Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 5 of 5
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-06-21 18:43 [p.7124]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, normally I would say it is a pleasure to rise to speak in the House, but I find it a little challenging when it is concerning Bill C-21.
In my former life, I was the mayor of a small city in Saskatchewan. One of my many roles as mayor was being the chair of the police commission. I have witnessed first-hand the full spectrum between responsible firearms owners and gang members. I am no stranger to competitive shooting or understanding the importance of the safe use of firearms. As a young boy, I won top shot numerous times in Air Cadets, and I was second in my platoon in basic officer training in Saint-Jean, Quebec. I credit this to my grandfather, who was a sniper in the offensive during World War II.
I personally know several people, and those from organizations, who are all responsible firearms owners who promote firearms safety. Today we are in the House to debate an example of the government doing something just to say it is doing something. This is something it has tremendous experience in. It is as though it legislates to generate good talking points instead of good policy. There is an old saying: “Walk around. Carry a clipboard, and look busy.” This is exactly what the government is doing: looking busy and accomplishing nothing.
As everyone watching likely knows, Bill C-21 is the Liberal government's latest attack on responsible Canadian firearms owners, another band-aid solution, another policy that would punish people instead of helping them. The government has had a habit of punishing people or industries for ideological reasons. I can name any number of examples: its carbon tax, warning labels on ground beef and, today, this attack on lawful firearms owners.
The NDP-Liberal government does not think people should hunt. It does not think farmers need firearms as tools. It does not think target shooting is a legitimate sport. The government simply does not believe anyone should own a gun. In short, it does not understand rural Canada. It is attacking us and our way of life.
Today I would like to spend some time talking about one of the aspects of this bill that has received the most attention and the most press: the handgun. Licensed handgun owners in Canada are responsible owners. For my Liberal colleagues across the aisle, who likely do not know the process but think they are experts, I would like to share with the House the lengthy process to obtain a handgun in Canada.
First, people need to go through the process to get their PAL. Again for my Liberal colleagues, that stands for a possession and acquisition licence. That involves taking the firearm safety course, passing the test and, finally, filling out the application forms and going through the needed background checks. To obtain a licence for a handgun, people also need to pass an additional safety course, which is the Canadian restricted firearm safety course. They must register the handgun and follow special storage, display, transportation and handling requirements. They may not carry the firearms on their person, they may only use them for target shooting or collecting. They may only be used at approved ranges, and one would likely need to be members in good standing at said ranges, which would come with its own background check.
After going through all these steps, it is not hard to see why handgun owners are so responsible. The cost and time to go through this process alone would deter anyone from breaking any of these rules. The question I have for my NDP-Liberal colleagues is this: What would a handgun ban accomplish that these strict rules do not already accomplish?
We all know that Canada's largest cities are experiencing a surge in gun violence. That is something that needs to be fixed, and fixed quickly, but it is not something this bill would do anything to address.
The government has never even tried to address the reasons people join gangs. Youth do it out of a sense of hopelessness and a lack of belonging. Hopelessness is created by not having a sense of responsibility. Who would when a government tries to bubble-wrap people and make decisions for them in almost every aspect of their lives?
What we want are responsible citizens who make decisions for themselves, who understand that for every decision a person makes, there is a consequence and sometimes an unintended consequence. For every decision someone makes, they have a choice between doing something good or something bad. They can either contribute to society and help their fellow man or take away from society and tear down their fellow man. What needs to be instilled in this country and future generations is a sense of responsibility, a sense of belonging and clear examples of the differences between right and wrong.
The gangs our youth are joining that commit these shootings are not using legal, registered firearms. They are using handguns smuggled over the border. Our border agency, the CBSA, needs more resources to tackle this problem. That is something that this bill, Bill C-21, falls well short of.
Recently, the public safety committee tabled its guns and gangs report, which included several recommendations to tackle gun violence in Canada, recommendations that seem to have been totally ignored in drafting this bill. It included recommendations such as creating a program to tour young offenders through penitentiaries; maintaining mandatory minimum sentences for drug and firearm-related crimes; removing the expensive firearm buyback program and allocating the money to gang prevention programs; adequately funding indigenous police forces to combat gangs and gun smuggling; and that the government actually recognize that the majority of illegal firearms in Canada are the result of smuggling.
If the NDP-Liberals were more interested in developing good policy instead of good talking points, they would have paid attention to the committee's important work. Sadly, this has not been the case.
Bill C-21 is not only short on resources for the the CBSA, but also for the RCMP. I have a constituent who has been trying, as a responsible gun owner, to contact the RCMP to register a handgun so that they are aware before the deadline. There are absolutely no resources in the RCMP to handle this influx of requests caused by the government's announcement. I have spoken to this man personally and he is very concerned. He is very concerned because he is a responsible gun owner and he wants to do the right thing, but he cannot accomplish that because of the limited resources the government has allocated to allow him to follow the rules.
