Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 49
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-06-20 14:13 [p.6962]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we are down to the last week for the government to attempt to ram through legislation through the final session since the last unnecessary election in the fall.
There remain more questions than answers about Bill C-11. Is user-generated content covered under the act or not? Does the wording of the bill allow for platforms to censor or not? With the government bulldozing through fulsome debate on this legislation, it appears that these questions will remain unanswered.
The irony of stifling the freedom to speak in the House on the very bill that has the greatest consequences of freedom of speech in our country's history cannot be understated. Whether it is of the heritage minister, the public safety minister, the emergency preparedness minister or the Prime Minister, this bill is another example of the government's disdain for the rights and freedoms of all Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, il ne reste plus qu’une semaine au gouvernement pour tenter de faire adopter à toute vapeur des mesures législatives dans le cadre de la dernière session depuis les dernières élections inutiles de l’automne.
Il reste plus de questions que de réponses au sujet du projet de loi C-11. Le contenu généré par l’utilisateur est-il couvert par la loi ou non? Le libellé du projet de loi permet-il aux plateformes de censurer ou non? Le gouvernement ayant tué dans l'œuf toute possibilité de débat approfondi sur la loi, il semble que ces questions demeureront sans réponse.
On ne peut que souligner à quel point il est paradoxal que le gouvernement restreigne la liberté de parole à la Chambre au sujet d'un projet de loi qui, justement, est susceptible d'avoir les conséquences les plus importantes sur la liberté de parole dans l’histoire de notre pays. Que l’on parle du ministre du Patrimoine, du ministre de la Sécurité publique, du ministre de la Protection civile ou du premier ministre, le gouvernement n'a que du mépris pour les droits et libertés de tous les Canadiens, et ce projet de loi n'en est qu'un autre exemple.
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-06-13 12:17 [p.6569]
Expand
Madam Speaker, this afternoon the minister is trying to defend the indefensible from coast to coast. Bill C-11 is a disaster, as was Bill C-10, and it is being shut down once again. We had 20 written submissions handed to us last Wednesday at committee from people who wanted to come to committee. The member talks about LGBTQ and indigenous issues. We have not heard from APTN, which was one of the guests the NDP wanted to bring to the committee. It has yet to come to talk to us.
This is a disaster waiting to happen. Why do the Liberals want to shut the bill down in the House of Commons, do nothing over the summer and hand it over to the Senate? We have time to bring other issues forward. Proposed subsection 4.1(2) has always been an issue. It was an issue a year ago when we debated Bill C-10 in the House, which they rammed through and then called the unnecessary election. This is the same situation we are seeing today with Bill C-11.
Madame la Présidente, cet après-midi, le ministre tente de défendre une mesure indéfendable d'un océan à l'autre. Le projet de loi C‑11 est un désastre, tout comme le projet de loi C‑10, et son étude est interrompue une fois de plus. Mercredi dernier, le comité a reçu 20 mémoires de gens qui voulaient venir témoigner. Le député parle d'enjeux concernant la communauté LGBTQ et les Autochtones. Nous n'avons pas encore entendu le témoignage d'APTN, l'un des témoins que le NPD souhaitait faire comparaître devant le comité. Nous n'avons pas encore entendu ce témoin.
On court au désastre. Pourquoi les libéraux souhaitent-ils mettre un terme à l'étude du projet de loi à la Chambre des communes, ne rien faire pendant l'été, puis le renvoyer au Sénat? Nous avons le temps d'examiner d'autres points problématiques. Le paragraphe 4.1(2) a toujours posé problème. Il posait problème il y a un an, lorsque nous débattions du projet de loi C‑10 à la Chambre, alors que le gouvernement tentait de le faire adopter à toute vitesse avant de déclencher des élections inutiles. Nous nous trouvons maintenant dans une situation semblable avec le projet de loi C‑11.
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-06-13 17:11 [p.6612]
Expand
Madam Speaker, before I get under way here this afternoon, I just wish to tell everyone that I am going to split my time with the member for Langley—Aldergrove. We get the good 10 minutes at the later part of the speeches, so I will set him up for it.
I am very thankful to speak to the bill today, Bill C-11. It is the programming motion regarding the online streaming act: the successor to, or should I say the copy of, Bill C-10, which we debated here in the House of Commons. Let us step back. We really did not have any debates last June on Bill C-10. It was pushed through the House with no amendments to it.
I am really desperate on this one because I thought the government learned last June about Bill C-10 and the flaws that we moved forward now on Bill C-11. As most remember, the Liberals tried the same tactics here in the House with the deeply flawed Bill C-10. It was wrong and undemocratic then. Nothing has changed. It is still wrong and mostly undemocratic now. The Senate is not even going to deal with the bill. To say that we need to pass it in the House today is ridiculous because the Senate, at best, will not see the bill until October.
Bill C-10 drew much controversy in the previous Parliament, and I talked about that, due to the proposed infringements on free expression, and massive granting of powers to the CRTC. I have talked for over a year and a half on the CRTC, and I will have more to say on that body and the potential to open up the Internet to broader regulations in a moment, among other serious concerns that I have.
Bill C-11 is the same flawed Liberal bill that could have potentially disastrous consequences for Canadian content creators, and most importantly for consumers. Conservatives said then that Bill C-10 needed more study, and we continue to say that today with this bill, Bill C-11.
As a former broadcaster, members can believe that I completely understand how desperately the Broadcasting Act needs to be upgraded. It has been 31 years since we started. The act is indeed badly outdated. It does not address the realities of modern broadcasting and content creation, and Canadian broadcasters and creators today are struggling because of that.
We absolutely need to put foreign streaming services and Canadian broadcasters on a level playing field, whatever that looks like. However, the solution, I feel, is not simply to force new realities into this old and outdated structure, or to have the CRTC regulate to its heart's desire.
The CRTC is in charge of broadcasting. Seventeen months later, it still has not updated the licence of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. It has been 17 months, and we have heard nothing. That is the CRTC's responsibility today: local licensing. We have heard nothing from chairman Ian Scott on CBC, saying, “We are busy. We are going through it.”
