, social services and not-for-profit organizations. However, those who continually refuse help and continue to reoffend should not be repeatedly returned to the streets in a revolving door justice system.
A big part of this is linked to the passage of Bill C-75. In 2017, the Liberal government's legislation watered down penalties for over 100 serious crimes, including the use of date rape drugs, human trafficking and impaired driving causing bodily harm. Sadly, the government severely underestimated the heartbreaking impact this decision would have on individuals, communities and families. It is unacceptable that taxpayers are once again being forced to pay more while at the same time receiving a lower quality of life.
Police officers I speak with say that Bill C-75 is the root of much of the issue regarding the catch and release bail concepts through the ladder principle, a principle that instructs justice system actors to release the accused at the earliest opportunity under the least restrictive conditions.
I firmly believe that serious crimes deserve serious penalties. Most importantly, the law should always put the rights of victims and law-abiding citizens above dangerous or reoffending criminals.
It is clear that Bill C-75 has hurt our community. To that end, I recognize that federal lawmakers must make bold changes to our criminal justice system. New methods, such as restorative justice, should be expanded, especially for those who show a desire to be rehabilitated and released as productive members of our society.
This brings me to Bill S-4. It may come as no surprise to anyone listening that the first thing I looked at was how much this bill would impact crime in the communities I represent and how it would impact those victims of crimes. The impetus for this bill is born from the increasing backlog facing the court system here in Canada. I believe we all have stories about that.
The judicial system has been facing a series of delays in cases proceeding to trial, which has been exacerbated by COVID. This is not lost on us here in the official opposition. We have continuously raised concerns about the delays and the potential for criminals to walk free due to the Supreme Court's Jordan decision, which said that no more than 18 months can pass between laying a charge and the end of the trial case in provincial courts or 30 months for cases in superior courts. We have raised our concerns in the House and in the media.
It was the Conservatives who called for a study into the impacts of COVID–19 on the judicial system at the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. Now Bill S-4 hopes to alleviate this backlog through several initiatives. It will amend the process for peace officers to obtain warrants without appearing in person, will expand the provisions to fingerprint the accused later should fingerprints not previously have been taken at the time of arrest, and will allow the courts to deal with administrative matters for accused persons not represented by lawyers.
Of these provisions I have no issue. Anything to move the process along that does not diminish the rights of the accused persons or victims or brings the justice system into disrepute is a good thing. I expect that these initiatives will be thoroughly examined at committee and perhaps even acted on.
However, I do have concerns, perhaps cautions is a better word, with the remaining provisions in the legislation, particularly around the expansion of the accused's ability to appear remotely by audio or video conference and to allow the participation of prospective jurors in the jury selection process by video conference. I would caution the members at committee to pay particular attention to the rights of victims and those citizens who are doing their duty as jurors.
We must ensure that the anonymity of jurors is protected. Technology has come a long way and the risk that recognition software might compromise jurors and risk the integrity of the trial is a real concern.
We must also take into consideration the impact of the expansion of telecommunication options, particularly when allowing accused persons to call in using a phone, which may impact the healing process for victims and their families. The bill will permit an offender to appear remotely for sentencing purposes. This measure would require the consent of the criminal prosecutor. The court would also weigh the rights of the offender to have a fair public hearing.
Nowhere is the victim asked or required to consent to the offender being allowed to call in for his or her sentence. The balance of rights in the court process is already heavily weighted in favour of the accused and I am afraid that Bill S-4 tips the scale even further.
That reminds me of another failure of the Liberal government, which is the delay in the filling of long vacancies, such as the federal ombudsman for victims of crime. Without that person in place, Bill S-4 will not be critically analyzed by a key advocate for victims to advise on how the bill will impact victims of crime.
Conservatives remain steadfast in our commitment to victims of crime and will ensure that legislation like Bill S-4 helps victims and their families in their pursuit of justice. We will stand up for law-abiding Canadians to ensure communities remain safe places to live and that delays in the court process do not allow criminals to walk free.
With that, I look forward to questions from my colleagues.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi S‑4, Loi modifiant le Code criminel et la Loi sur l’identification des criminels et apportant des modifications connexes à d’autres lois. J'en ai long à dire au sujet de cette mesure, mais je commencerai par parler brièvement des échecs du gouvernement libéral en matière de criminalité.
La criminalité rurale est un grave problème que le gouvernement libéral néglige depuis beaucoup trop longtemps. Dans ma région, par exemple dans le comté d'Haliburton, le nombre d'incidents est passé de 526 en 2017 à 758 en 2021. Les services de police tentent de s'adapter au nombre accru de personnes accusées de crimes, un nombre supérieur à celui des quatre dernières années.
L'indice de gravité de la criminalité est fondé sur les crimes déclarés par la police et fournit une évaluation globale de l'ensemble des crimes; pour le calculer, on attribue un poids plus élevé aux crimes graves. L'indice dresse un portrait des tendances régionales en matière de criminalité. Dans le secteur de Kawartha Lakes, particulièrement à Lindsay, ce portrait n'est pas très reluisant. Comme c'est le cas dans le comté d'Haliburton, l'indice de gravité de la criminalité de Lindsay a augmenté considérablement en 2021. En effet, Lindsay avait un indice global de 93,1 en 2021, une augmentation de plus de 20 % par rapport à 2020. C'est un résultat beaucoup plus élevé que la moyenne nationale, qui se situe à 73,7, et presque deux fois plus élevé que l'indice de la province, qui s'établit à 56,21 pour la même période.
Le chef du service de police de Kawartha Lakes, Mark Mitchell, a dit que la situation se détériore lentement, car, même s'il n'y a pas de meurtres, les crimes non violents sont généralement en hausse. Il a ajouté ceci: « Les demandes de service ont augmenté de 20 % en 2021, le nombre d'accusations criminelles a augmenté de 25 %, il y a eu une hausse considérable des cas d'introduction par effraction et de fraude, et le nombre d'accusations de vol a dépassé de 80 % celles qui ont été portées pendant l'année précédente et l'année en cours. »
J'ai parlé avec des résidants qui ont peur de se déplacer à pied dans leur collectivité. Ils ont peur même dans leur propre maison. Ils sont frustrés et fâchés. Ces inquiétudes étaient à leur plus haut point lors d'une assemblée publique que le service de police de Kawartha Lakes a organisée il y a un an, et à laquelle j'ai participé.
Lors de cette assemblée, des résidants ont appris qu'environ 1 700 personnes avaient été redirigées vers le service de santé mentale de l'hôpital Ross Memorial pendant cette année-là seulement. La Société John Howard a indiqué que la situation était difficile, étant donné le nombre de personnes venues dans la région pour soutenir les détenus et ceux qui sont libérés dans la collectivité avec promesse de comparaître, libérés sous caution ou libérés après avoir purgé leur peine.
Le service de police de Kawartha Lakes fait tout ce qu'il peut, mais le gouvernement lui rend malheureusement la tâche plus difficile. Bien qu'il ait été pénible d'entendre les histoires racontées par de nombreuses personnes présentes, il m'est apparu évident que le système de justice du Canada avait laissé tomber ces citoyens respectueux de la loi. Al Hussey, un résidant de Lindsay, s'est inquiété des victimes d'actes criminels et a demandé: « Quand l'aide commencera-t-elle à nous parvenir? » Il parlait des victimes de la criminalité, comme les résidants qui vivent à proximité de repaires de trafiquants de drogue, les propriétaires de commerces et de logements qui sont victimes de vol et les personnes qui ont peur de se balader dans certains secteurs de la ville.
Il est vrai qu'un petit nombre de personnes crée une quantité disproportionnée de travail pour les forces de l'ordre, le système judiciaire, les services sociaux et les organisations à but non lucratif. Cependant, les personnes qui refusent continuellement l'aide qui leur est offerte et qui persistent à récidiver ne devraient pas être remises en liberté de façon répétée à cause d'un système prorécidive.
Une grande partie de cette situation est liée à l'adoption du projet de loi C‑75. En 2017, le gouvernement libéral a édulcoré les peines pour plus de 100 crimes graves, y compris l'utilisation de drogues du viol, la traite des personnes et la conduite avec facultés affaiblies causant des lésions corporelles. Malheureusement, le gouvernement a gravement sous-estimé les conséquences déchirantes que cette décision aurait sur les personnes, les communautés et les familles. Il est inacceptable que les contribuables soient une fois de plus contraints de payer davantage tout en bénéficiant d'une qualité de vie inférieure.
Les policiers avec qui j'ai parlé ont dit que le projet de loi C‑75 était la source d'une grande partie du problème de ce qu'on appelle « la capture et la remise en liberté » et de l'idée de codifier le principe dit de l'échelle, un principe qui demande aux acteurs du système de justice de libérer l'accusé à la première occasion, en imposant les conditions les moins restrictives à sa libération.
Je crois fermement que les crimes graves méritent des sanctions graves, mais surtout, que la loi devrait toujours placer les droits des victimes et des citoyens respectueux des lois avant les droits des criminels dangereux ou récidivistes.
Il ne fait aucun doute que le projet de loi C‑75 a fait du tort à notre collectivité. Pour cette raison, je suis d'avis que les législateurs fédéraux doivent apporter des changements audacieux au système canadien de justice pénale. De nouvelles méthodes, comme la justice réparatrice, devraient être étendues, en particulier pour les personnes qui expriment le désir d'être réadaptées et libérées pour redevenir des membres productifs de la société.
J'en viens maintenant au projet de loi S‑4. Tous ceux qui sont à l'écoute ne seront probablement pas surpris d'apprendre que la première chose que j'ai cherché à savoir, c'est à quel point le projet de loi aurait des répercussions sur la criminalité dans la région que je représente et à quel point il serait bénéfique pour les victimes. La mesure législative a été motivée par l'arriéré qui s'alourdit dans le système judiciaire au Canada. Je pense que nous pourrions tous raconter des histoires à ce sujet.
Le système judiciaire fait face à une série de retards pour les affaires qui se rendent devant les tribunaux, une situation qui a été exacerbée par la COVID. Nous en sommes bien conscients ici, du côté de l'opposition officielle. Nous avons constamment soulevé des préoccupations à propos des retards et de la possibilité que des criminels soient remis en liberté en raison de l'arrêt Jordan de la Cour suprême, qui a établi qu'il ne doit pas s'écouler plus de 18 mois entre le dépôt d'une accusation et la fin du procès pour les tribunaux provinciaux ou 30 mois pour les cours supérieures. Nous avons exprimé nos inquiétudes à la Chambre et dans les médias.
Ce sont les conservateurs qui ont demandé une étude concernant les répercussions de la COVID‑19 sur le système judiciaire au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne. Maintenant, le projet de loi S‑4 vise à réduire l'arriéré par l'entremise de plusieurs initiatives. Il modifierait le processus afin que les agents de la paix puissent obtenir un mandat sans se présenter en personne, élargirait les dispositions en vue d'autoriser la prise ultérieure des empreintes de l'accusé lorsqu'elles n'ont pas pu être prises au moment de son arrestation, et elle permettrait aux tribunaux de régler des questions de nature administrative pour les accusés non représentés par avocat.
Ces dispositions ne me posent aucun problème. Je suis en faveur de tout ce qui fait avancer le processus sans diminuer les droits des accusés ou des victimes, ni jeter le discrédit sur notre système de justice. Je m'attends à ce que le comité examine en profondeur ces initiatives et peut‑être même qu'il y donne suite.
Toutefois, j'ai des préoccupations — ou, plutôt, des réserves — quant aux autres dispositions du projet de loi, en particulier celles visant à élargir les possibilités de comparution à distance, par audioconférence ou vidéoconférence, pour les accusés, ainsi qu'à autoriser la participation de candidats-jurés dans le processus de constitution du jury par vidéoconférence. Je conseille aux membres du comité d'accorder une attention toute particulière aux droits des victimes et des citoyens remplissant les fonctions de juré.
Nous devons nous assurer que l'anonymat des jurés est protégé. La technologie a beaucoup évolué et le risque que des logiciels de reconnaissance compromettent les jurés et mettent en péril l'intégrité du procès est une réelle préoccupation.
Nous devons également prendre en considération les effets de l'expansion des options de télécommunication, notamment lorsqu'on permet aux accusés de comparaître par téléphone, ce qui peut avoir une incidence sur le processus de guérison des victimes et de leurs familles. Le projet de loi permettrait à un délinquant de comparaître à distance aux fins de la détermination de la peine. Cette mesure nécessiterait le consentement du procureur au criminel. Le tribunal évaluerait également les droits du délinquant de bénéficier d'une audience publique équitable.
À aucun moment la victime n'est priée ou tenue de consentir à ce que son agresseur comparaisse par audioconférence. La représentation des droits dans le processus judiciaire penche déjà fortement en faveur de l'accusé et je crains que le projet de loi S‑4 ne fasse pencher la balance encore davantage.
Cela me fait penser à un autre échec du gouvernement libéral, soit le retard à pourvoir des postes vacants depuis longtemps, comme celui de l'ombudsman fédéral des victimes d'actes criminels. Sans cette personne, le projet de loi S‑4 ne pourra pas faire l'objet d'une analyse critique de la part d'un important représentant des victimes qui pourrait donner son avis sur les répercussions du projet de loi sur les victimes d'actes criminels.
Les conservateurs sont toujours aussi résolument du côté des victimes d'actes criminels. Nous veillerons à ce que les mesures législatives comme le projet de loi S‑4 aident les victimes et leurs familles dans leur quête de justice. Nous défendrons les Canadiens respectueux des lois pour faire en sorte que les collectivités demeurent des endroits sûrs et que les retards dans les procédures judiciaires ne permettent pas aux criminels d'être libérés.
Sur ce, je suis prêt à répondre aux questions de mes collègues.
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-11-14 12:34 [p.9382]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I will use the first few moments of my remarks to continue with the point I was making, because it really is astounding to hear that member.
On a personal level, as House leaders, we all get to know each other a little. We have extra meetings throughout the week to talk about the business of the House, things like the Board of Internal Economy and other aspects about the place. I have always found that my counterpart on the government bench has been decent to work with, and I want to say that off the bat. We all come from different political perspectives, we are all human beings here, and I do appreciate that about him. However, to listen to a representative from the government talk about misinformation, divisiveness and the battle for the heart and soul of Canadians, this is a government that has been caught telling blatant falsehoods time and time again.
I want to share with the hon. member that when I referenced the scriptural part about “Go and sin no more” would I ever presume to hold myself up to that standard. I can assure him that I make no pretensions whatsoever. However, I will let the member in on a little secret. In a couple of hours we will have question period, and we will hear misinformation and falsehoods coming from the government side. We will hear the Prime Minister deny that he has a role in inflation.
We have a Prime Minister who has directly caused the worst inflation Canadians have had in 40 years, and on a daily basis he gets up and he denies that. He gets up and tries to say that it is all these external factors, that it is kind of like the weather, that inflation is just happening to us, so we better bundle up, add another layer and shove some twenties in our pockets as those prices will get us if we are not looking carefully. It is just nonsense. We know that his money printing and deficits caused the Bank of Canada to bankroll his out-of-control spending, a good chunk of which had nothing to do with COVID. That is why we have inflation, but we do not hear that. Instead, we hear misinformation and falsehoods, with the government trying to blame everybody else for the inflation we see.
There is an expression many people are probably very aware of, which goes something along the lines of “Your poor planning does not constitute an emergency on my part.” The government House leader referenced a couple of examples of legislation that his own government is responsible for the delay. He talked about Bill C-9, which sat on the Order Paper for six months before the government called it. When it did call it, the Liberals were surprised that members wanted to speak to it, that they wanted to point out some of its deficiencies. They do not like that.
The member also talked about Bill S-5 needing six days of debate, as if six days is a long time. Bill S-5 is comprehensive legislation that would amend several acts, has a whole bunch of new regulations as it relates to the chemical industry and all kinds of interrelated aspects. Members of Parliament need to draw out, in their time in the House, some of the flaws in that bill to raise awareness. Many stakeholders and industry groups will be affected by that legislation.
When we come to this place, we do that due diligence and we take our time to highlight that. We allow time for people who are affected by the legislation to react, to educate their members or their colleagues or to educate us. Sometimes we start debating legislation and all of a sudden our agenda gets booked by people wanting to meet with us to tell us what the impact would be if the legislation is or is not passed, and all that takes time.
The government does not give every single Canadian a heads up as to what it is doing. There is no daily Canada Gazette email to Canadians that says that in four or five months this is what the government will be doing so let it know what they think. There is a small notice period where the government tells the House what it is going to do and then tables it at first reading, and often we are on to the second reading debate the very next day. Many Canadians are getting that information for the very first time, and it takes time for people to inform their members of Parliament as to how they will be affected.
Acting as if six days in the House before a bill gets to committee is an inordinately long period of time is ridiculous, especially when we consider that two of those days were one-hour debates. The government called the debate for second reading on short days. In fact, if I am not mistaken, the NDP critic for the legislation on Bill S-5 had to wait until the third day to conclude remarks because of that. If the government is saying that it does not want to listen to the NDP members give speeches, I have some affinity for that and some sympathy, but I do not think it is proper to ram through a motion like this and, as a result, not allow for enough time for NDP members to have their say.
I certainly believe in hearing all points of view and all voices before the House takes a decision, so this is just a completely false and bogus argument altogether. There is nothing to it; there is no justification for it.
What is it akin to? The government House leader spoke a lot about the need for the House to get things done. I think a lot of Canadians would agree with that. They see us in this chamber. We know the issues that are affecting them on a daily a basis and they want some action. They want their elected representatives to tackle those issues. However, they also do not want the government to have a completely unfettered hand.
Every democracy tries to put in place not only mechanisms for decisions to be made, but mechanisms for those who oppose those decisions to, at the very least, have an impact and to limit the unfettered power that the executive branch may have. In Canada, we have some checks and balances. Other countries have more. Other countries make the inability to get things done a feature of their system. Many people might look to the United States and see a very complicated process that takes a lot of time and requires a political party to have control in all three branches of the government with respect to both houses, congress and the senate, and the presidency to really make ambitious changes. They might look at that and say it is a flaw, which it may very well be at times. The system may have been designed to make it difficult to get things done.
The Canadian system was designed to make it easier for the government to implement its agenda, but it is not without checks and balances in and of itself. We have a second chamber in our Parliament, the Senate, that provides many of the same rights and privileges that many members of Parliament have. It goes through the same process. Once a bill leaves the House and goes to the Senate, it has its three readings. It has committee study. There have been occasions in Canadian history where the Senate has held up government legislation when acting as that kind of check.
The calendar and the daily program is also a check on the government's power. The Prime Minister cannot come in and start moving legislation, have it rubber-stamped and sail it through. The government has to prioritize. It has to look at the calendar and the number of sitting days and prioritize its legislation. If it brings something in that the opposition has no intention of supporting, because it is poorly drafted or will have terrible consequences, then it has to understand that the House will take longer to pass that kind of legislation, which will have an impact on other bills it wants to pass.
Therefore, by the government giving itself the power to extend these sittings, it really does take away a very important check on the unfettered power of the Prime Minister. It is going to weaken the ability for the House of Commons to put the brakes on some of these terrible ideas we see coming from the government side.
The Conservatives will make no apology for fighting the government's inflation-causing agenda. Yes, we absolutely will go through pieces of legislation to ruthlessly scrutinize whether they will add to the cost of government, because we know the cost of government is driving up the cost of living. There is a direct correlation between the massive deficit spending that the Prime Minister has put Canadians through over the past years and the record-high prices Canadians are paying at the grocery store and the fuel pump.
Therefore, every time the government brings in legislation, that is our first and foremost lens. The Conservatives get out the sharp pencils and the extra scraps of paper and we start to ruthlessly scrutinize it to see if it will add to the cost of government, if it will grow the obligation the state has to pay out of taxpayer funds or if it will add extra compliance costs to industries that are already suffering under some of the biggest regulatory and tax burdens among our major trading partners. It takes time to do that. It takes time to not just do that research, but meet with those stakeholders.
I have been a shadow minister responsible for infrastructure. Among my colleagues today, I see many shadow ministers from a wide variety of portfolios. I know that I speak for all of us when I say that, when we get legislation, our speech in the House of Commons, the 10 or 20 minutes of analysis we provide, is just a small fraction of the work we do. We instantly start meeting with the people who will be affected by the legislation, to hear directly from them.
The government talked about Bill S-5. I have never been in the plastics industry, but I sure as heck know a lot of people who are, and they know exactly how this legislation would affect them. I know people who work in various aspects of manufacturing, distributing and retail who would all be affected by some of the regulatory burdens in Bill S-5. We have to meet with them, take what one groups says and weigh it off against what another group says, and use our intelligence and wisdom to sift through all of that information before we make a determination as to whether or not we are going to vote yes or no.
Debate in the House of Commons acts as a check on the government, preventing it from being able to ram through its agenda, and that is really important in today's context because the Canadian people have refused to give the Liberal Party a majority government in two elections. We all know that is very disappointing to the Prime Minister. He was hoping that an election might have cleansed his reputation after the corruption his government was involved in came to light with the SNC-Lavalin scandal and his own personal acts of racism, when he committed racist acts by putting on blackface so many times he has lost count.
We know the Prime Minister was hoping to get a majority government to have a palate cleanse of those things and to redeem his reputation, but Canadians did not give him that. Canadians do not want this party to ram through its agenda. They want those checks and balances to make sure there is a lot of oversight and a lot of scrutiny on what the government is doing. Extending the hours on a selective basis is going to allow the government to ram through more of its agenda. It is trying to avoid that accountability by stealth.
It is also very hypocritical. I am not using unparliamentary language when I quote the government House leader who called himself a hypocrite. I have to say that he has some justification for that when it comes to the government's excuse for this measure. He is talking about the fact that there is not enough time to get through the legislation when it was the party that prorogued just to get out of a corruption investigation scandal.
For anybody watching who might not be up to speed on all the fancy words we use in this place, proroguing is kind of like a big reset button. It is like cancelling the rest of the House's sittings for a period of time, and it resets everything. It is like a big eraser on a whiteboard of all the bills. The government is saying it has to now sit late to enact all of the bills that had been completely cancelled and had to start from scratch. We did not do that. The opposition party cannot prorogue Parliament. There is only one person who can, and that is the Prime Minister. That is what he did. There is only one person who can call elections in this country, and that is the Prime Minister.
The previous Parliament had a very similar makeup to what it does now. We had an election last year just because the Prime Minister decided that he wanted one, just like when he prorogued Parliament during the WE group of companies investigation. Do members remember that? In the early days of the pandemic, when Canadians were still suffering through some of the harshest lockdowns around the world and being told they could not visit their loved ones in hospitals, when children were being told that they could not go to school, and when young and healthy athletes were being told they were not allowed to play sports or finish their year, what did the Prime Minister do? The Prime Minister never misses an opportunity to take advantage and reward his friends.
