Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 14 of 14
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, I would ask members to imagine a runner. He takes his place and is about to run the biggest race of his lifetime, but before the whistle blows, he leans down and ties his shoelaces together so that one shoe is securely fastened to the other shoe.
Then the runner deliberately turns around so that his back faces the finish line and sits down. Meanwhile, all his opponents stand at the ready. Their shoes are fastened properly and they face forward. These runners are prepared to race.
That is a good way for us to picture the different position the Prime Minister is putting Canada in when there is a looming global food shortage that we are not prepared for.
Other countries around the world are ready. They are not punishing producers and they have a plan to tackle the looming crisis. Agriculture is our superpower. It is this hidden economic driver that can not only solve world hunger but could also bring a great deal of prosperity to this nation. However, our producers cannot do this alone. They need the government to work alongside them, not against them, but the Prime Minister fails to recognize this. Not only that, but he has belittled and disrespected this industry by tying its hands behind its back and kicking it aside, all the while expecting it to solve our problems.
It started with applying the carbon tax to on-farm fuels, followed by poor trade deals and then a threat of a 30% reduction in fertilizer usage. Now our producers are dealing with sky-high input costs and the new threat of front-of-pack labelling for single-ingredient ground beef. At the very least, all our producers are asking for from the government is clarity. Unlike everyone else, our farmers only get one shot at success every year, and they cannot go into this blindly.
In my question, I asked the minister for clarity around the retroactive tariff on Russian fertilizer purchased before March 2. In her answer, she refused to give specifics. Now we are here on June 20, and our farmers are still somewhat in the dark. Fertilizer prices have more than doubled over the winter, and when these are coupled with sky-high input costs, our producers simply cannot afford an extra tariff that was applied on a product purchased before the war even started.
Despite what the minister thinks, fertilizer is not some optional add-on; rather, it is a critical tool that is used to boost crop yields and maximize output. Farmers really have no choice but to use it in order to meet the global demand and to make a profit on the crops that they grow.
As we look at what is happening across the globe with the war in Ukraine, India placing a ban on the export of wheat and poor yields as a result of the drought in western Canada, it is safe to say that we are on the brink of a global food crisis. If we want to solve this problem with a made-in-Canada solution, the government should work to make inputs less expensive so we can increase crop yields. The minister can do this today by cancelling the tariff on Russian fertilizer.
Tonight I will ask again: Will the government do the right thing and remove the retroactive tariff on fertilizer purchased before March 2?
Collapse
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, again, it is backwards hearing it from the parliamentary secretary when he thinks that just because it is paid by importers, somehow farmers are not going to have to pay for it. We all know the importers are going to pass that cost on to the farmer, but the farmer has no means of passing that cost on to anybody else. If the government truly wanted to support farmers, it would scrap the tariff for farmers.
Canada is also an outlier on this issue. The G7 countries do not have this kind of tariff because they truly know what it means to support farmers. Supporting farmers and going tough on Russia for its illegal occupation of Ukraine are not exclusive to each other.
I call on the minister once again. Let us harness our superpower and use it to address the looming global food crisis. After seven years of working against our farmers, the government has an opportunity to change course. Instead of working against them by making their lives more expensive, let us work alongside our producers. Standing up and saying they are working with the industry is not enough. Our farmers deserve actions and results.
Once again, will the government do the right thing, support our farmers and drop the tariff on Russian fertilizer purchased before March 2?
Collapse
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2022-05-19 14:43
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canada is the fifth-largest agri-food exporter in the world. In fact, we ship healthy food all over the globe. However, increasingly in Europe non-tariff trade barriers are restricting our access. Can the minister assure the producers in the agri-food industry that these tariffs will be eliminated or will not be applicable in the upcoming Canada-U.K. agreement?
Monsieur le Président, le Canada est le cinquième exportateur agroalimentaire en importance dans le monde. Nous expédions des aliments nutritifs aux quatre coins de la planète. Toutefois, des barrières non tarifaires en Europe restreignent de plus en plus notre accès. La ministre peut-elle assurer aux producteurs de l'industrie agroalimentaire que ces droits de douane seront éliminés ou qu'ils ne seront pas applicables dans le nouvel accord entre le Canada et le Royaume‑Uni?
Collapse
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, farmers need the certainty of knowing what the government is doing, especially since they have started their spring seeding. First, the Liberals hinted at restricting fertilizer use. Now they are implementing a 35% retroactive tariff on fertilizer imports from Russia. We are living in a disrupted world for food supply and trade, and there is no plan offering Canadian farmers stability.
We are close to a global food crisis and the minister is forcing farmers to grow less and taxing them out of existence. Will the minister remove the tariff on fertilizer purchased before March 2?
Monsieur le Président, les agriculteurs doivent savoir avec certitude quelles mesures prend le gouvernement, d'autant plus qu'ils ont commencé les semailles du printemps. Premièrement, les libéraux ont parlé de leur intention de restreindre l'utilisation des engrais. Maintenant, ils mettent en œuvre des droits de douane rétroactifs de 35 % sur les importations d'engrais de la Russie. À l'heure actuelle, l'approvisionnement alimentaire et le commerce sont perturbés, mais le gouvernement n'a aucun plan pour offrir de la stabilité aux agriculteurs canadiens.