Seventeen months later, the public broadcaster still does not have a licence, because the CRTC is looking at it. I do not have to tell everyone in the House, all 338 of us, that we desperately want a three-digit suicide line. As of the month of June the request is a year old. We still have not got it. Why? It is because of the CRTC.
Do we see where I am going on this? It is not capable today of doing anything. As for its chairman, Ian Scott, his five-year term is up and he is leaving in September. We are going to have a new chair. He or she will get a five-year term and they will have to be re-educated on what the CRTC actually delivers to the citizens of the country.
Regulating the Internet, the Pandora's box that is being opened up in this legislation, is also simply not in the best interests of Canadians. We need to make sure that we are protecting the fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadians. Ensuring those protections cannot start by regulating the Internet and restricting the free speech that we have in the country today.
These are issues that need further study at committee. There are dozens of important witnesses that still wish to be heard. As for one of those witnesses, it is kind of interesting to listen to everyone talking about indigenous voices, because we have not heard from the indigenous peoples television network, APTN. We have not heard from it.
The Aboriginal Peoples Television Network has not come to committee to speak about what Bill C-11 would do for that network, which was started years ago because the public broadcaster did little with indigenous programming. That is why APTN started: it heard voices. In fact, I was at an event on Saturday in Saskatoon, and the Filipino community is asking about Bill C-11. The Filipino community does a half-hour televised tape show in Saskatoon on cable, and they have asked about whether they can continue if this bill passes. I had no answers for them.
This is the diversity we are hearing in our country that Bill C-11 has not answered in committee. We have not had a chance to even slice through the first level of onion to get to this bill, and now the Liberal government, as it did last year with Bill C-10, is pushing it through the House, but this time there is no excuse for it. The Senate will not even look at this bill until maybe late in September or early in October. We have all summer to deal with Bill C-11.
I remember when the government came into power, and we all remember when it came into power in 2015. It promised sunny ways and made a commitment not to use closure and time allocation as the Conservatives did in the previous government. They have forgotten that in six and a half short years. All I have heard is “Harper this,” and “Harper that”. Now, I am going to suggest that it is the member for Papineau who is shutting everything down in the House of Commons.
Now, whenever there is the slickest push-back against the Liberals' agenda, they go straight to time allocation and, today, the programming motion. I participated in the study on Bill C-10 in the previous Parliament, when the government passed a similar programming motion. Several legal and industry experts came before the committee and raised concerns about the legislation. They were the same concerns from 2021 that have come in 2022. As legislators, have we looked at this bill and said we have done the best we can with it? That is our job. We 338 are elected to get the best bills coming out of the House. Have we done that? We have not done that at all, and the Liberals agree with that, yet they are moving forward today.
Tomorrow we will have a full day, going through from noon to nine o'clock, with amendments, then we will push the amendments through from nine until midnight without a word we can say or object to. We proposed further witnesses and debate in the last Parliament, and Canadians deserve better on this bill. The government, however, is clearly sick of hearing about the problems with the legislation. We have gone through two heritage ministers already, and probably will a third when we come back in the fall, and shut down Bill C-11. Thankfully, Bill C-10 did not complete the legislative process because of a useless election. What is it going to be this summer?
Now, the chamber has a second chance to get this bill, Bill C-11, right. This time we have the opportunity, as members of Parliament, to give Canadians what they want out of this bill, Bill C-11.
First of all, despite claims to the contrary by the minister, Bill C-11 absolutely would leave the door open to the CRTC regulating user-generated content online. In other words, the CRTC could still, under Bill C-11, decide what Canadians can and cannot see. These powers pose a clear threat for free expression in this country, which is the most fundamental right in a democratic country. Under Bill C-11, the CRTC could regulate away free expression online.
Second is the fact that the powers the bill grants to the CRTC are so broad and wide-ranging that they empower the commission to essentially regulate any content in a manner it sees fit, and I have talked enough about the CRTC, but that second bullet should be a concern to everyone in the House of Commons.
What will happen to the foreign services that are small players in this Canadian market? Where did the Canadian market go? In a small part of the user base, we have new regulations and requirements that we can thrust upon them.
Third, the government is asking us to vote on legislation that we do not have all the pieces to. The government says it will address the problems through ministerial order, but it has not shown us what the orders will be. Bill C-11 is a flawed bill.
Madame la Présidente, avant de commencer, je veux simplement dire à tout le monde que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Langley—Aldergrove. Les 10 bonnes minutes sont à la fin des discours, alors je vais lui préparer le terrain.
Je suis très reconnaissant de parler du projet de loi C‑11 aujourd'hui. Il s'agit de la motion de programmation concernant la Loi sur la diffusion continue en ligne, le successeur, ou devrais-je dire la copie du projet de loi C‑10, dont nous avons débattu ici à la Chambre des communes. Prenons un peu de recul. Nous n'avons pas vraiment eu de débat en juin dernier sur le projet de loi C‑10. Il a été adopté par la Chambre sans aucun amendement.
Je suis vraiment désespéré sur ce point parce que je pensais que le gouvernement avait appris en juin dernier du projet de loi C‑10 et des lacunes que nous avons soulevées par rapport au projet de loi C‑11. La plupart des députés s'en souviendront, les libéraux ont tenté la même tactique ici à la Chambre avec le projet de loi C‑10, qui comportait de graves lacunes. Il était répréhensible et antidémocratique à l'époque, et rien n'a changé: il est encore répréhensible et surtout antidémocratique maintenant. Le Sénat ne va même pas étudier le projet de loi. Il est ridicule de dire que nous devons l'adopter à la Chambre aujourd'hui, car le Sénat, au mieux, ne verra pas le projet de loi avant octobre.
Le projet de loi C‑10 avait soulevé une vive controverse lors de la législature précédente — et je m'étais exprimé à ce sujet — en raison de ce qu'il proposait, notamment des atteintes à la liberté d'expression et l'attribution de pouvoirs considérables au CRTC. Cela fait plus d'une année et demie que je parle du CRTC, et je reviendrai dans quelques instants sur cette entité et le potentiel d'élargir la réglementation sur Internet, pour ne nommer que quelques-unes de mes grandes préoccupations dans ce dossier.
