Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 33
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-09-26 15:06 [p.7685]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, with Fiona top of mind, people in my communities and across Canada are crying out for compassion from the Liberal government. Increased payroll taxes are hitting at a time when a lot of our small businesses are struggling to recover and maintain their employees. Those same workers are struggling to put food on their families' tables, put gas in their family vehicles and keep a roof over their families' heads.
Will the government restore Canadians' hope and cancel its planned tax increase for Canadians' paycheques?
Monsieur le Président, étant donné que Fiona est une priorité, les gens dans ma circonscription et dans l'ensemble du Canada réclament la compassion du gouvernement libéral. L'augmentation des taxes sur les chèques de paie frappe à un moment où beaucoup de petites entreprises peinent à réembaucher et à conserver leurs employés. Ces mêmes travailleurs ont du mal à nourrir leur famille, à mettre de l'essence dans les véhicules familiaux et à loger leur famille.
Le gouvernement va-t-il redonner espoir aux Canadiens en annulant l'augmentation des taxes prévue sur les chèques de paie des Canadiens?
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-09-26 18:09 [p.7712]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the member for Kenora.
It is an honour to rise to speak on behalf of the constituents of Saskatoon West, but before I speak to this legislation, I would like to let everyone in Atlantic Canada know that my thoughts and prayers are with them as they recover from this weekend's terrible storm. This is a very difficult time, with property destruction, injuries and deaths, and I know that the rest of the country stands with them and is ready to help with whatever they need.
Over the summer, I spoke with many constituents, and all of them had the same message: The cost of living is really starting to hurt. Seniors are struggling to get by on their fixed incomes, and all Canadians know about the high cost of groceries, at least those of us who actually buy our own groceries. I am talking about grocery prices that are up by almost 11%. They are rising at the fastest pace in 40 years.
Here we are in week two of our new parliamentary session. Is the government talking about reducing the sky-high cost of food? Is the government talking about stopping planned payroll tax hikes, such as the tax increases on January 1 that will reduce everybody's paycheques, or the coming carbon tax price increase on April Fool's Day, which is all part of the government's plan to triple the carbon tax? Is this what we are debating? No, we are here debating legislation that was born out of a cynical coalition deal between the NDP and the Liberals to keep this tired, worn-out government in power.
Yes, this legislation, Bill C-30, is nothing more than a scheme cooked up between the NDP and the Liberals through a tweet. In the summer, the NDP leader tweeted that the Liberals needed to do this or that to count on his unwavering support, and the government responded with Bill C-30 and Bill C-31. Close to $5 billion will be used and, to use the words of the Minister of Tourism last week, thrown into the lake to keep the NDP happy.
I do not believe that government should be throwing money into the lake just to cling to power. Governments exist to serve the people who elected them, so today I have good news for Canadians. Our party just elected a new leader who is well versed in economics. He is a man who actually understands how economic works. For years, the member for Carleton warned the government about reckless and out-of-control spending. What was his simple message? It was that excessive government spending would lead to out-of-control inflation. Well, guess what? Inflation is rampant and out of control. Our new leader predicted this, and he has a solid plan to get us out of this. In the meantime, we will continue to hold our Prime Minister to account and work hard to encourage the government to implement sensible policy.
Let us talk about this piece of legislation, Bill C-30, and the financial implications for our treasury, our economy and, most importantly, the everyday taxpayer. The government is telling us that this a limited, one-time doubling of the GST rebate that will provide $467 for the average family. When I look at this, on the one hand, who will argue if the government wants to hand them some cash? It is welcomed relief coming at a difficult time, but it is a short-term band-aid that does not get to the heart of the problem. If we do not fix the core problem, then more band-aids will be proposed, and indeed we are already seeing this. While the government says that this is a one-time payment, it is openly admitting that this is just the start of a larger government spending package. Bill C-31, for example, includes more inflation boost in cash injections, which is just the start of an even bigger spending program that the health minister cannot even quantify right now.
I think this would be a good opportunity to take a moment to provide the government with some information that it may not understand. You see, I, like many of my Conservative colleagues, studied economics. Like me, many of my Conservative colleagues have run businesses and created jobs prior to being elected to this great House. I used sound economic principles to build my successful business and run my own household with the help of my wife. Together, we understood some of the basic economic principles and used them successfully. Now, we are not particularly smarter than other Canadians. In fact, I would suggest that most Canadians understand these basic economic principles and use them every day to manage their own households.
What are some of these basic principles? First, there is only so much money. It is not infinite. There is not a magic money tree in the backyard where we can go when we need a little extra cash. No, we have to make some hard choices. We have a limited amount of money with unlimited ways to spend it, and so we have to sit down together, weigh the pros and cons of the various options available and make a choice. Sometimes that choice is hard, especially right now. Families have to choose between inflated food prices and paying the carbon tax on their heating bills. These are not easy choices, but people are creative. Families find ways to scrimp and save in one area to allow them to spend in another. That is the first principle: Money is finite.
The next principle is that borrowing money is like playing with fire. It needs to be done very carefully and in a controlled manner. Yes, sometimes we need to borrow money, when we are borrowing to purchase a house, for example, but loan payments can become a heavy financial burden, especially when interest rates start to rise.
That is why most families understand that borrowing should be temporary, and that is why, when loans get paid off, there is great celebration in a household and a wonderful feeling of freedom. That is the second principle: borrow with caution. How does this apply to the government? If the government applied these two simple principles, the results would be lower taxes and lower debt. Canadians could keep more money in their pockets and have the freedom to spend their money the way they choose.
There is a third, very important principle I also want to talk about. This one is a larger principle that governments really must understand and apply. The third principle is the law of supply and demand. The easiest way to understand this is through an example. If consumers have $10, and the store has 10 loaves of bread, then consumers will pay $1 for each loaf of bread. If the government suddenly gives consumers an extra $10, but the amount of bread does not increase, now people are going to pay $2 for each loaf of bread. That is inflation. The loaf of bread goes from costing $1 to $2, and that is exactly what is happening in our country right now.