As I mentioned before, I can say with near certainty that the gang members in downtown Toronto are not graduates of a restricted firearms safety course. I talked earlier about carrying a clipboard and looking busy. The government is very good at introducing legislation that does very little and simply virtue signals to their base. That is exactly what Bill C-21 is doing, virtue signalling to their base at the expense of Saskatchewan and all of rural Canada.
Finally, this being my last chance to speak before we will rise for the summer, I would like to take this chance to thank the pages, interpreters, security, IT staff and everyone else who keeps this place running. I wish them a well-deserved summer.
Monsieur le Président, normalement, c'est toujours un plaisir de prendre la parole à la Chambre, mais je trouve cela un peu plus difficile pour le projet de loi C-21.
Dans une vie antérieure, j'ai été maire d'une petite ville de la Saskatchewan. Un de mes nombreux rôles en tant que maire était de présider la commission de police. J'ai pu constater de visu toutes les différences existant entre les propriétaires d’armes à feu responsables et les membres de gangs. Je connais bien le tir sportif et je sais combien il est important de savoir manier les armes à feu en toute sécurité. Quand j'étais jeune, j'ai été reconnu meilleur tireur des cadets de l'air à de nombreuses reprises, et j’ai obtenu la deuxième place en tir dans mon peloton durant la formation de base des officiers que j'ai suivie à Saint‑Jean, au Québec. Je pense que ce talent me vient de mon grand-père, qui a été tireur d'élite pendant l'offensive de la Seconde Guerre mondiale.
Je connais personnellement plusieurs personnes — et d'autres qui appartiennent à des organismes — qui sont des propriétaires d’armes à feu responsables qui font la promotion de la sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu. Aujourd'hui, nous débattons à la Chambre d'un sujet sur lequel le gouvernement prétend agir, sans qu'il le fasse pour autant. Le gouvernement a beaucoup d'expérience en la matière. On pourrait même dire qu'il légifère pour produire de bons discours, au lieu de produire de bonnes politiques. Il y a un vieil adage qui dit que pour être pris au sérieux, il faut se promener avec un bloc-notes et avoir l'air occupé. C'est exactement ce que le gouvernement essaie de faire: avoir l'air occupé tout en n'accomplissant absolument rien.
Comme le savent probablement tous ceux qui nous regardent, le projet de loi C‑21 est l'attaque la plus récente lancée par le gouvernement libéral contre les propriétaires d'arme à feu responsables du Canada. Il s'agit d'une autre solution de fortune, d'une autre politique qui punirait les Canadiens plutôt que de les aider. Le gouvernement a pris l'habitude de punir les particuliers ou les industries pour des raisons idéologiques. Je nomme quelques exemples: sa taxe sur le carbone, ses étiquettes d'avertissement sur les emballages de bœuf haché et, aujourd'hui, cette attaque contre les propriétaires d'arme à feu respectueux des lois.
Le gouvernement néo-démocrate—libéral croit que les gens ne devraient pas chasser, que les agriculteurs n'ont pas besoin d'arme à feu, que le tir à la cible n'est pas un sport légitime. Il croit tout simplement que nul ne devrait posséder une arme à feu. Bref, il ne comprend pas le Canada rural. Il s'en prend à nous et à notre mode de vie.
Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais prendre un moment pour parler de l'un des aspects de ce projet de loi ayant suscité le plus l'attention, notamment dans les médias: l'arme de poing. Les propriétaires d'arme de poing détenteurs d'un permis en règle au Canada sont des propriétaires d'arme à feu responsables. Dans l'intérêt de mes collègues libéraux en face, qui ne connaissent probablement pas le processus mais qui se croient des experts, j'aimerais informer la Chambre du long processus qu'une personne doit suivre pour se procurer une arme de poing au Canada.
Tout d'abord, les gens doivent suivre le processus pour obtenir leur PPA. À titre d'information pour mes collègues libéraux, cela veut dire permis de possession et d'acquisition. Pour l'obtenir, il faut suivre le cours de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu, réussir l'examen et, enfin, remplir les formulaires de demande et se soumettre aux vérifications nécessaires des antécédents. Pour obtenir un permis pour une arme de poing, les gens doivent également suivre un cours de sécurité supplémentaire, soit le cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu à autorisation restreinte. Ils doivent enregistrer l'arme de poing et respecter des exigences particulières en matière d'entreposage, d'exposition, de transport et de maniement. Ils ne peuvent pas porter les armes à feu sur eux, ils peuvent seulement les utiliser à des fins de tir à la cible ou de collection. Ils ne peuvent les utiliser que dans des champs de tir approuvés et il est probablement nécessaire d'être un membre en règle dans ces champs de tir, et ceux-ci font leur propre vérification des antécédents.