Le projet de loi C‑11 est le même projet de loi libéral bancal qui risque d'avoir des conséquences désastreuses non seulement pour les créateurs de contenu canadiens, mais surtout pour les consommateurs. Les conservateurs estimaient que le projet de loi C‑10 devait faire l'objet d'une étude plus approfondie, et notre opinion est la même pour le projet de loi actuel, le projet de loi C‑11.
En raison de ma carrière à la télévision, les députés peuvent comprendre à quel point je suis convaincu que la Loi sur la radiodiffusion doit être actualisée. Cette loi, qui est entrée en vigueur il y a 31 ans, est totalement désuète. Elle ne tient pas compte de la réalité moderne de la radiodiffusion et de la création de contenu. C'est pour cela que les radiodiffuseurs et les créateurs de contenu canadiens éprouvent aujourd'hui des difficultés.
Nous devons absolument uniformiser les règles du jeu pour les services étrangers de diffusion continue et les radiodiffuseurs canadiens, peu importe la forme que cela prendra. Cependant, je pense que la solution ne consiste pas simplement à faire entrer de force les nouvelles réalités dans cette structure législative vieille et désuète ni à donner toute la latitude voulue au CRTC pour légiférer.
Le secteur de la radiodiffusion relève du CRTC. Dix-sept mois ont passé, et le CRTC n'a toujours pas mis à jour la licence de CBC/Radio-Canada. Dix-sept mois plus tard, nous ne savons pas où en est ce dossier. Le CRTC a actuellement pour responsabilité de s'occuper des licences locales. Nous n'avons pas de nouvelles de la part du président du CRTC, Ian Scott, à propos de CBC/Radio-Canada. Il dit simplement que les gens du CRTC sont occupés et qu'ils s'occupent du dossier.
Bref, 17 mois plus tard, le diffuseur public n'a toujours pas de licence parce que le CRTC est en train de s'occuper du dossier. Par ailleurs, je n'ai pas besoin de rappeler à tout le monde à la Chambre, aux 338 députés, que nous avons désespérément besoin d'une ligne à trois chiffres pour la prévention du suicide. Cette demande a été faite il y a un an, en juin 2021, et la ligne n'existe toujours pas. Pourquoi? C'est à cause du CRTC.
Les députés voient-ils le thème qui se dessine? À l'heure actuelle, le CRTC est incapable d'accomplir quoi que ce soit. Quant à son président, Ian Scott, son mandat de cinq ans achève et il quittera son poste en septembre. Il y aura un nouveau président. Il ou elle aura un mandat de cinq ans et il faudra l'informer de ce que le CRTC fait pour les citoyens du pays.
La réglementation d'Internet, cette boîte de Pandore que le projet de loi à l'étude vient ouvrir, ne sert vraiment pas les intérêts des Canadiens. Nous devons faire le nécessaire pour protéger les droits et libertés fondamentaux des Canadiens. Nous ne pouvons donc pas, d'emblée, réglementer Internet et restreindre la liberté de parole qui existe actuellement au Canada.
Voilà les enjeux que le comité devra examiner de plus près. Des dizaines de témoins souhaitent encore être entendus. Ainsi, je trouve plutôt intéressant que tout le monde parle des voix autochtones, car le comité n'a pas encore entendu le réseau de télévision des peuples autochtones, APTN. Nous n'avons pas entendu son témoignage.
Les représentants de l'Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, l'APTN, n'ont pas encore comparu devant le comité pour parler des répercussions qu'aura le projet de loi C‑11 sur ce réseau de télévision qui a été lancé il y a de nombreuses années parce que le radiodiffuseur public ne diffusait que très peu de programmation autochtone. Voilà pourquoi on a lancé l'APTN: des gens l'ont réclamé. En fait, j'ai assisté à un événement samedi, à Saskatoon, où la communauté philippine m'a interrogé au sujet du projet de loi C‑11. Cette communauté diffuse une émission préenregistrée d'une demi-heure aux abonnés du câble à Saskatoon, et elle a demandé si elle pourra continuer de le faire si le projet de loi est adopté. Je n'avais pas de réponse à offrir.
Voilà la diversité des intervenants partout au pays qui nous interrogent au sujet du projet de loi C‑11 et pour qui le comité n'a pas obtenu de réponses. Nous n'avons même pas commencé à effleurer la surface du projet de loi, et voilà que le gouvernement libéral essaie de le faire adopter à toute vitesse, tout comme il l'avait fait l'année dernière avec le projet de loi C‑10, mais, cette fois-ci, rien ne le justifie. Le Sénat n'aura même pas l'occasion de l'étudier avant septembre ou le début d'octobre. Nous disposons de tout l'été pour étudier le projet de loi C‑11.
Je me souviens de l’année où le gouvernement est arrivé au pouvoir; nous nous en souvenons tous, c'était en 2015. Il a promis des voies ensoleillées et il a promis de ne pas recourir à la clôture et à l’attribution de temps comme les conservateurs le faisaient sous l’ancien gouvernement. Ils ont oublié tout cela en l’espace en six ans et demi seulement. Tout ce que j’ai entendu, c’est « Harper ceci » et « Harper cela ». Maintenant, je pense bien que c’est le député de Papineauqui met fin à tous les débats à la Chambre des communes.
Maintenant, chaque fois qu’il y a un tant soit peu de résistance contre le programme des libéraux, ils invoquent immédiatement l’attribution de temps et, aujourd’hui, une motion de programmation. J’ai participé à l’étude du projet de loi C-10 lors de la dernière législature, quand le gouvernement a adopté une motion de programmation semblable. Plusieurs experts juridiques et de l’industrie avaient comparu devant le comité et avaient soulevé des préoccupations au sujet du projet de loi. Les préoccupations de 2021 ont été réentendues en 2022. En tant que législateurs, avons-nous examiné ce projet de loi, et pouvons-nous affirmer que nous avons fait de notre mieux? C’est notre travail. Nous sommes 338 à avoir été élus pour que la Chambre produise les meilleurs projets de loi possible. Est-ce que nous accomplissons notre devoir? Pas du tout, et les libéraux le savent, mais ils vont de l’avant avec cette mesure législative.