The government has dramatically boosted the amount of money available to people with $500 billion in the last two years. This extra money has bid up the price of everything that we buy. This extra money has also been tacked onto our national debt, resulting in increased interest payments, an obligation that our children's children will have to deal with long after we are gone from this place. When the Prime Minister famously said he does not think about economic policy, this simple principle is what he was not thinking about, and because he was not thinking, we are in this mess today.
I will once again remind everyone that the Conservative leader does understand these principles and is committed to running government according to them. What would it look like if Conservatives were in charge right now? Let us say we had a Conservative prime minister and that we believed the government should provide some GST tax relief to Canadians, just as Bill C-30 proposes. How would we implement something like this?
First, we would understand that money is finite and that we cannot go to a magic money tree to implement this bill. We would task our government to find savings somewhere else to pay for this new program. We would recognize that a new dollar spent would require a dollar to be saved somewhere else, just like all Canadians do every day when they manage their own households. If the government behaved like this, it would not take long for inflation to back down and for taxes to be reduced. That is how Conservatives would govern.
I need to come back to the topic of high prices and the rampant inflation that we see every day. There is a grocery store a few blocks down 22nd Street from my constituency office. The folks who shop there know that I sometimes set up shop there on the weekends to shake hands, hand out reusable grocery bags and chat with my constituents in Saskatoon West.
I also shop there for groceries with my wife Cheryl. Cheryl and I have seen our grocery bill go up every month. It may be salad ingredients, such as lettuce and tomatoes. It might be meat and potatoes, or the side dishes and vegetables. Bread, milk, coffee, pop and chips, everything, has increased in price, and prepackaged portions are decreasing. I am not just talking about small increases. Look at the cost of meat today versus two years ago. It has nearly doubled in price. That is 100% inflation.
Chicken breasts used to go for five in a package for $10. Now we only get three for that same price. They have cut the portion size to hide the cost increase. I was just at Costco this weekend, and I bought a four-pack of bacon. It used to cost $20, but now it costs $30. That is 50% more.
Is this a result of Russia invading Ukraine, as the Liberals would have us believe? How much beef, chicken, lettuce, potato chips, rice, coffee and milk do we get from Ukraine? It is probably zero. The vast majority is farmed and harvested right here in Canada. It is the domestic policy of the federal government, such as printing cash for the past two years, that has put Canada in this inflation period. It is domestic policies, such as the Bank of Canada aiding and abetting the federal government by underwriting its massive debt load instead of sticking to its mandate to control inflation. It is domestic policies, such as the carbon tax and fertilizer reductions, that are hurting our farmers and causing food prices to soar. It is domestic policies, such as ramming massive spending legislation through the House of Commons to keep a marriage of convenience with the NDP alive.
As I wrap up, I want to focus on accountability. Who is accountable for the $5 billion the government is shovelling out the door to satisfy a Twitter outburst from the NDP leader? I know it will not be the Liberals and the NDP, as they ram the legislation through Parliament and pat themselves on the back like they like to do. Instead, it will be the people of Saskatoon West left holding the bag through more inflation, higher taxes and reduced benefits from the government. Rodney Dangerfield famously said he gets no respect. Unfortunately for Canadians, from the Liberal government, they get no respect either.
Monsieur le Président, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Kenora.
C'est un honneur de prendre la parole au nom des habitants de Saskatoon-Ouest, mais avant de parler du projet de loi, je tiens à ce que tous les habitants du Canada atlantique sachent que mes pensées et mes prières les accompagnent alors qu'ils se remettent de la terrible tempête de la fin de semaine. C'est une période très difficile: il y a eu des dommages matériels, des blessés et des morts. Je sais que le reste du pays est de tout cœur avec les habitants de cette région et qu'il est prêt à leur offrir tout ce dont ils ont besoin.
Au cours de l'été, j'ai discuté avec bon nombre de mes concitoyens, et ils avaient tous le même message: le coût de la vie commence vraiment à causer du tort. Les aînés ont du mal à joindre les deux bouts avec leur revenu fixe, et tous les Canadiens savent que le coût de l'épicerie a augmenté, du moins ceux qui font l'épicerie. Je parle ici de l'augmentation de près de 11 % du prix de l'épicerie. C'est l'augmentation la plus rapide en 40 ans.
Alors que nous amorçons notre deuxième semaine de la session parlementaire, le gouvernement a-t-il parlé de réduire le coût exorbitant des aliments? Parle-t-il d'annuler ses hausses de taxes sur les salaires, dont celles qu'il prévoit imposer le 1er janvier et qui réduira les salaires de tout le monde, ou encore de la hausse de la taxe sur le carbone prévue le jour du poisson d'avril, puisque le gouvernement compte tripler la taxe sur le carbone? Est-ce de cela que nous débattons? Non, nous sommes en train de débattre d'un projet de loi qui découle d'une entente de coalition conclue de façon cynique entre le NPD et le Parti libéral afin de maintenir ce gouvernement usé au pouvoir.
Ce projet de loi, le projet de loi C‑30, n'est qu'un stratagème élaboré par le NPD et le Parti libéral pour donner suite à un gazouillis. En effet, dans un gazouillis publié en été, le chef du NPD a dit que les libéraux devaient faire telle ou telle chose s'il voulait pouvoir compter sur son appui indéfectible, et le gouvernement a répondu en présentant les projets de loi C‑30 et C‑31. Pour contenter le NPD, près de 5 milliards de dollars seront dépensés et jetés dans le lac, pour reprendre les propos tenus la semaine dernière par le ministre du Tourisme.
Je ne crois pas que le gouvernement devrait jeter de l'argent dans le lac juste pour se maintenir au pouvoir. Les gouvernements sont là pour servir la population qui l'a élu. J'ai donc une bonne nouvelle pour les Canadiens. Notre parti vient d'élire un nouveau chef bien versé en économie. C'est un homme qui sait vraiment comment l'économie fonctionne. Cela fait des années que le député de Carleton nous met en garde contre les dépenses irresponsables et effrénées du gouvernement. Son message était simple. Il nous a prévenus que les dépenses excessives du gouvernement allaient mener à une inflation débridée. Or, devinez quoi? On assiste maintenant à une inflation galopante et incontrôlée. Notre nouveau chef l'avait prédit, et il a un plan rigoureux pour nous sortir de cette situation. En attendant, nous allons continuer de demander des comptes au premier ministre, et nous allons redoubler d'efforts pour encourager le gouvernement à adopter des politiques raisonnables.