While Canadians were focused on their health and trying to save their businesses after these punitive restrictions prevented them from earning a living, while Canadians were all focused on the very horrifying impact on their lives in so many ways, what did the Prime Minister do? He took the time to take out the chequebook that is written on the taxpayers' bank account and reward his friends at the WE group of companies by giving them an untendered half a billion dollars of Canadian taxpayers' money.
When he got caught, he pressed the big reset button. While that investigation was going on, he took out the big whiteboard eraser and—
An hon. member: Oh, oh!
Madame la Présidente, je veux d'abord revenir au point que je faisais valoir, car ce que le député dit est vraiment ahurissant.
Sur le plan personnel, à titre de leaders parlementaires, nous apprenons tous à nous connaître un peu. Nous participons à des réunions supplémentaires tout au long de la semaine, notamment à celles du Bureau de régie interne, pour discuter des travaux de la Chambre et d'autres aspects de cette assemblée. J'ai toujours estimé que mon homologue du côté ministériel était une bonne personne avec qui travailler, et je tiens à le dire d'emblée. Je suis conscient que tout le monde ici a des opinions politiques différentes et que nous sommes tous des êtres humains, y compris le député. Toutefois, il parle de désinformation, de division et d'une lutte pour le cœur et l'âme des Canadiens, alors qu'il représente un gouvernement qui s'est fait prendre à dire des faussetés flagrantes à maintes reprises.
J'aimerais préciser au député que ma référence au passage « Va, et ne pêche plus » des Saintes Écritures ne signifie absolument pas que je prétends satisfaire à cette norme. Je peux l'assurer que je n'ai aucune prétention à cet égard. Cependant, j'aimerais lui confier un petit secret. Dans quelques heures, ce sera la période des questions et nous entendrons des renseignements erronés et des faussetés du côté du gouvernement. Nous entendrons le premier ministre nier qu'il a une part de responsabilité dans l'inflation.
Chaque jour, quand il prend la parole, le premier ministre nie qu'il a directement causé la pire inflation que les Canadiens aient connue dans les 40 dernières années. Il jette le blâme sur des facteurs externes, comme si l'inflation était une simple tempête qui survient inopinément, se plaisant à nous avertir d'ajouter une couche de protection et de garder quelques billets de 20 dollars bien au chaud dans nos poches afin de ne pas être pris au dépourvu, si nous ne sommes pas vigilants, par les bourrasques de la hausse des prix. C'est tout simplement insensé. Nous savons qu'il a financé ses dépenses effrénées, dont une bonne partie n'avait rien à voir avec la COVID‑19, en forçant la Banque du Canada à imprimer de l'argent et en augmentant les déficits. Voilà pourquoi nous nous retrouvons en pleine crise inflationniste, mais ce n'est pas le message qui est véhiculé. Le gouvernement nous sert des renseignements erronés et des faussetés en essayant de rejeter la responsabilité de l'inflation sur le dos des autres.
Il y a une expression que bon nombre de personnes connaissent probablement très bien, qui dit à peu près ceci: « Une mauvaise planification de votre part ne constitue pas une urgence pour moi. » Le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a cité quelques exemples de projets de loi qui sont retardés par la seule faute de son gouvernement. Il a parlé du projet de loi C-9, qui est resté au Feuilleton pendant six mois avant que le gouvernement veuille en faire l'étude. Quand enfin le gouvernement a voulu l'étudier, les libéraux ont été surpris que des députés veuillent intervenir pour signaler des lacunes dans le projet de loi. Les libéraux n'aiment pas cela.
Le député a aussi dit que le projet de loi S-5 nécessitait six jours de débat, comme si cela constituait un long débat. Le projet de loi S‑5 est une mesure législative très complexe qui modifierait plusieurs lois. Il compte de nombreux nouveaux règlements d'application, car il se rapporte à l'industrie chimique et à toutes sortes d'éléments interreliés. Les députés ont besoin du débat à la Chambre pour faire ressortir les lacunes du projet de loi afin de sensibiliser les Canadiens. Nombre d'intervenants et de groupes qui représentent les industries seront touchés par le projet de loi.
Lorsque nous venons ici, nous prenons le temps de faire les choses comme il faut. Nous donnons aux gens qui seront touchés par le projet de loi le temps de donner leur avis, de renseigner les membres de leur organisation, leurs collègues ou les députés de cette Chambre. Lorsque nous commençons à débattre d'un projet de loi, il arrive que nous soyons soudainement sollicités par nombre de personnes qui veulent nous rencontrer et nous renseigner sur ce qui arriverait si le projet de loi était adopté ou rejeté, et cela prend du temps.
Le gouvernement n'avise pas tous les Canadiens de ce qu'il compte faire. On n'envoie pas de courriels tous les jours aux Canadiens pour leur indiquer ce qui est publié dans la Gazette du Canada afin qu'ils sachent quelles sont les mesures législatives que le gouvernement compte faire adopter dans quatre ou cinq mois et qu'ils puissent donner leur avis à ce sujet. Le gouvernement laisse peu de temps à la Chambre entre l'annonce de ce qu'il compte faire et la présentation du projet de loi en première lecture, et il arrive souvent qu'on passe à l'étape de la deuxième lecture dès le lendemain. Dans bien des cas, ce n'est qu'à ce moment que les Canadiens sont informés de la situation, et il leur faut du temps pour informer leurs députés de la façon dont ils seraient touchés par ce projet de loi.
Il est ridicule de prétendre que six jours de séance à la Chambre avant qu'un projet de loi ne soit renvoyé à un comité est une période inhabituellement longue, surtout quand on pense que le débat n'a duré qu'une heure pendant deux de ces journées. Le gouvernement a prévu le débat à l'étape de la deuxième lecture les jours où les séances sont les plus courtes. En fait, si je ne me trompe pas, c'est pour cette raison que la porte-parole néo-démocrate concernant le projet de loi S‑5 a dû attendre jusqu'au troisième jour avant de pouvoir conclure ses remarques. Si le gouvernement dit qu'il ne veut pas écouter les députés néo-démocrates présenter des discours, j'éprouve une certaine sympathie à leur égard, mais je ne crois pas qu'il est approprié d'imposer ce genre de motion, qui fera en sorte que les députés néo-démocrates n'auront pas assez de temps pour s'exprimer.
À mon avis, il faut pouvoir entendre tous les points de vue et toutes les voix avant que la Chambre ne prenne une décision. Par conséquent, l'argumentaire du député est totalement bidon. Il ne s'appuie sur rien de solide; c'est du vent.
À quoi cela revient-il? Le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a parlé en long et en large du fait que la Chambre doit agir. Je crois que bien des Canadiens seraient d'accord. Ils nous regardent à la Chambre. Nous connaissons les problèmes qui les affectent au quotidien et nous savons qu'ils attendent des gestes concrets. Ils veulent que leurs représentants élus s'attaquent à ces problèmes. Par contre, ils ne veulent pas que le gouvernement ait les mains totalement libres.
Toutes les démocraties cherchent à mettre en place des mécanismes pour la prise de décisions, mais également pour permettre à ceux qui s'opposent à ces décisions d'avoir au moins un impact et la possibilité de limiter le pouvoir absolu que peut avoir l'exécutif. Au Canada, il existe des freins et contrepoids. Dans certains pays, il y en a plus. Il y a aussi des pays qui ont fait de l'incapacité à changer les choses une des caractéristiques mêmes de leur système. Beaucoup de gens regarderont les États‑Unis et diront que le processus est très compliqué et qu'il demande beaucoup de temps et que, pour accomplir des changements ambitieux, un parti doit avoir le contrôle des trois branches du gouvernement soit des deux Chambres, la Chambre des représentants et le Sénat, et de la présidence. Certains pourraient dire que c'est un défaut et c'est probablement parfois vrai. C'est que le système américain a peut-être été conçu de façon à ce qu'il soit difficile de changer les choses.
Le système canadien a été conçu de façon à ce qu'il soit plus facile pour le gouvernement de mettre en œuvre son programme, mais il comporte tout de même des freins et contrepoids. Le Parlement comprend une deuxième Chambre, le Sénat, dont les membres jouissent de bon nombre des mêmes droits et privilèges dont jouissent les députés. Cette assemblée utilise le même processus législatif. Une fois qu'un projet de loi quitte la Chambre et est renvoyé au Sénat, il doit passer par les trois étapes de lecture et être étudié par un comité. À diverses occasions dans l'histoire du Canada, le Sénat a ralenti l'adoption de projets de loi du gouvernement afin de pouvoir exercer son rôle de contrepoids.
Le calendrier et le programme quotidien constituent également un contrepoids au pouvoir du gouvernement. Le premier ministre ne peut pas arriver et commencer à présenter des projets de loi, à les faire approuver sans discussion et à les faire adopter. Le gouvernement doit tenir compte du calendrier et du nombre de jours de séance, et établir des priorités pour ses mesures législatives. S'il présente un projet de loi que l'opposition n'a pas l'intention d'appuyer, parce qu'il est mal rédigé ou qu'il entraînera des conséquences terribles, il doit comprendre que la Chambre prendra plus de temps pour adopter ce genre de projet de loi, ce qui aura une incidence sur l'étude d'autres projets de loi qu'il veut faire adopter.
Donc, en se donnant le pouvoir de prolonger ces séances, le gouvernement élimine réellement un contrepoids très important au pouvoir sans entraves du premier ministre. Cela va affaiblir la capacité de la Chambre des communes à mettre un frein à certaines idées déplorables qui viennent du gouvernement.
Les conservateurs n'ont pas à s'excuser du fait qu'ils s'opposent au programme du gouvernement qui cause l'inflation. Il va sans dire que nous examinerons très scrupuleusement toutes les mesures législatives pour nous assurer qu'elles n'augmentent pas les dépenses gouvernementales, parce que celles-ci font augmenter le coût de la vie. Il y a une corrélation directe entre l'énorme déficit budgétaire que le premier ministre a imposé aux Canadiens au cours des dernières années et les prix records que les Canadiens paient à l'épicerie et à la pompe.
Par conséquent, chaque fois que le gouvernement présente une mesure législative, le tout premier réflexe des conservateurs est de sortir crayon et papier pour l'examiner attentivement. L'exercice vise à savoir si la mesure alourdira les dépenses gouvernementales et la dette que l'État doit payer à même l'argent des contribuables ou si elle entraînera des frais de conformité supplémentaires pour les industries déjà aux prises avec un fardeau réglementaire et fiscal parmi les plus lourds en comparaison avec nos principaux partenaires commerciaux. Un tel exercice prend du temps, car il ne se limite pas à de la recherche, mais comprend aussi des rencontres avec les parties prenantes.
Au sein du cabinet fantôme, j'agis à titre de ministre responsable de l'infrastructure. Je vois aujourd'hui bon nombre de mes collègues chargés d'une grande variété de dossiers au sein du cabinet fantôme. Je suis convaincu de parler au nom de tous si je dis que lorsque nous sommes saisis d'une mesure législative, notre intervention à la Chambre des communes, soit l'analyse que nous en présentons en 10 ou 20 minutes, ne représente qu'une fraction de notre travail. Dès que nous sommes saisis d'un projet de loi, nous commençons immédiatement à rencontrer les gens qui seraient touchés pour entendre directement leur son de cloche.
Le gouvernement a abordé le projet de loi S‑5. Bien que je n'ai jamais travaillé dans l'industrie du plastique, je peux dire que je connais beaucoup de gens dont c'est le cas et qui savent exactement quelles seraient les répercussions de cette mesure législative. Je connais des gens qui travaillent dans divers secteurs de la fabrication, de la distribution et de la vente au détail et qui seraient tous touchés par l'accroissement du fardeau réglementaire découlant du projet de loi S‑5. Nous devons les rencontrer, tenir compte des opinions de certains groupes par rapport à d'autres, et faire preuve du discernement et de la sagesse nécessaires pour analyser tous ces renseignements avant de décider si nous souhaitons voter pour ou contre ce projet de loi.
Les débats de la Chambre des communes permettent de faire contrepoids au gouvernement, en l'empêchant d'imposer son programme législatif, ce qui est particulièrement important dans le contexte actuel. En effet, lors des deux dernières élections, les Canadiens ont refusé de donner au Parti libéral la possibilité de former un gouvernement majoritaire. Nous savons tous que le premier ministre en a été fort déçu. Il espérait que les élections lui permettraient de blanchir sa réputation après qu'on ait découvert l'implication de son gouvernement dans le scandale SNC‑Lavalin et le fait qu'il ait lui-même commis des actes racistes en portant le « blackface » à d'innombrables reprises.
Nous savons que lepremier ministre espérait avoir un gouvernement majoritaire afin de faire le ménage et de redorer son blason, mais les Canadiens ne lui ont pas donné cette chance. Les Canadiens ne veulent pas que ce parti puisse imposer son programme à tout prix. Ils veulent des mécanismes de freins et contrepoids pour s'assurer que le gouvernement fait l'objet d'une surveillance et d'un examen minutieux. En voulant prolonger les heures des séances selon sa convenance personnelle, le gouvernement veut imposer une plus grande partie de son programme. Il essaie en douce d'éviter de rendre des comptes.
De plus, cette attitude est très hypocrite. Je n'utilise pas un langage non parlementaire si je cite le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes, qui s'est lui-même qualifié d'hypocrite. Je dois dire qu'il a quelques raisons de le faire au regard de l'excuse donnée par le gouvernement pour cette mesure. Il dit qu'il n'y a pas assez de temps pour faire adopter le projet de loi, mais cette excuse provient du parti qui a prorogé le Parlement uniquement pour se sortir d'un scandale lié à une enquête sur la corruption.
Pour ceux qui nous regardent et qui ne connaissent pas toutes les belles expressions que nous utilisons à la Chambre, la prorogation est comme un gros bouton redémarrer. Proroger revient ni plus ni moins à annuler toutes les séances qui restent à la Chambre pour une période donnée, et le compteur est remis à zéro. C'est comme passer l'éponge sur le tableau blanc des projets de loi. Le gouvernement dit qu'il doit maintenant prolonger les séances afin d'adopter tous les projets de loi qui ont été complètement annulés et dont on a dû reprendre l'étude à zéro. Ce n'est pas nous qui avons fait cela. L'opposition ne peut pas proroger le Parlement. Une seule personne peut le faire: c'est le premier ministre. C'est précisément ce qu'il a fait. Une seule personne peut déclencher des élections au Canada: c'est le premier ministre.
À la législature précédente, la composition de la Chambre ressemblait énormément à celle de la législature actuelle. Nous avons tenu des élections l'an dernier uniquement parce que le premier ministre a décidé qu'il souhaitait en déclencher, de la même manière qu'il a prorogé le Parlement au cours de l'enquête sur le groupe d'entreprises UNIS. Les députés se souviennent-ils de cela? Au début de la pandémie, alors que les Canadiens devaient toujours composer avec des directives de confinement parmi les plus sévères au monde, qu'on leur interdisait de visiter des êtres chers à l'hôpital, que les enfants ne pouvaient plus aller à l'école et qu'on interdisait aux jeunes et aux athlètes en santé de pratiquer des sports ou de terminer leur année, qu'a fait le premier ministre? Fidèle à ses habitudes, il a saisi l'occasion pour enrichir ses amis.
Alors que la priorité des Canadiens était de rester en santé, de tenter de sauver leur entreprise parce que les restrictions punitives les empêchaient de gagner leur vie et de composer avec les conséquences effrayantes de la pandémie dans leur vie, qu'a fait le premier ministre? Il a pris le temps de sortir le carnet de chèques associé au Trésor public et de récompenser ses amis du groupe d'entreprises UNIS en leur donnant, sans appel d'offres, un demi-milliard de dollars de l'argent des contribuables canadiens.
Lorsqu'il s'est fait prendre, il a appuyé sur le gros bouton redémarrer. Au beau milieu de l'enquête, il a passé l'éponge et...
Une voix: Oh, oh!
Collapse
View Rachel Blaney Profile
NDP (BC)
View Rachel Blaney Profile
2022-11-04 12:23 [p.9351]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, this is a very broad and complex bill. It is important that we recognize that. It can lead to some serious concerns that we may want to talk about later.
Part of this bill creates the new personal information and data protection tribunal, which can overrule the new enforcement actions and fines imposed by the Privacy Commissioner. I am concerned about the vagueness of the membership of the tribunal, with many appointed by the government.
Would this not be either a political tool or perceived as a political tool for the government to turn over rulings it does not like?
Monsieur le Président, c'est un projet de loi vaste et complexe. Il est important de le reconnaître. Il peut soulever de vives inquiétudes dont nous devrions peut-être parler plus tard.
Ce projet de loi vise à créer le nouveau Tribunal de la protection des renseignements personnels et des données, qui pourrait annuler les nouvelles mesures d'application et les amendes imposées par le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Je suis préoccupée par le flou entourant la composition du tribunal, dont les membres seraient en grande partie nommés par le gouvernement.
Cela ne pourrait-il pas servir d'outil politique permettant au gouvernement d'annuler des décisions qui ne font pas son affaire, ou être perçu comme tel?
Collapse
View François-Philippe Champagne Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my hon. colleague for her thoughtfulness in this regard, because she understands, like I do, how important it is for society to move and to have modern privacy laws that would protect Canadians. This legislation is about giving more power and control to people over their data.
With respect to the tribunal, in terms of procedural fairness, we have heard a lot. The point I would make to my hon. colleague is that we listened to a lot of people on that. The fact that we would have a specialized tribunal is something that is quite common in our country, where we often have a commissioner who has regulatory power and power to demand action from companies that do not comply with the act. In terms of procedural fairness, we always have this check and balance with a tribunal.
I can assure the member that the thinking behind the bill is to have people who are specialized in the area in order to make sure we have the best possible rulings on that, so that we can make sure the enforcement of the act is enshrined in the law, and also that we have judicial review in a way that would be done by people who are well versed in the field. As she well knows, obviously these decisions could be appealed to the Federal Court of Appeal, so there are a lot of safeguards, and it is really meant to make sure we have the best possible people, who understand privacy law and the digital world and can make rulings that would serve Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie ma collègue de ses observations réfléchies à ce sujet, car elle comprend, comme moi, à quel point il est important que la société évolue et qu'elle modernise ses lois en matière de protection des renseignements personnels afin de mieux protéger les Canadiens. Ce projet de loi vise à permettre aux gens d'exercer plus de pouvoir et de contrôle sur leurs renseignements.
En ce qui concerne le tribunal, nous avons entendu bien des choses sur l'équité procédurale. Je dirais à ma collègue que nous avons entendu l'avis de nombreuses personnes à ce sujet. La mise sur pied d'un tribunal spécialisé est une pratique très courante au pays, et dans bien des cas, un commissaire peut exercer un pouvoir réglementaire et exiger que des entreprises non conformes se plient aux exigences de la loi. En ce qui a trait à l'équité procédurale, un tribunal permet toujours d'assurer un certain équilibre.
Je peux assurer à la députée que, en présentant ce projet de loi, nous cherchons à garantir la nomination à ce tribunal d'experts en la matière qui rendront les meilleures décisions possibles. De cette façon, nous pouvons nous assurer que cette proposition législative est entérinée, et qu'une révision judiciaire est effectuée par des gens s'y connaissant très bien dans ce domaine. Comme la députée le sait pertinemment, ces décisions pourraient, bien sûr, être portées en appel devant la Cour d'appel fédérale. Beaucoup de mesures de sauvegarde sont donc prévues. Ce projet de loi vise en fait à nommer les gens les plus compétents, des gens qui comprennent le droit à la protection des renseignements personnels et le monde numérique, et qui peuvent prendre des décisions servant les intérêts des Canadiens.
Collapse
View Rachel Blaney Profile
NDP (BC)
View Rachel Blaney Profile
2022-11-04 13:25 [p.9361]
Expand
Madam Speaker, one thing that is a bit concerning for me in this bill is how broad and complex it is. It brings a lot of things into one place, and that can sometimes be a lot. It is important for us to have a process to look through that very closely to make sure that nothing is left out, and that does concern me.
One thing in particular that I have reviewed is the personal information and data protection tribunal. I asked a question of the minister earlier today and the minister was very clear: He felt this is a normal process and no one should worry. However, I am concerned, because this tribunal would have the ability to overrule the new enforcement actions and fines imposed by the Privacy Commissioner. Unfortunately, the vagueness of the membership of the tribunal is a concern, with many of its members appointed by the government. Today, we know it is very important that we not have any conflict or any perception of conflict. Both of those things are important.
I am wondering if the member could talk about whether this could be perceived or actually implemented in such a way that it allowed the government to use it as a political tool for the government to overrule decisions that it simply does not like.
Madame la Présidente, ce qui m'inquiète unpeu dans ce projet de loi, c'est son ampleur et sa complexité. Il rassemble beaucoup de choses en un seul endroit. Il est important que nous ayons un processus permettant d'examiner le projet de loi très attentivement afin de veiller à ce que rien ne soit oublié. C'est ce qui me préoccupe.
J'ai examiné une chose en particulier, soit le Tribunal de la protection des renseignements personnels et des données. J'ai posé une question au ministre plus tôt dans la journée et il a été très clair: il estime qu'il s'agit d'un processus normal et que personne ne doit s'inquiéter. Cependant, je suis inquiète, car ce tribunal aurait la capacité d'annuler les nouvelles mesures d'application et les amendes imposées par le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Malheureusement, le flou qui entoure la composition du tribunal est préoccupant, car beaucoup de ses membres sont nommés par le gouvernement. Aujourd'hui, nous savons qu'il est très important de ne pas avoir de conflit d'intérêts ni d'apparence de conflit d'intérêts. Ces deux choses sont importantes.
J'invite le député à indiquer si ce tribunal pourrait être perçu comme un outil politique permettant au gouvernement d'annuler des décisions qu'il n'aime tout simplement pas, voire même s'il pourrait être réellement mis en place à cette fin.
Collapse
View René Villemure Profile
BQ (QC)
View René Villemure Profile
2022-11-04 13:26 [p.9362]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for that excellent question. At this point, we do need some parameters we can use to define the tribunal's role and the Privacy Commissioner's role. I think the commissioner should have a little more power.
I am usually on the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, but this time around, I will be on the Standing Committee on Industry and Technology because I want to make sure this work gets done. I will make sure that we do this work rigorously, that we take a non-partisan approach to assessing this bill and that we get everyone on board with the bill.
Let me reiterate that this bill will have an impact on people's lives in the future. That is why we cannot let it become a political tool. I do not think it is one at this point, but I want to make sure it never becomes one. We will have to clearly define the roles of the tribunal and the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, as well as those of the higher courts, which may want to rule on these matters. There is some confusion about these roles that needs to be cleared up.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de sa question fort pertinente. Actuellement, il y a quelques petits balisages à faire pour définir la fonction du tribunal et la fonction du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Je crois qu'on devrait accorder un pouvoir un peu plus grand au commissaire.
Je siège habituellement au Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique. Cette fois-ci, je siègerai au Comité permanent de l'industrie et de la technologie afin de m'assurer que ce travail est fait. Je vais m'assurer que la justesse est préservée, que l'on peut évaluer sans aucune partisanerie ce projet de loi et que tout le monde est en accord avec le projet de loi.