Après avoir franchi toutes ces étapes, il n'est pas difficile de comprendre pourquoi les propriétaires d'armes de poing sont si responsables. Le coût et le temps requis pour mener à bien ce processus dissuaderaient à eux seuls quiconque d'enfreindre l'une de ces règles. Voici la question que je veux poser à mes collègues néo-démocrates et libéraux: qu'est-ce que l'interdiction des armes de poing accomplirait que ces règles strictes n'accomplissent pas déjà?
Nous savons tous que les plus grandes villes du Canada connaissent une montée de violence liée aux armes à feu. C'est un problème qui doit être réglé, et ce, rapidement, mais le projet de loi ne ferait rien pour y remédier.
Le gouvernement n’a même jamais essayé de comprendre les raisons pour lesquelles certaines personnes décident de se joindre à des gangs de rue. Les jeunes le font par désespoir et par manque de sentiment d’appartenance. Leur désespoir provient du fait qu’ils n’ont pas le sens des responsabilités. Qui peut se sentir responsable quand le gouvernement tente de surprotéger ses citoyens et de prendre les décisions qui leur appartiennent à leur place dans presque tous les aspects de leur vie?
Nous voulons des citoyens responsables qui prennent leurs propres décisions et qui comprennent que chaque décision entraîne des conséquence, parfois indésirables. Chaque fois que l'on doit prendre une décision, il faut faire un choix entre le bien et le mal. On peut soit contribuer à la vie en société en aidant son prochain, soit soutirer quelque chose à la société au détriment de son prochain. Ce qu'il faut inculquer dans notre pays et aux générations futures, c'est l'importance d'avoir le sens des responsabilités, un sentiment d’appartenance et des exemples clairs de la différence entre le bien et le mal.
Les gangs qui courtisent nos jeunes sont à l’origine de fusillades perpétrées avec des armes illégales et non enregistrées. Ces gangs utilisent des armes à feu issues de la contrebande à la frontière. L’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada nécessite plus de ressources pour s’attaquer à ce problème. Or, le projet de loi C‑21 ne propose aucune solution pour le faire.
Récemment, le comité de la sécurité publique a déposé son rapport sur les armes à feu et les gangs, qui comprenait plusieurs recommandations visant à lutter contre la violence armée au Canada, des recommandations qui semblent avoir été totalement ignorées lors de la rédaction de ce projet de loi. Le rapport recommandait notamment la création d'un programme de visites de jeunes délinquants dans les pénitenciers; le maintien de peines minimales obligatoires pour les crimes liés à la drogue et aux armes à feu; la suppression du coûteux programme de rachat d'armes à feu et la réaffectation de l'argent ainsi économisé à des programmes de lutte contre les gangs; le financement adéquat des forces de police autochtones pour lutter contre les gangs et la contrebande d'armes à feu; et la reconnaissance par le gouvernement du fait que la majorité des armes à feu illégales au Canada proviennent de la contrebande.
Si les néo-démocrates-libéraux étaient plus intéressés à élaborer de bonnes politiques que de bons arguments, ils auraient porté attention à l'important travail du comité, ce qui n'a malheureusement pas été le cas.
Le projet de loi C‑21 ne prévoit pas assez de ressources pour l'ASFC ou la GRC. Un habitant de ma circonscription, en propriétaire d'armes à feu responsable, a essayé de communiquer avec la GRC pour enregistrer une arme de poing avant la date limite. La GRC n'a absolument aucune ressource pour gérer cet afflux de demandes causé par l'annonce du gouvernement. J'ai parlé à cet homme et il est très préoccupé, car c'est un propriétaire d'armes à feu responsable et il veut faire les choses dans les règles, mais il en est incapable à cause des ressources limitées que le gouvernement a allouées pour lui permettre de le faire.
Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, je suis presque certain que les membres de gangs du centre-ville de Toronto n'ont pas réussi de cours de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu à autorisation restreinte. Plus tôt, j'ai aussi parlé de se promener, l'air occupé, une planchette à pince à la main. Le gouvernement est un expert pour ce qui est de présenter des projets de loi qui accomplissent très peu de choses, mais qui lui permettent de faire étalage de sa vertu aux yeux de sa base électorale. C'est exactement le cas du projet de loi C‑21. C'est un étalage de vertu à l'intention de la base électorale du gouvernement aux dépens de la Saskatchewan et de l'ensemble du Canada rural.