Nous aurons une journée chargée demain. Nous examinerons des amendements de midi à 21 heures, puis ils feront l'objet d'un vote 21 heures à minuit sans que nous puissions dire quoi que ce soit ou nous y opposer. Nous avons proposé d'entendre d'autres témoins et de tenir d'autres débats lors de la dernière législature. Les Canadiens méritent mieux pour ce projet de loi. Cependant, le gouvernement en a manifestement assez d'entendre parler des problèmes dans le projet de loi. Nous avons déjà changé deux fois de ministres du Patrimoine, une situation qui se répétera probablement une troisième fois à notre retour à l'automne, quand nous mettrons un terme au projet de loi C‑11. Heureusement, le projet de loi C‑10 n'a pas franchi toutes les étapes du processus législatif à cause d'une élection inutile. Que va-t-il se passer cet été?
Ceci dit, avec le projet de loi C‑11, la Chambre a une seconde chance de parvenir à un bon projet de loi. Cette fois-ci, nous avons l'occasion, en tant que députés, de donner aux Canadiens ce qu'ils veulent du projet de loi C‑11.
Premièrement, bien que le ministre prétende le contraire, le projet de loi C‑11 laisserait certainement la porte ouverte à une réglementation par le CRTC du contenu généré par les utilisateurs en ligne. Autrement dit, en vertu du projet de loi C‑11, le CRTC pourrait encore décider ce que les Canadiens peuvent ou ne peuvent pas voir. Ces pouvoirs constituent une menace flagrante à la liberté d'expression au Canada, qui est le droit le plus fondamental dans un pays démocratique. En vertu du projet de loi C‑11, le CRTC pourrait réglementer la liberté d'expression en ligne.
Deuxièmement, les pouvoirs que le projet de loi accorde au CRTC sont si vastes qu'ils lui permettent essentiellement de réglementer n'importe quel contenu comme bon lui semble. J'ai suffisamment parlé du CRTC, mais ce deuxième point devrait préoccuper tous les députés de la Chambre des communes.
Qu'arrivera-t-il aux services étrangers qui sont de petits joueurs sur le marché canadien? Qu'est-il advenu du marché canadien? Nous pouvons imposer de nouveaux règlements et de nouvelles exigences à une petite partie des utilisateurs.
Troisièmement, le gouvernement nous demande de voter sur un projet de loi incomplet. Le gouvernement dit qu'il va régler les problèmes par arrêté ministériel, mais il n'a pas indiqué quels seront ces arrêtés. Le projet de loi C‑11 est un projet de loi imparfait.
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-06-13 17:22 [p.6613]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it is interesting about the CRTC. I asked a question of Bell, the owners of CTV. I asked how much it pays for American programming, because every night on television from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. there is American programming and very little Canadian content. It did not answer how much it spent on American content, although it said that when it goes to Hollywood to bid on programming in the fall, it is being challenged now by Netflix, Amazon and others. How could it be challenged in the United States by these streamers when we, all along, have gone there, filled our American basket and brought things up to Canada to produce no Canadian content?
Madame la Présidente, le commentaire au sujet du CRTC est intéressant. J'ai posé une question à la société Bell, propriétaire de CTV. J'ai demandé combien elle paie pour les émissions américaines, parce que tous les soirs, de 19 heures à 23 heures, cette chaîne présente des émissions américaines et très peu de contenu canadien. Bell n'a pas dit combien elle dépense pour du contenu américain, mais elle a dit que lorsqu'elle va à Hollywood, à l'automne, pour faire l'acquisition d'émissions américaines, elle est en concurrence notamment avec Netflix et Amazon. Comment Bell peut-elle être en concurrence aux États-Unis avec ces diffuseurs en ligne alors que depuis toujours les diffuseurs canadiens vont là-bas pour acheter des émissions américaines qu'ils rapportent au Canada sans contribuer au contenu canadien?
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-06-13 17:24 [p.6613]
Expand
Madam Speaker, all of us know of discoverability. Where do we find things when we are on Facebook? What do I like, what do others like or what does the member from the Bloc like to see? Where will it be the next time we open Facebook? There are algorithms. Who is in charge of determining what we see and where it comes up? If it is Canadian content, will it automatically be in the first 10 things we look at, or will it be down in the 500?
We have issues with section 4.2. We have talked about it in the House. We also have a lot of issues with discoverability. There are many Canadians producing fabulous stuff today on YouTube, TikTok and so on. They are more than worried about where this legislation goes when it does become law, next year maybe, because a lot of the creators in this country are making a pretty good living promoting Canadian content.
Madame la Présidente, nous avons tous entendu parler de découvrabilité. Où trouve-t-on des choses sur Facebook? Qu'est-ce que j'aime, qu'est-ce que les autres aiment ou qu'est-ce que le député bloquiste aime voir? Quand ouvrira-t-on Facebook la prochaine fois? Il y a des algorithmes. Qui est chargé d'établir ce que voient les abonnés et où apparaît le contenu? S'il s'agit de contenu canadien, figurera-t-il automatiquement dans les 10 premiers éléments consultés, ou figurera-t-il dans les 500 premiers?
L'article 4.2 nous pose problème. Nous en avons parlé à la Chambre. Nous avons également énormément de réserves en ce qui concerne la découvrabilité. De nombreux Canadiens présentent des choses formidables aujourd'hui, notamment sur YouTube et TikTok. Ces gens sont extrêmement préoccupés par l'application qui sera faite de la loi, l'année prochaine peut-être, parce qu'un grand nombre de créateurs au Canada gagnent passablement bien leur vie en faisant la promotion de contenu canadien.
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-06-13 17:25 [p.6614]
Expand
Madam Speaker, that is interesting because last week in committee, on Wednesday, the clerk gave me 20 printed submissions that we had to deal with. That tells me that as a committee we are not doing our job because these are submissions that have come through the clerk to the committee from people and organizations wanting to speak to this.
I want APTN there. I have been requesting that APTN come to committee. We need the indigenous voice on Bill C-11. We have not heard it. That is one of the flaws with this bill. We need APTN to see its future and how Bill C-11 would affect that network.
