Hansard
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 88
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-14 13:44 [p.9392]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I deeply appreciate the speech that my colleague gave today, especially the part about committees and her concern for veterans affairs. I share that concern given the fact that we have had two meetings cancelled at a time when we want the minister and the deputy minister to return to give a clearer understanding of their testimony versus what came forward from our veterans. It is very disconcerting that this is happening.
I would like the member to speak momentarily about the fact that, as I am hearing, the Liberals are upset that we on this side of the House want to speak. They are now giving us more time to speak, but they are removing themselves from that equation with the opportunity to not have to meet quorum. How does she feel about that?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie grandement ma collègue du discours qu'elle a prononcé aujourd'hui, en particulier de ses remarques sur les comités et de sa préoccupation pour le comité des anciens combattants. Je partage cette préoccupation, puisque deux réunions de ce comité ont été annulées, alors que nous souhaitons que le ministre et son sous‑ministre y reviennent pour clarifier leurs témoignages par rapport aux dires de nos anciens combattants. L'annulation de ces réunions est fort troublante.
J'aimerais que la députée parle un instant du fait que, selon ce que j'ai entendu, les libéraux sont mécontents que nous voulions nous exprimer, de ce côté‑ci de la Chambre. Ils nous donnent maintenant plus de temps pour nous exprimer, mais ils se soustraient de l'équation en rendant possible l'absence de quorum. Qu'en pense‑t‑elle?
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-03 12:58 [p.9272]
Expand
Madam Speaker, in a recent take-note debate on mental health, I spoke about our veterans, who have unique challenges that impact their well-being and mental wellness and that very few civilians face. They embody the emotional and mental toll of having been deployed to many theatres of war, sometimes for peacemaking or peacekeeping, where they and their comrades face peril, injury and death and where they participate in and witness violence that they cannot and do not want to begin to share with anyone outside of those who have also had that lived experience.
Too many have experienced mental, physical and sexual abuse from those they thought would be their mentors and have their backs no matter what. Many come home with physical and/or mental and emotional injuries after serving and they struggle to cope. They struggle on a whole other level as they start to realize they are failing in their relationships with their spouses and children. Many struggle with trying to fit into a civilian world, where, from their life experience and perspective, they have trouble finding their place.
Then there is a challenge that is so counterintuitive and disturbing to me that it grieves my heart and keeps me awake. It is the added injury that sanctuary trauma inflicts on so many of our veterans. Sanctuary trauma is what happens to the spirit and mind of veterans when they experience the failure of the government to fulfill its promise to take care of them and their families. This happens while they serve and put their lives on the line and when they choose to leave or retire or are released due to injuries that, in the mind of their superiors, prevent them from any form of continued service in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Having served now for seven years on the veterans affairs standing committee under multiple ministers and ombudsmen, everything from homelessness and mental wellness to seamless transition and the growing backlogs has been studied multiple times in different ways. Recommendations on top of recommendations have been made in reports that sometimes do not get the proper response from the government.
The recent report from the Auditor General reinforces the need for VAC to have clear paths and metrics to determine its outcomes. The bureaucracy is broken. Yes, buckets of money have been announced for veterans, but the processes in place are not capable of getting it out the door. Veteran Affairs Canada is broken, and veterans and their families are experiencing unprecedented levels of sanctuary trauma because of that.
Last night, I reached out to four individuals in very different veterans organizations that I deeply appreciate and that are part of those that are making a difference in combatting veteran homelessness.
Stephen Beardwood of Veterans House Charity said this to me:
If we only treat the symptoms but not the cause, we will have rows of housing with full bank accounts and no one spending the money or living in the accommodations. We have missed an incredible opportunity to change what causes homelessness. We need to change our approach. We must first start by greeting humanity with humanity, not bureaucracy and political solutions. I am hopeful one day soon we will embrace change as an opportunity to grow.” He says in the end, “Imagine if instead of wading into the stream daily to rescue drowning victims, we instead went upstream and kept them from falling in.
Alan Mulawyshyn, the deputy executive director of Veterans' House Canada, is actually in Toronto today at a three-day Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness conference, where they are having a veteran homelessness breakout sessions stream for the very first time. His words for me today were to remind Parliament of its all-party motion of June 2019, which set the goal to both prevent and end veteran homelessness in Canada by 2025.
Debbie Lowther, the CEO and co-founder of VETS Canada, emailed me last night to say:
[A]ll levels of government must come together in a non-partisan way and commit to addressing Veterans’ homelessness. It’s not enough to talk about the issue; we need action, not words. And we don’t need more research. A big step in the right direction would be to provide sufficient funding to those on the front lines trying not only to confront the problem but to prevent it. Policymakers should consult these groups and Veterans with lived experience to ascertain the greatest needs. And listen to what they are told. The problem will only worsen due to the nationwide housing crisis and the rising cost of living.
Organizations such as VETS Canada are no longer recognized as specialized service providers according to the Auditor General’s report. I cannot even understand this. I know Deb and VETS Canada well, and I cannot comprehend any good reason why they are not valued and validated by VAC.