Enfin, comme c'est la dernière fois que je prends la parole à la Chambre avant l'ajournement estival, j'en profite pour remercier les pages, les interprètes, les agents de sécurité, le personnel des technologies de l'information et tous les autres employés qui assurent le bon fonctionnement de la Chambre. Je leur souhaite à tous un été bien mérité.
Collapse
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-06-21 18:54 [p.7125]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the member talks about red flags and yellow flags. Here is a red flag: Our party approached the Liberals to split this bill so that we could actually have a conversation about it, but that did not happen. The red flag is when we hear from the Liberals that they want to listen to the people, but they are not. They did not listen, and they are not listening to reports coming to them that are giving them good advice. Instead, they are shutting themselves down and saying this is what we need to do. They are not listening. They are not listening to Saskatchewan.
Monsieur le Président, le député parle dispositions de signalement d’urgence et de dispositions de signalement préventif. Voici un signalement: notre parti a approché les libéraux pour leur demander de scinder ce projet de loi en deux afin que nous puissions bien en discuter, mais cela ne s’est pas produit. Nous signalons que les libéraux disent qu’ils veulent écouter les gens, mais qu'ils ne le font pas. Ils n’écoutent jamais les rapports qui visent à leur donner de bons conseils. Au lieu de cela, ils refusent d’entendre quoi que ce soit et disent que c’est ce qu’il faut faire, un point c’est tout. Ils n’écoutent pas. Ils ne sont pas à l’écoute de la Saskatchewan.
Collapse
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-06-21 18:55 [p.7125]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, number one, I do remember that tragedy. It is still fresh in my mind, the moment when I heard the news about what happened. It is a tragedy, but I also would like to point out that there is an opportunity to have an open conversation about motivating factors and what the motivating factors are for people who illegally use firearms. That is not being addressed in this bill, so I find that tragic as well.
Monsieur le Président, premièrement, je me souviens de cette tragédie. Le moment où j’ai appris la nouvelle est encore frais dans ma mémoire. C’est une tragédie, mais je tiens à souligner qu’il est possible de tenir une discussion ouverte sur les facteurs de motivation des personnes qui font un usage illégal des armes à feu. Ce n’est pas abordé dans ce projet de loi. Je trouve cela tragique également.
Collapse
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-06-21 18:57 [p.7126]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I wish the member a very happy summer and look forward to working with her again in the fall, if we have that opportunity, in the committee.
Domestic violence is obviously a tragic thing that happens, and I am very sad that it does happen, but again, we need to focus on what drives and motivates. We are talking about gangs and what motivates people getting into gangs. That is a challenge, because they have a sense of hopelessness. They feel like they are not part of something. That is not being addressed. All the recommendations that have come forward are not being addressed in this bill.
Just doing something to look like something is being done does not solve the problem. We need to address the root of this problem, so I just ask that we vote this down and give it an other opportunity to actually address the real concerns within our country.
Monsieur le Président, je souhaite à la députée un très bel été et j'ai hâte de recommencer à travailler avec elle à l'automne, si nous en avons encore l'occasion, au comité.
La violence familiale est tragique, bien sûr, et je suis désolé qu'il y en ait, mais je répète que nous devons mettre l'accent sur ce qui motive ou incite les gens. Il s'agit des gangs et de ce qui motive des personnes à y adhérer. C'est un défi parce que ces personnes ressentent du désespoir. Elles ont l'impression de ne pas faire partie de quelque chose. Or, on n'en parle pas. Le projet de loi ne répond pas à toutes les recommandations proposées.
Il ne suffit pas d'avoir l'air d'agir pour régler le problème. Nous devons nous attaquer à la source du problème. Je demande donc aux députés de voter contre pour donner au projet de loi une autre occasion de régler les véritables problèmes de notre pays.
Collapse
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-06-21 18:58 [p.7126]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am absolutely disappointed. I am disappointed that we seem to be soft on punishing those who have committed horrendous crimes, yet punish lawful firearms owners. I cannot reconcile that, and I just find it absolutely crazy. I think that is a very good question. There is a huge gap and divide in this bill that we are not addressing. We have an opportunity to actually do that at this point in time, but the Liberals have shut that down.
Monsieur le Président, je suis extrêmement déçu. Je suis déçu que l'on semble faire preuve de laxisme lorsqu'il s'agit de punir les individus qui ont commis d'horribles crimes tout en pénalisant les propriétaires d'arme à feu respectueux des lois. Je n'arrive pas à concilier ces deux aspects et je trouve que c'est complètement insensé. Je pense que c'est une très bonne question. Ce projet de loi comporte d'énormes lacunes que nous n'avons toujours pas corrigées. Nous aurions eu l'occasion d'y remédier immédiatement, mais les libéraux s'y sont opposés.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 5 of 5

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data