Hansard
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 31
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-12-01 15:27 [p.10307]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, a colleague voted by the app, encountered some technical difficulties and could not log on in time to switch his vote. I am wondering if the House would allow, as we have done in the past for other members, for the hon. member for Foothills to change his vote. His intention was to vote in favour. If the House would grant consent for that change, this would be a unanimous vote in favour of the bill.
Monsieur le Président, un de mes collègues a voté avec l'application, a éprouvé des difficultés techniques et n'a pas pu ouvrir une session à temps pour changer son vote. Je me demande si la Chambre autoriserait le député de Foothills à changer son vote, comme elle l'a fait par le passé pour d'autres députés. Il avait l'intention de voter en faveur de la motion. Si la Chambre y consentait, il y aurait alors unanimité des voix en faveur du projet de loi.
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-11-23 16:02 [p.9907]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House, we trust our excellent table officers. We have clerks at the table, vote-callers and the Speaker in the chair observing things.
As much as the help from the hon. member for Kingston and the Islands may be appreciated by members on the other side of House, we do not believe that anybody at the table in the House of Commons needs help from him.
Monsieur le Président, de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous faisons confiance à nos excellents greffiers. Nous pouvons compter sur les greffiers au Bureau, les préposés à l'appel nominal et le Président qui occupe le fauteuil pour surveiller le déroulement du vote.
Les députés d'en face apprécient peut-être l'aide de leur collègue de Kingston et les Îles, mais, de ce côté-ci, nous estimons que personne au Bureau des greffiers de la Chambre des communes n'a besoin de son aide.
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-11-22 15:43 [p.9856]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am rising to add to this morning's point of order raised by the NDP House leader concerning the application of Standing Order 69.1 to Bill C-27.
In general, we have reviewed the hon. member's submissions and concur with them. That said, there are a couple of additional citations I want to put before the Chair for your consideration. I will not repeat the arguments, because you already have them before you, Mr. Speaker, but we do agree that the measures proposed in part 3 of Bill C-27 are significantly different from and unrelated to parts 1 and 2 such that they warrant a separate vote at second reading.
As my NDP counterpart articulated, the purpose of parts 1 and 2 of the bill concern privacy protections, the powers of the Privacy Commissioner and the establishment of a new government tribunal. Part 3, meanwhile, would create a whole new law respecting artificial intelligence. The mechanisms under the minister and department's powers are completely unrelated to those in parts 1 and 2. That last point is significant in view of another aspect of the March 1, 2018, ruling of Mr. Speaker Regan, which my colleague cited. Allow me to quote your predecessor, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Regan said:
As each of the first two parts of the bill does indeed enact a new act, I can see why the hon. member for Berthier—Maskinongé would like to see each one voted separately. However, my reading of the bill is that the regimes set out in part 1, the impact assessment act, and part 2, the Canadian energy regulator act, are linked in significant ways, reflected in the number of cross-references. For example, the impact assessment act provides for a process for assessing the impact of certain projects, but contains specific provisions for projects with activities regulated under the Canadian energy regulator act. There are also obligations in the Canadian energy regulator act that are subject to provisions in the impact assessment act. Given the multiple references in each of these parts to the entities and processes established by the other part, I believe it is in keeping with the standing order that these two parts be voted together.
Deputy Speaker Bruce Stanton also encountered a similar situation in his June 18, 2018, ruling at page 21,196 of the Debates. Unlike the case that I quoted just now respecting the pipeline-killing former Bill C-69, Bill C-27 does not feature any significant or intertwining cross-references. In other words, Speaker Regan found that the two parts should be voted on together because of all the intertwining and cross-referencing in so many parts, and one part mentioning and referencing items in the first part.
This is not the situation we have today with part 3 of Bill C-27. In fact, part 3 of Bill C-27 does not explicitly cross-reference the personal information and data protection tribunal act, which part 2 would enact. Furthermore, there appears to be only one single, tiny, solitary cross-reference to the consumer privacy protection act, which part 1 would enact, and that is solely for the purpose of proposing a definition of personal information, which would be common to both of those laws. That is certainly not enough to warrant any kind of grouping when it comes to votes.