Madame la Présidente, c'est intéressant, car mercredi dernier, au comité, la greffière m'a remis 20 mémoires que nous devions étudier. Cela me porte à croire que le comité ne fait pas son travail, car la greffière nous remet les mémoires de personnes et d'organismes qui souhaitent venir nous parler.
Je veux entendre les représentants du réseau APTN au comité. Je l'ai déjà demandé. Il faut entendre la voix des Autochtones au sujet du projet de loi C‑11. C'est l'une des failles de ce projet de loi. Ces témoins doivent venir dire au comité comment ils entrevoient l'avenir du réseau avec le projet de loi C‑11.
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-06-13 17:27 [p.6614]
Expand
Madam Speaker, while I want to thank the member for her concerns, they are not valid. We have seen in committee people like Dr. Michael Geist and former commissioners of the CRTC. They know this is a flawed bill and they are upset that it is progressing the way it has.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie la députée de ses préoccupations, mais elles ne sont pas valables. Nous avons entendu au comité des personnes comme Michael Geist et d'anciens commissaires du CRTC. Ils savent qu'il s'agit d'un projet de loi imparfait. Ils sont contrariés par la manière dont il progresse dans le processus législatif.
Collapse
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-05-31 14:17
Expand
Mr. Speaker, everyone agrees that Canada needs a modernized Broadcasting Act that fits today's digital age. Unfortunately, Liberal Bill C-11 is another in a long line of bad Liberal bills. Bill C-11 would create more red tape for businesses and creators, put more control in the hands of the incompetent CRTC and open up a Pandora's box of Internet regulation.
If passed, Bill C-11 could give the government the power to decide what Canadians can and cannot post on their social media profiles. Bill C-11 would limit consumer choice, drive up prices, create further uncertainty for Canadian businesses and creators and limit the free expression of all Canadians. It is time for the government to scrap Bill C-11 and get back to the drawing board, once and for all.
Monsieur le Président, tout le monde désire que le Canada modernise sa Loi sur la radiodiffusion pour l’adapter à l’ère numérique. Malheureusement, le projet de loi C-11 des libéraux s’ajoute à la longue liste des mauvaises mesures législatives libérales. Le projet de loi C-11 créerait plus de tracasseries administratives pour les entreprises et les créateurs, mettrait plus de contrôle entre les mains d’un CRTC incompétent et ouvrirait une boîte de Pandore de règlements régissant Internet.
S’il est adopté, le projet de loi C-11 pourrait donner au gouvernement le pouvoir de décider ce que les Canadiens peuvent et ne peuvent pas publier dans leurs profils dans les médias sociaux. Le projet de loi C-11 limiterait le choix des consommateurs, hausserait les prix, créerait davantage d’incertitude pour les entreprises et les créateurs canadiens et limiterait la liberté d’expression de tous les Canadiens. Il est temps que le gouvernement laisse tomber le projet de loi C-11 et qu’il recommence à zéro une fois pour toutes.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-30 18:48
Expand
Madam Speaker, that is a fair question. Lots of people wonder what the role of the opposition is in government.
The role is to make sure that government legislation does get better. We have some very thoughtful but maybe critical arguments on some of the legislation, for example Bill C-11. I do not think the government should be legislating the Internet and regulating what people can and cannot see. I believe in free speech. The Liberals do not. There is another example. I do not think people should have to pay a carbon tax on the gas they use in their vehicles, on the equipment they use to seed or on the machinery they use to grow food for people across Canada. I do not think schools should have to pay carbon tax on their heating. I do not think there should be a carbon tax on bussing kids to school in Saskatchewan. These are policy debates we could have.
The Liberals say, “But they get it back.” My question or comment, and Premier Wall made the same comment, would be this: If the government is just going to give the carbon tax back to Canadians in boutique tax credits, why take it in the first place? Please, why do we not let Canadians keep the money in their own pockets?
Madame la Présidente, c’est une question juste. Beaucoup de gens se demandent quel est le rôle de l’opposition au sein du gouvernement.
Son rôle est de s’assurer que les mesures législatives du gouvernement s’améliorent. Nous avons des arguments très réfléchis, mais peut-être critiques, sur certains projets de loi, par exemple le projet de loi C-11. Je ne pense pas que le gouvernement doive légiférer sur Internet et réglementer ce que les gens peuvent ou ne peuvent pas voir. Je crois en la liberté d’expression. Les libéraux, quant à eux, non. Il y a un autre exemple. Je ne pense pas que les gens devraient avoir à payer une taxe sur le carbone pour l’essence qu’ils mettent dans leurs véhicules, pour l’équipement dont ils se servent pour semer ou pour les machines qu’ils utilisent pour cultiver des aliments pour des gens d’un bout à l’autre du pays. Je ne pense pas que les écoles devraient payer une taxe sur le carbone pour leur chauffage. Je ne pense pas qu’il devrait y avoir une taxe sur le carbone pour le transport des enfants à l’école en autobus en Saskatchewan. Ce sont des débats de politique que nous pourrions tenir.
Les libéraux disent: « Mais ils récupèrent l’argent. » Ma question ou mon commentaire, et le premier ministre Wall a fait le même commentaire, irait comme suit: si le gouvernement a l’intention de rendre la taxe sur le carbone aux Canadiens sous forme de crédits d’impôt ciblés, pourquoi la percevoir? De grâce, pourquoi ne laissons-nous pas les Canadiens garder l’argent dans leurs poches?
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-11 16:47
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would really appreciate it if the House leader would stick to the facts and not spread misinformation. If he actually has proof that the Conservatives—
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais beaucoup que le leader à la Chambre s'en tienne aux faits et s'abstienne de relayer de fausses informations. S'il a la preuve que les conservateurs...
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-11 19:05
Expand
Madam Speaker, it is a pleasure to join in this debate tonight. I would like to thank the hon. member for Kingston and the Islands for allowing me to change the speaking order today as I have an appointment later this evening. I appreciate that very much, so my thanks to my colleague across the way.
When it comes to the CRTC and Bill C-11, I am not an expert on information, and they are experts on misinformation, or on the Internet and what the CRTC should or should not be doing, so I am going to read a couple of comments from Michael Geist, who is an expert when it comes to information, the Internet, what should be happening with it and how it should be regulated.