Alors que pointe la menace d'une crise alimentaire mondiale, la ministre force les agriculteurs à réduire leurs cultures et elle les accable de taxes qui mettent leurs activités en péril. La ministre annulera-t-elle les droits de douane sur les engrais achetés avant le 2 mars?
Collapse
View Michael Kram Profile
CPC (SK)
View Michael Kram Profile
2022-03-25 11:33
Expand
Madam Speaker, Saskatchewan is the breadbasket of the world and leads the country in the production of wheat, canola and many other crops. That takes fertilizer, lots of fertilizer.
According to Fertilizer Canada, the government's announcement to ration fertilizer by 30% will cost Canadian farmers $40 billion in lost income. Why did the government refuse to consult with Saskatchewan before announcing its plan to ration fertilizer?
Madame la Présidente, la Saskatchewan est le grenier du monde et elle se trouve au premier rang au Canada pour ce qui est de la production du blé, du canola et de beaucoup d'autres cultures. Cela nécessite de l'engrais, beaucoup d'engrais.
Selon Fertilisants Canada, l'annonce du gouvernement de réduire de 30 % l'utilisation d'engrais fera perdre 40 milliards de dollars en revenus aux agriculteurs canadiens. Pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il refusé de consulter la Saskatchewan avant d'annoncer son intention de rationner l'engrais?
Collapse
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Speaker, it is an honour to rise in the House once again.
How do we begin to go over the country’s finances under the Liberal government? There is always so much spending and it is impossible to keep track of it all. It can give someone a headache if they try to keep up with it. Many of my fellow Conservatives are doing a great job of going through these spending items, showing how a lot of them do not make any sense and helpfully explaining how to handle Canada’s finances more effectively to get a better deal for the taxpayer.
I think it needs to be said, as a general comment, that in difficult times it is actually more important, not less, to make sure that we are managing our finances carefully and with close attention. The government must not act like it received a blank cheque from Canadians. However, when we are dealing with unusually large amounts of money, and when our minds are easily distracted by the news and events surrounding us here in this country, the temptation is always there to fall into a spending spree and make impulsive decisions without clearly thinking about the future and the ramifications of the decisions we make.
Everybody knows by now that we have entered a time of soaring inflation and supply chain shortages. Maybe it took an extra while for the Liberals to acknowledge it, because the warnings were coming from the official opposition, but they got there eventually and recognized that it was more than “Justinflation”.
To a degree, some challenges were expected during all the uncertainty and real disruptions to do with COVID and two years of lockdowns. That is the sort of thing that has been affecting countries around the world, which has been the government’s favourite talking point for a little while. However, it is not the perfect excuse that the Liberals are trying to make it out to be. Their mandate for truckers crossing the border, for example, at a time when supply chains are fragile with moving goods, is only one of the latest examples of their wrong-headed and unbalanced policies. We are already behind 18,000 truckers, and the mandates are only further exacerbating that issue. The Prime Minister's inflammatory and extreme rhetoric has also not been helping. However, I am not so much speaking on national unity today. It is the economic side of these problems that is the focus of debating the bill in front of us right now.
As far as handling COVID is concerned, the Liberals really have been normalizing lockdowns in practice. They have gone along as if it was a fallback or default position. Sometimes it seems as if they are stuck in the spring of 2020. The Liberals did not listen to feedback inside or outside of the House about supporting the provinces, strengthening their health care funding and providing all kinds of preventive measures as requested. The Conservatives demanded that they maximize all the incentives for businesses to hire and for more people to keep working, but now we find ourselves with ongoing labour shortages across different sectors. We are not out of the woods yet.
Even though we do need to be prepared for the worst-case scenario, it is still concerning to see the government announce a local lockdown program when it has consistently lacked a balanced approach. It would be one thing if the government was caught off guard by a crisis and had trouble finding its way, but with the Liberals and their economic update, it is about so much more than just COVID. Our finances were not in good shape before 2020 because of the same government’s mismanagement. We started off weaker than we needed to be, and it is obvious that the Liberals have not learned anything and are not willing to correct the course.
Over the last couple of years as a member of Parliament, I have had the chance to work on a few committees. In each of them, I have seen the same pattern up close. The government will make announcement after announcement for our future economy yet to come, while it does not hesitate to actively undermine our strongest sectors in the current economy. We cannot go on spending as much as we are if we do not have a strong economy to back it up.
When we ask them practical questions about the most basic details of their dream economy, there is not an answer, because questioning them on it just kills the mood. The Liberals are shooting our country in the foot and asking questions about it later, but it is okay, as there is a buyback program for the proverbial gun anyway. They will happily bring in new restrictions on people’s lives through taxes and new laws, but they do not seem to care as much about making sure that ordinary life can function in their new utopia.
First, they brought in their carbon tax, with no regard for the disproportionate impacts it has on rural areas, like the ones I serve, and the most vulnerable populations, even though their regulatory review admits it. It specifically singles out seniors living on a fixed income, but also single mothers, who are most at risk of experiencing energy poverty. As the carbon tax continues to escalate, The Liberals are looking to pile on the clean fuel standard, which has another carbon pricing mechanism attached to it. These people are only going to feel more and more crushed by the burden of the government's tax-heavy approach.
However, there is no need to worry because they say they are preparing our economy for the future. They promise a boom for industry with electric vehicles and biofuels in Canada. Again, without a plan, it sounds too good to be true.