Parlons du projet de loi C-30 et des répercussions financières pour le Trésor, l'économie et, ce qui importe le plus, le contribuable ordinaire. Le gouvernement affirme que, grâce à la mesure limitée et ponctuelle consistant à doubler le remboursement de la TPS, une famille moyenne recevrait 467 $. D'une part, qui se plaindra que le gouvernement veut lui remettre de l'argent? Certes, il s'agit d'un répit qui arrive à point nommé en période difficile, mais il s'agit d'une solution de fortune, à court terme, qui ne s'attaque pas aux racines du problème. Si on ne règle pas le problème principal, d'autres solutions de fortune seront proposées. En fait, c'est déjà le cas. Le gouvernement dit qu'il s'agit d'un paiement ponctuel, tout en admettant ouvertement que ce n'est que le début d'un programme de dépenses gouvernementales de plus grande envergure. Le projet de loi C-31 prévoit, par exemple, d'autres injections d'argent qui alimenteront l'inflation. Cela n'est que le début d'un programme de dépenses plus vaste que le ministre de la Santé ne peut même pas quantifier à l'heure qu'il est.
Voici donc une bonne occasion de prendre un instant pour fournir au gouvernement certains renseignements qu'il ne comprend peut-être pas. Voyez-vous, j'ai fait des études en économie, comme beaucoup de mes collègues conservateurs. Comme moi, bon nombre des députés conservateurs ont dirigé une entreprise et créé des emplois avant d'être élus dans cette illustre enceinte. Je me suis appuyé sur de solides principes économiques pour bâtir une entreprise prospère et gérer mon ménage avec l'aide de mon épouse. Tous les deux, nous avons compris certains principes économiques de base et les avons appliqués de manière fructueuse. Nous ne sommes pas nécessairement plus intelligents que les autres Canadiens. En fait, je suis prêt à affirmer que la plupart des Canadiens comprennent ces principes économiques de base et les appliquent dans la gestion de leur propre ménage.
Voyons certains de ces principes de base. D'abord, l'argent dont nous disposons est limité. Il n'est pas infini. Dans notre jardin, il n'y a pas d'arbre magique où pousse de l'argent que nous pourrions aller cueillir au besoin. Non. Nous sommes forcés de faire des choix difficiles. Nous disposons d'une quantité limitée d'argent, et les possibilités de le dépenser sont illimitées. Nous devons donc nous asseoir ensemble, peser le pour et le contre des différentes options et faire un choix. Il arrive que ce choix soit difficile, surtout en ce moment. Des familles se retrouvent coincées entre la flambée des prix des denrées alimentaires et la taxe sur le carbone qui fait grimper leur facture de chauffage. De tels choix sont difficiles, mais les Canadiens sont créatifs. Les familles trouvent des moyens d'économiser à certains endroits pour pouvoir dépenser ailleurs. Voilà le premier principe: l'argent dont nous disposons est limité.
Le principe suivant veut qu'emprunter de l'argent, ce soit comme jouer avec le feu. Il faut y aller avec beaucoup de précaution et de façon contrôlée. Bien entendu, il faut parfois emprunter de l'argent, pour acheter une maison, par exemple, mais le remboursement du prêt peut devenir un lourd fardeau financier, surtout lorsque les taux d'intérêt commencent à grimper.
C'est pourquoi la plupart des familles comprennent que les emprunts devraient être temporaires et que, lorsque des prêts sont remboursés, elles sont enchantées et se sentent merveilleusement libres. C'est là le deuxième principe: emprunter avec prudence. Comment cela s'applique‑t‑il au gouvernement? Si le gouvernement avait appliqué ces deux principes simples, cela aurait réduit le fardeau fiscal et la dette. Cela aurait permis aux Canadiens de garder plus d’argent dans leurs poches et de dépenser à leur guise.
Je veux aussi parler d'un troisième principe fort important. Il s'agit d'un principe général que les gouvernements doivent vraiment comprendre et appliquer: c'est la loi de l'offre et de la demande. La meilleure façon de l'expliquer, c'est en donnant un exemple. Si les consommateurs ont 10 $ et que le magasin vend 10 miches de pain, les consommateurs paieront 1 $ pour chaque miche. Cependant, si le gouvernement leur donne soudainement 10 $ de plus, mais que la quantité de pain n'augmente pas, les gens paieront désormais 2 $ pour chaque miche. C'est cela l'inflation. Le prix du pain passe de 1 $ à 2 $. C'est exactement ce qui est en train de se passer dans notre pays.
En offrant aux Canadiens une série de mesures d'aide d'une valeur de 500 milliards de dollars au cours des deux dernières années, le gouvernement a augmenté de façon spectaculaire le montant d'argent en circulation. Cet argent supplémentaire a fait augmenter le prix de tous les biens à la consommation. Cela a également fait augmenter notre dette nationale, donnant lieu à une hausse des intérêts à payer, une obligation avec laquelle nos petits-enfants devront composer bien longtemps après que nous ne serons plus ici. Cela revient à la célèbre déclaration du premier ministre comme quoi il ne réfléchit pas vraiment à la politique économique. Ce principe pourtant simple est exactement ce à quoi il n'a pas réfléchi, et parce qu'il n'a pas réfléchi, nous nous retrouvons aujourd'hui dans ce bourbier.
Je rappelle à tous que le chef conservateur comprend ces principes et est déterminé à diriger le gouvernement en les respectant. À quoi ressemblerait la situation à l'heure actuelle si les conservateurs étaient au pouvoir? Si par exemple nous avions un premier ministre conservateur et que nous estimions que le gouvernement devrait alléger le fardeau de la TPS pour les Canadiens, comme il est proposé dans le projet de loi C‑30. Comment nous y prendrions-nous?