Like the United States, it is time for Veterans Affairs Canada to have a catalogue listed of all of these amazing veteran-centric organizations, with veterans helping other veterans, so that veterans can reach out. They will choose the ones they know are the most effective in this country.
David Howard, president and CEO of Homes for Heroes Foundation, told me, “[D]eveloping solutions needs to come through partnerships between the municipal, the provincial and federal governments and at the same time private businesses and charity organizations like Homes For Heroes.” He said, as we have heard today, that the Senate published a report stating there were 5,000 veterans experiencing homelessness across Canada, but he believes the number is closer to 10,000. I have to agree, because I am becoming more and more aware of the many homeless veterans in my province alone who are not getting the care they need.
He says traditionally our veterans do not self-identify. They are proud and are not using these services because they believe they are for women and children. This is more than just homelessness. It is veterans who are living rough, living in the woods and couch surfing.
He also says that a number of our vets are struggling to transition back to civilian life, and the Homes For Heroes program builds tiny home villages with wraparound social supports to address the problem. That means they are coming off the streets into a home, working with social workers and working on the issues that put them on the streets in the first place, and now they are finding a sense of belonging. They then transition out of the program, with the majority of them working full time, and move to permanent housing, making room for more veterans.
He says, “We are fortunate to have the support of Veterans Affairs, as they are a partner in supplying funding for our social workers.” CMHC is a partner and is providing funding for builds, but more is needed. He goes on to say, “I've been involved supporting our veterans for 25 years and we have an opportunity to eliminate the issue, but every day that goes by, the problem gets worse, and action is needed immediately.”
He says it is a struggle to convince municipal and provincial governments to grant them land access for their projects, and also says they are struggling to find funds at the federal level, as the current government has not implemented housing for homeless veterans in its mandate. It is cheaper to house our veterans and have them work with social workers to move on and transition back to civilian life than it is to have these heroes, who stood on guard for us, living on the streets.
I will end my intervention today by reiterating what I believe Stephen, Alan, Debbie and David have said.
Imagine if instead of wading into the stream daily to rescue drowning victims, we went upstream and kept them from falling in. Who is serving whom and when? The government is not preventing them from falling in. The broken processes are pushing them in. The intentions expressed in the all-party motion of June 2019, which set the goal to both prevent and end veterans homelessness in Canada by 2025, must be honoured. All levels of government must work together in step with private businesses and charities to succeed.
In the case of the federal government’s direct role right now, right here, it has a duty to consult, listen and implement what it hears from the lived experience of veterans’ organizations, which veterans and their families are trusting, by providing sufficient funding that empowers them to do the work that, quite honestly, I do not believe and it clearly appears government cannot accomplish directly. It has a duty to consult, listen and respond to the lived experience of individual veterans and serving members. It has a duty to end the sanctuary trauma that has become increasingly harmful to our veterans over these last seven years.
I hear over and over again that we have the highest level of demoralization there has ever been in our Canadian Forces. There is a lack of willingness to even enlist, and veterans are being encouraged to consider options other than care. One comment was made in committee that they can access MAID in 90 days, but it is taking them over 265 days to get the care they need.
Madame la Présidente, récemment, dans le cadre d'un débat exploratoire sur la santé mentale, j'ai évoqué le fait que nos anciens combattants connaissent des difficultés uniques qui ont une incidence sur leur bien-être et leur santé mentale et auxquelles très peu de civils sont confrontés. Ils incarnent le stress émotionnel et mental qu'implique le fait d'avoir été déployés à de nombreux endroits où eux-mêmes et leurs camarades ont bravé des périls, des blessures et la mort. Ils sont à la fois acteurs et témoins d'une violence qu'ils ne peuvent pas et ne veulent pas raconter à quiconque en dehors de ceux qui ont également vécu cette expérience.
Ils sont trop nombreux à avoir été victimes d'agressions psychologiques, physiques et sexuelles de la part de ceux qu'ils pensaient être leurs mentors ou sur qui ils croyaient pouvoir compter quoi qu'il arrive. À la fin de leur service, beaucoup rentrent chez eux avec des blessures corporelles, psychologiques ou psychiques et luttent pour s'en sortir. Ils luttent aussi, d'une tout autre façon, lorsqu'ils s'aperçoivent de l'échec de leurs relations avec leur conjoint et leurs enfants. Beaucoup ont du mal à s'intégrer au monde civil, dans lequel, d'après leur expérience et leur perspective, ils peinent à trouver leur place.
À cela s’ajoute un problème que je trouve très paradoxal et très troublant. Il s’agit de la blessure supplémentaire que le traumatisme du sanctuaire inflige à tant de nos anciens combattants. Le traumatisme du sanctuaire est ce qui détruit l’esprit et l’âme des anciens combattants lorsque le gouvernement ne tient pas sa promesse de prendre soin d’eux et de leur famille. Ce traumatisme survient quand ils servent leur pays au péril de leur vie, quand ils choisissent de quitter les forces armées ou de prendre leur retraite ou qu’ils sont libérés à la suite de blessures qui, dans l’esprit de leurs supérieurs, les empêchent de continuer de servir sous quelque forme que ce soit dans les Forces armées canadiennes.