A couple of days ago in committee, I followed up with the Minister of International Trade on a potential problem under CUSMA. Since coming into force in July of 2020, we have had a window of time to prepare for a requirement to regionally source 75% of lithium for EV batteries with minimal impacts on tariffs. If we are unable to do so there will be a massive increase in tariffs. With or without them, we could easily fall behind in this new industry, which appears to be crucial for the government's direction. What if it does not work out as well as expected?
I asked the minister about it a year ago. She did not seem to know what it was, and with no clear answer since then I decided to bring it up again this week, one year later. I am still not sure if the minister is actually aware of it and it is hard to get anything done if one does not know what one might have to deal with.
When it comes to new mines or resource projects in this area, industry has clearly said that the Liberal government's own impact assessment process is getting in the way and causing delays. The timelines for approval take way too long and it does not have to be this way. Our Canadian economy depends on resource development, the energy industry, specifically oil and gas, as a major contributor for work and wealth, but it is the same Liberal legislation, with an activist environment minister, that would aggressively shut it down while preventing the projects it will need to replace it.
If the Liberals want to keep spending away, where will the money come from? This is not the only way Liberal policies are working at cross-purposes either. Ever since the Liberals first floated their idea of reducing fertilizer emissions by 30%, producers and industry have been deeply concerned that this would follow the European Union's model of restricting the total amount of fertilizer used. It went with a 20% hard-cap reduction on fertilizer usage. This could cause huge losses for crop production.
Following its efforts, I raised this issue multiple times and the government has not ruled it out here in the House of Commons. Last fall, Meyers Norris Penny released a commissioned report on the estimated impact of such a policy in the coming years. By 2030, according to the report, losses of crop yields for corn, canola and spring wheat could total tens of millions of tonnes, costing up to nearly $48 billion to the Canadian economy. For Canadian agriculture, which is already a leading example of environmental efficiency and sustainability, this would be nothing short of devastating.
Considering the estimated number of losses to crops, this would also create new problems for trade exports and disruptions to domestic or global supply chains. Price pressures with reduced supply can easily combine with inflation to make it worse. What makes it even worse yet is this. Part of the Liberals' plan for their new economy for the new future is going to be biofuels. We all know that both corn and canola are the main crops we are going to be growing for biofuels going forward. According to this report, the number of bushels that are going to be produced is going to massively drop and we are not going to be able to meet this demand to fuel the future set out in the Liberals' plan.
Do members know what the government's response continues to be to all of this? It disagrees with the report, which is fair enough, except it has not even done its own impact studies or clearly laid out to farmers and producers what it is going to do. I was glad to hear it is looking at options besides heavily reducing fertilizer, but the main issue I am trying to raise today, and in the past, is that it continues to refuse to rule out the hard cap for the use of fertilizer. This whole time the government could have reassured us by saying it is not going to happen, but here we are again. It will not do it.
The Liberals need to think twice about ruining their own plan for biofuels where there is going to be even more demand for canola. How will it work for our producers who are having a harder time growing it underneath this new regime it is putting in place? The input costs are already through the roof, both for seed, fertilizer and spray. Machinery costs are also through the roof. Somehow I do not think they understand the practical realities and decisions that our farmers have to consider. The government already is not taking the concerns about land used for food versus fuel seriously, but now it wants to play with the idea of restricting fertilizer.
Despite all the uncertainties right now with inflation and supply chains in our economy, Canadians can be sure of at least one thing. The current Liberal government has been and will continue to be a disaster for our economy. It really could be so much better if it would only listen.
Madame la Présidente, je suis honoré de prendre une fois de plus la parole à la Chambre.
Par où devrait-on commencer quand on veut parler de la situation financière du pays sous le gouvernement libéral? Les dépenses sont si nombreuses qu'il est impossible d'en faire le suivi. Quiconque tente de s'y retrouver écope assurément d'un gros mal de tête. Bon nombre de mes collègues conservateurs font de l'excellent travail en examinant les postes de dépenses, en dénonçant les nombreuses incohérences et en expliquant de manière très utile comment on pourrait gérer plus efficacement les finances du Canada de manière à mieux servir l'intérêt des contribuables.
Une chose qu'il vaut la peine de mentionner, en guise d'observation générale, c'est qu'en période difficile, il est en fait plus important, et non moins, de gérer nos finances avec soin et attention. Le gouvernement ne doit pas se comporter comme si les Canadiens lui avaient donné un chèque en blanc. Cela dit, quand il est question de sommes d'argent plus importantes qu'à l'habitude, quand nous sommes facilement distraits par l'actualité et les événements qui nous entourent au pays, il est toujours tentant de se livrer à de folles dépenses et de prendre des décisions impulsives sans penser clairement à l'avenir et aux répercussions de ces décisions.
Tout le monde sait maintenant que nous sommes entrés dans une période d'inflation galopante et de ruptures des chaînes d'approvisionnement. Peut-être les libéraux ont-ils tardé à le reconnaître car ce sont les députés de l'opposition officielle qui les ont mis en garde, mais ils ont fini par admettre qu'il ne s'agissait pas que de « justinflation ».