Je répète que ce projet de loi aura des répercussions sur vie des gens à l'avenir. Par conséquent, je ne crois pas que cela peut être un outil politique. Je ne pense pas que c'en soit un actuellement, mais j'aimerais m'assurer que cela n'en deviendra pas un. Il faudra tracer des lignes claires entre les rôles du tribunal et du commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, ainsi que celui des cours supérieures, qui pourraient vouloir statuer. Il y a une petite confusion en ce qui a trait aux rôles, qui doivent être éclaircis.
Collapse
View Brenda Shanahan Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Brenda Shanahan Profile
2022-10-31 15:00 [p.9081]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, since day one on the job, the Minister of National Defence has made it clear that we need to build military institutions where every member feels safe, protected and respected. That is why she accepted Madame Arbour's report in its entirety and immediately stepped up efforts to change the culture within the national defence team.
Last week, the minister announced the appointment of an external monitor. Can she tell us a bit more about the importance of this appointment?
Monsieur le Président, depuis sa nomination, la ministre de la Défense nationale a été claire: il faut bâtir des institutions militaires où chaque membre se sent en sécurité, protégé et respecté. C'est pourquoi elle a accepté le rapport de Mme Arbour dans son entièreté et a immédiatement redoublé les efforts pour effectuer un changement de culture au sein de l'équipe de la défense.
La semaine dernière, la ministre a annoncé la nomination d'une contrôleuse externe. Peut-elle en dire un peu plus sur l'importance de cette nomination?
Collapse
View Anita Anand Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anita Anand Profile
2022-10-31 15:00 [p.9081]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for that important question.
We have already established the foundations for a culture change. For example, we have started transferring cases to the civilian system. Last week, I appointed Jocelyne Therrien as external monitor. She will help us ensure that we continue to make real progress. We will keep working to protect women and minorities in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie ma collègue de cette importante question.
Nous avons déjà établi les bases d'un changement de culture, notamment en commençant le transfert de cas vers le système civil. La semaine dernière, j'ai nommé Jocelyne Therrien comme contrôleuse externe. Elle va nous aider à nous assurer que nous continuons de faire des progrès solides. Nous allons continuer nos efforts pour protéger les femmes et les minorités dans les Forces armées canadiennes.
Collapse
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anthony Rota Profile
2022-10-31 15:25 [p.9084]
Expand
I declare the motion carried.
Accordingly, the bill stands referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
Je déclare la motion adoptée.
En conséquence, le projet de loi est renvoyé au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne.
Collapse
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
CPC (ON)
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
2022-10-28 10:01 [p.9011]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is my sincerest pleasure to be able to speak to Bill C-9, an act to amend the Judges Act.
As someone who has dedicated my life before politics to upholding Canada's justice system and representing those who have been victimized, I will begin these remarks by expressing the necessity for our justice system to be transparent.
This bill seeks to improve on the current judicial complaints process. More than six years ago, in 2016, the Liberal government began the consultations on reforming the complaints process for judges. I question the government's priorities at this time, once again, that these reforms are only now coming to the floor after being introduced some six years ago.
I am glad to see that this legislation has finally come forward. I believe that, with proper amendments at committee, it will make the complaints process inherent in this bill much stronger.
The credibility of Canadian democracy and its institutions have been shaken over the last few years. This is especially so since the onset of COVID and profound encroachment that the government has had on the lives of its citizens at almost every turn.
I have been deeply concerned about the declining state of our institutions and of our democracy. I am concerned about the erosion of Canadian institutions, and I am concerned that this happened over the course of the Liberal administration. We have seen Canadians lose confidence and trust in their government, in health care authorities, in law enforcement and in the media.
Canada's justice system has also been tested greatly. During this time, its independence, its impartiality, its access and its fairness have all been brought into question. I know our system is not perfect. There are many issues that need to be addressed. We must ensure that our legal system maintains the trust of Canadians, and that is part of my job as a legislator.
We are fortunate that, despite the Liberal government's many blunders, there is still some confidence in our system. Sadly, we see that on one hand, the government is attempting to improve the rigour of the system by strengthening the judicial complaints process. On the other hand, it is undermining victims of crime by removing things like mandatory minimum sentences for the most violent offences.
It is imperative that we stand on guard and ensure that the pillars of our democracy are upheld. It is imperative that we always look for ways to fix the weaknesses, to find the loopholes and to strengthen the mechanisms that build trust, accountability and transparency in our justice system.
There are weaknesses in our justice system and some of them have been exacerbated by the Liberal government. This long overdue bill is a step in the right direction. This bill highlights the need to fix the weaknesses in our justice system and to also strengthen the checks and balances around how central players of our justice system, like judges, are held to account when an allegation of misconduct arises.
What would this bill do? As I mentioned, Bill C-9 proposes changes to the Judges Act to strengthen the judicial complaints process, which was first established 50 years ago. The Judges Act regulates judges in a number of ways. It empowers the Canadian Judicial Council, the CJC, to investigate public complaints. Judges can also be investigated on a referral from an Attorney General of Canada or a provincial attorney general with respect to any conduct of federally appointed judges.
The Canadian Judicial Council has 41 members, including all chief justices and associate chief justices. Under the new process proposed in this bill, there are four reasons that judges may be removed. These include infirmity, misconduct, failure in the due execution of judicial office or the judge is in a position that a reasonable and fair-minded individual, an informed observer, would consider to be incompatible with the due execution of judicial office.
The bill specifically states that a federally appointed judge may be removed from office if:
the judge’s continuation in office would undermine public confidence in the impartiality, integrity or independence of the judge or of their office to such an extent that it would render the judge incapable of executing the functions of judicial office:
I would now like to turn to the topic of fixing the system.
The Canadian Judicial Council has for years publicly lamented the fact that the current system is often “enormously time-consuming, expensive and taxing on our federal courts.” It has called for legislative reforms that are necessary to “maintaining public confidence in the administration of justice”, which is the crux of the matter. For that, there must be a deep trust and confidence not only in the system, but in the administrators of the system, the judges who are counted on to dispense fair and impartial decisions based on evidence and in accordance with law, and who would administrate and execute those duties with the utmost confidence in the system.
The only way that public confidence is maintained is by ensuring there is a robust process by which judges are held to account. If people lose confidence in the integrity of the judiciary, then the whole system unravels.
I can tell members that, as a trial lawyer and someone who has owned my own practice, I had confidence appearing before judges. I knew they were qualified, would make sound decisions and were committed to the rule of law. However, over the past two years I have been approached by many individuals who are concerned about our system. They have asked me things like how a judge who ran for the Liberal Party could sit and preside over a bail hearing of somebody in the convoy who was charged under the Emergencies Act. These questions bring our administration of justice into disrepute and highlight the need to ensure that judges are not in a conflict.
Our system is not perfect, but it aspires to apply the scales of justice equally to all of us. It is logical to insist that judges be held to a higher standard than the average person precisely because of the office they hold.
In closing, I will highlight the fact that I am commending the government on getting this legislation to the floor. I believe that if this legislation is put before committee we could really hammer out some of the sections that need to be strengthened.
Monsieur le Président, je suis vraiment très heureuse de pouvoir prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges.
Avant d'entrer en politique, j'ai consacré une bonne partie de ma vie à faire respecter le système de justice du Canada et à représenter les victimes. Je vais donc commencer mes observations en affirmant que notre système de justice doit être transparent.
Ce projet de loi vise à améliorer le processus d'examen des plaintes visant les juges. Il y a plus de six ans, en 2016, le gouvernement libéral a entrepris des consultations sur la réforme du processus d'examen des plaintes déposées contre des juges. Je m'interroge une fois de plus sur les priorités du gouvernement, car nous voici saisis de ces réformes six ans après le début du processus.
Je suis heureuse qu'on débatte enfin de cette mesure législative. Je crois que si l'on y apporte des amendements appropriés à l’étape du comité, le processus d'examen des plaintes qu'elle prévoit sera beaucoup plus solide.
La crédibilité de la démocratie canadienne et de ses institutions a été ébranlée ces dernières années, en particulier depuis l'arrivée de la COVID et en raison de l'importante ingérence du gouvernement dans pratiquement tous les aspects de la vie de ses citoyens.
Je suis très préoccupée par le déclin de nos institutions et de notre démocratie. Je suis préoccupée par l'érosion des institutions canadiennes et par le fait que cette érosion s'est produite sous le gouvernement libéral. Nous avons vu les Canadiens perdre confiance dans leur gouvernement, dans les autorités sanitaires, dans les services de police et dans les médias.
Le système de justice du Canada a également été mis à rude épreuve. Au cours de cette période, son indépendance, son impartialité, son accès et son équité ont tous été remis en question. Je sais que notre système n'est pas parfait. Il comporte de nombreux problèmes qui doivent être réglés. Nous devons veiller à préserver la confiance des Canadiens envers notre système judiciaire, ce qui fait partie de mon travail en tant que législatrice.
Heureusement, malgré les nombreuses bévues du gouvernement libéral, les Canadiens ont encore une certaine confiance dans le système. Malheureusement, nous constatons, d'une part, que le gouvernement tente d'améliorer la rigueur du système en renforçant le processus d'examen des plaintes visant les juges et, d'autre part, qu'il porte atteinte aux victimes d'actes criminels en supprimant des éléments comme les peines minimales obligatoires pour les infractions les plus violentes.
Il est impératif de faire preuve de vigilance et d'assurer le respect des piliers de notre démocratie. Il est impératif de toujours chercher des moyens de corriger les faiblesses, de trouver les failles et de renforcer les mécanismes qui instaurent la confiance, la reddition de comptes et la transparence dans notre système de justice.
Il y a des faiblesses dans notre système de justice, et le gouvernement libéral a exacerbé certaines d'entre elles. Ce projet de loi, attendu depuis longtemps, est un pas dans la bonne direction. Il souligne la nécessité de corriger les faiblesses de notre système de justice et de renforcer également les freins et contrepoids en ce qui a trait à la façon dont les acteurs centraux de notre système de justice, comme les juges, sont tenus de rendre des comptes en cas d'allégation d'inconduite.
Que ferait ce projet de loi? Comme je l'ai mentionné, le projet de loi C‑9 propose des modifications à la Loi sur les juges afin de renforcer le processus d'examen des plaintes visant des juges, qui a été établi pour la première fois il y a 50 ans. La Loi sur les juges régit les juges de plusieurs façons. Elle habilite le Conseil canadien de la magistrature, le CCM, à enquêter sur les plaintes du public. Les juges peuvent également faire l'objet d'une enquête sur renvoi d'un procureur général du Canada ou d'un procureur général provincial en ce qui concerne toute conduite des juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral.
Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature compte 41 membres, dont tous les juges en chef et les juges en chef adjoints. Selon le nouveau processus proposé dans ce projet de loi, les juges peuvent être révoqués pour quatre raisons: l'invalidité, l'inconduite, le manquement aux devoirs de la charge de juge et toute situation qu'un observateur raisonnable, équitable et bien informé jugerait incompatible avec les devoirs de la charge de juge.
Le projet de loi stipule spécifiquement qu'un juge nommé par le gouvernement fédéral peut être démis de ses fonctions si:
le fait qu’il demeure en poste minerait la confiance du public dans l’impartialité, l’intégrité ou l’indépendance du juge ou dans l’indépendance de sa charge au point de le rendre incapable d’occuper la charge de juge pour l’un ou l’autre des motifs suivants:
Je voudrais maintenant parler de la correction des lacunes du système.
Depuis des années, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature se plaint publiquement que le système actuel est souvent « énormément onéreu[x] en temps, en argent et en efforts pour nos tribunaux fédéraux ». Il réclame des réformes législatives nécessaires pour le « maintien de la confiance du public envers l'administration de la justice »; c'est là le cœur de la question. Pour cela, il faut une grande confiance non seulement dans le système, mais aussi dans les administrateurs du système, c'est-à-dire les juges desquels on attend qu'ils rendent des décisions justes et impartiales, fondées sur des preuves et conformes à la loi, et qu'ils appliquent la loi et exercent leurs fonctions avec une entière confiance dans le système.
Le seul moyen de maintenir la confiance du public est de faire en sorte qu'il y ait un processus rigoureux permettant de demander des comptes aux juges. Si les Canadiens perdent confiance dans l'intégrité de la magistrature, le système entier échouera.
Je peux dire aux députés que, en tant qu'avocate plaideuse ayant déjà eu son propre cabinet, j'étais confiante de comparaître devant les juges. J'avais la certitude de me trouver devant des personnes qualifiées, au jugement sûr et attachées à la primauté du droit. Cependant, au cours des deux dernières années, nombre de gens m'ont approchée pour m'exprimer leurs préoccupations à propos de notre système. On m'a demandé, entre autres, comment il est possible qu'un juge ayant été candidat pour le Parti libéral puisse présider une audience sur le cautionnement d'un manifestant du convoi de la liberté accusé aux termes de la Loi sur les mesures d'urgence. Ces questions jettent le discrédit sur l'administration de la justice et font ressortir la nécessité de faire en sorte que les juges ne se retrouvent pas en conflit d'intérêts.
Notre système n'est pas parfait, mais il vise à appliquer les principes de justice équitablement pour tous. Il est logique d'insister pour que les juges soient assujettis à des normes plus élevées que les citoyens ordinaires, justement en raison de leurs fonctions.
En terminant, je tiens à féliciter le gouvernement d'avoir présenté ce projet de loi à la Chambre. Je pense que si le projet de loi est renvoyé à un comité pour étude, certaines sections seront amendées afin de les renforcer.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2022-10-28 10:11 [p.9012]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we have the Canadian Judicial Council, and I believe they had a semi-annual meeting take place in Alberta. There was a concern as to why the legislation was not passing through. The government has a fairly robust legislative agenda. We have attempted to get Bill C-9 through, ultimately having to go to time allocation to get it through second reading. It still needs to go through the committee stage, not to mention the report and third reading stages.
Could the member provide her thoughts on the need for the passage of the legislation? Does she believe that the legislation should pass this year, or would the Conservative Party rather see it pass in 2023?
Monsieur le Président, il existe un Conseil canadien de la magistrature, en effet, et je crois qu'il a tenu une réunion semestrielle en Alberta. Certaines personnes se demandaient pourquoi cette mesure législative n'avait pas encore été adoptée. Le programme législatif du gouvernement est plutôt chargé. Nous avons tenté de faire adopter le projet de loi C‑9; nous avons d'ailleurs dû avoir recours à l'attribution de temps pour qu'il franchisse l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Il reste encore l'étude en comité, puis les étapes du rapport et de la troisième lecture.
La députée pourrait-elle parler de l'importance d'adopter ce projet de loi? Est-elle d'avis qu'il devrait être adopté cette année, ou le Parti conservateur préfère-t-il attendre jusqu'en 2023?
Collapse
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
CPC (ON)
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
2022-10-28 10:12 [p.9012]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I take my job as a legislator very seriously. It is imperative that the people who elect us know that we are not just pushing bills through, but that we are passing the best bills.
For that to happen, it means that, when we have time allocation, we use that time to make sure we improve on the bill and we put the best bill forward. That is what I endeavour to do.
Monsieur le Président, je prends mon travail de législatrice très au sérieux. Il est absolument crucial que les électeurs sachent que nous ne nous contentons pas simplement d'adopter des projets de loi, mais que nous adoptons les meilleures mesures possible.
Pour atteindre cet objectif, lorsqu'il y a attribution de temps, nous devons utiliser le temps à notre disposition pour améliorer le projet de loi afin qu'il soit aussi solide que possible. C'est ce que je m'efforce de faire.
Collapse
View Sylvie Bérubé Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for her speech.
I want to say that we support this bill. I must also note that the process needs to take less time.
Look at what happened in Val‑d'Or with Judge Girouard. That took place not far from where I live, so I am very familiar with the story. He had been appointed to the Superior Court of Quebec, and he was able to keep receiving his salary the whole time the case was before the courts. It is unthinkable that a judge could even do such a thing, that is, possibly sell cocaine.
We must prevent these situations from ever happening again and put an end to the process, which is too long and does not allow people to be judged accordingly.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie ma collègue de son discours.
Je tiens à dire que nous appuyons ce projet de loi. Je dois dire aussi qu'il faut réduire la durée du processus.
Regardons ce qui s'est passé à Val‑d'Or avec le juge Girouard. Cela est arrivé non loin de chez moi. Je suis donc très au fait de ce qui s'est passé. Il a été nommé juge à la Cour supérieure du Québec et il a pu conserver son salaire tout le temps que l'affaire a duré. C'est impensable qu'un juge ait même pu faire une telle chose, c'est-à-dire possiblement vendre de la cocaïne.
Il faut éviter que ces situations se reproduisent et mettre un terme au processus qui est trop long et qui ne permet pas de juger les personnes en conséquence.
Collapse
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
CPC (ON)
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
2022-10-28 10:14 [p.9012]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is very true that, when a judge is charged with improprieties, they should not be rewarded by having their salary or their pensions continue, especially such an egregious impropriety as alluded to by the hon. member.
It is my position that a part of this bill has to be the strengthening of the clauses that would take away this privilege from judges and also take away the fact that they could appeal and use taxpayer dollars to frustrate the system when they have been charged with an offence.
Monsieur le Président, il est tout à fait vrai que, lorsqu'un juge est accusé d'irrégularités, il ne devrait pas être récompensé par le maintien de son salaire ou de sa pension, surtout dans le cas d'un écart de conduite aussi grave que celui dont la députée a fait mention.
Selon moi, une partie du projet de loi doit consister à renforcer les dispositions qui enlèveraient ce privilège aux juges et qui les empêcheraient de faire appel et d'utiliser l'argent des contribuables pour déjouer le système lorsqu'ils sont accusés d'une infraction.
Collapse
View Bonita Zarrillo Profile
NDP (BC)
View Bonita Zarrillo Profile
2022-10-28 10:14 [p.9012]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I think I heard from the member that the Conservatives are interested in moving this forward and sending this to committee.
Could the member tell us if Conservatives are committed to not slowing down and frustrating this process and to sending the bill to committee?
Monsieur le Président, les propos tenus par la députée laissent entendre que les conservateurs sont disposés à faire avancer le projet de loi et à le renvoyer au comité.
La députée peut-elle nous dire si les conservateurs s'engagent à ne pas ralentir et entraver le processus, et à renvoyer le projet de loi au comité?
Collapse
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
CPC (ON)
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
2022-10-28 10:15 [p.9012]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I take deep exception to the comments of anybody who would think that I or my colleagues would slow down the process. I take my job very seriously as a legislator.
As I said before, this is something that is very important to me. I believe the bill is very important to the judicial system. I have been an officer of the court as a lawyer. I think it is very important that we maintain integrity in the system. Therefore, a rigorous application of this bill is necessary, and we would continue to do that to put the best bill forward.
Monsieur le Président, je m'inscris en faux contre les commentaires de quiconque affirme que moi ou mes collègues ralentirions le processus. Je prends très au sérieux ma tâche de législatrice.
Comme je l'ai déjà dit, il s'agit d'un dossier qui me tient à cœur. Selon moi, ce projet de loi est très important pour le système judiciaire. En tant qu'avocate, j'ai été auxiliaire de justice. J'estime qu'il est crucial de maintenir l'intégrité du système. Par conséquent, il est nécessaire d'appliquer la mesure à l'étude de façon rigoureuse, et nous y veillerions en présentant le meilleur projet de loi possible.
Collapse
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
CPC (ON)
View Tony Baldinelli Profile
2022-10-28 10:15 [p.9012]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the member talked about maintaining public confidence in our system.
Perhaps the member could further elaborate about public confidence in our justice system, after seven years of Liberal policies that have eroded the public's trust.
Monsieur le Président, la députée a parlé de maintenir la confiance du public dans le système canadien.
La députée pourrait peut-être en dire un peu plus sur la confiance du public dans le système de justice canadien après sept ans de politiques libérales qui ont mené à l'érosion de cette confiance.
Collapse
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
CPC (ON)
View Leslyn Lewis Profile
2022-10-28 10:16 [p.9013]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for that very pertinent question.
There is a problem with the public trust. As I said, as a lawyer I appeared before judges and I always had the confidence of knowing that these judges were impartial. However, with some of the things that we have seen over the last few years, even with how the Emergencies Act was dispensed, there is a lot of concern among Canadian citizens about the erosion of institutions in our system. When we have violent offenders being released on the streets and frustrating the parole system, it really brings our administration of justice into disrepute.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de sa question très pertinente.
Il y a un problème de confiance du public. Comme je l'ai dit, en tant qu'avocate, j'ai plaidé devant des juges et j'ai toujours l'assurance qu'ils étaient impartiaux. Cependant, à la lumière de certains cas que nous avons vus au cours des dernières années — il n'y a qu'à penser à la façon dont la Loi sur les mesures d'urgence a été appliquée —, les citoyens canadiens sont très préoccupés par l'érosion des institutions dans notre système. Lorsque des délinquants violents sont relâchés et se jouent du système de libération conditionnelle, cela jette vraiment le discrédit sur l'administration de la justice au Canada.
Collapse
View Dan Muys Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dan Muys Profile
2022-10-28 10:17 [p.9013]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, my hon. colleague from Haldimand—Norfolk raised some very good points and spoke about why it is very important to address the judicial system and build integrity in the system, and my colleague from Niagara Falls raised the issue of public confidence in our justice system, so I want to pick up on those points and talk about the fact that violent crime is up on our streets, yet the government and its coalition partners have certainly been shown to be soft on crime.
I want to refer, as we talk about debate on this issue, to three articles that were in The Hamilton Spectator, the daily paper in my community, just this week alone. Let me read the headlines, because I think they speak to the fact that we really have a crime wave that is going on in our streets, and if we are going to talk about the judicial system, what is not in the bill and what we are not talking about is the increase in violent crime and the increase in weapons and those things that were watered down in Bill C-5 with the watered-down mandatory minimums. We need to really address that, because that is certainly what people in my community are asking about.
This was just on Wednesday: “Two teens charged and one suspect at large after weekend shooting near Hess Village”, which is a popular area for bars in the Hamilton area. This article refers to the fact that there were “32 shootings reported in Hamilton this year”, and three people killed. This is just one example.
Two days prior, on Monday of this week, there was a “Loaded firearm seized...at Hamilton Mountain restaurant”. This is concerning to people in my community. Police arrested some suspects in this crime, but the fact that there were loaded firearms at restaurants in suburban communities and the fact that people are afraid to go out as a result of these things are a concern. That is something that is not really being addressed in changes to the judicial system under the current government.
There is another one, from Sunday, again this same week, so there are three articles this week: “Police are investigating gunshots following a ‘disturbance’ on Hamilton’s west Mountain...Officers say [this was] in a parking lot of [a] housing complex”. Here we have people who are living in these communities, and they are experiencing all these increases in gun crime and violent crime. That is something that is not being addressed in this bill and is not being addressed by the government.