Premièrement, nous comprendrions que l'argent n'est pas une ressource renouvelable et qu'on ne peut pas la faire pousser dans les arbres, comme par magie, pour mettre en œuvre ce projet de loi. Nous chargerions donc le gouvernement de trouver des économies ailleurs pour payer ce nouveau programme. Nous reconnaîtrions que pour chaque dollar dépensé, il faut économiser un dollar ailleurs, exactement comme le font les Canadiens lorsqu'ils gèrent les finances de leur ménage au quotidien. Si le gouvernement agissait ainsi, l'inflation diminuerait rapidement et les taxes aussi. Voilà comment les conservateurs gouverneraient.
Je reviens sur les prix exorbitants et l'inflation généralisée que nous observons jour après jour. Il y a une épicerie située à quelques pâtés de maisons de mon bureau de circonscription, sur la 22e rue. Les gens qui y font leurs emplettes savent que je m'y installe parfois la fin de semaine pour serrer la main des citoyens de ma circonscription, Saskatoon‑Ouest, leur remettre des sacs réutilisables et discuter avec eux.
J'y fais aussi mes courses avec ma femme, Cheryl. Cheryl et moi avons vu notre facture d'épicerie augmenter chaque mois. Qu'il s'agisse de ce que nous mettons dans nos salades, comme de la laitue et des tomates, ou encore de la viande, des pommes de terre, des plats d'accompagnement, des légumes, du pain, du lait, du café, des boissons gazeuses ou des croustilles, tout a augmenté, et les portions des produits préemballés diminuent. Je ne parle pas que de petites augmentations. Comparons le prix de la viande aujourd'hui à celui d'il y a deux ans. Il a presque doublé. C'est une inflation de 100 %.
Autrefois, on pouvait acheter un paquet de cinq blancs de poulet pour 10 $. Maintenant, nous n'en avons que trois pour le même prix. On a réduit la taille des portions pour masquer l'augmentation des prix. J'étais chez Costco en fin de semaine et j'y ai acheté quatre paquets de bacon, qui coûtaient auparavant 20 $, mais qui coûtent aujourd'hui 30 $. Cela représente une augmentation de 50 %.
Est-ce que c'est attribuable à l'invasion de l'Ukraine par la Russie, comme tentent de nous le faire croire les libéraux? Quelle est la quantité de bœuf, de poulet, de laitue, de croustilles, de riz, de café et de lait que nous importons d'Ukraine? C'est probablement zéro. La majeure partie de ces produits sont cultivés et récoltés ici même, au Canada. Ce sont les politiques intérieures du gouvernement fédéral, comme l'impression effrénée de billets depuis deux ans, qui ont poussé le Canada vers une période d'inflation. Ce sont les politiques intérieures comme celles de la Banque du Canada, qui a soutenu le gouvernement fédéral en se portant garante de la dette massive qu'il a engendrée, au lieu de jouer le rôle qui lui incombe, soit de limiter l'inflation. Ce sont les politiques intérieures comme la taxe sur le carbone et l'imposition d'une réduction de l'utilisation d'engrais qui nuisent aux agriculteurs canadiens et qui provoquent une explosion du prix des aliments. Ce sont les politiques intérieures comme l'adoption forcée de mesures législatives ultracoûteuses par la Chambre des communes dans le seul but de maintenir en vie le mariage de convenance intervenu entre les libéraux et le NPD qui sont en cause.
En terminant, je voudrais parler de responsabilité. Qui assumera la responsabilité des 5 milliards de dollars que le gouvernement jette par la fenêtre dans le seul but d'apaiser une crise que le chef du NPD a faite sur Twitter? Je sais que ce ne seront ni les libéraux ni les néo-démocrates parce qu'ils forcent l'adoption de projets de loi au Parlement et qu'ils s'en félicitent, comme d'habitude. Ce seront plutôt les gens de Saskatoon‑Ouest, qui devront subir l'inflation galopante, la hausse du fardeau fiscal et la réduction des prestations gouvernementales. Malheureusement, cela me fait penser à la célèbre déclaration de Rodney Dangerfield, qui avait affirmé que personne ne le respecte; hélas, personne au gouvernement libéral ne respecte les Canadiens non plus.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-09-26 18:21 [p.7714]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is a good point. We need permanent solutions to these problems. A temporary tax relief measure like Bill C-30 is helpful, as I said, but it is only temporary.
What we need to do is get government out of the way of our economy. The government is stepping in and messing around with the economy in ways that cause businesses to make decisions differently than they would have before. It causes us to lose jobs. It causes our economy to not have the economic output that it should have, which affects everything from jobs to incomes, from paycheques to government revenue. This is the direction we need to go in. We need to help the government get out of the way so we can let our economy do what it is supposed to do, which is better for everyone, including government.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un bon point. Nous avons besoin de solutions permanentes à ces problèmes. Une mesure d'allégement fiscal temporaire comme le projet de loi C‑30 est utile, comme je l'ai dit, mais elle n'est que temporaire.
Nous devons empêcher le gouvernement d'intervenir dans notre économie. Le gouvernement s'immisce dans l'économie et la perturbe d'une manière qui amène les entreprises à prendre des décisions différentes de celles qu'elles auraient prises auparavant. Cela nous fait perdre des emplois. Notre économie n'a pas la production économique qu'elle devrait avoir, ce qui a des répercussions sur tout, allant des emplois aux revenus et des chèques de paie aux recettes de l'État. Nous devons aller dans cette voie. Nous devons aider le gouvernement à cesser d'intervenir afin que l'on puisse laisser notre économie faire ce qu'elle est censée faire, ce qui est mieux pour tout le monde, y compris pour le gouvernement.
Collapse
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
View Robert Kitchen Profile
2022-09-23 11:43 [p.7621]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Saskatchewanians are suffering from the government's lack of action on inflation and the skyrocketing cost of living. Winter is on its way, and with temperatures ranging between -10°C and -30°C, we have no choice but to heat our homes. Food prices have increased by 10% since last year and the carbon tax will be tripling, yet the government rebates do not even come close to covering those increased costs.