Part 3 is completely separate. It is its own independent section. There is not anywhere near the level of cross-referencing and intertwining that previous Speakers have ruled are justification for deciding not to have a separate vote. Therefore, it is clear in this situation that Bill C-27, should you, Mr. Speaker, agree with the arguments, should be dealt with in such a manner that there can be a separate vote on part 3.
Standing Order 69.1 is a relatively recent innovation. It has only been in the last number of years that Speakers have been given the authority by the House to separate aspects of bills for separate votes. I will read it:
(1) In the case where a government bill seeks to repeal, amend or enact more than one act, and where there is not a common element connecting the various provisions or where unrelated matters are linked, the Speaker shall have the power to divide the questions, for the purposes of voting, on the motion for second reading and reference to a committee and the motion for third reading and passage of the bill. The Speaker shall have the power to combine clauses of the bill thematically and to put the aforementioned questions on each of these groups of clauses separately, provided that there will be a single debate at each stage.
If we think about the context in which this standing order developed and was ultimately passed by the House, it was to allow members more flexibility and latitude to make their votes count on various aspects of the bill. It is important to think about why the House decided to adopt this measure. There had been, over the course of several Parliaments and across different governments at various times, more and more subject material being included in bills, and this was done at the time to give members the option of voting in favour of some aspects of a bill and oppose others and to clarify for their constituents and Canadians which parts of a bill they supported and which parts of a bill they opposed.
The reason I am talking about this context is I do not believe that at the time, the rationale and impetus for the inclusion of this measure in the Standing Orders was meant to be terribly restrictive. The whole point of the standing order was for it to be more permissive to allow greater latitude and flexibility. This is a relatively new innovation that has only been used a small number of times, and in parliamentary terms certainly a very small number of times, and I believe it would not be in keeping with the spirit and intent that was guiding members when we adopted it to start off, early on in its new use, with being very restrictive, because things around here tend to go in one direction and powers or flexibilities accorded the Chair over time often get more and more rigid as rules and precedents develop around them.
If the Speaker were to adopt a very restrictive interpretation of this standing order, I believe it would take away the point of this innovation, as it was proposed. I do not believe it would take a permissive interpretation of the standing order to agree with my hon. colleague from the NDP and the points that I raise here today. It is very clear that these parts are separate. Part 3 of Bill C-27 is completely independent, stands on its own and is not related, intertwined or cross-referenced in earlier parts of the act.
I only mention the point about restrictive interpretation as one further point to urge the Speaker to consider what the spirit, intent and purpose of this innovation was meant to do, which was to allow members to clearly differentiate which parts of legislation they support and which parts they do not. I would urge you, Mr. Speaker, to keep that in mind as you study the arguments that were put before you. I hope you will find in our favour and allow members to vote separately on part 3.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole pour revenir sur le rappel au Règlement qui a été soulevé ce matin par le leader à la Chambre du NPD au sujet de l’application de l’article 69.1 du Règlement au projet de loi C‑27.
De façon générale, nous avons examiné les arguments du député et sommes d’accord. Cela dit, je voudrais présenter quelques citations de plus à la présidence à des fins d’examen. Je ne répéterai pas les arguments parce que vous les avez déjà devant vous, monsieur le Président, mais nous sommes d’accord pour dire que les mesures proposées dans la partie 3 du projet de loi C‑27 sont fort différentes des parties 1 et 2 et n’ont aucun lien avec celles-ci, de sorte qu’elles justifient la tenue d'un vote distinct à l’étape de la deuxième lecture.