One of the problems that Professor Geist has with Bill C-11, which is very, very similar to Bill C-10, is this:
But dig a little deeper and it turns out that the bill is not quite as advertised. While Section 4.1 was restored, the government has added 4.1(2), which creates an exception to the exception. That exception to the exception—in effect a rule that does allow for regulation of content uploaded to a social media service—says that the Act applies to programs as prescribed by regulations that may be created by the CRTC.
It lays out three criteria that this “exception to the exception” may fall under:
The bill continues with a new Section 4.2, which gives the CRTC the instructions for creating those regulations. The result is a legislative pretzel, where the government twists itself around trying to regulate certain content. In particular, it says the CRTC can create regulations that treat content uploaded to social media services as programs by considering three factors: whether the program that is uploaded to a social media service directly or indirectly generates revenue; if the program has been broadcast by a broadcast undertaking that is either licensed or registered with the CRTC; if the program has been assigned a unique identifier under an international standards system. The law does not tell the CRTC how to weigh these factors. Moreover, there is a further exclusion for content in which neither the user nor the copyright owner receives revenue as well as for visual images only.
I think these are some of the biggest issues that we on this side have with Bill C-11. There are some hidden questions within this legislation. The exception to the exception is a big concern, and also that the CRTC has not received all of its marching orders from the Liberal government as yet. We are not quite sure what the mandate for the CRTC is when it comes to online content.
I have received some comments from constituents. Actually, one of them is from country music singer JJ Voss, who just won an award. He is concerned that we would hold this bill up because there are some things in here about Canadian content and supporting Canadian musicians, Canadian culture and Canadians who are really doing great work. That is not our practice at all. What we want to do is make sure that people are protected. Our job as the loyal opposition is to review legislation cautiously to see where there may be some traps, because there are some things in these pieces of legislation that Canadians might not think are good ideas. This, in particular, is one of those situations for sure.
I believe that a lot of people in Regina—Lewvan, the area that I represent in Saskatchewan, are a little unsure of my voting in favour of a piece of legislation if they are not even sure what the mandate to the CRTC is yet or what exactly “an exception to an exception” means. They are really not comfortable with the “just trust us” approach that the Liberal government sometimes takes to legislation. I can understand why. We have gone through a lot of situations over the past two years where “just trust me” has ended up in people not being able to go to weddings or funerals. “Just trust us. We want to have the ability to tax and spend for 18 to 22 months without having any oversight whatsoever”; that is another situation where people do not feel comfortable with the decisions the Liberal government has made.
When it comes to us deciding if this bill is something we can really support, do we not think Canadians have the ability to actually use their own discretion when they are posting online? Why can Canadians not have that freedom of expression or freedom of speech?
When it comes to Bill C-11, those are some of the questions we have had. There is also the fact that, over the last two hours in this building, when we have been talking about Bill C-11, which some people would see as censorship by the government, the Liberals brought in closure on a bill about censorship. One cannot make this up. We had had 30 minutes of questions and answers, when at one point the NDP member for Courtenay—Alberni had the audacity to say that we were holding up legislation just because we asked for a standing vote and did not pass the piece of legislation on division. That is our job. That is why people sent us to this building, to stand up and be counted.
I will not be talked down to by someone from Courtenay—Alberni when the Liberals do not want me to be doing my job. That was an actual conversation during the 30 minutes of questions and answers, when the Liberals once again used closure to try to pass this legislation faster because, quite frankly, I do not think they believe it stands up to the scrutiny that the loyal opposition has been putting it to. It does not pass the smell test. For the constituents who have sent us here, that is really our job.
I think I understand why some of the members across the way say that everyone should pay their fair share, and we agree with them, but why do they really want to get some money back from Facebook and Netflix? I have a list of how much money a few of the Liberal members have spent on advertising on Facebook. The member for Fleetwood—Port Kells, who just spoke about vinyl records, spent almost $5,000 on advertising from June 25, 2019 to May 9, 2022, and that is just coming from his member's office budget. That is $5,000 in taxpayer dollars he spent on advertising on Facebook—
Madame la Présidente, c'est un bonheur de participer aujourd'hui à ce débat. J'aimerais remercier le député de Kingston et les Îles d'avoir accepté que l'on modifie l'ordre d'intervention, car j'ai un rendez-vous ce soir. Je lui en suis fort reconnaissant, donc mes remerciements à mon collègue d'en face.
Au sujet du CRTC et du projet de loi C‑11, je ne suis pas un spécialiste de l'information, et je ne possède par leur expertise en matière de mésinformation. Je ne suis guère mieux placé pour traiter d'Internet et de ce que le CRTC devrait faire ou non. Donc, je vais lire quelques commentaires de Michael Geist, qui, lui, est un spécialiste en matière d'information, d'Internet, de ce qui devrait être fait dans ce domaine et de la façon dont celui-ci devrait être réglementé.
Voici l'un des problèmes relevés par M. Geist dans le projet de loi C‑11, qui reprend essentiellement le projet de loi C‑10:
En y regardant de plus près, toutefois, il est clair que le projet de loi ne correspond pas tout à fait à ce qui a été annoncé. Bien que l'article 4.1 ait été rétabli, le gouvernement a ajouté le paragraphe 4.1(2), qui vient créer une exception à l'exception. Cette exception à l'exception, c'est‑à‑dire la règle qui permet la réglementation du contenu téléversé sur les médias sociaux, précise que la loi s'applique aux émissions visées par un règlement du CRTC.
Le professeur Geist énonce trois critères auxquels cette « exception à l'exception » peut répondre:
Le projet de loi continue avec une nouvelle disposition, l'article 4.2, qui donne au CRTC les instructions pour créer ces règlements. Le résultat est un bretzel législatif, où le gouvernement s'entortille pour tenter de réglementer certains contenus. Le CRTC aurait, plus précisément, le pouvoir de prendre des règlements qui considèrent comme des émissions les contenus téléversés vers les services de médias sociaux en tenant compte des trois critères suivants: la mesure dans laquelle l'émission téléversée vers un service de médias sociaux génère directement ou indirectement des revenus; le fait que l'émission a été radiodiffusée par une entreprise de radiodiffusion titulaire d'une licence ou enregistrée auprès du CRTC; le fait qu'un identifiant unique a été attribué à l'émission en vertu d'un système international de normalisation. Le projet de loi ne dit pas au CRTC comment pondérer ces facteurs. En outre, il renferme une autre exclusion visant le contenu pour lequel ni l'utilisateur qui l'a téléversé ni le titulaire du droit d'auteur ne perçoit de revenus, ainsi que le contenu constitué exclusivement d'images.