I know of another example, though I do not have the article or the headline on it, in my own riding in the town of Binbrook, which is really a small community of about 5,000 people. Recently in Binbrook there have been a number of car thefts and a number of home invasions. Members can imagine someone in a bedroom community who is fearful of home invasions in their community. This is a little further from the city, so police response is slow. These are things that are of real concern to real people in our communities, but they are not being addressed in changes to the justice system under the current government.
The revolving door of crime we are seeing is something that really needs to be more strongly addressed. I could throw out a number of different stats from the articles I talked about. There are still 348 people who are wanted on outstanding charges, including drugs and weapons charges. Many are repeat offenders, and that is not being addressed in the legislation.
As well, our system is not perfect, and that is the point that has been made by my colleague from Haldimand—Norfolk, but we do expect a higher standard of judges, and we expect a response to these activities that are going on in our communities that make people fearful to walk the streets. We know that is going on. We know there is this increase in violent crime. How are we addressing the root causes of that and focusing in on that?
Let me just conclude by echoing the comments made by my colleague. It is not perfect. There are things in the bill that we support. There are some criticisms she has suggested, and obviously they will be studied at committee, but my larger question is this: How are we helping people in our communities who are concerned about the increase of crime and not hearing any answers?
Monsieur le Président, ma collègue, la députée d'Haldimand—Norfolk, a présenté de bons arguments et a expliqué pourquoi il est très important de renforcer l'intégrité du système judiciaire. Puisque mon collègue, le député de Niagara Falls, a parlé de la confiance du public dans notre système de justice, j'aimerais revenir sur cette question et parler du fait que, malgré la hausse de la criminalité violente dans les collectivités, le gouvernement et ses partenaires coalisés ont certainement fait preuve de laxisme à l'égard de la criminalité.
Puisque nous débattons de cette question, j'aimerais parler des trois articles qui ont été publiés cette semaine seulement dans l'Hamilton Spectator, le quotidien de ma collectivité. J'aimerais lire les grands titres, parce que je crois que ces articles révèlent que nos collectivités sont confrontées à une vague de criminalité. Tandis que nous parlons du système judiciaire, ce dont le projet de loi ne tient pas compte, et ce dont on ne parle pas, c'est la hausse de la criminalité violente, y compris la criminalité armée, et les dispositions législatives qui ont été affaiblies par le projet de loi C‑5, notamment en ce qui concerne les peines minimales obligatoires. Nous devons vraiment corriger cela, car c'est certainement un problème dont les gens me parlent dans ma collectivité.
Mercredi, il y a deux jours à peine, on pouvait lire: « Deux adolescents sont inculpés et un suspect se trouve en fuite après une fusillade près de Hess Village ». Il s'agit d'un quartier populaire pour ses bars dans la région d'Hamilton. Cet article explique que « 32 fusillades ont été signalées à Hamilton cette année », et que trois personnes ont été tuées. Ce n'est là qu'un exemple.
Deux jours avant, soit lundi, nous apprenions ceci: « Une arme à feu chargée a été saisie [...] au restaurant Hamilton Mountain ». Voilà qui est inquiétant pour les gens de ma communauté. La police a arrêté quelques suspects dans cette affaire, mais il est préoccupant qu'il y ait eu des armes à feu chargées dans un restaurant de banlieue et que les citoyens aient peur de sortir à cause de cela. C'est un problème qui n'est pas vraiment pris en compte dans les changements apportés au système judiciaire par le gouvernement actuel.
Un autre article a été publié dimanche, pour un total de trois articles cette semaine: « La police enquête sur des coups de feu survenus après que du tapage eut été entendu dans le quartier Mountain West à Hamilton [...] Les policiers affirment que cela s'est produit dans le stationnement d'un complexe d'habitation ». Les personnes qui vivent dans ces communautés subissent la hausse des crimes commis avec des armes à feu et des crimes violents. Voilà un problème que le projet de loi n'aborde pas, à l'instar du gouvernement.
Je n'ai pas en main l'article qui en traite, mais je connais un autre cas qui est survenu dans ma circonscription, à Binbrook, une très petite ville d'environ 5 000 habitants. Récemment, à Binbrook, il y a eu un certain nombre de vols de voitures et d'invasions de domicile. Les députés peuvent s'imaginer que les habitants des villes-dortoirs craignent les invasions de domicile. Ces villes sont situées un peu à l'écart des grands centres, donc les interventions policière sont lentes. Voilà le genre de problèmes qui préoccupent vraiment les habitants ordinaires des collectivités, mais les changements apportés au système de justice par le gouvernement actuel ne s'y attaquent pas.
Il faut vraiment lutter plus énergiquement contre le phénomène actuel de la porte tournante dans le système de justice pénale. Je pourrais citer des statistiques tirées des articles dont j'ai parlé. Il y a encore 348 personnes recherchées pour des accusations en instance, dont des accusations en lien avec les drogues et les armes. Plusieurs de ces personnes sont des récidivistes, et le projet de loi ne s'attaque pas à ce problème.
Comme l'a indiqué ma collègue d'Haldimand—Norfolk, notre système n'est pas parfait, mais nous nous attendons à ce que les juges se conforment à des normes de conduite plus rigoureuses. Nous attendons aussi une réaction aux activités criminelles dans nos collectivités, activités qui font que les gens ont peur de se promener dans la rue. Nous savons ce qui se passe. Nous savons qu'il y a une hausse des crimes violents. Comment pouvons‑nous nous attaquer en priorité aux causes profondes de ce problème?
En guise de conclusion, je répéterai ce que ma collègue a dit: le projet de loi n'est pas parfait. Il y a des éléments du projet de loi que nous appuyons. Cependant, comme elle l'a laissé entendre, il comporte aussi des lacunes, qui seront évidemment étudiés par le comité. Or, la question la plus importante est la suivante: comment allons‑nous aider nos concitoyens qui s'inquiètent de la hausse de la criminalité et de l'absence de solutions proposées?
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2022-10-28 10:22 [p.9013]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the principle of this bill is to ensure and continue to support the need for independence in our judicial system. It would enable the process of looking at our judges and their performance to continue to be independent of politics.
We are a country that is based on the rule of law. There is a great expectation from stakeholders that this legislation will, in fact, pass through the system before the end of the year. Because of time allocation, we are finally going to be able to get it out of second reading so that it goes to committee.
I posed this question to the previous speaker today: What is the Conservative Party's position? I am asking this so that the people in the back room will be able to inform whoever might be speaking whether the Conservative Party's intention is to ultimately see this bill pass in 2022, or if it would rather see it pass in 2023.
Monsieur le Président, le principe de ce projet de loi est de garantir et de maintenir le besoin d'indépendance de notre système judiciaire. Il permettrait de disposer d'un processus d'examen concernant nos juges et leurs performances, indépendamment du pouvoir politique.
Notre pays est fondé sur l'État de droit. Les parties prenantes s'attendent à ce que ce projet de loi soit adopté avant la fin de l'année. Grâce à la motion d'attribution de temps, nous allons finalement pouvoir lui faire franchir l'étape de la deuxième lecture pour qu'il soit renvoyé en comité.
J'ai posé une question à l'intervenant précédent aujourd'hui. Quelle est la position du Parti conservateur? Je repose cette question afin que les personnes dans les coulisses puissent indiquer à quiconque prendrait la parole si l'intention du Parti conservateur est de voir ce projet de loi adopté en 2022 ou s'il préférerait le voir adopté en 2023.
Collapse
View Dan Muys Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dan Muys Profile
2022-10-28 10:23 [p.9013]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as was pointed out in the question, there is time allocation on the bill, so we will be proceeding with it today, obviously, and we will get it to committee.
Aside from the bill, the larger question that the Conservative Party is asking is this: What are we doing about violent crime in our cities? What are we doing about the fact that there is an opioid crisis?
There are many issues that are not being dealt with, which are the concern of everyday Canadians, like the people I referred to in my communities and like the instances that were referred to in the articles I presented. That is really our question. When are we going to get serious about crime in this country?
Monsieur le Président, comme le député l'a mentionné dans sa question, l'étude du projet de loi fait l'objet d'une motion d'attribution de temps, donc il va de soi que nous le renverrons au comité aujourd'hui.
Au-delà du projet de loi, les questions plus générales que se pose le Parti conservateur sont les suivantes: que faisons-nous pour lutter contre les crimes violents dans nos villes? Que faisons-nous à propos de la crise des opioïdes?
Il y a de nombreux problèmes à propos desquels le gouvernement ne fait rien, ce qui inquiète les Canadiens, notamment les gens de ma circonscription dont j'ai parlé. Les articles que j'ai cités en sont un parfait exemple. Bref, la véritable question est ceci: quand allons-nous nous attaquer sérieusement à la criminalité au pays?
Collapse
View Michelle Ferreri Profile
CPC (ON)
View Michelle Ferreri Profile
2022-10-28 10:24 [p.9014]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for his speech, and he brought up a really great point that I would love to learn more about.
We just had a municipal election in my riding, and the number one concern was the rise of crime and the statistics that the same small number of people were responsible for the majority of crime, which has to do with bail reform. It is this “rinse and repeat” of people who are committing crimes and then re-released. They are committing the majority of crimes, but they are let out on bail. How important is bail reform versus Bill C-9?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de son discours. Il soulève un excellent point et j'aimerais en savoir plus à ce sujet.
Dans ma circonscription viennent de se tenir des élections municipales, et la principale préoccupation soulevée au cours de la campagne a été l'intensification de l'activité criminelle et les statistiques selon lesquelles la majorité des crimes sont commis par un même petit groupe de personnes, ce qui souligne la nécessité de réformer le cautionnement. Il faut mettre fin à la justice prorécidive. On continue de remettre en liberté les personnes qui sont responsables de la majorité des crimes commis. Le député pourrait-il nous parler de l'importance de la réforme du cautionnement par rapport à l'importance du projet de loi C‑9?
Collapse
View Dan Muys Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dan Muys Profile
2022-10-28 10:25 [p.9014]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would point out that Peterborough—Kawartha is a beautiful area of Ontario and our country, and I would encourage you and all members of the House to visit Peterborough—Kawartha sometime soon.
It is a good question with regard to bail reform, which is what I referred to with some of the instances I pointed out. There is this revolving door, and at least according to one article, two-thirds of the charges were with regard to repeat offenders. There is that revolving door, and that is really what we think should be addressed: bail reform and some of the other aspects that are contributing to the rising crime and the rising violent crime, in addition to what is being proposed here today.
Monsieur le Président, je voudrais souligner que Peterborough—Kawartha est une des magnifiques régions de l'Ontario et du Canada et j'invite tous les députés à visiter cette circonscription dès qu'ils en auront l'occasion.
La députée pose une bonne question au sujet de la réforme du cautionnement, qui est liée à certains des cas dont j'ai parlé. C'est un système de justice prorécidive et, d'après un article, les deux tiers des accusations étaient portées contre des récidivistes. C'est ce système prorécidive qui, à notre avis, doit être revu, notamment la réforme du cautionnement et d'autres éléments qui contribuent à la montée de la criminalité et à l'augmentation des crimes violents, en plus de ce qui est proposé aujourd'hui.
Collapse
View Denis Trudel Profile
BQ (QC)
View Denis Trudel Profile
2022-10-28 10:26 [p.9014]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech.
This is an important bill, and the Bloc Québécois will support it because it seems that some communities are seeing the rise of a kind of self-policing ecosystem. We must legislate in response.
A year or two ago, I moved a motion to establish an independent body to handle complaints in sport following complaints by female Swimming Canada team members. There have also been complaints by young athletes in Ontario and allegations of sexual violence.
Sport is a self-regulating system. Sometimes it works; sometimes it does not. I would like to hear my colleague's thoughts on the importance of creating an independent body to handle complaints in the justice system as proposed in Bill C‑9.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de son discours.
C'est un projet de loi important et le Bloc québécois va l'appuyer parce qu'il semble que certains milieux développent des espèces d'écosystèmes où ils se font justice eux-mêmes. Il est important de légiférer à ce sujet.
Il y a un an ou deux, j'ai déposé une motion à la Chambre pour créer un comité indépendant de gestion des plaintes dans le sport à la suite de plaintes de nageuses de l'équipe de Natation Canada. Il y a aussi eu des plaintes de jeunes sportifs en Ontario et des allégations d'agression sexuelle.
Le sport est un système qui se régule, qui fait le travail — ou qui ne le fait pas — lui-même. J'aimerais entendre mon collègue sur l'importance de créer un comité indépendant de gestion des plaintes dans le domaine de la justice comme le propose le projet de loi C‑9.
Collapse
View Dan Muys Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dan Muys Profile
2022-10-28 10:27 [p.9014]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Longueuil—Saint-Hubert. That is also a beautiful area of the country. I would encourage people to visit it.
It was interesting that he used an example of swimming in his question. I was a lifeguard many years ago, going through high school and university. Swimming is a great sport, but his question was with regard to a toxic culture in sports. We have certainly seen that in others, the recent example of Hockey Canada being one that is top of mind.
In terms of an independent inquiry, I would refer to my colleagues who are the respective shadow ministers for that file to comment on that specifically. He made the valid point that there are these issues with crime and justice that need to be addressed and that are not being addressed by the government and its coalition partner. We take that to heart.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de Longueuil—Saint‑Hubert. Cette région du pays aussi est magnifique. J'invite les gens à la visiter.
Je trouve intéressant que le député ait parlé de la natation dans sa question. J'ai été sauveteur il y a bien longtemps, lorsque j'étais au secondaire et à l'université. La natation est un excellent sport, mais la question du député portait sur la culture toxique dans le sport. Nous avons vu qu'elle existe certainement dans d'autres sports; je pense notamment à ce qui s'est récemment passé à Hockey Canada.
En ce qui concerne la création d'un comité indépendant, je dirigerais mon collègue vers les ministres du cabinet fantôme responsables de ce dossier à ce sujet. Il a raison de dire qu'il y a des enjeux en matière de criminalité et de justice dont le gouvernement et son partenaire coalisé ne s'occupent pas. Nous prenons ces enjeux au sérieux.
Collapse
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2022-10-28 10:28 [p.9014]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to rise here today to speak to this piece of legislation.
In my riding of Kelowna—Lake Country, the impacts of crime and increasing crime rates are things that I have heard more and more about from my constituents. According to a release from Statistics Canada earlier this year, the Kelowna census metropolitan area, the CMA, now has the highest crime rate in Canada, with 27,147 Criminal Code violations in the region in the 2021 report.
While the crime severity index, the CSI, is 73.7 across Canada, according to Statistics Canada, in the Kelowna CMA, it is significantly higher, at 122.3 in our region. It is the topic of discussion I hear from constituents in meetings, through emails, at coffee shops and on the streets, and it was one of the most important issues discussed during our municipal election, which just ended a few weeks ago, with different solutions discussed on how to best solve the issue.
One of the problems that arises from this is the revolving door we see in our criminal justice system. Unfortunately, too often we see individuals go through a catch-and-release system, where they do not serve their time and also do not receive the help they need to help reduce the chances of them reoffending, including addiction or mental health treatment. These are all areas where we need to see improvement in our system, on top of Bill C-9.
Unfortunately, in the conversations I have had in my community, there needs to be improvement in public confidence in our justice system and there has not been much evidence that the Liberal government has helped to uphold this. This is yet again another example of a bill which could have been in place almost a year ago if it were not for the Liberal government's decision to hold an unnecessary snap election last fall.
The previous iteration of this bill was Bill S-5 from the 43rd Parliament. It would have been debated, studied and perhaps adopted by now if all members of the House were to have moved it forward. Instead, here we are again, starting debate on this bill from the beginning, over a year since the last version was introduced, because of an unnecessary, costly election. Just as a reminder, ash was falling from the sky in my riding of Kelowna—Lake Country when the Prime Minister called the snap election.
There are many examples of legislation being worked on in the last Parliament, but due to the snap election, everything was cancelled and had to start over again. The committee I sit on is now looking at a Bill C-22, the Canada disability benefit act, which was also first introduced over a year ago and then died on the Order Paper because of the snap election last fall. Here is another example of how we really have to look at what the government's priorities are. A lot of its priorities are political rather than moving forward good legislation that we need in this country.
Conservatives are always happy to work for reforms in our judiciary. Public faith in our system is what guarantees our society's commitment to due process under law. No one spoke more eloquently on this than former Conservative leader Rona Ambrose when she introduced her final piece of legislation in 2017, the just act. That bill proposed judicial accountability through sexual assault law training.
As a strong voice for women and sexual assault survivors, Ms. Ambrose recognized that far too often our justice system fails to respect the experiences of victims of sexual assault. Sexual assault survivors need to know that those hearing their cases have the training, background and context to give them a fair trial and better ensure that sexual assault survivors do not hesitate to come forward. We, unfortunately, still need a judicial system that we can trust and that will be fair, a system that really focuses on victims.
More work needs to be done to ensure judges understand the laws surrounding this consent. More tools need to be provided to judges to provide fair, compassionate sentences that will see offenders rehabilitated.
My own private member's bill legislation, Bill C-283, would provide such a tool in reforming the sentencing process for offenders suffering from drug addiction and mental health challenges. My legislation would amend the Criminal Code of Canada to support a two-stream sentencing process. While both would have the same sentence time, certain convicted individuals who demonstrate a pattern of problematic substance use and meet certain parameters at the time of sentencing could have the judge offer them the choice to be sentenced to participate in a mental health assessment and addiction treatment inside a federal penitentiary while they serve out their sentence.
Through this sentencing process, offenders would still receive meaningful consequences for their actions, but they would also receive curative treatment leading to a path of reducing the risk of reoffending. In other words, it would end the revolving door. I have actually called my private member's bill the “end the revolving door act”. My bill has the support of many stakeholders who work in addiction treatment and in the criminal justice system, and it also has support across some party lines in this place. I am thankful to say we had our first debate on it, and it will be coming forth again.
It is too important of an opportunity to miss out on, just like this bill we have here today. Some victims have said they have lost faith in the judicial system completely. It was not too long ago that victims, especially women, were blamed for sexual assault. Before laws were put into place improving the process, it was common for judges to factor in things such as the length of a woman's skirt or whether she had a past relationship with the perpetrator when determining if something was criminal. There needs to be more accountability in the judiciary. Legislation that involves our judicial system is really important.
Unfortunately, we know violent crime is up across Canada. It is up 32% since the government took office. One has to wonder how some of these soft-on-crime policies the government has can impact Canadians' faith in their justice system, as well as public safety.
We also need to remember the position of the federal ombudsman for victims of crime has repeatedly been left vacant by the government for many months at a time. Most recently, it was left vacant for almost a year. These are things that are really important when we are looking at our entire judicial system and how it functions, and we need to focus on these types of issues no only so the public has confidence, but also so the public is best served in all of these different areas. It is also really important that, at the core of everything, we keep victims in mind and that we are always standing up for the victims of crime, which is something the Conservatives absolutely do. It is always something we are considering and focusing on.
In closing, if the Liberal government really were concerned about the issue we are debating here today, Bill C-9, it would have not called a snap election last year. This would have been already in place. It is something that already would have been enacted.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un honneur de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet de ce projet de loi.
Dans ma circonscription, Kelowna—Lake Country, mes concitoyens s'inquiètent de plus en plus de l'augmentation du taux de criminalité et de ses conséquences. Selon un communiqué de Statistique Canada publié plus tôt cette année, la région métropolitaine de recensement de Kelowna affiche maintenant le taux de criminalité le plus élevé au pays, le rapport de 2021 faisant état de 27 147 infractions au Code criminel dans cette région.
Selon Statistique Canada, alors que l'indice de gravité de la criminalité est de 73,7 pour l'ensemble du Canada, celui-ci est beaucoup plus élevé et s'établit à 122,3 dans la région métropolitaine de recensement de Kelowna. C'est un sujet dont me parlent mes concitoyens au cours de réunions, dans des courriels, dans des cafés et dans la rue. C'était l'un des enjeux les plus importants qui ont été abordés pendant la campagne électorale municipale qui s'est terminée il y a quelques semaines, et différentes solutions ont été proposées pour s'y attaquer.
Un des problèmes qui en découle est celui de la récidive dans le système de justice pénale. Malheureusement, nous voyons trop souvent des individus passer par un système fondé sur la capture et la remise en liberté, où ils ne purgent pas leur peine et ne reçoivent pas non plus l'aide dont ils ont besoin pour réduire les risques de récidive, notamment le traitement de la toxicomanie et les soins de santé mentale. Nous devons apporter des améliorations au système dans tous ces domaines, en plus du projet de loi C‑9.
Hélas, d'après les conversations que j'ai eues dans ma circonscription, il faut augmenter la confiance du public dans notre système de justice, mais très peu d'éléments semblent indiquer que le gouvernement libéral contribue à maintenir cette confiance. C'est un autre exemple d'un projet de loi qui aurait pu être adopté il y a près d'un an, si ce n'était de la décision du gouvernement libéral de déclencher des élections surprises inutiles l'automne dernier.
La version précédente de ce projet de loi était le projet de loi S‑5 de la 43e législature. Il aurait déjà été débattu, étudié et peut-être adopté si tous les députés l'avaient fait avancer. Au lieu de cela, nous voici de nouveau à la Chambre en train de reprendre le débat sur le projet de loi depuis le début, plus d'un an après la présentation de la dernière version, à cause d'une élection inutile et coûteuse. À titre de rappel, des cendres tombaient du ciel dans ma circonscription, Kelowna—Lake Country, lorsque le premier ministre a déclenché des élections surprises.
Il existe de nombreux exemples de projets de loi sur lesquels nous travaillions au cours de la dernière législature, mais qui ont été annulés en raison de l'élection surprise, nous forçant ainsi à tout recommencer. Le comité auquel je siège examine actuellement le projet de loi C‑22, Loi sur la prestation canadienne pour les personnes handicapées, qui a également été présenté pour la première fois il y a plus d'un an, puis qui est mort au Feuilleton en raison de l'élection surprise de l'automne dernier. Voilà un autre exemple qui montre que nous devons vraiment examiner les priorités du gouvernement. Beaucoup de ses priorités sont politiques et ne visent pas à faire avancer les bons projets de loi dont le pays a besoin.
Les conservateurs sont toujours heureux de travailler pour des réformes de notre système judiciaire. La confiance du public dans notre système est ce qui garantit l'engagement de notre société en faveur de l'application régulière de la loi. Personne n'a parlé avec plus d'éloquence à ce sujet que l'ancienne chef conservatrice Rona Ambrose lorsqu'elle a présenté son dernier projet de loi en 2017, la « loi juste ». Ce projet de loi proposait la responsabilisation des juges par l'entremise d'une formation en droit relatif aux agressions sexuelles.