Comme l’a dit mon collègue du NPD, l’objet des parties 1 et 2 du projet de loi concerne la protection de la vie privée, les pouvoirs du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et la création d’un tribunal gouvernemental. Quant à la partie 3, elle créerait une toute nouvelle loi sur l’intelligence artificielle. Les mécanismes relevant des pouvoirs du ministre et du ministère ne sont absolument pas liés à ceux des parties 1 et 2. Ce dernier point est important compte tenu d’un autre aspect de la décision du 1er mars 2018 du Président Regan, que mon collègue a cité. Permettez-moi de citer votre prédécesseur, monsieur le Président. M. Regan a dit:
Puisque chacune des deux premières parties du projet de loi prévoit l'édiction d'une loi nouvelle, je comprends pourquoi la députée de Berthier—Maskinongé souhaiterait qu'elles soient mises aux voix séparément. Cependant, d'après mon interprétation du projet de loi, les régimes prévus dans la Loi sur l'évaluation d'impact (soit la partie I) et dans la Loi sur la Régie canadienne de l'énergie (soit la partie 2) sont étroitement liés, comme en témoigne le nombre de renvois entre ces deux parties. Par exemple, la Loi sur l'évaluation d'impact prévoit un processus d'évaluation de l'impact de certains projets, mais elle comporte des dispositions visant des projets dont les activités tombent sous le régime de la Loi sur la Régie canadienne de l'énergie. En outre, certaines obligations prévues à la Loi sur la Régie canadienne de l'énergie sont visées par des dispositions de la Loi sur l'évaluation d'impact. Puisque chacune de ces parties renferme un grand nombre de renvois visant des entités et des processus établis dans l'autre partie, j'estime qu'une mise aux voix communes de ces deux parties est conforme au Règlement.
Le vice-président Bruce Stanton avait rendu une décision concernant une situation similaire le 18 juin 2018, à la page 21 162 des Débats. Contrairement à ce qui avait été constaté dans la situation dont je viens de parler au sujet du projet de loi interdisant tout nouveau pipeline, le projet de loi C‑69, dans le cas du projet de loi C‑27, il n'y a pas un nombre important de renvois entre les parties. Autrement dit, le président Regan était arrivé à la conclusion que les deux parties devaient être mises aux voix ensemble en raison du nombre de renvois et de liens entre de nombreuses parties et du fait qu'une partie faisait référence à des éléments qui se trouvaient dans l'autre partie.
Ce n’est pas ce qui se produit aujourd’hui en ce qui concerne la partie 3 du projet de loi C‑27. En fait, la partie 3 de ce projet de loi ne renvoie pas, d’une manière explicite, à la Loi sur le Tribunal de la protection des renseignements personnels et des données, que la partie 2 édicterait. En outre, il semble n’y avoir qu’un seul petit renvoi solitaire à la Loi sur la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs, que la partie 1 édicterait. Cela servirait uniquement à proposer une définition de « renseignements personnels » commune pour ces deux lois. Cela n’est, de toute évidence, pas suffisant pour exiger tout regroupement quand vient le temps de passer au vote.
La partie 3 est complètement distincte. Il s’agit d’une section indépendante. On n’observe aucunement le niveau de renvoi et d’entrelacement qui, selon d’anciens présidents, a justifié le fait de ne pas tenir un vote distinct. Il est donc évident que, dans cette situation, le projet de loi C‑27 devrait être traité d’une manière qui permettrait un vote distinct sur la partie 3 si vous, monsieur le Président, acceptez les arguments présentés.
L'article 69.1 du Règlement est une innovation relativement récente. Ce n'est qu'au cours des dernières années que la Chambre des communes a conféré à la présidence le pouvoir de séparer divers éléments d'un projet de loi pour les soumettre à des votes séparés. Voici le libellé de cet article:
(1) Lorsqu’un projet de loi émanant du gouvernement vise à modifier, à abroger ou à édicter plus d’une loi dans les cas où le projet de loi n’a aucun fil directeur ou porte sur des sujets qui n’ont rien en commun les uns avec les autres, le Président peut diviser les questions, aux fins du vote, sur toute motion tendant à la deuxième lecture et au renvoi à un comité et à la troisième lecture et l’adoption du projet de loi. Le Président peut combiner des articles du projet de loi thématiquement et mettre aux voix les questions susmentionnées sur chacun de ces groupes d’articles séparément, pourvu qu’un seul débat soit tenu pour chaque étape.