Will the government stop hurting Canadians and cancel its planned tax hikes on gas, heating and groceries?
Monsieur le Président, les Saskatchewanais souffrent de l'inaction du gouvernement face à l'inflation et à la montée en flèche du coût de la vie. L'hiver est à nos portes, et avec des températures variant entre -10 et -30 degrés Celsius, nous n'avons d'autre choix que de chauffer nos maisons. Le prix des aliments a augmenté de 10 % depuis l'année dernière, et la taxe sur le carbone va tripler. L'argent que le gouvernement retourne aux contribuables est loin de couvrir ces coûts accrus.
Le gouvernement cessera-t-il de faire du tort aux Canadiens et annulera-t-il les hausses de taxes prévues sur l'essence, le chauffage et la nourriture?
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, are members surprised that the cost of living in northern Saskatchewan is skyrocketing? Record high gas prices and an ever-increasing carbon tax have led to unprecedented freight costs. Everything, and I mean everything, costs more under this coalition government. In some communities, four litres of milk is nearly $14, a dozen eggs is nine dollars and a kilogram of apples is $12.
The people in northern communities cannot afford more taxes. Will the government cancel today its planned increases on northerners' gas, groceries and heating fuel?
Monsieur le Président, les députés s'étonnent-ils que le coût de la vie dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan monte en flèche? Les prix records de l'essence et une taxe sur le carbone qui ne cesse d'augmenter se traduisent par des coûts de transport sans précédent. Tout, et je dis bien tout, coûte plus cher sous l'actuel gouvernement de coalition. Dans certaines collectivités, quatre litres de lait coûtent près de 14 $, une douzaine d'œufs, 9 $, et un kilo de pommes, 12 $.
Les habitants des communautés du Nord ne peuvent pas se permettre de payer plus d'impôts. Le gouvernement annulera-t-il aujourd'hui les augmentations prévues sur l'essence, l'épicerie et le combustible de chauffage des habitants du Nord?
Collapse
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-09-23 14:09 [p.7643]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to start by saying it is a privilege to be speaking here on behalf of the constituents of Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan. Our thoughts and prayers are with those in eastern Canada as they brace for the storm that is about to hit the shores of Canada. We want to let them know we are with them in our thoughts and prayers.
It is a pleasure today to join the debate on Bill C-210. This bill, put forward by the NDP member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley, would lower the voting age in Canada from 18 to 16. I have some concerns with this bill, but first it is important to give some important background on it.
The last time the voting age in Canada was lowered was back in 1970, the year I was born. We lowered it from 21 to what it is today, 18 years of age. In the 1972 election, right after the voting age was lowered, voter turnout increased just 1%, up to 76.7%. Let us think about that number for a minute. Most of us would be surprised if the voter turnout in the next election was even that high. For the sake of comparison, the turnout in the last election, in 2021, was 62.5%. Turnout in Canadian elections has been hovering around that number for at least the last 15 years.
Today's debate is about the youth's vote, so let us look at that information and the data, according to Statistics Canada, on those aged 18 to 24. Just 66% of that age bracket voted in the last election. That compares with 80% of those aged 55 to 64 and 83% of those aged 65 to 74. One must wonder if lowering the voting age to 16 would do much to increase voter turnout in our country. In fact, a 2004 study from Cambridge University concluded there was no evidence such a change would do anything to increase voter turnout here.
This ties in well with what we have been debating all week in the House: the cost of living and the challenges the next generation is facing. The 18-to-24 demographic has been one of the hardest hit by the skyrocketing costs of living. Someone of that age used to be able to find a decent paying job, save money and maybe buy a nice starter house. Today, that is a fantasy; it is unattainable. Young people are having trouble affording rent while also paying for groceries, gas and other necessities.
However, do not worry; the government is here to help. It is sending renters $500 to put toward a year's worth of rent. Let us hold off on that for just a moment and analyze it. Only one in five renters will qualify for that $500 cheque. Seriously, the government thinks $40 per month will help someone whose rent is well over $2,000 in some markets, and not everybody will qualify. Even in Moose Jaw, the average rent is around $1,000 a month.
The fact is, life for young Canadians has become harder and more expensive under the Liberal government. While this bill would lower the voting age, we know there are several other demographics that historically have had lower voting rates than average: first nations, those with disabilities and many more. We have many well-thought-out ideas and recommendations on how to encourage these groups to vote.
I know that, prior to the last election, my colleagues on the procedure and House affairs committee did tremendous work on a study on how to safely hold an election during the pandemic. I would like to thank my friends from Perth—Wellington and Elgin—Middlesex—London for their work on that committee. They heard from advocates for all these groups about lower voter turnouts. They heard several ideas on how to get more people to vote. Ultimately, this study and all its recommendations were ignored. The first goal of this place should be to encourage those who are currently eligible to vote to go out and vote.
My colleague, the member for Calgary Shepard, spoke of this bill earlier. He spoke about the responsibilities of citizenship and that is something that I would like to talk about. Canadians can join the military reserves at the age of 16 with parental consent. In Saskatchewan, someone can get a learner's driver's licence at the age of 16, but they must drive with an adult. In other areas, it is about earning the responsibility and earning the respect. The purchase of alcohol and cannabis in Saskatchewan is limited to those who are age 19. The fact is that we place limits on young people in Canada. People get the full benefits of citizenship as they get older.
Democracy is important to me. My grandfather fought alongside Canadians in World War II. Canadians were kind and generous. They went overseas. My mother, who was growing up in Scotland, met lots of Canadian soldiers. These Canadian soldiers would bring chocolates, candy, dolls and other things my parents could not get. They were kind and generous. On the front, my grandfather fought alongside Canadians, and he saw the sacrifices they were willing to make in order to preserve democracy and freedom.
Democracy and the ability to vote is a privilege and it requires careful thought and consideration. Ultimately, I do not see a compelling argument that this bill would do anything to address the issue of lower voter turnouts. We have known for years how to address this ongoing issue. We need to lower barriers to make it easier to vote, yes, but we also have to encourage those existing voters by giving them good policies and a positive direction for the future of this country.