À titre d'ardente défenseure des femmes et des survivants d'agressions sexuelles, Mme Ambrose a reconnu que, bien trop souvent, notre système judiciaire ne respecte pas les expériences des victimes d'agressions sexuelles. Les survivants d'agressions sexuelles doivent savoir que les personnes qui entendent leur cause ont la formation, l'expérience et le contexte nécessaires pour leur donner un procès équitable et faire en sorte que les survivants d'agressions sexuelles n'hésitent pas à se manifester. Malheureusement, il nous manque encore un système judiciaire auquel nous pouvons faire confiance et qui sera équitable, un système qui se concentre vraiment sur les victimes.
Il faut en faire plus pour veiller à ce que les juges comprennent les lois entourant le consentement. Il faut leur fournir davantage d'outils afin qu'ils puissent rendre des jugements justes et empreints de compassion qui permettront la réadaptation des contrevenants.
Mon propre projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C‑283, constituerait un de ces outils en réformant le processus de détermination de la peine relativement aux contrevenants souffrant de toxicomanie et de problèmes de santé mentale. Ma mesure législative modifierait le Code criminel du Canada afin d'appuyer un processus de détermination de la peine à deux volets. Les deux volets auraient la même durée de peine, mais certains individus condamnés ayant une tendance à la consommation problématique de substances et répondant à certains paramètres au moment de la détermination de la peine pourraient se voir offrir par le juge le choix d'être condamnés à participer à une évaluation de leur santé mentale et à un traitement de la toxicomanie à même un pénitencier fédéral pendant qu'ils purgent leur peine.
Grâce à ce processus de détermination de la peine, les contrevenants continueraient à subir les conséquences significatives de leurs actes, mais ils obtiendraient également une cure de désintoxication, ce qui permettrait de réduire le risque de récidive. Autrement dit, cela mettrait fin à la justice prorécidive. En fait, j'ai appelé mon projet de loi le « projet de loi pour mettre fin à la justice prorécidive ». Il recueille l'approbation de nombreuses parties intéressées qui travaillent dans le domaine du traitement des dépendances et de la réforme de la justice pénale, ainsi que de certains partis à la Chambre. Je suis reconnaissant qu'on en ait déjà débattu une fois à la Chambre, et j'ai hâte au prochain débat à son sujet.
C'est une occasion trop importante pour qu'on la laisse passer, tout comme le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui. Certaines victimes ont dit qu'elles ont complètement perdu confiance dans le système judiciaire. Il n'y a pas si longtemps, les victimes, surtout les femmes, étaient blâmées pour les agressions sexuelles commises contre elles. Avant que des lois ne soient instaurées pour améliorer le processus, il arrivait souvent aux juges de prendre en considération des éléments comme la longueur de la jupe de la femme ou encore l'existence d'une relation antérieure avec son agresseur quand venait le temps de déterminer si l'acte reproché était de nature criminelle. Il faut que les juges soient plus tenus de rendre des comptes, d'où la grande importance des mesures législatives qui concernent la magistrature.
Malheureusement, nous savons que les crimes violents ont augmenté partout au Canada. Ils ont augmenté de 32 % depuis l'arrivée au pouvoir du gouvernement. On peut se demander de quelle façon certaines des politiques clémentes envers les contrevenants du gouvernement ont une incidence sur la confiance des Canadiens dans le système judiciaire, ainsi que sur la sécurité publique.
Il faut aussi se rappeler que le poste d'ombudsman fédéral des victimes d'actes criminels a souvent été laissé vacant pendant plusieurs mois par le gouvernement. Récemment, il a été laissé vacant pendant près d'un an. Il s'agit de questions très importantes lorsque nous examinons l'ensemble du système judiciaire et son fonctionnement, et nous devons nous concentrer sur ce type de questions non seulement pour maintenir la confiance du public, mais aussi pour que celui-ci reçoive les meilleurs services dans tous ces domaines. Au cœur de toutes nos décisions, il est aussi très important que nous gardions les victimes à l'esprit et que nous défendions toujours les intérêts des victimes d'actes criminels, ce que les conservateurs font assurément. Nous prenons toujours en compte cet élément et axons toujours nos efforts en ce sens.
En terminant, si le gouvernement libéral se préoccupait vraiment de la question dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui, soit le projet de loi C‑9, il n'aurait pas déclenché d'élections surprises l'année dernière. Le projet de loi aurait déjà été adopté, et le processus serait déjà en place.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2022-10-28 10:38 [p.9015]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to be fair, as I have asked this of the previous speakers this morning. Recognizing the importance of the legislation and respecting the principle of judicial independence and the fact there are stakeholders who are really hoping to see progress with this legislation, so far the progress has only happened as a direct result of the government bringing in time allocation. That only takes it through second reading, and concerns with regard to committee stage, third reading and so forth.
The member made reference to the Senate. Does the Conservative Party believe this is legislation it could get behind and support passage of this year, or would it rather hold off until 2023?
Monsieur le Président, je vais être équitable, puisque j'ai demandé la même chose aux intervenants précédents ce matin. Compte tenu de l'importance de ce projet de loi, du respect du principe de l'indépendance judiciaire et de l'espoir de certaines parties intéressées qui attendent des progrès dans ce dossier, ce n'est que lorsque le gouvernement a décidé d'imposer l'attribution de temps que le projet de loi a progressé. Cependant, il est seulement rendu à l'étape de la deuxième lecture et rien n'est garanti pour l'étude en comité, l'étape de la troisième lecture et ainsi de suite.
La députée a fait référence au Sénat. Le Parti conservateur croit-il pouvoir appuyer ce projet de loi afin qu'il soit adopté avant la fin de l'année ou préférera-t-il attendre jusqu'en 2023?
Collapse
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2022-10-28 10:39 [p.9016]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the legislative calendar is really up to the government. The government chooses when it tables legislation. It chooses how many days of debate we have. It is really the government's legislative calendar. Our House leader, every Thursday, stands up to ask what is coming up, what is next and what is on the agenda.
It is really up to the government to set the agenda. We do know that we are at the end of the debate here. We have almost completed this part of the process, and then it will be moving onto the Senate. Of course, it will be up to the Senate to decide its timeline and its processes on its side.
Monsieur le Président, c'est uniquement le gouvernement qui détermine le calendrier législatif. C'est le gouvernement qui décide quand il présente les projets de loi. C'est encore lui qui détermine le nombre de jours de débats accordés à chacun d'eux. Il s'agit vraiment du calendrier législatif du gouvernement. Notre leader parlementaire se lève chaque jeudi pour demander ce qui nous attend à la Chambre, quels seront les prochains travaux et ce qui figure au programme.
Il incombe au gouvernement de choisir ce qui figure au programme. Nous savons toutefois que le débat tire à sa fin pour ce projet de loi. Nous avons presque terminé cette partie du processus, puis le projet de loi sera envoyé au Sénat. Bien entendu, le Sénat déterminera lui-même son échéancier et l'ordre de ses travaux.
Collapse
View Terry Dowdall Profile
CPC (ON)
View Terry Dowdall Profile
2022-10-28 10:39 [p.9016]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I was fortunate enough, in my prior life, to be the chair of the police board in my area, the Nottawasaga Police Services Board. I often heard from many of the top brass and those first responders, the ones who were out there on the scene, that there was a huge frustration with what has been spoken about earlier, and that is the issue of repeat offenders. They become frustrated.
Do we think that this has hurt the morale of a lot of our officers in our areas because they know that, a lot of the times, the soft-on-crime is not working?
Monsieur le Président, avant de devenir député, j'ai eu la chance de présider la Commission des services policiers Nottawasaga, la commission de police de ma région. J'ai souvent entendu les hauts gradés et les premiers intervenants, ceux qui étaient sur les scènes de crime, dire que la question des récidivistes, dont on a parlé plus tôt, était source d'une énorme frustration. Ils deviennent exaspérés à la longue.
Est-ce que les récidives nuisent au moral des policiers de nos régions respectives parce qu'ils savent que, dans bien des cas, l'indulgence envers les criminels ne donne pas de bons résultats?
Collapse
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2022-10-28 10:40 [p.9016]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his service.
Unfortunately, if we look back, in my community alone, it is very often a headline. We have some online news publications. Every day, I open up the website and there it is. There is another story.
This revolving door is occurring in all of our communities, including mine. I know that, speaking to a number of first responders, whether we are talking about law enforcement or firefighters, because they are often the first ones attending, they are attending issues that are often not even within their normal roles because of addiction and mental health issues which can, ultimately, lead into crime.
They are overburdened. They are overworked, and it is really frustrating when we hear headlines that someone has been picked up 50, 60, 70 or 100 times, and they are still circulating through the system. We have to address this.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député d'avoir servi dans cette commission.
Quand on regarde ce qui se passe, ce problème fait malheureusement souvent les grands titres, ne serait-ce que dans ma collectivité. Nous avons quelques publications de nouvelles en ligne. Chaque jour, j'ouvre le site et je vois une autre de ces histoires.
Le phénomène de la porte tournante existe dans toutes les collectivités du pays, y compris la mienne. Je parle à des premiers intervenants, qui sont souvent des policiers ou des pompiers. Comme ils sont souvent les premiers à intervenir, ils doivent composer avec des enjeux qui dépassent souvent leur rôle habituel et qui sont causés par des problèmes de toxicomanie ou de santé mentale qui peuvent mener à des crimes.
Ils sont surchargés. Ils sont débordés, et il est vraiment exaspérant d'entendre qu'une personne a été arrêtée 50, 60, 70 ou 100 fois, mais qu'elle continue de traîner dans le système. Il faut régler ce problème.
Collapse
View Jamie Schmale Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the hon. member mentioned victims in her speech. I think that is something often overlooked, especially by the Liberal government.
The victims are the ones dealing with what has happened to them, the trauma and the feeling of being unsafe in their community and their home, etc. That is something that comes through loud and clear. Maybe my colleague can expand on that and the role the government should be playing to help the victims of crime.
Monsieur le Président, dans son discours, la députée a mentionné les victimes. Je pense qu'elles sont souvent négligées, surtout par le gouvernement libéral.
Ce sont les victimes qui doivent composer avec ce qui leur est arrivé, le traumatisme et le sentiment de ne pas être en sécurité dans leur collectivité et chez elles, entre autres. C'est clair et net. Ma collègue pourrait peut‑être en dire plus long sur ce sujet et sur le rôle que le gouvernement devrait jouer pour aider les victimes d'actes criminels.
Collapse
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2022-10-28 10:42 [p.9016]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, absolutely, victims have to be at the core of what we consider when we are looking at legislation. A good example of that is Bill C-5 and how the government is removing minimum sentences from very serious crimes. That puts these individuals who have committed these crimes right back into their communities and right back into where the victims are.
That was one of the main reasons why we did not support that piece of legislation. We were looking out for the victims and caring for the victims.
Monsieur le Président, absolument, les répercussions sur les victimes doivent être au centre de nos préoccupations lors de l'étude d'une mesure législative. Prenons l'exemple du projet de loi C‑5, une initiative ministérielle qui élimine les peines minimales obligatoires pour des crimes très graves. Cela permet aux auteurs de crime de réintégrer la société, à l'endroit même où vivent leurs victimes.
C'est l'une des principales raisons pour lesquelles nous n'avons pas appuyé cette mesure législative. Nous tentions de protéger les victimes et de veiller à leurs intérêts.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-10-28 10:43 [p.9016]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is an honour and pleasure to speak in this House on behalf of the citizens of Saskatoon West. Of course, I am rising today to speak to the bill before us, Bill C-9, which makes changes to the way federally appointed judges can be removed for misconduct.
My approach today will be a bit different. I am not a lawyer, so I am not well versed in how law works and all the details and technicalities of it. The best example of that was from yesterday when I was privileged to attend the justice committee. I was listening to witnesses on the subject of Bill C-28, the extreme intoxication law. It is unbelievable that in this country, a person who gets so drunk that they commit a crime that results in great harm to a person can get off for it and there are no consequences. That is exactly what happened. That is why the government brought in Bill C-28 earlier. It was supposedly to fix this.
As a layperson at the committee yesterday, I was listening to all my learned colleagues ask very intelligent questions that were going over my head. I was listening to professors explain the legal technicalities of everything. However, one thing that did come out clear was that it is absolutely wrong that if a person commits a crime, they do not face consequences simply because they were too drunk. Clearly, that needs to be fixed.
The more troubling thing that came across to me was that the government attempted to fix this law in a very hurried way earlier this year. Essentially, it rammed through legislation to supposedly close a loophole. What I heard yesterday was that what the Liberals rammed through in a hurry, without proper consultation and without actually talking to people, has not solved the problem. In fact, it may have made it worse. We need to be very careful in the House when we propose solutions and ram them through the House without proper due diligence, because we can actually make things worse. That was the main thing I took away from yesterday.
I also want to note another piece of legislation going through the House right now. It is Bill S-4. It amends the process for peace officers to apply for and obtain a warrant using telecommunications rather than appearing in person. It expands the abilities for accused and offenders to appear remotely by audio conference and video conference. It also allows prospective jurors in a jury selection process to appear by video conference.
This is a bill that came about because of COVID. There were some changes needed in our system to accommodate more remote appearances, as members can see. What I find interesting is that these changes were due to the COVID epidemic we have, which started two years ago. It has taken two years for the Liberal government to get this to second reading in this House.
I find it odd that on one hand, some legislation gets rammed through almost instantaneously, like Bill C-28, while in the case of Bill S-4, it lollygags along for a while. Maybe COVID will be in the rear-view mirror when it finally gets passed. I find it quite rich when the government talks about those on the Conservative side obstructing things, when we are trying to do the proper due diligence and trying to make sure that we do not get bad laws.
This brings me to Bill C-9. This bill was originally introduced as a Senate bill, Bill S-5, in 2021. The bill modifies the existing judicial review process by establishing a process for complaints serious enough to warrant removal from office and another for offences that would warrant other sanctions, such as counselling, continuing education and reprimands. Currently, if the misconduct is less serious, one Canadian Judicial Council member who conducts the initial review may negotiate with the judge for an appropriate remedy.
The bill states that the reasons a judge could be removed from office include:
(a) infirmity;
(b) misconduct;
(c) failure in the due execution of judicial office;
(d) the judge is in a position that a reasonable, fair-minded and informed observer would consider to be incompatible with the due execution of judicial office.
Also, a screening officer can dismiss complaints rather than referring them to the review panel should they seem frivolous or improper.
Federal judges are appointed for life, and it is absolutely critical that they are free of political inference. It is important that we have mechanisms in place to deal with them and remove them from office if that extreme point is necessary. Parliament sets laws, though, and judges need to respect the will of Parliament. A good example is the mandatory minimum sentences that the previous Conservative government brought in.
Any violent criminal, regardless of race, gender and sexual orientation, should be treated as equal. The offender should face a jury of their peers and if convicted should get the appropriate punishment. Prison time will keep that person off the streets so they cannot engage in further criminal activity.
Mental health issues, as well as drug and alcohol abuse, need to be addressed and monitored by trained personnel. Therapy and 12-step programs that are offered in prisons must be made mandatory for prisoners. Under house arrest, there is no way to ensure that these offenders get the help they need.
We also need to consider victim safety when we are sentencing offenders. A sad but real truth is that violent crime is often committed within a family. It can be spousal abuse, sexual exploitation of a child, custodial kidnapping or robbery for the purposes of illicit substances. The people in closest proximity are always the most accessible victims. If a judge is required to sentence a spousal abuser to live at home rather than go to prison, what happens to the abused spouse and children? Do they flee to a crisis centre, or will they will get revictimized?
I want to talk a bit about Saskatoon and my riding of Saskatoon West. It is an awesome and beautiful place to live and work. My wife and I call it home. For years before I became a member of Parliament, I was a home builder. I built new homes for families moving into the riding.
First as a candidate and now as an MP, I can say that I have knocked on almost every door in Saskatoon West. As I have walked through those neighbourhoods, I have seen some of the areas of highest crime. In the past year, there have been 389 cases of reported sexual violations in Saskatoon, 2,303 reported cases of assault, 65 reported cases of kidnapping and abduction and 759 cases of violation under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.
Saskatoon is well above the national crime severity index of 73.4 in Canada's largest cities and has a crime severity index of 118, and it was ranked fourth behind Lethbridge, Winnipeg and Kelowna in 2020. Much of this crime is in the areas right around my constituency office. My constituency office is on the convergence of these neighbourhoods, and according to the Saskatoon Police Service, it is in the highest crime area of Saskatoon. As a result, we have to be very diligent in our office. We have gotten to know many of the people who live in the neighbourhood. They frequent our office and frequent the area by our office, and we have developed relationships with them.
My staff have a security door and a buzzer system in place to screen people before they come into the office. Still, my office has been broken into and I have had my House of Commons computer stolen. An employee of mine had the window on his car broken just because somebody wanted a few quarters that were sitting in there. A lot of this is because of addicts. We have a lot of addiction issues that drive many of the crime problems we have.
This is something that I agree with the government on. The approach on how to fix it, though, is where we differ. I believe in the miracles of alcohol and drug treatment through 12-step programs and abstention. The NDP-Liberals believe in what is called harm reduction.
What I think needs to happen is that addicts need to be treated with love and compassion, which is offered through 12-step programs. These programs offer alcoholics and addicts a way to get clean and help others get clean at no cost to the individual or taxpayer. Unfortunately, there are two things that the government does not like. First, these are programs of spirituality. They require the addict to “turn their will and lives over to the care of God”. Second, as I explained, this does not require big government intervention. These programs deliver miracles; I know that for a fact. I know people who have been through them and care about them.
As I wrap up, I just want to say that there are so many areas that we need to be working on in this House to improve our criminal justice system. Bill C-9 is a good step forward. We need to make sure that our judges are independent and that they are worthy of the positions they hold.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un honneur et un plaisir de prendre la parole à la Chambre au nom des gens de Saskatoon-Ouest. Bien entendu, j'interviens aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi à l'étude, le projet de loi C‑9, qui apporte des modifications à la manière dont les juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral peuvent être révoqués pour inconduite.
Mon approche aujourd'hui sera un peu différente. Je ne suis pas avocat, donc je ne suis pas très au fait du fonctionnement du droit, de ses détails et de ses aspects techniques. Le meilleur exemple de cela est celui d'hier, lorsque j'ai eu le privilège d'assister à une audience du comité de la justice. J'écoutais les témoignages au sujet du projet de loi C‑28 sur l'intoxication volontaire extrême. Il est incroyable que, dans ce pays, une personne qui est tellement ivre qu'elle commet un crime causant un grave préjudice à une autre personne puisse s'en tirer sans aucune conséquence. Or, c'est exactement ce qui s'est produit. C'est pour cette raison que le gouvernement a présenté le projet de loi C‑28, qui était censé corriger les choses.
À l'audience du comité tenue hier, j'ai écouté en tant que profane tous mes éminents collègues poser des questions très intelligentes qui me dépassaient. J'ai entendu des professeurs expliquer les subtilités juridiques de toutes sortes de choses. Cependant, j'ai clairement compris ceci: il est absolument inadmissible qu'une personne qui commet un crime n'ait pas à en subir les conséquences simplement parce qu'elle était trop ivre. Il est clair que cela doit être corrigé.
Ce que j'ai trouvé particulièrement troublant, c'est que, plus tôt cette année, le gouvernement a voulu remédier à la situation en précipitant les choses. Il a essentiellement voulu accélérer l'étude de ce projet de loi en prétextant vouloir combler des lacunes. Selon ce que j'ai entendu hier, les mesures que les libéraux ont voulu faire adopter à toute vapeur, sans mener de consultations adéquates, et sans même parler à qui que ce soit, n'ont pas réglé le problème. En fait, elles l'ont peut-être même aggravé. La Chambre doit être très prudente lorsqu'elle propose des solutions, car si on va trop vite, sans faire preuve de la diligence requise, alors on risque d'aggraver la situation. C'est la principale chose que j'ai retenue hier.
J'aimerais aussi parler d'un autre projet de loi à l'étude à la Chambre en ce moment. Il s'agit du projet de loi S‑4, qui vise à modifier le processus que les agents de la paix doivent suivre pour demander et obtenir un mandat en se servant de moyens de télécommunication au lieu de se présenter en personne. Il élargit les possibilités pour que les accusés et les délinquants puissent comparaître à distance, par vidéoconférence ou audioconférence. Il permet aussi aux candidats-jurés de participer au processus de sélection des jurés par vidéoconférence.
Ce projet de loi découle de la pandémie. Comme les députés peuvent le constater, le système devait être modifié pour permettre un plus grand nombre de comparutions à distance. Ce que je trouve intéressant, c'est que ces changements s'inscrivent dans la foulée de la pandémie de COVID, qui a commencé il y a deux ans. Il a donc fallu deux ans au gouvernement libéral pour amener ce projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture à la Chambre.
Je trouve étrange que d'un côté, certains projets de loi soient adoptés presque instantanément, comme le projet de loi C‑28, alors que d'autres, comme le projet de loi S‑4, traînent pendant un certain temps. Peut-être que la COVID ne sera plus qu'un mauvais souvenir quand ce projet de loi sera finalement adopté. Je trouve un peu fort que le gouvernement affirme que les conservateurs font de l'obstruction, alors que nous essayons de faire preuve de diligence raisonnable pour éviter d'adopter de mauvaises mesures législatives.
Ce qui m'amène au projet de loi C‑9. À l'origine, ce projet de loi a été présenté au Sénat. Il s'agissait du projet de loi S‑5 en 2021. Le projet de loi modifie le processus d'examen des plaintes visant les juges en établissant un processus pour les plaintes suffisamment graves pour justifier une révocation, ainsi qu'un autre pour les infractions qui justifieraient d'autres sanctions, comme une thérapie, la participation à de la formation continue et des réprimandes. À l'heure actuelle, en cas d'inconduite mineure, un membre du Conseil canadien de la magistrature qui procède à un examen initial peut négocier avec le juge concerné pour trouver une solution appropriée.
Selon le projet de loi, un juge peut être démis de ses fonctions pour l'un des motifs suivants:
a) invalidité;
b) inconduite;
c) manquement aux devoirs de la charge de juge;
d) situation qu’un observateur raisonnable, équitable et bien informé jugerait incompatible avec les devoirs de la charge de juge.
De plus, un agent de contrôle peut rejeter les plaintes au lieu de les renvoyer au comité d'examen s'il est d'avis qu'elles sont frivoles ou faites dans un but inapproprié.
Les juges fédéraux sont nommés à vie, et il est absolument essentiel qu'ils ne subissent aucune ingérence politique. Il est important d'avoir des mécanismes en place pour les encadrer et les démettre de leurs fonctions si cette mesure extrême est nécessaire. Cela dit, c'est le Parlement qui établit les lois, et les juges doivent respecter sa volonté. Les peines minimales obligatoires présentées par le gouvernement conservateur précédent en sont un bon exemple.
Tout criminel violent, indépendamment de sa race, de son sexe et de son orientation sexuelle, devrait être traité équitablement. Le délinquant doit être confronté à un jury composé de ses pairs et, s'il est reconnu coupable, il doit recevoir la peine appropriée. Une peine d'emprisonnement évitera que cette personne retourne dans la rue pour se livrer à d'autres activités criminelles.