Dans une certaine mesure, on s'attendait à des problèmes en raison de l'incertitude et des perturbations bien réelles liées à la COVID‑19 et à deux ans de confinements. C'est le type de problème qui touche tous les pays du monde, comme se plait à le rabâcher le gouvernement depuis un certain temps. Cependant, ce n'est pas l'excuse parfaite, comme les libéraux tentent de le faire croire. La vaccination obligatoire des camionneurs qui traversent la frontière, à un moment où les chaînes d'approvisionnement sont fragilisées par la circulation des marchandises, n'est qu'un des derniers exemples de leurs politiques insensées et démesurées. Il nous manque déjà 18 000 camionneurs et la vaccination obligatoire ne fait qu'aggraver le problème. De plus, la rhétorique incendiaire et excessive du premier ministre n'a rien arrangé. Cependant, aujourd'hui, je ne m'attarderai pas plus qu'il ne faut sur l'unité nationale. C'est l'aspect économique de ces problèmes qui est au cœur du débat sur le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis.
En ce qui concerne la gestion de la COVID, les libéraux ont pratiquement normalisé le confinement. Ils se rabattent sur cette carte comme si c'était leur position par défaut. Parfois, ils semblent figés au printemps 2020. Ils font fi des commentaires formulés à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la Chambre sur le soutien à apporter aux provinces, sur l'augmentation des transferts en santé et sur la prise des mesures préventives qu'elles demandent. Les conservateurs ont demandé que les libéraux bonifient les mesures incitatives à l'embauche et au maintien en poste visant respectivement les entreprises et les particuliers. À présent, nous nous retrouvons avec des pénuries de main-d'œuvre qui perdurent dans différents secteurs. Nous ne sommes pas encore sortis du bois.
Même si nous devons nous préparer au pire scénario possible, nous sommes préoccupés de voir le gouvernement, qui n'a jamais su trouver le juste équilibre, annoncer un programme de confinement local. Ce n'est pas comme si le gouvernement était pris au dépourvu par une crise et qu'il cherchait la voie à suivre. Avec les libéraux et leur mise à jour économique, le problème dépasse la COVID. Même avant 2020, nos finances n'étaient pas en bon état en raison de cette même mauvaise gestion du gouvernement. Nous avons commencé dans une position beaucoup plus fragile qu'elle n'aurait dû l'être. Manifestement, les libéraux n'ont rien appris et refusent de corriger le tir.
À titre de député, j'ai eu la chance de siéger à quelques comités au cours des deux dernières années. J'ai vu la même tendance se répéter à chacun d'eux. Le gouvernement multiplie les annonces au sujet de l'économie de demain tout en n'hésitant pas à miner activement les secteurs les plus dynamiques de l'économie d'aujourd'hui. Nous ne pouvons pas continuer à dépenser autant que nous le faisons si nous n'avons pas une économie assez forte pour le faire.
Quand nous posons des questions pratiques aux libéraux au sujet des détails les plus fondamentaux de leur économie de rêve, ils n'ont rien à répondre parce que les interroger à ce sujet gâche l'ambiance. Les libéraux tirent dans le pied du Canada et posent des questions à ce sujet plus tard, mais ce n'est pas grave parce que, de toute façon, il existe un programme de rachat pour la proverbiale arme à feu qu'ils utilisent. Ils seront heureux d'imposer de nouvelles restrictions aux gens en mettant en place des taxes, des impôts et de nouvelles lois, mais ils ne semblent pas se soucier autant de veiller à ce que les citoyens ordinaires puissent évoluer dans leur nouvelle utopie.
Premièrement, les libéraux ont instauré la taxe sur le carbone sans se soucier des répercussions disproportionnées qu'elle a sur les régions rurales, comme celles que je représente, et sur les populations les plus vulnérables, même si c'est ce que confirme leur examen réglementaire. Cette taxe fait particulièrement mal aux aînés à revenu fixe, mais aussi aux mères seules, qui sont les plus susceptibles de souffrir de pauvreté énergétique. Alors que la taxe sur le carbone continue d'augmenter, les libéraux, eux, veulent y ajouter la Norme sur les combustibles propres, qui s'accompagne d'un autre mécanisme de tarification du carbone. Ces personnes se sentiront seulement de plus en plus écrasées par l'approche du gouvernement, qui est fortement axée sur des mesures fiscales.
Cependant, il n'y a pas lieu de s'inquiéter, car ils affirment préparer notre économie pour l'avenir. Ils promettent une forte expansion pour l'industrie des véhicules électriques et des biocarburants au Canada. Comme on l'a dit, l'absence de plan fait que cela semble trop beau pour être vrai.
Il y a deux jours, au cours d'une réunion de comité, j'ai fait un suivi auprès de la ministre du Commerce international concernant un problème potentiel dans le cadre de l'ACEUM. Depuis l'entrée en vigueur de l'accord en juillet 2020, nous avons eu le temps de nous préparer à satisfaire à l'exigence voulant que 75 % du lithium présent dans les batteries des véhicules électriques proviennent de sources régionales pour garantir une incidence minimale sur les droits de douane. Dans le cas contraire, il y aura une hausse massive des droits de douane. Avec ou sans ces droits, nous pourrions facilement prendre du retard dans cette nouvelle industrie, qui semble cruciale pour l'orientation du gouvernement. Qu'arrivera-t-il si cela ne fonctionne pas aussi bien que prévu?
J'ai posé la question à la ministre il y a un an. Elle ne semblait pas savoir de quoi je parlais. Étant donné que je n'avais pas reçu de réponse claire depuis, j'ai décidé d'aborder à nouveau le sujet cette semaine, soit un an plus tard. Je ne suis toujours pas sûr que la ministre soit réellement au courant de ce dossier et il est difficile d'accomplir quoi que ce soit si l'on ne sait pas à quoi s'en tenir.