Most importantly, we need to give people a reason to vote for good things. This legislation will not do it. Ultimately, we have to earn the voter's respect.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens d'abord à dire que c'est un privilège de prendre la parole ici au nom des gens de Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan. Nos pensées et nos prières accompagnent les habitants de l'Est du Canada, qui se préparent à affronter l'ouragan sur le point de frapper nos côtes. Nous voulons leur faire savoir que nous sommes de tout cœur avec eux.
C'est un plaisir aujourd'hui de participer au débat sur le projet de loi C‑210. Ce projet de loi, présenté par le député néo-démocrate de Skeena—Bulkley Valley, ferait passer l'âge de voter au Canada de 18 à 16 ans. Ce projet de loi me préoccupe, mais il est avant tout nécessaire de le situer dans son contexte.
La dernière fois que l'âge du droit de vote a été abaissé au Canada, c'était en 1970, l'année de ma naissance. Nous l'avons fait passer de 21 ans à ce qu'il est aujourd'hui, soit 18 ans. Lors des élections de 1972, juste après l'abaissement de l'âge du droit de vote, la participation électorale a augmenté de seulement 1 %, passant ainsi à 76,7 %. Réfléchissons à ce chiffre pendant une minute. La plupart d'entre nous seraient surpris que le taux de participation aux prochaines élections soit aussi élevé. À titre de comparaison, le taux de participation aux dernières élections, en 2021, était de 62,5 %. Le taux de participation aux élections canadiennes oscille autour de ce chiffre depuis au moins les 15 dernières années.
Puisque le débat d'aujourd'hui porte sur le vote des jeunes, jetons un coup d'œil à l'information et aux données provenant de Statistique Canada, sur les jeunes de 18 à 24 ans. Seulement 66 % des jeunes dans cette tranche d'âge ont voté lors des dernières élections, comparativement à une proportion de 80 % parmi les personnes de 55 à 64 ans et de 83 % parmi celles de 65 à 74 ans. Force est de se demander si le fait de baisser l'âge du vote à 16 ans contribuerait vraiment à augmenter la participation électorale au Canada. En fait, une étude réalisée en 2004 par l'Université Cambridge conclut que rien ne montre qu'un tel changement aurait une incidence sur la participation électorale.
Cette question s'inscrit dans le droit fil des débats que nous avons eus toute la semaine à la Chambre sur le coût de la vie et les défis auxquels est confrontée la nouvelle génération. Le groupe des 18 à 24 ans est l'un des plus durement touchés par la hausse vertigineuse du coût de la vie. Auparavant, les jeunes de ce groupe d'âge pouvaient trouver un emploi décemment rémunéré, économiser et peut-être même acheter une jolie première maison. Aujourd'hui, c'est un rêve inatteignable. Les jeunes ont du mal à payer le loyer alors qu'ils doivent également acheter de la nourriture, de l'essence et d'autres produits de première nécessité.
Il n'y a toutefois pas lieu de s'inquiéter, le gouvernement est là pour les aider. Il envoie aux locataires 500 $ pour les aider à payer un an de loyer. Arrêtons-nous un instant sur ce point et analysons la situation. Seul un locataire sur cinq sera admissible à ce chèque de 500 $. Je suis sérieux, le gouvernement pense qu'une somme de 40 $ par mois aidera quelqu'un dont le loyer est nettement supérieur à 2 000 $ dans certains marchés. Sans compter que ce n'est pas tout le monde qui aura droit à cet argent. Même à Moose Jaw, le loyer moyen est d'environ 1 000 $ par mois.
Le fait est que la vie des jeunes Canadiens est devenue plus difficile et plus coûteuse sous le gouvernement libéral. Ce projet de loi abaisserait l'âge de voter, mais nous savons qu'il y a plusieurs autres groupes démographiques dont le taux de participation électorale a toujours été inférieur à la moyenne, à savoir les Premières Nations, les personnes handicapées et bien d'autres. Nous avons de nombreuses idées et recommandations bien réfléchies sur la façon d'encourager ces groupes à voter.
Je sais qu'avant les dernières élections, mes collègues du comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre ont fait un travail remarquable dans le cadre d'une étude sur la façon de tenir des élections en toute sécurité pendant la pandémie. Je tiens à remercier mes amis de Perth—Wellington et d'Elgin—Middlesex—London de leur travail au sein de ce comité. Ils ont entendu les défenseurs de tous ces groupes parler de la faible participation des électeurs. Ils ont entendu plusieurs idées sur la façon d'inciter plus de gens à voter. En fin de compte, cette étude et toutes ses recommandations ont été ignorées. Le premier objectif de la Chambre devrait être d'encourager ceux qui ont actuellement le droit de voter à le faire.
Le député de Calgary Shepard a parlé de ce projet de loi plus tôt. Il a mentionné les responsabilités liées à la citoyenneté, un sujet que j'aimerais aborder. Les Canadiens peuvent s'enrôler dans la Force de réserve dès l'âge de 16 ans avec le consentement de leurs parents. En Saskatchewan, une personne peut obtenir un permis de conduire d'apprenti à l'âge de 16 ans, mais elle doit conduire avec un adulte. Dans d'autres secteurs, l'idée est de mériter la responsabilité et le respect. En Saskatchewan, l'achat d'alcool et de cannabis est limité aux personnes âgées de 19 ans. Le fait est que le Canada impose des limites aux jeunes. Les gens obtiennent tous les avantages de la citoyenneté en vieillissant.
La démocratie est importante à mes yeux. Mon grand-père a combattu aux côtés des Canadiens pendant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Les Canadiens étaient bons et généreux. Ils ont traversé l'océan. Ma mère, qui grandissait en Écosse, a rencontré de nombreux soldats canadiens. Ils amenaient avec eux du chocolat, des bonbons, des poupées et d'autres choses que mes parents ne pouvaient pas avoir. Ils étaient bons et généreux. Sur le front, mon grand-père a combattu aux côtés des Canadiens et il a vu quels sacrifices ils étaient prêts à faire pour préserver la démocratie et la liberté.