Les problèmes de santé mentale, ainsi que l'abus de drogues et d'alcool, doivent être traités et surveillés par un personnel qualifié. La thérapie et les programmes en 12 étapes qui sont proposés dans les prisons doivent être rendus obligatoires pour les détenus. En détention à domicile, il n'y a aucun moyen de s'assurer que les délinquants concernés obtiennent l'aide dont ils ont besoin.
Lorsque nous condamnons les criminels, nous devons également tenir compte de la sécurité des victimes. La triste réalité, c'est que les crimes violents sont souvent commis au sein de la famille. Il peut s'agir de violence conjugale, d'exploitation sexuelle d'un enfant, d'enlèvement d'un enfant sous la garde d'un membre de la famille ou de vol à main armée pour l'achat de substances illicites. Les personnes les plus proches sont toujours les victimes les plus faciles à atteindre. Si un juge est amené à condamner un conjoint violent à vivre chez lui plutôt que d'aller en prison, qu'advient-il du conjoint et des enfants maltraités? Vont-ils se réfugier dans un centre de crise ou seront-ils de nouveau victimes de la violence?
Je voudrais parler un peu de Saskatoon et de ma circonscription, Saskatoon‑Ouest. C'est un endroit formidable et magnifique pour vivre et travailler. Ma femme et moi y avons élu domicile. Pendant des années avant de devenir député, j'ai été constructeur de résidences. Je bâtissais des maisons neuves pour les familles qui s'installaient dans la circonscription.
D'abord à titre de candidat et maintenant à titre de député, je peux dire que j'ai frappé à presque toutes les portes de Saskatoon‑Ouest. En me promenant dans les quartiers, j'ai découvert certaines zones où la criminalité est le plus élevée. Au cours de la dernière année, 389 cas d'infractions sexuelles ont été signalés à Saskatoon, mais aussi 2 303 agressions, 65 enlèvements et 759 infractions à la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances.
En 2020, l'indice de gravité de la criminalité à Saskatoon était de 118, soit bien au-dessus de la moyenne de 73,4 dans les plus grandes villes du Canada, ce qui porte Saskatoon au quatrième rang, derrière Lethbridge, Winnipeg et Kelowna. Mon bureau de circonscription est situé à la convergence des quartiers où sont commis une grande partie de ces crimes. Selon le service de police de Saskatoon, c'est le secteur de la ville qui connaît le plus haut taux de criminalité. Par conséquent, le personnel de mon bureau et moi devons être très prudents. Nous avons appris à connaître bien des gens qui vivent dans le voisinage. Ils fréquentent mon bureau et ses environs, et nous avons créé des liens avec eux.
Mon bureau est doté d'une porte de sécurité pouvant être déverrouillée à distance, ce qui permet à mon personnel de vérifier qui est à la porte avant de les laisser entrer. Malgré cela, des cambrioleurs y sont entrés par effraction pour voler mon ordinateur de la Chambre des communes, et quelqu'un a cassé la fenêtre du véhicule de l'un de mes employés pour s'emparer des quelques pièces de monnaie qui s'y trouvaient. Beaucoup de cette activité criminelle est attribuable à la toxicomanie, un problème très présent dans le secteur.
Je suis d'accord avec le gouvernement pour dire qu'il faut remédier à ce problème. Par contre, je ne suis pas d'accord avec lui sur la façon de nous y prendre. Je crois aux miracles du traitement des dépendances à l'alcool et aux drogues grâce aux programmes en 12 étapes et à l'abstention. La coalition néo-démocrate—libérale croit plutôt à ce qu'on appelle la réduction des méfaits.
À mon avis, ce qu'il faut, c'est traiter les toxicomanes avec amour et compassion, ce que font les programmes en 12 étapes. Ces programmes offrent aux alcooliques et aux toxicomanes un moyen de devenir sobres et d'aider les autres à le devenir, sans frais, ni pour eux ni pour le contribuable. Malheureusement, il y a deux choses que le gouvernement n'aime pas. Premièrement, ce sont des programmes axés sur la spiritualité. Ils demandent aux toxicomanes de « confier leur volonté et leur vie aux soins de Dieu ». Deuxièmement, comme je l'ai expliqué, ces programmes fonctionnent sans interventionnisme du gouvernement. Ils accomplissent des miracles; je l'ai moi-même constaté. Des gens que j'aime y ont eu recours.
En terminant, je voudrais simplement ajouter qu'il y a énormément d'éléments du système de justice pénale sur lesquels la Chambre doit se pencher pour trouver des améliorations. Le projet de loi C‑9 est un pas dans la bonne direction. Il faut que les juges soient indépendants et dignes du poste qu'ils occupent.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2022-10-28 10:53 [p.9018]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I find it interesting when the Conservatives talk about the whole issue of crime and how tough they want to be on crime. I was an MLA, and back in, let us say, 2005 or 2006, Manitoba had the highest number of car thefts per capita. It was about the same 300 youth stealing literally thousands of cars. I think 15,000 cars was our peak. That was when we had Stephen Harper as prime minister.
I am wondering if the Conservatives can provide comment on this, as they like to say that we have developed a revolving door. How would they respond to the fact that there were so many cars being stolen in the province of Manitoba? Would they take responsibility for that?
Monsieur le Président, je trouve toujours intéressant que les conservateurs parlent des enjeux liés à la criminalité et de leur intention de serrer la vis aux criminels. Lorsque j'étais député provincial au Manitoba, en 2005 ou 2006 peut-être, la province avait le pire bilan pour le vol de voitures par habitant. Environ 300 jeunes étaient responsables du vol de milliers de voitures. Au pire de la série de délits, je crois qu'on parlait de 15 000 voitures. C'était à l'époque où Stephen Harper était premier ministre.
J'aimerais que les conservateurs disent ce qu'ils en pensent, eux qui aiment répéter que nous avons mis en place un système de portes tournantes. Comment expliquent-ils qu'autant de voitures aient été volées au Manitoba? En assument-ils la responsabilité?
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-10-28 10:53 [p.9018]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am a little disappointed that the parliamentary secretary did not ask me the standard question he has asked all the other people who have talked. I spoke to that a little in my speech, but I want to reiterate it because I want to answer the question that he really wanted to ask me but could not. It is so important in this House, when it comes to legislation, that we do not ram legislation through but give it proper due diligence, and that when hon. colleagues have things to say, they are respected and have their chance to say them.
More importantly, it is interesting how the government complains at this point that it had to invoke time allocation, when in fact it called an election to stop this legislation before. We could have had this legislation passed had we not had the needless election a year ago that the Prime Minister called.
That was what I wanted to say in response to the question that I know the parliamentary secretary wanted to ask.
Monsieur le Président, je suis quelque peu déçu que le secrétaire parlementaire ne me pose pas la même question qu'à tous les autres députés qui ont pris la parole. C'est quelque chose que j'ai abordé dans mon discours, mais que je tiens à répéter parce que je veux répondre à la question qu'il voulait véritablement me poser. Il est absolument essentiel, à la Chambre, lorsque nous étudions des mesures législatives, de ne pas les adopter à la hâte, de prendre le temps nécessaire pour les analyser soigneusement comme il se doit et, lorsque nos collègues souhaitent s'exprimer, de les respecter et de leur donner l'occasion de le faire.
Plus important encore, il est curieux d'entendre le gouvernement se plaindre d'avoir dû recourir à l'attribution de temps, alors qu'il a déclenché des élections pour empêcher l'adoption d'un projet de loi sur le même sujet. Si nous n'avions pas eu les élections inutiles que le premier ministre a déclenchées il y a un an, ce projet de loi aurait pu être adopté.
C'est la réponse que je tenais à donner à la question que le secrétaire parlementaire voulait véritablement me poser.
Collapse
View Denis Trudel Profile
BQ (QC)
View Denis Trudel Profile
2022-10-28 10:55 [p.9018]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for his speech.
I would like to address a somewhat related issue. There is a problem in this country with the way sexual assault cases are handled. Women are still afraid of the legal system. Women in Quebec who are victims of sexual assault can turn to centres known as CALACS, or Centres d'aide et de lutte contre les agressions à caractère sexuel. These centres play a very important role. According to statistics kept by CALACS, 5% of sex crimes are reported to the police. Just 5% of all sex crimes are reported. Clearly, women are afraid of the legal system. Based on the same statistics, three out of every 1,000 sexual assault cases that end up in the justice system result in a conviction. That is outrageous.
How does my colleague see this problem being addressed?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de son discours.
J'aimerais aborder un sujet un peu connexe. Il y a un problème dans ce pays quant à la façon dont on traite les cas d'agression sexuelle. Les femmes ont encore peur du système judiciaire. Au Québec, il existe les Centres d'aide et de lutte contre les agressions à caractère sexuel pour les femmes qui sont victimes d'agression sexuelle, les CALACS. Ces centres jouent un rôle très important. Selon les statistiques que tiennent les CALACS, 5 % des crimes sexuels sont rapportés à la police. C'est seulement 5 % de l'ensemble des crimes sexuels. De toute évidence, les femmes ont peur du système judiciaire. Toujours selon leurs statistiques, parmi les plaintes qui finissent par se rendre dans le système de justice, 3 plaintes pour agressions sexuelles sur 1 000 se soldent par une condamnation. Cela n'a aucun bon sens.
Selon mon collègue, comment peut-on régler ce problème?
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-10-28 10:55 [p.9018]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, what the whole situation boils down to is a lack of confidence in the justice system. When a victim is unsure if a perpetrator will be held to account, and particularly unsure if a perpetrator will ever be incarcerated or see any consequences for their actions, it is very difficult for a victim to go through the mental anguish and pain of a court process. That is exactly why we need to do everything we can in this House to solidify and improve our system.
The current Liberal government has done the exact opposite. It has made it weaker and less responsible, and we are going to see more victims not wanting to come forward. That is why we need a strong Conservative government to fix the mess that has been created in the judicial system by the Liberals.
Monsieur le Président, cette situation se résume à un manque de confiance dans le système judiciaire. Lorsqu'une victime n'a pas la certitude que l'auteur d'un acte criminel sera tenu responsable de ses actes et, notamment, qu'il sera un jour incarcéré ou qu'il répondra de ce qu'il a fait, l'angoisse et la souffrance psychologique associées à une procédure judiciaire lui sont très difficiles à supporter. C'est précisément pour cette raison que nous devons faire tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir à la Chambre pour consolider et améliorer notre système.
Le gouvernement libéral actuel fait exactement le contraire. Il affaiblit notre système et l'a il le rend moins responsable, ce qui dissuadera de plus en plus de victimes de se manifester. C'est pourquoi, pour réparer les pots cassés par les libéraux dans le système judiciaire, il faut la fermeté d'un gouvernement conservateur.
Collapse
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
View Leah Gazan Profile
2022-10-28 10:57 [p.9018]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I was really shocked to hear my colleague criticize harm reduction approaches for people who are struggling with addictions or who use drugs recreationally. I had five people in my riding die from the toxic drug supply last weekend. It goes against what public health experts are saying about the importance of putting in harm reduction to tackle addictions or to ensure people do not overdose.
My colleague mentioned the AA program. Certainly that works for many, but suggesting that is the way forward goes against science. I know his party has difficulty following science.
I am hoping my colleague can respond to me and perhaps evolve in his understanding of harm reduction.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai été vraiment choquée d'entendre mon collègue critiquer les approches axées sur la réduction des méfaits pour les personnes qui sont aux prises avec la toxicomanie ou qui consomment de la drogue à des fins récréatives. La fin de semaine dernière, cinq personnes sont décédées dans ma circonscription en raison d'un approvisionnement en drogues toxiques. Cela va à l'encontre de ce que disent les experts en santé publique sur l'importance de mettre en place des mesures de réduction des méfaits pour lutter contre la toxicomanie et éviter les surdoses.
Mon collègue a mentionné le programme des Alcooliques anonymes. Ce programme aide certainement beaucoup de personnes, mais la suggestion qu'il s'agit de la voie à suivre va à l'encontre de la science. Je sais que le parti du député a du mal à se fier à la science.
J'espère que mon collègue pourra me répondre et améliorer éventuellement sa compréhension de la réduction des méfaits.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-10-28 10:58 [p.9018]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am just happy that today I was able to shock the member for Winnipeg Centre.
Monsieur le Président, je suis simplement heureux d'avoir pu choquer la députée de Winnipeg‑Centre aujourd'hui.
Collapse
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Scott Reid Profile
2022-10-28 10:58 [p.9018]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I have two minutes. I will be continuing after question period, after a delay of about an hour, which is better than a situation I once had where I started a speech and then was delayed by a two-week break. There is nothing like having two weeks between the first two minutes and the remaining eight minutes of a speech to allow one to refine those remarks. The second half of the speech was considerably better than the first.
This time I am going to turn it around, and I am going to put all the exciting stuff at the front end. I am going to talk about the legislative history of this bill, a bill that is so urgently important that the government is applying time allocation and limiting debate. It is a matter that is absolutely critical to get dealt with, which is presumably why the government has delayed debate from when it introduced the bill in December 2021. It did not start debate for a further six months, until June 16 of this year, just shy of six months after it was introduced. No, in fact it is exactly six months. Maybe the government is seeking symmetry here, but that is when debate at second reading started. Of course we cannot complete anything that fast. It then disappeared. It is now back in October, and the government is announcing that it is a crisis and we must deal with this immediately, after having delayed it.
However, the story is actually worse than that because the original bill was introduced in the Senate as Bill S-3, and the government then put its own bill in. Even that misses the point that there was a previous bill, which was essentially identical, introduced before the last election, the mid-COVID pandemic election, which caused everything on the Order Paper to be set aside. It was an election which served, as far as I can tell, literally no purpose. It was the least important election in Canadian history, and simply replicated the previous mandate down almost to the exact seat.
Now it is a panic. Before we had literally years to deal with it, and I should point out that this is dealing with an issue that is essentially 50 years old. However, I will stop now and I look forward to continuing after question period.
Monsieur le Président, je dispose de deux minutes. Je reprendrai mon discours après la période des questions, après une pause d'environ une heure, ce qui est mieux que la situation que j'ai vécue une fois où j'ai commencé un discours que je ne pouvais reprendre que deux semaines plus tard. Rien ne vaut deux semaines entre les deux minutes au début d'un discours et les huit minutes qui restent pour permettre à la personne de préciser ses observations. La deuxième partie du discours était considérablement meilleure que la première.
Cette fois-ci, je vais virer les choses à l'envers: je vais laisser tous les aspects captivants pour la fin. Je vais parler de l'histoire législative du projet de loi, un projet de loi qui est tellement urgent et important que le gouvernement impose l'attribution de temps et limite la durée du débat. C'est une question qu'il est absolument essentiel de régler, ce qui explique vraisemblablement pourquoi le gouvernement a retardé le débat depuis la présentation du projet de loi en décembre 2021. Il n'a pas commencé le débat pendant six mois, jusqu'au 16 juin de cette année, un peu moins de six mois après sa présentation. Non, en fait, c'était exactement six mois. Peut-être le gouvernement cherche-t-il à établir une symétrie, mais voilà le délai qui a précédé la deuxième lecture. Bien sûr, nous ne pouvons pas terminer rapidement quoi que ce soit. Ensuite, le projet de loi a disparu. Maintenant, en octobre, il est de retour et le gouvernement annonce qu'il s'agit d'une crise et qu'il faut s'en occuper immédiatement, après l'avoir retardé.
Cependant, l'histoire est en fait pire parce que le projet de loi original a été présenté au Sénat en tant que projet de loi S‑3, et le gouvernement a ensuite présenté son propre projet de loi. Même cette situation ne tient pas compte du fait qu'il existait un projet de loi antérieur, essentiellement identique, présenté avant les dernières élections, celle qui a eu lieu au milieu de la pandémie de COVID et qui a entraîné l'annulation de tout ce qui figurait au Feuilleton. Ces élections, pour autant que je sache, n'ont servi à rien. C'était les élections les moins importantes de l'histoire du Canada, et elles ont simplement reproduit le mandat précédent presque siège pour siège.
Maintenant, c'est la panique. Nous avions littéralement des années pour débattre du problème, et je dois souligner qu'il s'agit d'un problème qui dure depuis 50 ans. Je vais m'arrêter maintenant, mais j'ai hâte de poursuivre après la période de questions.
Collapse
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Scott Reid Profile
2022-10-28 12:14 [p.9033]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I think this is something that may have never happened in the House before, a member beginning a speech on a bill in one seat and continuing it in a separate seat on the very same day. This was made possible, of course, by a standing order change that allows us to sit absolutely anywhere in the House. I was tempted to do it from the Prime Minister's seat, but that would have involved a little too many logistics. I was not sure we would get back to the debate, so I will do it from this seat here.
We are debating Bill C-9, an act to amend the Judges Act, and we are at second reading. I want to talk about the substance of the bill. It is actually, I think, a very good bill, and I will deal with that in a minute.
First, I want to talk about the fact the government is once again rushing this debate through and imposing closure. As I consider its actions, the thought that occurs to me is that, out there in the normal world, there is a saying. It is that “your lack of planning does not equal my crisis,” but this is the House of Commons of Canada. As long as they have the support of the New Democrats, the Liberals can be as disorganized as they want and can create crises for themselves and then impose limits on democracy and open debate in order to rush through crises of their own making.
In the case of the bill, which has now been time allocated, a version of it was introduced as Bill S-5, a government bill in the Senate, in May 2021, but it died on the Order Paper, because the Prime Minister, in his infinite wisdom, decided to call the least necessary election in Canadian history, which resulted in our having exactly the same seat breakdown we had prior to the election. However, it did cause everything on the Order Paper to be wiped off the Order Paper, and when we resumed in the autumn of 2021, a new bill was introduced on the Order Paper, on December 1, 2021, as Bill S-3. Subsequently, that bill was dropped and Bill C-9, the bill we are presently debating, found its way onto the Order Paper on December 16, 2021. It then sat on the Order Paper, undebated, for exactly six months to the day, until June 16, 2022.
The House rises in time for Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day, which is on the 24th of June. The bill, therefore, had a couple days of time for debate before the House rose. Then, with a whole summer going by, it did not come back until very recently, when we had been here for a month. This makes the point that the reason there is a rush, if there is a rush at all, is that the government has caused a delay. I should point out as well that the purpose of the bill is to make changes to the Judges Act, which was implemented in 1971, so we are talking about changes to something that has been in place for 50 years.
Saying this constitutes the kind of crisis that warrants putting limits on debate is, in my view, simply unreasonable and simply a reflection of the fact that it is now reflexive for the current government to put time limits on all debates on everything.
Now, let me talk about the substance of the bill.
Bill C-9 deals primarily with judges, but as for the provisions it replaces, this new process would also apply to persons other than judges who are appointed under an act of Parliament to hold office under what is known as “good behaviour”. The question of what constitutes “good behaviour” is a matter that needs to be updated from time to time, particularly in the world of the law and the actions of judges, because if something goes wrong in the court system and if judges or courts act inappropriately, we say that the law is brought into disrepute. Bringing the law into disrepute is the worst thing a judge can do. What constitutes “disrepute” does change over time as we get greater sensitivity, for example, to gender issues, which lie at the heart of the present piece of legislation, or to concerns relating to the ability of people who face various forms of disabilities to communicate with the courts and so on.
Standards within society do change. I think they usually improve, and it is reasonable to update this from time to time.
Right now, the way it works is that, should a federally appointed judge be found to be potentially in breach of their responsibilities, the issue is sent to the Canadian Judicial Council for review. The bill would establish a new process for reviewing allegations of misconduct, allegations that are not serious enough to warrant a judge's removal from office, and would make changes to the process by which recommendations regarding removal from office can be made to the Minister of Justice.
The bill would specifically modify the existing judicial review process by establishing a process for complaints serious enough to warrant removal from office and another for offences that could warrant other sanctions, such as counselling, continuing education and reprimands.
Currently, if misconduct is less serious, a single member of the Canadian Judicial Council holds the initial review and may negotiate with a judge for remedy. I should mention as well that the Canadian Judicial Council was set up under the existing law. It dates back to 1971 and is mandated to promote efficiency and uniformity and improve the quality of judicial services in all superior courts in Canada.
The reasons a judge could be removed from office include infirmity, misconduct, failure in the due execution of judicial office, and the judge's being “in a position that a reasonable, fair-minded and informed observer would consider to be incompatible with the due execution of judicial office”.
Under the new rules, a screening officer could dismiss complaints rather than referring them to the review panel, should they appear frivolous or improper. Certain things, such as a complaint that alleges sexual harassment or discrimination, may not be dismissed. The full screening criteria would be published by the Canadian Judicial Council.
These amendments address the shortcomings of the current process by imposing mandatory sanctions on a judge when a complaint of misconduct is found to be justified but not to be serious enough to warrant removal from office. Again, such sanctions could include counselling, continuing education and reprimands.
In the name of transparency, this legislation would require that the Canadian Judicial Council include the number of complaints received and how they were resolved in its public annual report, something that is a very sound idea.
Since its inception in 1971, the Canadian Judicial Council has completed inquiries into eight complaints considered serious enough that they would warrant removal from the bench. Four of them, in fact, did result in recommendations for removal.
Under the new process, as laid out in Bill C-9, the Canadian Judicial Council would continue to preside over the judicial complaints process, which would start with a three-person panel. If the complaint is serious enough that it might warrant removal from the bench, it could be referred to a separate, five-person hearing panel.
As I am out of time, I will just make the observation that, on the whole, this is a good piece of legislation. I am glad it is before us. It could have been before us earlier. I very much welcome the opportunity to vote in favour and send this off to committee, but of course I object to the rush we have been put in to do that.
Monsieur le Président, je pense que nous assistons peut-être à une première à la Chambre: un député qui commence son discours sur un projet de loi à un siège et qui le poursuit à un autre plus tard la même journée. C'est possible, bien sûr, en raison d'une modification au Règlement qui nous permet de prendre place n'importe où à la Chambre. J'ai eu envie de le faire à la banquette du premier ministre, mais la logistique nécessaire aurait été un peu trop lourde. Je n'étais pas sûr que nous allions reprendre le débat, je vais donc le faire de ce siège-ci.
Nous débattons du projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges, et nous sommes à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Je veux parler du fond du projet de loi. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un très bon projet de loi et je vais y revenir dans une minute.
Tout d'abord, je veux parler du fait que le gouvernement précipite un autre débat et impose une fois de plus la clôture. Lorsque je me suis penché sur ses actions, j'ai tout de suite pensé à cette expression populaire: « Un manque de planification de votre part ne constitue pas une crise pour moi. » Cependant, nous sommes à la Chambre des communes du Canada. Tant qu'ils ont l'appui des néo-démocrates, les libéraux peuvent être aussi désorganisés qu'ils le veulent et se créer des crises, puis imposer des limites à la démocratie et au débat ouvert afin de traverser à toute vitesse des crises qu'ils ont eux-mêmes créées.