Sur le plan des nouveaux projets miniers ou d'exploitation des ressources, l'industrie a clairement dit que c'est le processus d'évaluation d'impact du gouvernement libéral qui met des bâtons dans les roues et qui entraîne des retards. Les délais d'approbation sont beaucoup trop longs. Les choses n'ont pas à se passer ainsi. L'économie canadienne dépend de la mise en valeur des ressources et de l'industrie énergétique — en particulier le secteur pétrolier et gazier —, qui sont d'importants créateurs d'emplois et de richesse, mais la loi des libéraux, avec leur ministre de l'Environnement activiste, cherche à réduire tout cela à néant tout en empêchant la réalisation des projets nécessaires pour prendre le relais.
Si les libéraux souhaitent continuer à dépenser sans compter, d'où viendra l'argent? Ce n'est pas le seul exemple de politiques libérales contradictoires. Depuis que les libéraux ont lancé leur idée de réduire les émissions d'engrais de 30 %, les producteurs et l'industrie craignent fort qu'on copie le modèle de l'Union européenne quant à la limitation de la quantité totale d'engrais utilisée. L'Union européenne a en effet imposé une limite ferme à l'utilisation d'engrais avec une réduction de 20 %. Une telle mesure pourrait entraîner une baisse colossale de la production agricole.
Dans la foulée de ces efforts, j'ai soulevé le problème plus d'une fois à la Chambre et le gouvernement n'a pas écarté cette possibilité. À l'automne dernier, le cabinet Meyers Norris Penny a publié un rapport commandé sur les répercussions estimées de l'entrée en vigueur d'une telle politique au cours des prochaines années. Ce rapport indique que les pertes sur le rendement des cultures de maïs, de canola et de blé de printemps pourraient s'élever à des dizaines de millions de tonnes d'ici 2030, et pourrait coûter jusqu'à 48 milliards de dollars à l'économie canadienne. Ce ne serait rien de moins qu'une catastrophe pour l'agriculture canadienne, qui est pourtant déjà un modèle en matière d'efficacité environnementale et de durabilité.
Étant donné l'ampleur des pertes estimées sur le rendement des cultures, de nouveaux problèmes surgiraient sur le plan des exportations ainsi que des perturbations dans les chaînes d'approvisionnement nationales et mondiales. Les pressions exercées sur les prix attribuables à la baisse de l'offre pourraient facilement s'ajouter aux pressions inflationnistes, empirant ainsi la situation, mais il y a pire encore. Le plan des libéraux pour leur nouvelle économie orientée vers l'avenir repose en partie sur les biocarburants. Nous savons tous que le maïs et le canola sont les principales cultures sur lesquelles nous miserons pour ces futurs biocarburants. Selon ce rapport, le nombre de boisseaux produits chutera dramatiquement et nous ne serons pas en mesure de satisfaire à la demande prévue dans le plan des libéraux.
Les députés savent-ils comment le gouvernement réagit à tout cela? Il s'oppose au rapport, ce qui est tout à fait légitime, mais il n'a même pas mené d'études d'impact ni expliqué clairement aux agriculteurs et aux producteurs ce qu'il prévoit faire. J'ai été heureux d'entendre qu'il explorait d'autres options qu'une réduction drastique des engrais, mais l'enjeu sur lequel je souhaite attirer l'attention aujourd'hui, comme je l'ai fait par le passé, c'est qu'il refuse encore de renoncer à l'idée d'établir une limite ferme à l'usage d'engrais. Le gouvernement aurait pu nous rassurer il y a longtemps en nous disant qu'il n'établirait pas une telle limite mais, une fois de plus, il refuse de le faire.
Les libéraux doivent y réfléchir sérieusement avant de compromettre leur propre plan en matière de biocarburants, un plan qui fera grimper la demande de canola. Comment cela pourrait-il fonctionner, alors que les producteurs ont plus de mal à cultiver le canola sous le nouveau régime que le gouvernement met en place? Le coût des intrants est déjà astronomique, qu'il s'agisse de semences, d'engrais ou de pulvérisation. Le coût de la machinerie est aussi astronomique. J'ai l'impression que le gouvernement ne comprend pas la réalité concrète des agriculteurs et les décisions qu'ils doivent envisager de prendre. Le gouvernement ne prend déjà pas au sérieux leurs préoccupations à propos de la distinction entre les terres consacrées à la nourriture et celles qui servent aux carburants, et il jongle maintenant avec l'idée de limiter l'usage d'engrais.
Malgré toutes les incertitudes économiques actuelles liées à l'inflation et aux chaînes d'approvisionnement, les Canadiens peuvent être certains d'une chose: l'actuel gouvernement libéral a été et continuera à être catastrophique pour l'économie. Il pourrait être tellement meilleur si seulement il était à l'écoute.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Chair, I asked in question period the other day whether we could expect, for the first nations-owned lumber mill in my riding, to have the $20 million that have been withheld in tariffs returned to it through this process.
The hon. member speaks of the process and playing it through to the end in an appropriate manner. Can this lumber mill in Saskatchewan that has $20 million tied up, which is not being used for first nations to provide social housing and other benefits to its communities, expect to get its $20 million back, and when it might happen?