La démocratie et la possibilité de voter sont des privilèges qui exigent beaucoup d'attention et de considération. Au bout du compte, je ne vois pas comment ce projet de loi permettrait de régler le problème du faible taux de participation. Nous savons depuis des années comment régler ce problème. D'accord, il faut éliminer les obstacles afin qu'il soit plus facile de voter, mais il faut aussi encourager les électeurs actuels en leur présentant de bonnes politiques et une vision positive de l'avenir de ce pays.
Mais le plus important, c'est qu'il faut donner aux gens une raison de vouloir voter pour de bonnes choses. Ce n'est pas ce que fera cette mesure législative. Il faut d'abord et avant tout gagner le respect des électeurs.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-22 12:19 [p.7537]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the leader of the NDP talks a lot about affordability, the pressures Canadians are facing, respect and dignity, and how his party is fighting for Canadians.
Is this done by propping up the Liberal government, by voting with the Liberals to increase taxes, to increase bureaucracy, to increase red tape that makes life difficult for everyday Canadians? For example, the New Democrats have been supporting the failed carbon tax that does not work, but it does make food more expensive and home heating more expensive. It makes driving kids to and from sports more expensive.
Why does the leader of the NDP brag that he and his party are fighting for Canadians when they keep voting for tax increases and increased bureaucratic red tape?
Monsieur le Président, le chef du NPD parle beaucoup d’abordabilité, des pressions que subissent les Canadiens, de respect et de dignité, et de la façon dont son parti se bat pour les Canadiens.
Est-ce en soutenant le gouvernement libéral, en votant avec les libéraux pour augmenter les taxes, la bureaucratie et les formalités administratives qui rendent la vie difficile aux Canadiens ordinaires qu’il le fait? Par exemple, les néo-démocrates soutiennent la taxe sur le carbone, qui ne fonctionne pas, mais qui hausse le coût de la nourriture et du chauffage. Elle augmente les coûts nécessaires pour véhiculer les enfants qui pratiquent des activités sportives.
Pourquoi le chef du NPD se vante-t-il que son parti et lui se battent pour les Canadiens alors qu’ils ne cessent de voter pour l’augmentation des taxes et l’augmentation de la paperasserie?
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-22 12:51 [p.7541]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, my colleague across the way mentioned there is a lot more the government can do to increase affordability for Canadians. One thing I would suggest is abolishing the carbon tax, because it is a tax on the most basic of necessities, like food, home heating and fuel in vehicles to get from point A to point B.
There is one thing, though, that I want to mention. I received lots of calls in my office throughout the summer regarding passport delays. I definitely like decreased red tape and programs that are very effectively run.
Does the member believe that her government will be able to successfully and efficiently run a dental care program with little wait time, little red tape and quick service delivery?
Monsieur le Président, mon collègue d’en face vient de dire que le gouvernement peut faire encore beaucoup plus pour rendre la vie plus abordable aux Canadiens. Je lui suggère d’abolir la taxe sur le carbone, car il s’agit d’une taxe sur un produit de toute première nécessité, au même titre que la nourriture, le chauffage résidentiel et l’essence qui permet aux gens de se rendre d’un point A à un point B.
J’aimerais soulever un point important. Au cours de l’été, j’ai reçu beaucoup d’appels à mon bureau concernant les retards dans le traitement des passeports. Je suis tout à fait en faveur d’un allégement des formalités administratives et de la gestion efficace des programmes.
La députée croit-elle que son gouvernement sera capable d’administrer avec succès et efficacité un programme de soins dentaires en garantissant des délais d’attente raisonnables, peu de formalités administratives et un service rapide?
Collapse
View Kelly Block Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kelly Block Profile
2022-09-22 15:03 [p.7562]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the cost of the Liberal government is driving up the cost of living.
Over the past number of months, I have met with too many constituents who are barely getting by. They are finding it more difficult to pay their bills, feed their families and are worried about losing their homes. In short, there is too much month left at the end of the money. They simply cannot afford higher taxes.
Will the Prime Minister cancel his planned tax increases?
Monsieur le Président, le coût du gouvernement libéral fait augmenter le coût de la vie.
Au cours des derniers mois, un trop grand nombre de mes concitoyens sont venus me dire qu'ils avaient du mal à joindre les deux bouts. Ils ont de plus en plus de mal à payer leurs factures, à nourrir leur famille et craignent de perdre leur logement. En bref, la fin du mois se fait cruellement attendre. Ils ne peuvent tout simplement pas se permettre de payer des taxes plus élevées.
Le premier ministre annulera-t-il les augmentations de taxes qu'il a prévues?
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-09-22 15:06 [p.7563]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canadians are looking for hope.
Every day, Conservatives stand up in the House to tell the stories of real Canadians who are facing the worst financial struggles of their lives, thanks to the mismanagement of the government.
Day after day in the House, the Liberals stand up to tell us how well Canadians are doing. Talk about a government being tone deaf and out of touch with Canadians.
Will the government finally give Canadians hope and cancel the planned tax increases on paycheques?
Monsieur le Président, les Canadiens ont besoin de retrouver espoir.
Chaque jour, les conservateurs prennent la parole à la Chambre pour parler de ce que vivent réellement les Canadiens, alors qu'ils sont aux prises avec les pires difficultés financières de leur vie en raison de la mauvaise gestion du gouvernement.
Jour après jour, les libéraux prennent la parole à la Chambre pour nous dire à quel point les Canadiens se portent bien. C'est dire à quel point le gouvernement fait la sourde oreille et est déconnecté des Canadiens.
Le gouvernement redonnera-t-il enfin espoir aux Canadiens en annulant ses hausses de taxes planifiées sur les chèques de paie?
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-20 14:54 [p.7427]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canadians should feel confident that when they work hard, they will have a roof over their heads and food on their tables, but under this NDP-Liberal government, Canadians are working harder and harder but falling farther and farther behind. This government's uncontrolled spending is driving up the cost of living, and increased taxes like the failed carbon tax is diving deeper and deeper into their pockets.