Intéressons-nous au contexte dans lequel cet article du Règlement a été élaboré avant d’être adopté par la Chambre. Les députés voulaient s'accorder un degré de souplesse et de latitude accru pour que leurs votes comptent pour différents aspects d’un projet de loi. Il est important de réfléchir aux raisons expliquant pourquoi la Chambre a décidé d’adopter cette mesure. Au cours de plusieurs législatures, différents gouvernements ont, à divers moments, présenté de plus en plus de matériel à inclure dans les projets de loi. Cette initiative, à l’époque, avait pour but de donner aux députés l’option de voter pour certains aspects du projet de loi et contre d’autres aspects de celui-ci, en plus de permettre aux électeurs et aux Canadiens de voir les parties du projet de loi qu’ils ont appuyées et à quels aspects ils se sont opposés.
Je parle de ce contexte parce que je ne crois pas que, à ce moment, le motif et l’élan permettant d'inclure cette mesure dans le Règlement devaient être extrêmement restrictifs. L’article du Règlement devait, en fait, être plus permissif, afin d’accorder une latitude et une souplesse accrues. Il s’agit d’une innovation relativement récente qui n’a été utilisée qu’à un petit nombre de reprises. En termes parlementaires, il s’agit vraiment d’un très petit nombre de fois. Je crois qu’on ne respecterait pas l’esprit et l’intention qui ont guidé les députés lors de l’adoption de cette mesure si l’on commençait dès le départ à l’utiliser d’une manière très restrictive, parce que les choses ici ont tendance à prendre une seule direction et que les pouvoirs ou la souplesse accordés par le président au fil du temps gagnent en rigidité, alors que des règles et des précédents s'y greffent.
Si le Président devait adopter une interprétation très restrictive de cet article du Règlement, je crois que cela annulerait le but de cette innovation, telle qu’elle a été proposée. Je ne crois pas qu’il soit nécessaire d'interpréter cet article d’une manière permissive pour être d’accord avec mon collègue du NPD et pour soutenir les arguments que je présente aujourd’hui. Les parties sont, de toute évidence, distinctes. La partie 3 du projet de loi C‑27 est entièrement indépendante. Elle n’a pas à être accompagnée d’autres parties. Elle n’est pas associée ni liée à d’autres parties précédentes de la loi et ces dernières n’y renvoient pas.
Si je mentionne l'interprétation restrictive, c'est pour donner un argument de plus à la présidence pour tenir compte de l'esprit, de l'intention et du but de cette innovation, c'est-à-dire permettre aux députés de distinguer clairement les dispositions législatives auxquelles ils sont favorables de celles auxquelles ils ne le sont pas. Monsieur le Président, je vous exhorte à garder cela à l'esprit lorsque vous soupèserez les arguments qui vous ont été présentés. J'espère que vous trancherez en notre faveur et que vous donnerez la possibilité aux députés de voter séparément sur la partie 3.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-11-15 12:11 [p.9474]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I am just curious; I do not think we have quorum in the House at the moment.
Monsieur le Président, j'invoque le Règlement. Par simple curiosité, j'aimerais savoir si nous avons le quorum à la Chambre dans le moment.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-11-15 12:21 [p.9475]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, I hate to be a nag but it looks like we do not have quorum in the House.
Monsieur le Président, j'invoque le Règlement. Je n'aime pas faire le difficile, mais il ne semble pas y avoir quorum à la Chambre.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-11-15 12:22 [p.9475]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I believe it is not proper to call out the presence of or the absence of anyone in the House. I would also make note that it is the Liberals' job to do the work in the House, with their NDP lapdogs. It is not being done properly.
Monsieur le Président, je crois qu'il est déplacé de signaler la présence ou l'absence de qui que ce soit à la Chambre. Je tiens également à souligner qu'il revient aux libéraux de faire le travail à la Chambre, de concert avec leurs chiens de poche néo-démocrates. Ce travail n'est pas fait correctement.
Collapse
View Kelly Block Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kelly Block Profile
2022-11-15 19:00 [p.9534]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I do not believe we have quorum.
Madame la Présidente, je ne crois pas qu'il y a quorum.
Collapse
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-11-03 18:36 [p.9326]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I would point out that there is not a quorum.