Dans le cas du projet de loi, qui fait maintenant l'objet d'une attribution de temps, il correspond à l'ancien projet de loi S‑5, un projet de loi du gouvernement au Sénat, présenté en mai 2021, mais mort au Feuilleton parce que le premier ministre, dans son infinie sagesse, a décidé de déclencher les élections les moins nécessaires de l'histoire du Canada, qui nous ont donné exactement la même répartition des sièges que nous avions avant les élections. Cependant, tout ce qui figurait au Feuilleton a été rayé du Feuilleton, et lorsque nous avons repris nos travaux à l'automne 2021, un nouveau projet de loi a été inscrit au Feuilleton le 1er décembre 2021 en tant que projet de loi S‑3. Par la suite, ce projet de loi a été abandonné, et le projet de loi C‑9, le projet de loi dont nous débattons actuellement, s'est retrouvé au Feuilleton le 16 décembre 2021. Il est resté au Feuilleton, sans être débattu, pendant exactement six mois, jusqu'au 16 juin 2022.
Comme la Chambre ajourne pour la Saint-Jean-Baptiste, qui a lieu le 24 juin, il n'y a eu que quelques jours pour débattre du projet de loi. Puis, tout un été a passé, et le projet de loi n'a été remis à l'ordre du jour que tout récemment, alors que nous siégions déjà depuis un mois. Donc, s'il y a urgence, s'il y a la moindre urgence, c'est parce que le gouvernement s'est traîné les pieds. Je devrais ajouter que ce projet de loi vise à apporter des changements à la Loi sur les juges, qui est entrée en vigueur en 1971. Il s'agit donc de modifier une loi vieille de 50 ans.
À mon avis, il est donc tout à fait déraisonnable de prétendre qu'il y a crise pour justifier qu'on veuille limiter le débat. Cela reflète simplement cette habitude qu'a prise le gouvernement de limiter tous les débats.
Parlons maintenant de la teneur du projet de loi.
Le projet de loi C‑9 traite principalement des juges, mais les dispositions qu'il remplacerait prévoient un nouveau processus qui s'appliquerait également aux autres personnes nommées sous le régime d’une loi fédérale pour occuper leur poste « à titre inamovible ». L'inamovibilité de la personne peut toutefois être remise en question, et ce, en particulier à cause du rôle des juges dans la sphère du droit. Si quelque chose n'allait pas dans le système judiciaire et que les juges ou les tribunaux agissaient de manière inappropriée, cela jetterait le discrédit sur le droit. Ce serait bien la pire chose qu'un juge puisse faire. L'idée qu'on se fait d'un comportement jetant le discrédit change avec le temps, au fur et à mesure que les sensibilités évoluent, par exemple, autour des questions de genre, qui se trouvent au cœur de ce qui a donné naissance au présent projet de loi, ou autour des préoccupations liées à la capacité des personnes souffrant de diverses formes de handicap à communiquer avec les tribunaux, et ainsi de suite.
Les normes de la société évoluent. En général, je pense qu'elles s'améliorent et qu'il est raisonnable de se mettre à jour de temps à autre.
À l'heure actuelle, si un juge nommé par le gouvernement fédéral est considéré comme ayant potentiellement manqué à ses responsabilités, l'affaire est renvoyée au Conseil canadien de la magistrature pour examen. Or, le projet de loi établirait un nouveau processus d'examen des allégations d'inconduite qui ne sont pas suffisamment graves pour justifier la révocation d'un juge, et il apporterait des changements au processus par lequel des recommandations à l'égard de la révocation peuvent être faites au ministre de la Justice.
Le projet de loi modifierait le processus de contrôle judiciaire actuel en établissant un processus qui permettrait de traiter les plaintes assez graves pour justifier la révocation d'un juge et un autre processus pour les infractions qui pourraient justifier d'autres sanctions, par exemple, réprimander le juge ou encore lui ordonner de suivre une thérapie ou de participer à de la formation continue.
À l'heure actuelle, si l'inconduite est de moindre gravité, un membre du Conseil canadien de la magistrature peut procéder à l'examen initial et négocier avec le juge fautif pour corriger la situation. Je tiens à préciser que le Conseil canadien de la magistrature a été institué en vertu de la loi en vigueur. Établi en 1971, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature a pour mandat de « d’améliorer l’efficacité, l’uniformité et la qualité des services judiciaires rendus dans les cours supérieures du Canada ».
Un juge peut être révoqué entre autres pour cause d'invalidité, d'inconduite ou de manquement aux devoirs de la charge de juge. Il peut l'être également s'il se retrouve dans une « situation qu’un observateur raisonnable, équitable et bien informé jugerait incompatible avec les devoirs de [la charge de juge] ».
Selon les nouvelles règles, un agent de contrôle pourrait rejeter une plainte qui semblerait frivole ou inappropriée, plutôt que de la renvoyer au comité d’examen. Par contre, une plainte qui allèguerait du harcèlement sexuel ou de la discrimination ne pourrait être rejetée. Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature publierait une liste complète des critères de sélection.
Ces modifications comblent les failles du processus actuel, puisqu'elles prévoient des mesures obligatoires pour les situations où une plainte d'inconduite s'avère fondée, mais qu'elle n'est pas assez grave pour justifier la révocation du juge. Comme on l'a déjà dit, les mesures en question pourraient être une réprimande ou l'obligation de suivre une thérapie ou de participer à de la formation continue.
Dans un souci de transparence, le projet de loi prévoit que le Conseil canadien de la magistrature inclurait, dans son rapport annuel public, le nombre de plaintes reçues et la façon dont elles ont été résolues. C'est une excellente idée.
Depuis sa création en 1971, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature a mené des enquêtes sur huit plaintes considérées comme suffisamment graves pour justifier la révocation d'un juge. Quatre d'entre elles ont effectivement donné lieu à des recommandations de révocation.
En vertu du nouveau processus proposé dans le projet de loi C‑9, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature continuerait de présider le traitement des plaintes contre les juges, qui commencerait dans un comité d'examen composé de trois personnes. Si la plainte est suffisamment grave pour justifier la révocation du juge, elle pourra être renvoyée à un comité d'audience distinct composé de cinq personnes.
Comme mon temps de parole tire à sa fin, je soulignerai tout simplement qu'il s'agit, dans l'ensemble, d'une bonne mesure législative. Je suis heureux que la Chambre en soit saisie, même si elle aurait pu en être saisie plus tôt. Je voterai avec plaisir pour que le projet de loi soit renvoyé au comité, mais je déplore que nous soyons obligés de l'étudier à la hâte.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2022-10-28 12:22 [p.9034]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I agree. It seems everyone is supporting the passage of the legislation to committee, and the Conservative opposition seems to be saying it is the government that sets the agenda and that if we had called it more often then maybe it would have been passed already. What it is not indicating is that even though we can call the legislation, ultimately it is the opposition that will determine the number of speakers and will cause legislation to get into committee or not get into committee, unless we bring in time allocation.
Because we brought in time allocation, we are finally going to see this legislation go to committee. Many of the stakeholders out there want to get a sense of when the legislation will ultimately get through the House of Commons, and my question is to that effect. Does the member believe or does the Conservative Party believe it could pass this legislation before the end of this year, or are the Conservatives suggesting it will be 2023 before they agree to see it pass?
Monsieur le Président, je suis d'accord avec le député. On dirait que tout le monde soutient le renvoi du projet de loi au comité, et l'opposition conservatrice semble dire que c'est le gouvernement qui établit le programme et que si nous avions appelé le projet de loi plus souvent à l'ordre du jour, il aurait peut-être déjà été adopté. Ce que l'opposition néglige de mentionner, c'est que même si nous appelons un projet de loi, au bout du compte, c'est l'opposition qui détermine le nombre de députés qui pourront prendre la parole, ce qui fera que le projet de loi pourra être renvoyé on non au comité, à moins que n'imposions l'attribution de temps.
Puisque nous avons eu recours à l'attribution de temps, le projet de loi sera enfin renvoyé au comité. Beaucoup d'intervenants veulent avoir une idée du moment où le projet de loi sera adopté à la Chambre des communes, et c'est sur cela que porte ma question. Le député, ou le Parti conservateur, croit-il que le projet de loi pourra être adopté avant la fin de l'année, ou les conservateurs laissent-ils entendre qu'ils n'accepteront pas qu'il soit adopté avant 2023?
Collapse
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Scott Reid Profile
2022-10-28 12:24 [p.9034]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, first of all, I will observe that in terms of there being a rush, I was just saying that the Canadian Judicial Council dealt with eight complaints and dismissed four judges over the course of the past half-century, so I am not exactly sure where the rush is. Clearly, the government does not actually see it as a rush; I mentioned the delays.
Which of the following is the fault of the opposition? Was it the fact the bill was introduced before the 2021 election and then the Prime Minister called an election? Was that the result of an action of the opposition, or was it the fact that the bill was reintroduced in the Senate, then reintroduced in the House of Commons, and then the government waited for six months and did not bring it forward until a day or two before the House rose for the summer? Was that the opposition's fault? I am just unclear as to which of these things that have led to a year and a half's delay is the fault of the opposition. If the parliamentary secretary gets a chance to get up and speak again, maybe he will be able to address that question.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens d'abord à faire remarquer que, comme je l'ai dit tantôt, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature a traité 8 plaintes et révoqué 4 juges au cours des 50 dernières années, alors je ne sais pas trop où est l'urgence. De toute évidence, le gouvernement estime que ce dossier n'est pas urgent. J'ai déjà parlé des délais.
Lequel des éléments suivants est attribuable à l'opposition? Est-ce le fait que le projet de loi a été présenté avant les élections déclenchées par le premier ministre en 2021? Ces élections sont-elles attribuables à un geste posé par l'opposition? Est-ce le fait que le projet de loi a été présenté de nouveau au Sénat, puis une autre fois à la Chambre des communes, et que le gouvernement a attendu six mois avant de le remettre à l'ordre du jour, et ce, un jour ou deux avant que la Chambre ajourne ses travaux pour l'été? Était-ce la faute de l'opposition? Je ne suis pas sûr de savoir lequel des éléments qui ont causé un an et demi de délai est attribuable à l'opposition. Si le secrétaire parlementaire a l'occasion d'intervenir de nouveau, il pourra peut-être répondre à la question.
Collapse
View Denis Trudel Profile
BQ (QC)
View Denis Trudel Profile
2022-10-28 12:25 [p.9034]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I had the opportunity to talk a bit about that earlier, but I would like to elaborate. A year and a half ago, I rose in the House to move a motion calling on the government to create an independent complaints commission for sports. It took some time, but that commission was created a year ago. I want to commend the government for that.
That commission may not yet have enough power though, because the various sports organizations have to register voluntarily. The system is not perfect yet, but it addresses the problem of sexual misconduct in sports, or at least the complaints management part of it.
There is a problem in the military, however. Former Supreme Court Justice Deschamps issued a report in 2015 recommending that this type of commission be set up to address sexual misconduct in the army, but that has not happened yet. It does not make any sense.
Today, we are talking about a bill about judges. That is good.
I would like my colleague to tell us about the importance of setting up this kind of independent commission to manage sexual misconduct complaints.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai eu l'occasion d'en parler un peu plus tôt, mais j'aimerais en dire davantage. Il y a un an et demi, je me suis levé à la Chambre pour présenter une motion afin d'inciter le gouvernement à créer un comité de gestion indépendante des plaintes dans le sport. Cela a pris un peu de temps, mais ce comité a été créé il y a un an. Je dis bravo au gouvernement.
Ce comité n'a peut-être pas encore assez de pouvoir, parce que les différentes fédérations doivent s'y inscrire de façon volontaire. Ce n'est donc pas encore parfait, mais cela règle le problème des inconduites sexuelles dans le sport, du moins une partie des problèmes de gestion des plaintes.
Dans l'armée, toutefois, il y a un problème. La juge Deschamps, ex-juge de la Cour suprême, a fait un rapport en 2015. Elle recommandait de justement créer ce genre de comité pour les inconduites sexuelles dans l'armée. Or cela n'a pas encore été fait. Cela n'a pas de bon sens.
Aujourd'hui, on nous arrive avec quelque chose sur les juges. C'est quand même bien.
J'aimerais que mon collègue nous parle de l'importance de créer ce genre de comité indépendant pour ce qui est de la gestion des plaintes d'inconduite sexuelle.
Collapse
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Scott Reid Profile
2022-10-28 12:26 [p.9034]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I think that is more of a comment than a question.
However, my hon. colleague is right.
Monsieur le Président, je pense qu'il s'agit davantage d'un commentaire que d'une question.
Toutefois, mon honorable collègue a raison.
Collapse
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2022-10-28 12:26 [p.9034]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I applauded, with great gusto, when the hon. member completed his first two minutes. What is to be encouraged is that sharing of a moment of a speech given before, where he had a two-week gap before resuming the speech.
I do not disagree with a single thing that the hon. member said. I like the fact that I am able to thank a Conservative member, because I quite often find myself differing in opinion, if not respect.
However, I certainly do not see a single reason this bill needed to be time allocated. Everybody understands that it is housekeeping that should have been done a long time ago.
It is a spectacular act of malfeasance that brings us this bill, that a judge, two weeks before his appointment, was trading in cocaine with one of his criminal defendant clients.
I ask the hon. member again: What could be the rush?
Monsieur le Président, j'ai applaudi, avec beaucoup d'enthousiasme lorsque le député a terminé les deux premières minutes de son discours. Il faut encourager les anecdotes comme celle qu'il a racontée au sujet d'un autre discours dont le début et la fin ont été séparés par un intervalle de deux semaines.
Je suis d'accord avec tout ce que le député a dit. En fait, je me réjouis de pouvoir remercier un député conservateur, car il arrive assez souvent que nous ayons des opinions différentes, même si nous ne nous manquons pas de respect.
Je ne vois pas la moindre raison pour laquelle il fallait une motion d'attribution de temps pour ce projet de loi. Je pense que tout le monde comprend qu'il s'agit d'une mesure d'ordre administratif qui aurait dû être adoptée il y a longtemps.
C'est un acte d'une incroyable forfaiture qui nous vaut d'être devant ce projet de loi, à savoir l'histoire d'un juge qui, deux semaines avant sa nomination, faisait du commerce de cocaïne avec l'un de ses clients accusés de crimes.
Je le demande à nouveau à l'honorable député, pourquoi une telle précipitation?
Collapse
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
View Scott Reid Profile
2022-10-28 12:27 [p.9035]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I cannot imagine what the rush is.
I appreciate the kind comments of my hon. colleague. We have always had good relations. She has good relations with many people on this side of the House and elsewhere, and that is something to be encouraged. After being here 22 years, I can say that, although there never was a golden age where we all got along, it is much worse now. However, we should all strive to get along with each other. We are colleagues and we should work together. That makes this place a better place.
Monsieur le Président, je ne peux m'imaginer ce qui presse à ce point.
Je remercie la députée de ses bons mots. Nous avons toujours eu de bons rapports. Elle entretient de bonnes relations avec bon nombre de députés de ce côté-ci de la Chambre et d'ailleurs, et cela mérite d'être encouragé. Après avoir passé 22 ans ici, je peux dire que, même si nous n'avons jamais été en parfaite harmonie, je dois dire que les choses sont bien pires aujourd'hui. Cependant, nous devrions tous nous efforcer de nous entendre. Nous sommes des collègues, et nous devrions travailler ensemble. C'est ce qui fait la force de la Chambre des communes.
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-10-28 12:28 [p.9035]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is an honour for me to rise again in this place on behalf of my constituents in Regina—Qu'Appelle to speak to this very important piece of legislation.
Again, I find myself following a comment made by the hon. member for Winnipeg North, and I just cannot help myself, so I will have to address some of the erroneous statements he made to my colleague from Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, which is the idea that somehow it is the opposition's fault that government legislation is not moving through the House. I have been here for several parliaments now, and I have never dealt with a government House team before that has had this idea that the opposition is somehow jointly responsible for moving government legislation through the House.
The member is surprised that members of Parliament from the Conservative Party want to speak to government bills. Well, we all come from diverse backgrounds. We all come from different parts of the country. We all may have constituents in our ridings who have had different experiences with the criminal justice system, so many of us may want to bring that wisdom, that expertise, that experience that we have to the floor of the House to make sure that all points of view are heard when we are dealing with something as important as the judicial branch of our government.
Therefore, I do not buy the parliamentary secretary's argument at all that there is justification for bringing in time allocation on the bill. There are 338 members of Parliament, and we do not expect every single MP to speak to every single bill, but it should not surprise the government when it brings forward legislation that members of the opposition party might want to speak to it and might want to highlight areas of the bill that cause concern or pause, or flag things that we would invite our colleagues at committee to address. This is part of the normal process.
The Liberals do not bring us into the consultation process before they draft the bill. They do not give us a heads-up, send over a working document or have a shared Google document that our shadow minister could see to make suggestions and edits to. They bring forward a bill, and they drop it on the table of the House of Commons. Then we have to go through it and study it. All that takes time, especially when we have our hands full dealing with the waste and corruption this government continues to push through the government system in many different ways.
We are constantly poring through Public Accounts to find wasteful spending and, lo and behold, we find them all the time. Just a few weeks ago, we discovered that the government spent $54 million of taxpayers' money on an app that could have been designed in a weekend, and most experts say that it could have been designed for a fraction of the cost that the government ended up billing taxpayers for. It is a good thing we did go through those accounts in great detail because we discovered that one of the companies listed as receiving a payment claims that it did not work at all on the app.
The parliamentary secretary might be frustrated that members of Parliament on this side take some time to review, with great scrutiny and detail, the Liberal legislation, even when there is broad consensus on the need or broad consensus on the objective of the bill. The parliamentary secretary will understand why we take out our microscopes, put our glasses on and really do a deep dive into these types of things, because every single time we do, we find more examples of Liberal waste, corruption and mismanagement.
The bill, which is a straightforward bill in many respects, is not terribly big, but I find it awfully heavy. It is laden down with irony because the bill would establish a process for judicial office holders who engage in misconduct that does not rise to the level of losing their position but some type of disciplinary process. Does it seem ironic to anybody in the House right now that we have a Prime Minister who is bringing in a mechanism to deal with misconduct and inappropriate behaviour?
Boy, would I like to see the principle of the bill expanded. Maybe we could expand it so that it does not just apply to the judicial branch but the executive branch of government as well, because I would love to see what a review council might do with a prime minister who committed awfully racists acts.
Imagine our Prime Minister, a public office holder, dressing up in racist costumes and putting on blackface so many times that he lost track of how often he did it. Imagine what a complaints council or a review tribunal would do with that allegation.
How about interfering in a criminal prosecution case? How about leaning on a public prosecutor to try to get a special deal for a very well-connected and very powerful corporation in the Prime Minister's own backyard? What would a complaints process do with that kind of improper allegation?
How about the accusations we have heard about bullying and harassment in the Prime Minister's own caucus, which drove a female person of colour out of the House, forcing her out of politics altogether? She no longer wished to cope with the type of treatment she was subjected to by the Prime Minister. This is a Liberal member of Parliament I am talking about, who experienced that type of offensive behaviour from her own leader. I would love to see what a complaints council or review tribunal would do with that.
I sure hope that our friends on the committee can build some consensus with other political parties and find a way to expand the scope of this bill. I would signal to my colleagues in other parties that if the idea brought to committee is to expand the scope of this bill to include public officer holders in the executive branch, the cabinet and the Prime Minister, the Conservatives will be there to support those types of amendments at committee. We might even move those amendments.
I wonder if the hon. member for Winnipeg North would establish the same principle that he is looking to establish around the judicial branch. Would he support efforts to hold all members of cabinet accountable, including the Prime Minister? Maybe he will have an opportunity during questions and comments to inform the House as to whether or not he would be in favour of that. Will he show some consistency when it comes to holding public office holders to the highest level of behaviour and conduct? If the Liberals do not, it will be rather telling, but we will know why. We will know that the member is afraid of how that would affect his own political leader.
The bill is also significant for what is not in it. The bill addresses the judicial system in Canada, and any time a government looks at our Criminal Code and our criminal justice system, the Conservatives eagerly await measures that will strengthen our justice system to protect innocent Canadians and victims of crime. That is something we are always hopeful will be contained in legislation.
Unfortunately, the Liberals decided to leave that out of this bill. They would have had lots of opportunities to look at the types of policies they have enacted in the last few years, which have made the situation worse. For example, the government has lowered penalties for some of the most violent types of offenders. They have lowered penalties for people who use firearms in the commission of certain crimes. As a result of the government's policies over the last seven years, there is a crime wave going on in many of our large cities and even in rural communities.
I represent the riding of Regina—Qu'Appelle, which is about 50% urban and 50% rural, and I hear different concerns about the judicial system. However, they can both relate to the rising crime waves. In the city of Regina, which is obviously a more urban area, there are all kinds of property crimes, thefts and personal assaults, and people are very concerned about the rising rates of them.
In rural areas, people are concerned about response times and the fact that when they call 911 when they are victims of a crime or when a crime is in progress, it can take 15, 20 or sometimes 40 minutes for a police officer to respond to the call. The government, without any consultation with those municipalities, retroactively made changes to the pay system and has left the bill with them, something I am hearing a lot about from people who live in the rural part of Regina—Qu'Appelle.
The Conservatives are eager to discuss this at committee. We are very disappointed that the government, because of its lack of planning and its mismanagement of the House calendar, has now had to bring in time allocation. We wish there was more in this bill to apply the same types of standards for behaviour to the Prime Minister. We understand why the Liberals will not do that, as they have to protect their political leader, but it does show the hypocrisy that the government has when it comes to rules for everyone else but not for its own leadership.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un honneur pour moi d'intervenir de nouveau à la Chambre, au nom de mes concitoyens de Regina—Qu'Appelle, pour parler de ce projet de loi crucial.
Encore une fois, je prends la parole après une intervention du député de Winnipeg-Nord, et je ne peux faire autrement que corriger certaines des choses erronées qu'il a dites à mon collègue de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston. Il a notamment laissé entendre que c'est en quelque sorte la faute de l'opposition si les projets de loi d'initiative ministérielle ne sont pas adoptés par la Chambre. Je siège ici depuis plusieurs législatures maintenant, et c'est la première fois que je fais affaire avec une équipe gouvernementale qui croit que l'opposition est conjointement responsable de l'adoption de projets de loi d'initiative ministérielle à la Chambre.
Le député est surpris que les conservateurs veuillent parler de projets de loi d'initiative ministérielle. Eh bien, nous venons tous de milieux variés. Nous venons tous de différentes parties du pays. Nous avons tous peut‑être des habitants dans nos circonscriptions qui ont vécu des expériences différentes dans le système de justice pénale. Par conséquent, bon nombre d'entre nous souhaitent peut-être faire part de leur sagesse, de leur expertise et de leur expérience à la Chambre afin que nous prenions en considération tous les points de vue quand nous traitons d'un enjeu aussi important que le pouvoir judiciaire de l'État.