Madame la présidente, à la période des questions l'autre jour, j'ai demandé si on pouvait s'attendre à ce que les 20 millions de dollars de droits de douane que la scierie appartenant à des Premières Nations dans ma circonscription a payés et qui sont retenus lui soient remis grâce à ces mécanismes.
Le député dit qu'il existe des mécanismes et qu'il faut y recourir de façon appropriée du début à la fin. Cette scierie en Saskatchewan, qui se trouve à avoir 20 millions de dollars immobilisés — des fonds qui ne sont pas utilisés par les Premières Nations pour fournir des logements sociaux et d'autres programmes à la communauté —, peut-elle s'attendre à récupérer cet argent? Dans l'affirmative, à quel moment?
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Chair, I will be splitting my time tonight with the member for Kenora.
As this is the first time I have risen in this 44th Parliament, I would like to take a minute to thank the constituents of Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River for re-electing me and sending me back to Ottawa to be their representative. It is a privilege and a responsibility that I do not take for granted. I would also like to thank my entire team for their time, their effort and their professionalism during the campaign. Without an awesome team, none of this is possible.
Last, I would like to thank my family, and especially my wife Lori, for continued support on this journey. For many of us, I know the support of our spouses makes it possible for us to do this important job.
The debate tonight has a direct impact and far-reaching consequences for the people of Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River. The forest industry in northern Saskatchewan is an economic driver that provides direct and indirect employment to approximately 8,000 people. Forest product sales are worth over $1 billion every year, and 30% of the timber supply in northern Saskatchewan is allocated to indigenous businesses. This is the highest of any province in Canada, and indigenous people make up roughly 30% of the forestry workforce, which again is the highest of any province in the country.
These stats only look at the current situation. With long-term growth in the sector having the potential to generate over $2 billion in annual sales and well over 12,000 jobs, this vital renewable resource industry is in a growth phase and is proving to have the ability to bring Saskatchewan residents together to solve many of the socio-economic problems in our communities.
Just yesterday, there was a major announcement made between Paper Excellence, the company that is restarting the pulp mill north of Prince Albert, and One Sky Forest Products, which is building a new oriented strand board mill. These two companies are moving together on a co-location partnership. They are sharing log storage areas and existing infrastructure, including electrical, natural gas and rail lines. The shared purpose in this collaboration should be celebrated as an example of navigating problems through mutual coordination and respectful dialogue. This is something that the Liberal government could learn in its dealings with the United States administration.
The development of these large forest-product manufacturing facilities is one of the many reasons why northern Saskatchewan, in September, was in the top 10 across the entire country for job growth. It is a statistic worth emphasizing. I point out that when the government, in this case the provincial Government of Saskatchewan, creates the framework for economic opportunity for all, it is the people who win.
Speaking of opportunity for all, I want to highlight a unique company in my riding. NorSask Forest Products is the largest 100% first nations owned and operated sawmill in Canada. As I stated recently in question period, NorSask currently has paid around $20 million in tariffs. The announcement of softwood lumber tariffs doubling will add to the damage that is being caused by these punitive actions. NorSask's profits are shared among the nine first nations of the Meadow Lake Tribal Council. These communities now have to deal with the shortfall in revenue. This means millions of dollars not being utilized for education, for health care including mental health and addictions programs, for housing, for youth and elder activities, etc.
This is not just an economic and international failure, it is another failure in reconciliation. First nations communities that have worked tirelessly to provide jobs for their people and created own-source revenues to help invest in the social issues they are facing deserve a federal government that works equally as hard at fighting for them to get back what is rightfully theirs.
In conclusion, as was so aptly described by the member for Abbotsford earlier tonight, from 2006 to 2015 under the leadership of Prime Minister Harper and presidents Bush and Obama, Canada and the United States had a softwood lumber agreement. Since being elected in 2015, the current government has seen three different U.S. administrations, and still we have no deal.
As the Minister of International Trade, Export Promotion, Small Business and Economic Development is leading a delegation to Washington today, I implore her, on behalf of the residents of Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River not to come home empty-handed. The people of northern Saskatchewan deserve better. Canadians deserve better.
Madame la présidente, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Kenora.
À l'occasion de ma première intervention depuis le début de cette 44e législature, je tiens à prendre un moment pour remercier les résidants de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill, qui m'ont réélu pour que je les représente de nouveau à Ottawa. C'est un privilège et une responsabilité que je ne tiens pas pour acquis. Je remercie aussi tous les membres de mon équipe pour leur professionnalisme et pour tout le temps et les efforts qu'ils ont consacrés à la campagne. Sans cette équipe extraordinaire, rien de tout cela n'aurait été possible.
Finalement, je souhaite remercier ma famille, particulièrement mon épouse, Lori, qui continue de me soutenir pendant cette aventure. Je sais que, pour de nombreux députés, le soutien de notre conjoint ou conjointe est ce qui nous permet d'accomplir la tâche importante qui nous incombe.
L'enjeu dont nous débattons ce soir a des conséquences importantes et un effet direct sur les gens de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill. L'industrie forestière du Nord de la Saskatchewan est un moteur économique qui fournit de l'emploi, directement et indirectement, à environ 8 000 personnes. La valeur des ventes de produits forestiers dépasse 1 milliard de dollars par année. Par ailleurs, 30 % de l'approvisionnement en bois dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan est alloué aux entreprises autochtones, le pourcentage le plus élevé parmi toutes les provinces du pays. Ajoutons que les Autochtones représentent environ 30 % de la main-d'œuvre du secteur forestier, ce qui est aussi le pourcentage le plus élevé parmi toutes les provinces du pays.