When will this NDP-Liberal government stop driving up costs and cutting the paycheques of Canadians?
Monsieur le Président, les Canadiens devraient avoir l'assurance qu'ils pourront se loger et se nourrir s'ils travaillent fort. Cependant, sous ce gouvernement néo-démocrate—libéral, les Canadiens travaillent de plus en plus fort, mais perdent de plus en plus de terrain. Les dépenses effrénées du gouvernement font grimper le coût de la vie, et l'augmentation des impôts, comme la taxe inefficace sur le carbone, puise de plus en plus dans leurs poches.
Quand le gouvernement néo-démocrate—libéral cessera-t-il de faire grimper les coûts et de réduire les chèques de paie des Canadiens?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-20 15:00 [p.7428]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the cost of government is driving up the cost of living. A half trillion dollars of Liberal inflationary deficits have bid up the cost of the goods we buy and the interest we pay. Inflation is running at historic highs and taking a massive bite out of the ability of Canadians to pay the bills.
Now, if one thought it could not get much worse, one would be wrong, because the Liberals are planning on raising taxes on the paycheques of Canadians by hiking CPP and EI premiums.
Instead of making the problem worse, will the government commit to cancelling its planned tax hikes and cancel its tripling of the carbon tax?
Monsieur le Président, les dépenses du gouvernement font augmenter le coût de la vie. Un demi-billion de dollars de déficits inflationnistes libéraux ont fait grimper le coût des biens que nous achetons et des intérêts que nous payons. L'inflation atteint des sommets historiques et elle réduit considérablement la capacité des Canadiens à payer leurs factures.
Maintenant, les personnes qui pensaient avoir vu le pire devront se raviser, car les libéraux prévoient hausser les impôts prélevés sur les chèques de paie des Canadiens en augmentant les cotisations au Régime de pensions du Canada et à l'assurance-emploi.
Au lieu d'aggraver le problème, le gouvernement s'engagera-t-il à annuler les hausses d'impôts qu'il a prévues et à renoncer à tripler la taxe sur le carbone?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-20 15:02 [p.7429]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the new measures proposed by the government will just get vaporized by continued sustained inflation. It is the cost of government that is driving up the cost of living.
Food is up 10% year over year, and four out of 10 Canadians are cutting their diets because of rising food costs. Canadians who have never used a food bank in their lives before are being forced to because they simply cannot keep up with soaring prices. Canadians are struggling to get by, and the government plans to raise taxes on gas, home heating, groceries and paycheques.
Will the government reverse its planned tax hikes and commit to no new taxes?
Monsieur le Président, les nouvelles mesures proposées par le gouvernement ne feront que s'évaporer sous l'effet d'une inflation soutenue. C'est le coût du gouvernement qui fait augmenter le coût de la vie.
Le prix des aliments a augmenté de 10 % depuis l'an dernier, et quatre Canadiens sur dix revoient leurs habitudes alimentaires à la baisse en raison de cette hausse. Des Canadiens qui n'ont jamais eu recours aux banques alimentaires sont maintenant obligés de le faire parce qu'ils ne peuvent tout simplement pas composer avec la flambée des prix. Les Canadiens ont du mal à s'en sortir, et le gouvernement prévoit d'augmenter les taxes sur l'essence, le chauffage et les aliments ainsi que les impôts prélevés sur les chèques de paie.
Le gouvernement va‑t‑il annuler les hausses de taxes et d'impôts envisagées tout en s'engageant à ne pas en créer de nouvelles?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-20 15:03 [p.7429]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, what has been vaporized is Canadians' purchasing power as the government has caused the record-breaking inflation that is hammering Canadians' abilities to make ends meet.
The best way to stop inflation is to put an end to the deficits that caused it in the first place. Instead, the Liberals are going to make the problem a whole lot worse. Rising prices have robbed Canadians of the ability to heat their homes and fill their fridges, and in the coming new year, the government is planning on hiking payroll taxes and carbon taxes, meaning Canadians will have to spend more as they take home less.
Will the government simply cancel its planned tax hikes?
Monsieur le Président, ce qui s’est évaporé, c’est le pouvoir d’achat des Canadiens parce que le gouvernement a causé une inflation sans précédent qui réduit considérablement la capacité des Canadiens de joindre les deux bouts.
La meilleure manière de freiner l’inflation est de mettre fin aux déficits qui l’alimentent. Au lieu de cela, les libéraux vont aggraver considérablement la situation. La hausse des prix empêche les Canadiens de chauffer leur domicile et de remplir leur réfrigérateur. Au cours de la prochaine année, le gouvernement prévoit d’augmenter les charges sociales et les taxes sur le carbone. Par conséquent, les Canadiens devront payer plus, alors qu’ils en auront encore moins dans les poches.
Le gouvernement décidera-t-il tout simplement d'annuler les hausses de taxes prévues?
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-06-23 15:02 [p.7244]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as my father always said, “Trudeau times were tough times back in the eighties.” We have the highest inflation rate since 1983, at 7.7%. We have heard the tired old talking points and we know the finance minister's only solution is to increase spending and raise taxes. That is simply not working. Now, more than 72% of Canadians are finding it hard to make their paycheque last until the end of the month.
The government cares only about its rich friends and elitist donors. It is really out of touch with the realties of families across Saskatchewan. Is that not the truth?
Monsieur le Président, comme mon père le disait toujours: « Les temps étaient durs sous le gouvernement Trudeau, dans les années 1980 ». Aujourd'hui, nous avons le plus haut taux d'inflation depuis 1983; il est à 7,7 %. On nous a fait jouer la même vieille cassette, et nous savons que la seule solution proposée par la ministre des Finances est d'augmenter les dépenses et de hausser les impôts. Cela ne fonctionne tout simplement pas. Aujourd'hui, plus de 72 % des Canadiens ont du mal à terminer le mois.
Le gouvernement se soucie uniquement de ses riches amis et de ses donateurs élitistes. Il est vraiment déconnecté des réalités des familles saskatchewanaises. N'est-ce pas là la vérité?
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 33 | Page: 1 of 3

1
2
3
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data