Madame la Présidente, j'invoque le Règlement. Je vous signale que nous n'avons pas le quorum.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-10-20 12:14 [p.8584]
Expand
Madam Speaker, this is a point of order. It is not debate. The member constantly said that there was no motion put forward by the opposition that involved the GST. I will read from the March 22 Hansard when the opposition motion was, “(i) Canadians are facing severe hardship due to the dramatic escalation in gas prices, (ii) the 5% collected under the Goods and Services Tax (GST), the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST), and the Quebec Sales Tax (QST) creates increased revenue for the federal government”.
This is not debate, Madam Speaker. This is the actual information. The member from wherever he is from is—
Madame la Présidente, j’invoque le Règlement. Cela ne relève pas du débat. Mon collègue dit tout le temps que l’opposition n’a présenté aucune motion sur la TPS. Je vais lire un extrait de la motion de l’opposition dans le hansard du 22 mars: « [...] (i) les Canadiens vivent de graves difficultés en raison de l’augmentation spectaculaire des prix de l’essence, (ii) les 5 % perçus au titre de la taxe sur les produits et services (TPS), la taxe de vente harmonisée (TVH) et la taxe de vente du Québec (TVQ) produisent des recettes pour le gouvernement fédéral [...] »
Cela ne relève pas du débat, madame la Présidente. Ce sont des faits concrets. Le député de je ne sais où est…
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-10-06 16:10 [p.8261]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I understand that we are debating an opposition day motion today from the NDP about food supply. I am unsure of the relevance of what the member across—
Madame la Présidente, je crois comprendre que nous débattons aujourd'hui d'une motion de l'opposition présentée par le NPD sur l'approvisionnement alimentaire. Je ne suis pas certaine de la pertinence de ce que le député d'en face...
Collapse
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2022-10-06 16:11 [p.8261]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the member for Battlefords—Lloydminster was very clear that she would like to see the member stick to the topic at hand. Also, the fact is that our leader has been very clear on this issue. He condemns it and condemns all the—
Madame la Présidente, la députée de Battlefords—Lloydminster a dit très clairement qu'elle aimerait que le député s'en tienne au sujet à l'étude. J'ajouterais aussi que notre chef s'est exprimé très clairement. Il dénonce la situation et dénonce tous les...
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-10-04 15:19 [p.8097]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I believe that if you check this side of the House, we were not withholding unanimous consent. We were not saying boo; we were saying boo-urns. Please allow him to continue.
Monsieur le Président, j'invoque le Règlement. Je crois que si vous vérifiez de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous ne refusions pas le consentement unanime. Nous ne disions pas « chou »; nous disions « chou-ette ». Veuillez lui permettre de poursuivre.
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-21 15:15 [p.7484]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, there seemed to be some confusion on the government's part during question period, so I would like to seek unanimous consent to table a document showing that combined CPP and EI premiums have gone up almost $700 under the current government. I would like to be able to—
Monsieur le Président, il semble qu'une certaine confusion régnait du côté du gouvernement pendant la période des questions. J'aimerais donc demander le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour déposer un document montrant que, combinées, les cotisations au Régime de pensions du Canada et à l'assurance-emploi ont augmenté de près de 700 $ depuis que le gouvernement actuel est au pouvoir. J'aimerais pouvoir...
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-06-14 12:11 [p.6660]
Expand
Madam Speaker, on a point of order, members' screens have to be on for them to count as being in the House.
Madame la Présidente, j'invoque le Règlement. Les députés doivent activer leur caméra pour qu'ils soient considérés comme étant présents à la Chambre.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-05-30 13:27
Expand
Mr. Speaker, we hear this narrative all the time with the Liberal Party saying that the Conservatives do not co-operate. We had unanimous consent on the constitutional amendment for Saskatchewan, so we have co-operated—
Monsieur le Président, les libéraux affirment constamment que les députés conservateurs ne coopèrent pas. Or, puisqu'il y a eu consentement unanime en ce qui concerne la modification constitutionnelle pour la Saskatchewan, nous avons coopéré...
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 31 | Page: 1 of 3

1
2
3
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data