Ces statistiques portent seulement sur la situation actuelle. À long terme, le secteur pourrait croître et générer plus de 2 milliards de dollars en ventes annuelles et bien au-delà de 12 000 emplois. Cette industrie vitale des ressources renouvelables, qui est en phase de croissance, montre qu'elle pourrait amener les résidants de la Saskatchewan à travailler de concert pour résoudre de nombreux problèmes socioéconomiques dans leurs collectivités.
Pas plus tard qu'hier, Paper Excellence, la compagnie qui est en train de remettre en marche l'usine de pâte à papier au nord de Prince Albert, et One Sky Forest Products, qui est à construire une nouvelle usine de panneaux de lamelles orientées, ont fait ensemble une annonce majeure. Ces deux compagnies ont noué un partenariat de colocation. Elles partagent des aires d'entreposage de billes et l'infrastructure existante, y compris les lignes électriques, les canalisations de gaz naturel et les voies ferrées. L'objectif commun de cette collaboration devrait être célébré comme un exemple de résolution de problèmes par la coordination et un dialogue empreint de respect. C'est là une leçon que le gouvernement libéral pourrait appliquer dans ses pourparlers avec l'administration américaine.
La mise sur pied de ces grandes usines de produits forestiers est l'une des nombreuses raisons qui expliquent qu'en septembre, le Nord de la Saskatchewan se classait parmi les dix régions du pays affichant la plus forte croissance en matière d'emploi. Cette statistique mérite d'être soulignée. Je signale que lorsque le gouvernement — dans ce cas-ci, le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan — crée un cadre pour offrir à tous des perspectives économiques, ce sont les gens qui y gagnent.
Puisqu'on parle de perspectives économiques offertes à tous, je tiens à parler d'une entreprise unique de ma circonscription. NorSask Forest Products est la plus grande scierie du Canada dont les propriétaires et les exploitants sont tous des membres de Premières Nations. Comme je l'ai dit récemment pendant la période des questions, jusqu'à maintenant, NorSask a payé environ 20 millions de dollars en droits de douane. Maintenant qu'on a annoncé que les droits de douane sur le bois d'œuvre vont doubler, les dommages causés par ces mesures punitives seront encore plus importants. Les profits de NorSask sont partagés entre les neuf nations autochtones du Conseil tribal de Meadow Lake. Ces communautés devront maintenant faire face à une baisse de revenus. Il y aura donc des millions de dollars de moins pour l'éducation, les soins de santé, y compris en santé mentale, pour les programmes destinés aux toxicomanes, pour le logement, pour les activités destinées aux jeunes et aux aînés, et cetera.
C'est non seulement un échec pour l'économie et les échanges internationaux, mais aussi un échec de plus sur le plan de la réconciliation. Les communautés des Premières Nations qui ont travaillé sans relâche pour fournir des emplois aux gens de leur communauté et qui ont créé leurs propres sources de revenus pour investir dans des solutions aux problèmes sociaux auxquels ils doivent faire face méritent que le gouvernement fédéral travaille tout aussi fort pour les défendre afin qu'ils récupèrent ce qui leur est dû.
En conclusion, comme le député d'Abbotsford l'a bien expliqué plus tôt ce soir, de 2006 à 2015, lorsque le premier ministre Harper et les présidents Bush et Obama étaient au pouvoir, il y avait un accord sur le bois d'œuvre entre le Canada et les États‑Unis. Depuis l'élection de l'actuel gouvernement, en 2015, trois administrations américaines se sont succédé, et il n'y a toujours pas d'accord.
Puisque la ministre du Commerce international, de la Promotion des exportations, de la Petite Entreprise et du Développement économique dirige une délégation à Washington aujourd'hui, je l'implore, au nom des résidants de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill, de ne pas revenir bredouille. Les gens du Nord de la Saskatchewan méritent mieux. Les Canadiens méritent mieux.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Chair, I actually have the press release from September 12, 2006, on that announced agreement, and that press release talks about the $4.3 billion that was to be returned to the importers of record at the time. One of those importers of record was NorSask Forest Products in northern Saskatchewan. I can tell members from a meeting I had with the company in the last couple of weeks that it remembers very clearly the return of its share of that $4.3 billion.
In the last two years that I have been raising this issue, the amount of tariffs that have been held from one first nations-owned company in northern Saskatchewan has increased from $14 billion to $20 billion. They do not have an eternity to solve this issue.
Madame la présidente, en fait, j'ai entre les mains le communiqué du 12 septembre 2006 sur cette entente. On peut y lire que, à l'époque, 4,3 milliards de dollars allaient être remboursés aux importateurs attitrés. NorSask Forest Products, située dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan, faisait partie de ces importateurs. J'ai rencontré l'entreprise dans les dernières semaines, et je peux dire aux députés qu'elle se souvient très bien d'avoir reçu sa part des 4,3 milliards de dollars.
Je soulève cette question depuis maintenant deux ans et au cours de cette période, le montant retenu en droits de douane d'une entreprise appartenant à des Premières Nations dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan est passé de 14 milliards de dollars à 20 milliards de dollars. Cette entreprise ne peut pas attendre indéfiniment que le problème soit réglé.