Par conséquent, je n'accepte pas du tout l'argument du secrétaire parlementaire comme quoi il est justifié d'invoquer l'attribution de temps à l'égard de ce projet de loi. Il y a 338 députés. Nous ne nous attendons pas à ce que chacun d'entre eux s'exprime au sujet de chaque projet de loi, mais le gouvernement ne devrait pas s'étonner que des députés de l'opposition souhaitent prendre la parole au sujet des projets de loi qu'il propose et peut-être souligner des éléments qui suscitent des préoccupations ou qui semblent problématiques pour inviter nos collègues à les examiner de plus près aux comités. Cela fait partie du processus normal.
Les libéraux ne nous consultent pas lorsqu'ils élaborent leurs projets de loi. Ils ne nous donnent aucun préavis, ils ne nous envoient aucun document de travail et ils n'ont pas de document partagé par l'entremise de Google dont notre ministre du cabinet fantôme pourrait prendre connaissance afin de proposer des suggestions ou des modifications. Ils présentent un projet de loi et ils le déposent sur le bureau à la Chambre des communes, et c'est alors seulement que nous pouvons en prendre connaissance et l'examiner. Tout cela prend du temps, d'autant plus que nous sommes déjà débordés par la dénonciation du gaspillage et de la corruption dont le gouvernement continue, par toutes sortes de moyens, d'imprégner l'appareil de l'État.
Nous épluchons sans arrêt les comptes publics pour trouver les dépenses inutiles et, ô surprise, nous en trouvons sans cesse de nouvelles. Il y a quelques semaines à peine, nous avons découvert que le gouvernement avait gaspillé 54 millions de dollars des contribuables pour une application qui aurait pu être produite en une fin de semaine et la plupart des experts disent qu'elle aurait pu coûter une fraction de ce que le gouvernement a facturé aux contribuables. Heureusement que nous avons passé attentivement en revue les comptes publics, parce que nous avons découvert qu'une des entreprises mentionnées parmi celles qui ont reçu des paiements affirme n'avoir rien à voir avec la création de cette application.
Le secrétaire parlementaire est peut-être frustré que les députés de ce côté-ci prennent le temps d'examiner attentivement et en détail les projets de loi présentés par les libéraux, même lorsqu'il y a consensus au sujet de la nécessité ou de l'objectif du projet de loi en question. Le secrétaire parlementaire comprendra qu'il est normal que nous prenions notre microscope et que nous mettions nos lunettes pour examiner en profondeur ce genre de choses parce que, chaque fois que nous le faisons, nous trouvons des exemples de gaspillage, de corruption et de mauvaise gestion de la part des libéraux.
Le projet de loi, qui est assez simple dans l'ensemble, n'est pas excessivement volumineux, mais je le trouve extrêmement lourd. C'est une mesure tout à fait ironique, parce que le projet de loi vise la création d'un processus disciplinaire concernant les titulaires d'une charge de juge qui commettent une inconduite ne justifiant pas leur destitution. N'est-il pas ironique que le premier ministre actuel propose un mécanisme concernant les inconduites et les comportements inappropriés?
Bon sang que j'aimerais que l'application de ce principe soit étendue. Peut-être qu'elle pourrait être étendue au-delà du judiciaire et concerner aussi l'exécutif, parce que j'aimerais bien voir ce qu'un comité d'examen ferait des agissements complètement racistes d'un premier ministre.
Imaginons le premier ministre, titulaire d'une charge publique, se déguiser avec des costumes racistes et se peindre le visage en noir si souvent qu'il ne sait plus combien de fois il l'a fait. Imaginons ce qu'un conseil des plaintes ou un tribunal de révision ferait de cette allégation.
Que dirait-il de l'ingérence dans une poursuite pénale? Que dirait-il des pressions exercées sur un procureur public pour tenter d'obtenir un traitement de faveur pour une société très influente et très puissante dans la cour du premier ministre? Que ferait un processus de traitement des plaintes avec ce genre d'allégation de comportements inacceptables?
Que dire des accusations que nous avons entendues au sujet de l'intimidation et du harcèlement au sein du caucus du premier ministre, qui ont poussé une femme de couleur à quitter la Chambre et l'ont forcée à quitter complètement le monde de la politique? Elle ne voulait plus avoir à supporter le type de traitement que lui faisait subir le premier ministre. Je parle d'une députée libérale qui a subi ce type de comportement offensant de la part de son propre chef. J'aimerais bien voir ce qu'un conseil des plaintes ou un tribunal de révision ferait de cette situation.
J'espère sincèrement que nos collègues au comité parviendront à s'entendre avec les autres partis et à trouver un moyen d'élargir la portée de ce projet de loi. Je signale à mes collègues des autres partis que si on présente au comité l'idée d'élargir la portée du projet de loi pour y inclure les titulaires de charges publiques de l'exécutif, le Cabinet et le premier ministre, les conservateurs sont prêts à appuyer un amendement en ce sens. Il se pourrait même que nous le proposions.
Je me demande si le député de Winnipeg‑Nord serait prêt à appliquer le même principe que celui qu'il cherche à appliquer au pouvoir judiciaire. Serait-il favorable à ce qu'on oblige tous les membres du Cabinet, y compris le premier ministre, à rendre des comptes? Peut-être qu'il aura l'occasion, pendant la période des questions et des observations, de dire à la Chambre s'il est en faveur d'une telle mesure. Fera-t-il preuve d'un peu de cohérence pour ce qui est d'exiger un comportement absolument irréprochable de la part des titulaires de charges publiques? Si les libéraux refusaient d'adopter une telle mesure, ce serait assez révélateur, mais nous saurions pourquoi: cela indiquerait que le député en craint les répercussions sur le chef de son propre parti.
Le projet de loi se démarque aussi par ce qu'on n'y retrouve pas. Il traite du système judiciaire au Canada, et chaque fois qu'un gouvernement se penche sur le Code criminel et notre système de justice pénale, les conservateurs attendent avec impatience des mesures qui renforceront notre système judiciaire, afin de protéger les Canadiens innocents et les victimes d'actes criminels. Nous espérons toujours que de telles mesures se retrouveront dans un projet de loi.
Malheureusement, les libéraux ont décidé de ne pas en inclure dans celui-ci. Ils ont pourtant eu de nombreuses occasions d'examiner le genre de politiques qu'ils ont adoptées au cours des dernières années et qui ont aggravé la situation. Par exemple, le gouvernement a réduit les peines pour certains types de délinquants parmi les plus violents. Il a réduit les peines pour les personnes qui utilisent une arme à feu lors de la perpétration de certains crimes. En raison des politiques que mène le gouvernement depuis sept ans, on assiste à une vague de criminalité dans plusieurs grandes villes canadiennes et même dans des régions rurales.
Je représente la circonscription de Regina—Qu'Appelle, qui est à peu près à 50 % urbaine et à 50 % rurale, et j'y entends diverses préoccupations à propos du système judiciaire. Toutefois, ces secteurs sont tous les deux confrontés à la hausse des vagues de criminalité. À Regina, qui est évidemment une zone urbaine, on constate toutes sortes de crimes contre les biens, des vols et des voies de fait, et les résidants sont très inquiets de l'augmentation de la fréquence de ces crimes.
Dans les régions rurales, les gens sont préoccupés par les délais d'intervention et le fait que, lorsqu'ils appellent le 911 parce qu'ils sont victimes ou témoins d'un crime, il puisse s'écouler 15, 20 ou parfois 40 minutes avant qu'un agent de police intervienne. Le gouvernement, sans avoir consulté les municipalités, a apporté des changements rétroactifs au système de rémunération en leur refilant la facture, un sujet dont me parlent beaucoup les gens qui vivent dans la partie rurale de Regina—Qu'Appelle.
Les conservateurs sont impatients de discuter de tout cela en comité. Nous sommes par contre très déçus que le gouvernement, en raison de son manque de planification et de sa mauvaise gestion du calendrier de la Chambre, doive maintenant recourir à l'attribution du temps. Nous souhaiterions que ce projet de loi comprenne davantage de dispositions visant à soumettre le premier ministre aux mêmes normes de comportement. Nous savons pourquoi les libéraux ne le feront pas: ils doivent protéger leur chef politique. Cela montre toutefois l'hypocrisie du gouvernement lorsqu'il s'agit d'établir pour tout le monde des règles qui ne s'appliquent cependant pas à ses propres dirigeants.
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2022-10-28 12:38 [p.9036]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I will save my comments on many statements made by the member for a possible opposition day in the future, as the Conservatives like and thoroughly enjoy the whole concept of character assassination, whether of the Prime Minister or other ministers.
I will go to the bill itself, which is widely respected. Its passage is being encouraged by a number of stakeholders. I highlight that the courts, our Canadian Judicial Council, would like to see the legislation pass. Let us not fool anyone. If it was not for time allocation, the Conservatives would be playing their games and they would not see this legislation pass.
Given the member is on the House leadership team, can he give a clear indication of whether the Conservative Party is prepared to see this bill pass through the House of Commons this year, or is it saying to the stakeholders and others that they will have to wait until 2023, unless of course the government brings in time allocation again?
Monsieur le Président, je vais réserver mes commentaires concernant plusieurs des déclarations du député pour une future journée de l'opposition, car les conservateurs adorent vraiment salir des réputations, qu'il s'agisse de celle du premier ministre ou d'autres ministres.
Je m'en tiendrai au projet de loi, qui est très respecté. De nombreuses parties prenantes nous invitent à l'adopter. Je souligne que les tribunaux et le Conseil canadien de la magistrature souhaitent que nous l'adoptions. Ne soyons pas dupes: sans l'attribution de temps, les conservateurs joueraient à leurs petits jeux, et le projet de loi ne serait pas adopté.
Comme le député fait partie de l'équipe des leaders parlementaires, peut-il dire clairement si le Parti conservateur est prêt à faire en sorte que la Chambre des communes adopte ce projet de loi cette année, ou est-ce qu'il est en train de dire aux parties prenantes et à tout le monde qu'il faudra attendre jusqu'en 2023, à moins bien entendu que le gouvernement n'impose l'attribution de temps une fois de plus?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-10-28 12:39 [p.9036]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, first, I will respond to the member's erroneous accusation that I was somehow engaged in a character assassination of the Prime Minister. Any damage to the Prime Minister's character has been self-inflicted. Nobody on this side told him to dress up in a racist blackface. That is heinous and offensive to all Canadians. He did that all on his own. He bullied members of his own caucus all on his own and members of his own caucus blew the whistle on that.
Only a Liberal would think that when the public holds the Prime Minister to account for his own personal failings that it somehow makes him a victim. The real victims are the people he offended with his racist acts, and the people in his caucus, the women in his caucus, whom he bullied and drove out of public life. They are the real victims. The Prime Minister is not a victim of character assassination. He is a victim of self-inflicted damage to his own personal credibility.
Monsieur le Président, je répondrai d'abord à l'accusation fallacieuse du député selon laquelle je me suis en quelque sorte employé à salir la réputation du premier ministre. Si la réputation du premier ministre a été salie, c'est de sa propre faute. Personne de ce côté-ci de la Chambre ne lui a dit de porter un « blackface » raciste pour se déguiser. Il s'agit d'un geste haineux et offensant pour tous les Canadiens. Le premier ministre a fait cela de son propre chef. Il a intimidé des membres de son caucus de sa propre initiative, et ces derniers ont dénoncé la situation.
Seul un libéral pourrait croire que, quand le public demande au premier ministre de rendre compte de ses échecs personnels, cela fait apparemment de lui une victime. Les vraies victimes sont les personnes qu'il a offensées avec ses gestes racistes, ainsi que les membres de son caucus, les femmes de son caucus, qu'il a intimidées et écartées de la vie publique. Ce sont elles les vraies victimes. Personne n'a fait du premier ministre une victime en salissant sa réputation. La seule chose dont il est victime, c'est d'avoir lui-même miné sa crédibilité.
Collapse
View Denis Trudel Profile
BQ (QC)
View Denis Trudel Profile
2022-10-28 12:40 [p.9037]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, in his speech, my colleague was justifiably critical of the way the government is managing its legislative agenda. Last year, the government prorogued the House, and I still cannot get over that.
Yesterday, Bill C‑31 was passed on closure. It is an important bill whose purpose is to send people money for housing and dental care, but we had a lot of problems with it. Contrary to what the government thinks, Bill C‑31 does not really solve the problem of the housing crisis in Canada. It is like a band-aid on a gaping wound.
However, my Conservative friends are not to be outdone when it comes to using time-wasting tactics here. I have been a member of the House for three years, and one of the most egregious things I have seen in that time happened the night the Conservatives made us vote on which of two members of the Conservative Party would get the floor. Later, in the lobby, I heard my Conservative friends laugh about finding this procedural loophole. How clever of them to figure out a way to delay proceedings for everyone. They wasted an hour of the House's time when we were supposed to be working on important issues.
Does my colleague think it would be a good idea for the Conservatives to come to the table and get to work, too?
Monsieur le Président, dans son discours, mon collègue a critiqué avec raison la gestion du programme législatif du gouvernement. L'année passée, le gouvernement a prorogé la Chambre et je n'en reviens toujours pas.
Hier, le projet de loi C‑31 a été adopté sous bâillon. C'est un projet de loi important qui vise à envoyer de l'argent pour le logement et les soins dentaires, mais avec lequel nous avions beaucoup de problèmes. Contrairement à ce que le gouvernement pense, le projet de loi C‑31 ne règle vraiment pas le problème de la crise du logement au Canada. C'est un pansement sur une plaie ouverte.
Cela dit, mes amis conservateurs ne sont pas en reste non plus quand il s'agit d'employer des tactiques pour nous faire perdre du temps ici. Je siège à la Chambre depuis trois ans, et l'une des choses les plus aberrantes que j'ai vues durant cette période s'est produite le soir où les conservateurs nous ont fait voter pour déterminer qui allait prendre la parole entre deux députés conservateurs. Plus tard, dans l'antichambre, j'ai entendu mes amis conservateurs rire du fait qu'ils avaient trouvé cette coquille procédurale. Ils trouvaient qu'ils avaient réussi un bon coup pour retarder tout le monde. Ils avaient fait perdre une heure à la Chambre, alors que nous étions censés travailler sur des questions importantes.
Mon collègue ne pense-t-il pas que les conservateurs auraient eux aussi intérêt à se mettre à la table pour travailler?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-10-28 12:41 [p.9037]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, during its opposition day this week, the Bloc Québécois chose to debate the monarchy in Canada. I cannot think of a better way to waste time in the House.
Quebeckers are quite concerned these days because their money is losing value. The government has destroyed the value of Quebeckers' hard-earned money. Nevertheless, this week, the Bloc chose to debate a very philosophical and esoteric topic. It is something I like to discuss over a glass of wine after a meal, as part of a discussion on the different ways to establish a nation.
The reality is that this is not something Canadians want us discussing here in the House. Canadians want MPs to talk about things such as the cost of living, wasted spending at the federal level and rising crime rates in our major cities and in our communities. These are the topics the Conservatives are always bringing up in the House.
Monsieur le Président, lors de sa journée de l'opposition, cette semaine, le Bloc québécois a choisi de débattre de la monarchie au Canada. Je ne peux penser à une meilleure façon de gaspiller le temps de la Chambre.
À l'heure actuelle, les Québécois et les Québécoises ont beaucoup d'inquiétudes parce que la valeur de l'argent diminue. Le gouvernement a détruit la valeur de l'argent durement gagné par les Québécois et les Québécoises. Pourtant, le Bloc a choisi cette semaine de débattre d'un sujet très philosophique et ésotérique. C'est un sujet dont j'aime discuter, mais avec un verre de vin après un repas, dans le cadre d'une discussion sur les différentes façons de créer un État.
Ce n'est pas de cette réalité que les Canadiens souhaitent que nous discutions ici à la Chambre. Les Canadiens veulent que nos députés parlent de sujets comme le coût de la vie, le gaspillage d'argent au fédéral et la hausse des crimes dans nos grandes villes et dans nos communautés. Ce sont des sujets que les conservateurs abordent toujours à la Chambre.
Collapse
View Marilène Gill Profile
BQ (QC)
View Marilène Gill Profile
2022-10-28 12:43 [p.9037]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I rise today to speak to Bill S‑207.
Of course, the Bloc Québécois will vote in favour of this bill. It is not against this bill. I will not be using all of my speaking time, but I would like—
Monsieur le Président, je vais prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi S‑207.
Le Bloc québécois votera en faveur de ce projet de loi, auquel il ne s'oppose pas. Je n'utiliserai pas tout mon temps de parole, mais j'aimerais quand même…
Collapse
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2022-10-28 12:44 [p.9037]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I think the member might be referencing the private member's bill. Maybe we can just vote on this, and then we can get to that.
Monsieur le Président, je crois que la députée parle du projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire. Votons d'abord sur la motion, puis nous pourrons passer au projet de loi.
Collapse
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
2022-10-28 12:45 [p.9037]
Expand
Pursuant to order made on Thursday, June 23, the division stands deferred until Monday, October 31, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
Conformément à l'ordre adopté le jeudi 23 juin, le vote par appel nominal est reporté au lundi 31 octobre, à la fin de la période prévue pour les questions orales.
Collapse
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2022-10-26 16:48 [p.8914]
Expand
moved:
That, in relation to Bill C-9, An Act to amend the Judges Act, not more than one further sitting day shall be allotted to the consideration at second reading stage of the said Bill; and
That, 15 minutes before the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders on the day allotted to the consideration at second reading stage of the said Bill, any proceedings before the House shall be interrupted, if required for the purpose of this Order, and, in turn, every question necessary for the disposal of the said stage of the Bill shall be put forthwith and successively, without further debate or amendment.
propose:
Que, relativement au projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges, au plus un jour de séance supplémentaire soit accordé aux délibérations à l’étape de la deuxième lecture de ce projet de loi;
Que, 15 minutes avant l’expiration du temps prévu pour les ordres émanant du gouvernement au cours du jour de séance attribué pour l’étude à l’étape de la deuxième lecture de ce projet de loi, toute délibération devant la Chambre soit interrompue, s’il y a lieu aux fins de cet ordre, et, par la suite, toute question nécessaire pour disposer de cette étape soit mise aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat ni amendement.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-10-26 16:50 [p.8914]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the irony today, as we are now debating Bill C-9, is that we see the government invoking closure when this legislation could have already been in place. Had we not had an unnecessary pandemic election, it most certainly would have been in place.
While the minister is here, I want to ask a question with respect to our justice system and the recent Supreme Court ruling dealing with consecutive periods of parole ineligibility. There are many victims and their families who have spoken out about the need to respond to the ruling that values each and every life that is taken when there is a case of mass murder in Canada. These cases are rare, but they do happen. The families of victims have said they do not want to go through the burden and retraumatization that is involved with parole hearings.
Sharlene Bosma appeared at our justice committee and spoke eloquently about how she was grateful that her daughter would not have to attend parole hearings to keep her father's killer behind bars, where he belongs, having killed three individuals.
I would ask the minister if he has consulted with the families of victims on a possible government response to this very unfortunate ruling.
Monsieur le Président, il est paradoxal de voir le gouvernement imposer la clôture aujourd'hui alors que nous débattons du projet de loi C‑9, compte tenu du fait que ce projet de loi aurait déjà pu être adopté. Si des élections inutiles n'avaient pas été déclenchées pendant la pandémie, il aurait très certainement été adopté.
Pendant que le ministre est ici, je veux lui poser une question sur notre système de justice et le récent arrêt de la Cour suprême concernant les périodes consécutives d'inadmissibilité à la libération conditionnelle. De nombreuses victimes et leurs familles se sont exprimées sur la nécessité de répondre au jugement et sur la valeur qu'on accorde à chaque vie qui est prise au cours d'une tuerie au Canada. Ces cas sont rares, mais ils se produisent. Les familles des victimes ont dit qu'elles ne voulaient pas subir le fardeau imposé par les audiences de libération conditionnelle et le nouveau traumatisme qu'elles infligent.
Sharlene Bosma a comparu devant le comité de la justice et a expliqué avec éloquence à quel point elle était reconnaissante que sa fille n'ait pas à assister aux audiences de libération conditionnelle pour que l'assassin de son père reste derrière les barreaux, là où il doit être, après avoir tué trois personnes.
J'aimerais demander au ministre s'il a consulté les familles des victimes au sujet d'une éventuelle réponse du gouvernement à cette décision très malheureuse.
Collapse
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
View David Lametti Profile
2022-10-26 16:52 [p.8914]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for Fundy Royal, and my critic, for his question. It is an important one.
Obviously, our hearts go out to the Bosmas, to the victims of the Quebec City mosque massacre and others who have been impacted by this ruling by the Supreme Court.
I remind the hon. member that, as the Attorney General, we defended the previous legislation in front of the Supreme Court, allowing judges the discretion to have consecutive sentences and building our argument on that. That argument was rejected. It is not that the sentencing was changed; these people are still serving consecutive sentences, but what the court has added is that there is a possibility of parole at various points in time.
I would remind the House that eligibility for parole is not the same as parole. A life sentence is a long time, and a parole hearing, yes, is still there. I know that has a negative impact on the families if they choose to come and testify again. It was a nine to nothing decision, which was a serious statement by the Supreme Court of Canada.
We will work with victims to support them. We have recently appointed a new ombudsperson to help, although the office remained open during the period of time we were searching to fill that role, and I think we can move forward in supporting victims, but recognizing the very clear ruling of the Supreme Court.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de Fundy Royal, le porte-parole de l'opposition pour mon ministère, de sa question, qui est importante.
Évidemment, nous sommes de tout cœur avec les Bosma, les victimes du massacre de la mosquée de Québec et les autres personnes qui ont été touchées par cette décision de la Cour suprême.
Je rappelle au député que, à titre de procureur général, j'ai défendu la mesure législative précédente devant la Cour suprême pour que les juges aient le pouvoir discrétionnaire d'imposer des peines consécutives, et mon argument reposait là-dessus. L'argument a été rejeté. Il ne faut pas croire que la détermination de la peine a été modifiée: ces personnes purgent encore des peines consécutives, mais les tribunaux ont ajouté la possibilité d'obtenir une libération conditionnelle à divers moments.
Je rappelle à la Chambre qu'être admissible à la libération conditionnelle n'est pas la même chose qu'obtenir la libération conditionnelle. Une peine d'emprisonnement à perpétuité, c'est long, et, certes, les audiences de libération conditionnelle ont toujours lieu. Je sais qu'elles ont une incidence négative sur les familles qui décident d'y témoigner. Il s'agissait d'une décision unanime des neuf juges, ce qui constitue une déclaration très sérieuse de la Cour suprême du Canada.
Nous travaillerons avec les victimes pour les soutenir. Nous avons récemment nommé un nouvel ombudsman pour les aider, même si le Bureau est demeuré ouvert durant la période où nous cherchions à doter ce poste. Je pense que nous pouvons soutenir les victimes, tout en acceptant la décision très claire de la Cour suprême.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 337 | Page: 1 of 6

1
2
3
4
5
6
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data