Voilà quelques-uns des principaux éléments que nous, de ce côté‑ci de la Chambre, reprochons au projet de loi C-11. Il y a des enjeux cachés dans ce texte. L'exception à l'exception est une grande préoccupation, et aussi le fait que le CRTC n'a pas encore reçu toutes ses directives du gouvernement libéral. Nous ne savons pas exactement quel est le mandat du CRTC en ce qui concerne le contenu en ligne.
J’ai reçu des commentaires d’électeurs. En fait, l’un d’eux me vient du chanteur de musique country JJ Voss, qui vient de gagner un prix. Il craint que nous retardions l’adoption de ce projet de loi parce qu’il contient d’excellentes dispositions sur le contenu canadien, sur le soutien des musiciens canadiens, sur la culture canadienne et sur les Canadiens qui font de l’excellent travail. Nous n’avons pas l’habitude de retarder l’adoption de projets de loi. Nous voulons simplement nous assurer que les gens sont protégés. Notre travail de loyale opposition est d’examiner attentivement les projets de loi pour y détecter des pièges éventuels, parce que ces projets de loi peuvent contenir des dispositions avec lesquelles les Canadiens ne seraient peut-être pas d’accord. Ce projet de loi-ci entre certainement dans cette catégorie.
Je crois que beaucoup de gens de Regina—Lewvan, la région que je représente en Saskatchewan, douteraient de la valeur de mon vote en faveur du projet de loi s’ils ne sont même pas certains du mandat qu’a reçu le CRTC ou de ce que signifie exactement « une exception à une exception ». Ils n’acceptent pas l’approche « faites-nous confiance » que le gouvernement libéral applique parfois pour légiférer. Je les comprends tout à fait. Ces deux dernières années, nous avons vécu beaucoup de situations où des gens se sont retrouvés dans l’impossibilité d’assister à des mariages ou à des funérailles. « Faites-nous confiance. Nous voulons avoir la capacité de taxer et de dépenser pendant 18 à 22 mois sans aucune surveillance. » C’est un autre cas où les gens ne sont pas à l’aise face aux décisions du gouvernement libéral.
Pour ce qui est de décider d’appuyer ou de rejeter ce projet de loi, ne pensons-nous pas que les Canadiens sont en mesure d’appliquer leur propre pouvoir discrétionnaire lorsqu’ils publient des messages en ligne? Pourquoi les Canadiens ne pourraient-ils pas jouir de ce genre de liberté d’expression?
Dans le cas du projet de loi C-11, ce sont quelques-unes des questions que nous avons posées. Il y a aussi le fait que ces deux dernières heures, alors que nous débattions du projet de loi C‑11, que certains considéreraient comme de la censure de la part du gouvernement, les libéraux ont imposé la clôture sur un projet de loi sur la censure. Cela ne s'invente pas. Nous avons eu 30 minutes de questions et de réponses et, à un moment donné, le député néo-démocrate de Courtenay—Alberni a eu l’audace de dire que nous retardions l’adoption du projet de loi simplement parce que nous demandions un vote par assis et levé et que nous n’avons pas adopté le projet de loi avec dissidence. C’est notre travail. C’est pour cela que les gens nous ont envoyés ici, afin que nous nous levions pour être comptés.
Je ne vais pas laisser le député de Courtenay—Alberni me faire la leçon alors que les libéraux ne veulent pas que je fasse mon travail. C’est une conversation qui a eu lieu pendant les 30 minutes de questions et de réponses, lorsque les libéraux ont encore une fois imposé la clôture pour faire adopter ce projet de loi plus rapidement. Bien franchement, je crois qu’ils pensent qu’il ne résisterait pas à l’examen minutieux auquel l’opposition officielle l’a soumis. Il n'est pas à la hauteur. C'est pourtant le rôle qui nous incombe et la raison pour laquelle nos électeurs nous ont envoyés ici.
Je crois comprendre pourquoi certains députés d'en face disent que tout le monde devrait payer sa juste part, et nous sommes d'accord avec eux sur ce point. Toutefois, pourquoi veulent-ils vraiment récupérer de l'argent de Facebook et Netflix? J'ai une liste des montants que quelques députés libéraux ont dépensés en publicité sur Facebook. Le député de Fleetwood—Port Kells, qui vient de parler de vinyles, a dépensé près de 5 000 $ en publicité du 25 juin 2019 au 9 mai 2022, et c'est la somme provenant de son budget de bureau de député uniquement. Il a donc dépensé 5 000 $ de l'argent des contribuables en publicité sur Facebook...
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-11 19:12
Expand
Madam Speaker, this is talking about Facebook, Netflix and the CRTC, so I think this would be something of interest to members.
I will talk about a few of the other bills that have been paid by the taxpayers. For the Prime Minister, $2.8 million has been spent on Facebook advertising from June 25, 2019 to May 9, 2022. Interestingly enough, the member for Kingston and the Islands, who speaks often here and I enjoy his speeches, spent $43,578 on Facebook advertising from June 25, 2019 to May 9, 2022. The member for West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country spent $23,466 from June 25, 2019 to May 9, 2022. These are all Liberal members. The member for Hamilton Mountain spent $2,787. The Liberal Party of Canada spent $4.2 million on Facebook ads from June 25, 2019 to May 9, 2022.
I can understand why they talk about wanting to get some of the money back from some of these big social media companies: It is because they have given them so much money. It is really quite impressive how much money they have given them over the period of June 25, 2019 to May 9, 2022.
When it comes down to it, we still have a lot of questions and we will not be supporting Bill C-11. When it gets to committee, our members will do their good work and ask some of the questions, especially about proposed subsection 4.1(2) on what the exception to the exception looks like and how the Liberals are really trying to regulate what online users are saying on social media. Those are some of the concerns that our members will bring forward at committee.