Collapse
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2021-11-30 14:45
Expand
Mr. Speaker, U.S. trade representative Tai has been waiting since May to start negotiations on softwood lumber. Yesterday, the Minister of International Trade stated in the House that the softwood lumber industry will provide her with a mandate on negotiating with the United States.
U.S. tariffs on softwood have been in place since 2015. It has been six years. Please do not tell me the minister does not yet know what the industry wants.
Monsieur le Président, la représentante américaine au Commerce, Katherine Tai, attend le début des négociations sur le bois d'œuvre depuis le mois de mai. Hier, la ministre du Commerce international a déclaré à la Chambre que l'industrie du bois d'œuvre lui donnera un mandat pour négocier avec les États‑Unis.
Les droits de douane américains sur le bois d'œuvre sont en place depuis 2015, donc depuis six ans. Qu'on ne me dise pas que la ministre ne sait pas encore ce que veut l'industrie.
Collapse
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2021-11-29 14:54
Expand
Mr. Speaker, during question period last week, the hon. Minister of International Trade told the House that she raised the issue of softwood lumber with the U.S. trade representative. As we have heard previously in questions, the response from the USTR is quite different. Regardless, it sounds like Ambassador Tai is ready to negotiate.
Therefore, could the minister tell us how many actual negotiations, not photo ops, on softwood lumber have taken place since Ambassador Tai's statement in May?
Monsieur le Président, la semaine dernière, durant la période des questions, la ministre du Commerce international a indiqué à la Chambre qu'elle avait abordé la question du bois d'œuvre avec la représentante américaine au commerce. Comme nous l'avons entendu précédemment durant la période des questions, le point de vue de la représentante américaine au commerce s'avère très différent. Quoi qu'il en soit, il semble que l'ambassadrice Tai soit disposée à négocier.
En conséquence, la ministre peut-elle nous dire combien de véritables séances de négociation sur le bois d'œuvre — autres que des séances de photos — ont eu lieu depuis la déclaration de l'ambassadrice Tai en mai?
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, with the announcement of softwood lumber tariffs doubling, we see again how this government is failing indigenous people. NorSask Forest Products, a 100% first nations-owned company in my riding, has millions of dollars held in tariffs. The government's failure to negotiate a softwood lumber agreement is costing the nine ownership nations the ability to invest in their communities.
I have been asking this question for two years, but I will ask again: Can the minister tell the leaders of these nations when they will get their money back and when these punitive softwood lumber tariffs will finally end?
Monsieur le Président, comme on vient d'apprendre que les droits sur le bois d'œuvre doubleront, on constate encore une fois que le gouvernement manque à son devoir envers les peuples autochtones. NorSask Forest Products, une entreprise appartenant à part entière à des Premières Nations, a des millions de dollars retenus en droits de douane. Étant donné que le gouvernement n'a pas réussi à négocier un accord sur le bois d'œuvre, neuf nations propriétaires d'entreprises perdent la capacité d'investir dans leurs communautés.
Je pose la question depuis deux ans, et je vais la poser de nouveau: la ministre peut-elle dire aux dirigeants des nations concernées quand celles-ci récupéreront leur argent et quand les droits punitifs sur le bois d'œuvre seront levés?
Collapse
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2021-11-25 14:45
Expand
Mr. Speaker, this government has a history of making promises to Canadians and not following through. An example of this behaviour happened last week when the Prime Minister travelled to Washington. If the Prime Minister did mention softwood lumber in his meeting with President Biden, it is obvious the President does not care what the Prime Minister has to say.
Following the Prime Minister's trip to the U.S., the U.S. commerce department doubled duties on Canadian softwood lumber. This is devastating to the industry. Why did the Prime Minister not use his one-on-one time with President Biden to resolve this dispute?
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement a l'habitude de faire aux Canadiens des promesses qu'il ne tient pas. Nous en avons vu un exemple la semaine dernière, lorsque le premier ministre s'est rendu à Washington. Si le premier ministre a effectivement abordé le sujet du bois d'œuvre au cours de sa rencontre avec le président Biden, il est évident que ce dernier ne se soucie guère de ce que dit le premier ministre.
Au lendemain de la visite du premier ministre aux États-Unis, le département américain du Commerce a doublé les droits perçus sur le bois d'œuvre canadien. C'est une nouvelle désastreuse pour l'industrie. Pourquoi le premier ministre n'a-t-il pas profité de sa rencontre en tête-à-tête avec le président Biden pour régler ce différend?
Collapse
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2021-11-25 14:47
Expand
Mr. Speaker, these actions by the United States are a serious threat to Canadian jobs and the Canadian economic recovery after the pandemic. These unfair duties hurt Canadian businesses and workers.
The government must take a clear and strong stand with the Biden administration to defend Canadian workers and the Canadian industry. Softwood workers want to know what the Prime Minister's plan is to end this dispute. What is his plan to end this dispute?
Monsieur le Président, les mesures prises par les États‑Unis menacent sérieusement les emplois canadiens et la relance économique du Canada après la pandémie. Ces droits de douane injustes nuisent aux entreprises et aux travailleurs canadiens.
Le gouvernement doit adopter une position forte et claire face à l'administration Biden pour défendre l'industrie et les travailleurs canadiens. Les travailleurs du secteur du bois d'œuvre veulent savoir quel est le plan du premier ministre pour mettre fin à ce conflit. Quel est son plan pour mettre fin à ce conflit?
Collapse
Results: 1 - 14 of 14

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data