When it comes to paying their fair share and whether or not we should make sure that we support our Canadian content creators, we will always do that. I will continue to advertise in my local papers, while the Liberals advertise on Facebook.
Madame la Présidente, il est question de Facebook, de Netflix et du CRTC, alors je pense que cela intéressera les députés.
Je vais parler de quelques-unes des autres factures qui ont été payées par les contribuables. Pour le premier ministre, 2,8 millions de dollars ont été dépensés en publicité sur Facebook du 25 juin 2019 au 9 mai 2022. Fait intéressant, le député de Kingston et les Îles, qui prend souvent la parole ici et dont j’apprécie les discours, a dépensé 43 578 $ en publicité sur Facebook du 25 juin 2019 au 9 mai 2022. Le député de West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country a dépensé 23 466 $ du 25 juin 2019 au 9 mai 2022. Ce sont tous des députés libéraux. La députée de Hamilton Mountain a dépensé 2 787 $. Le Parti libéral du Canada a dépensé 4,2 millions de dollars en publicités sur Facebook du 25 juin 2019 au 9 mai 2022.
Je peux comprendre pourquoi ils parlent de vouloir récupérer une partie de l’argent de certaines de ces grandes entreprises de médias sociaux: c’est parce qu’ils leur ont donné tellement d’argent. C’est vraiment très impressionnant de voir combien d’argent ils leur ont donné entre le 25 juin 2019 et le 9 mai 2022.
En fin de compte, nous avons encore beaucoup de questions et nous n’appuierons pas le projet de loi C-11. Lorsqu’il sera renvoyé au comité, nos députés feront leur bon travail et poseront certaines questions, en particulier au sujet du paragraphe 4.1(2) proposé sur ce à quoi ressemble l’exception à l’exception et sur la façon dont les libéraux essaient vraiment de réglementer ce que les utilisateurs en ligne disent sur les réseaux sociaux. Ce sont là quelques-unes des préoccupations que nos députés feront valoir au comité.
Lorsqu’il s’agit de payer leur juste part et de savoir si nous devons ou non nous assurer de soutenir nos créateurs de contenu canadien, nous le ferons toujours. Je continuerai à faire de la publicité dans mes journaux locaux, tandis que les libéraux font de la publicité sur Facebook.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-11 19:16
Expand
Madam Speaker, I look forward to debate on the charter and who respects the charter more between the Conservatives and the Liberals every time, because I remember just recently that there was a huge infringement on the charter when the Liberal Party brought in the Emergencies Act, only a few short months ago. The fact of the matter is that if the Liberals were to respect the charter rights of Canadians and their right to free speech, and actually walked down and talked to some of the people who were here in late February, I think they would have really had a good lesson to learn.
When it comes to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, we will respect it. I really wish the Liberals would show that respect when people want their charter rights taken seriously as well.
Madame la Présidente, j’attends avec impatience le débat sur la Charte et sur la question de savoir qui, des conservateurs ou des libéraux, respecte le plus la Charte, parce que j’ai le souvenir que, tout récemment, une énorme violation de la Charte a été commise lorsque le Parti libéral a fait adopter la Loi sur les mesures d’urgence, il y a quelques mois à peine. Le fait est que, si les libéraux respectaient les droits des Canadiens garantis par la Charte et leur droit à la liberté d’expression et s’ils sortaient pour parler avec certaines des personnes qui étaient ici à la fin du mois de février, je crois qu'ils pourraient en tirer une excellente leçon.
En ce qui concerne la Charte des droits et libertés, nous la respectons. J’aimerais vraiment que les libéraux fassent preuve du même respect lorsque les gens veulent que les droits que leur confère la Charte soient également pris au sérieux.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-11 19:18
Expand
Madam Speaker, we are discussing Bill C-11, and maybe the member did not hear me talk earlier about some of the issues we had specifically with Bill C-11, such as proposed subsection 4.1(2), which talks about an exception to the exception and some of the criteria that the CRTC has laid out on what could be admissible under the new Broadcasting Act and what may not be admissible. There are issues we have with the bill we are talking about right now. I laid that out quite cleanly in my opening remarks, when we were talking about this bill, which is Bill C-11, and we will debate Bill C-18 another time. I look forward to having that discussion with the hon. member, when that is the actual bill we are supposed to be discussing on the floor.
Madame la Présidente, nous discutons actuellement du projet de loi C-11, et le député ne m’a peut-être pas entendu évoquer plus tôt certains problèmes précis que nous avions avec le projet de loi C-11, par exemple le paragraphe 4.1(2), qui fait état d’une exception à l’exception et de certains des critères que le CRTC a établis sur ce qui pourrait être admissible ou ne pas l'être au titre de la nouvelle Loi sur la radiodiffusion. Le projet de loi dont nous parlons en ce moment a son lot de problèmes. Je l’ai expliqué assez clairement dans mes remarques préliminaires, lorsque nous avons discuté du projet de loi C‑11. Nous débattrons du projet de loi C‑18 à un autre moment. J’ai hâte d’avoir cette discussion avec le député lorsque le moment sera venu pour nous de discuter ici du projet de loi en question.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-11 19:19
Expand
Madam Speaker, I think my friend gets to the crux of the argument Conservatives have on this side, and that is having the content that is put on social media regulated by the government. Is there going to be a Liberal government czar who says what is good and what is not good for online content? That is really what Canadians are scared of, and these are the questions I get in my office, so that goes to the heart of the argument we have of why this bill is so flawed and should be scrapped.
Madame la Présidente, je pense que mon ami touche au cœur de ce que les conservateurs reprochent à ce projet de loi, à savoir que le contenu des médias sociaux serait réglementé par le gouvernement. Y aura-t-il un tsar du gouvernement libéral qui dira quel contenu en ligne est bon et lequel ne l'est pas? C'est vraiment ce que craignent les Canadiens, et ce sont les questions que je reçois à mon bureau. Donc, c'est l'essence même de ce que nous disons, à savoir que ce projet de loi est à ce point bancal qu'il devrait être mis à la poubelle.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 49 | Page: 1 of 4

1
2
3
4
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data