Depuis sept ans maintenant que je siège au Comité permanent des anciens combattants, sous plusieurs ministres et ombudsmans, j’ai vu divers enjeux être étudiés plusieurs fois et de différentes façons, de l’itinérance au bien-être mental, en passant par la transition efficace et harmonieuse à la vie civile, sans oublier les dossiers en attente toujours plus nombreux. Quantité de recommandations ont été formulées dans des rapports auxquels, parfois, le gouvernement n’apporte pas de réponse satisfaisante.
Le récent rapport de la vérificatrice générale insiste sur la nécessité pour Anciens Combattants Canada d’établir un plan et des paramètres clairs pour évaluer ses résultats. L’administration faillit à la tâche. Certes, des sommes énormes ont été annoncées pour les anciens combattants, mais les processus en place ne permettent pas de les débloquer. Rien ne va plus au ministère des Anciens Combattants et, de ce fait, les anciens combattants et leur famille subissent comme jamais le traumatisme du sanctuaire.
Hier soir, j’ai communiqué avec quatre personnes de quatre associations d’anciens combattants très différentes que j’apprécie beaucoup et qui font partie de celles qui font bouger les choses dans la lutte contre l’itinérance de ce segment de la population.
Stephen Beardwood, de l'organisaton caritative Veterans House, m’a dit:
Si nous traitons seulement les symptômes, mais pas la cause, nous aurons des rangées de logements et des comptes en banque garnis, mais personne ne dépensera d’argent ou ne vivra dans ces logements. Nous avons laissé passer une occasion incroyable de changer ce qui cause l’itinérance. Nous devons changer d’approche; nous devons d’abord faire preuve d’humanité et ne pas faire passer l’administration et les solutions politiques en premier lieu. J'espère qu’un jour prochain, nous verrons dans le changement une possibilité de grandir. En conclusion, imaginez si, au lieu de patauger dans l’eau tous les jours pour sauver des victimes de la noyade, nous allions en amont pour les empêcher de tomber à l’eau.
Alan Mulawyshyn, le directeur général adjoint de Veterans House Canada, se trouve aujourd’hui à Toronto où il participe à une conférence de trois jours de l’Alliance canadienne pour mettre fin à l’itinérance où sont diffusées pour la toute première fois des réunions en petits groupes d’anciens combattants sans abri. Ce qu’il m’a dit aujourd’hui, c’est de rappeler au Parlement la motion multipartite adoptée en juin 2019 qui fixait comme objectif de prévenir l’itinérance chez les anciens combattants au Canada et d’y mettre un terme d’ici 2025.
Debbie Lowther, la PDG et cofondatrice de VETS Canada, m’a envoyé un courriel hier soir disant ceci:
Tous les ordres de gouvernement doivent se réunir de façon non partisane et s’engager à s’attaquer à l’itinérance des vétérans. Il ne suffit pas de parler du problème, il faut des gestes et non de paroles. Nous n’avons pas besoin de plus de recherches. Un grand pas dans la bonne direction consisterait à fournir un financement suffisant à ceux qui sont en première ligne et qui essaient non seulement de s'attaquer au problème, mais aussi de le prévenir. Les décideurs devraient consulter ces groupes et les vétérans ayant vécu l'expérience pour cerner les besoins les plus importants et écouter ce qu’on leur dit. Le problème ne fera que s’aggraver en raison de la crise du logement à l’échelle nationale et de l’augmentation du coût de la vie.
Le rapport de la vérificatrice générale révèle que des organismes comme VETS Canada ne sont plus reconnus comme des fournisseurs de services spécialisés. Voilà qui dépasse l’entendement. Je connais bien Mme Lowther et VETS Canada et je ne vois aucune bonne raison pour laquelle ils ne sont pas reconnus et valorisés par Anciens Combattants Canada.
À l’instar des États-Unis, il est temps qu’Anciens Combattants Canada dispose d’un catalogue de tous ces incroyables organismes axés sur les vétérans, où des vétérans en aident d’autres, afin que les vétérans puissent communiquer avec eux. Ils choisiront ceux qu’ils savent être les plus efficaces au Canada.
David Howard, président et chef de la direction de la fondation Homes for Heroes, m’a dit que l’élaboration de solutions doit passer par des partenariats entre les administrations municipales, provinciales et fédérales, ainsi que des entreprises privées et des organismes caritatifs comme Homes for Heroes. Comme nous l’avons entendu aujourd’hui, il a dit que le Sénat a publié un rapport indiquant qu’il y avait 5 000 vétérans sans abri au Canada, mais il croit que le nombre serait plus près de 10 000. Je suis d’accord, car je suis de plus en plus consciente du nombre de vétérans sans abri qui ne reçoivent pas les soins dont ils ont besoin dans ma seule province.
Il dit qu’en général, nos vétérans ne s'auto-identifient pas. Ils sont fiers et n’utilisent pas ces services parce qu’ils croient qu’ils sont destinés aux femmes et aux enfants. Il ne s’agit pas seulement d’itinérance. Il s’agit de vétérans qui vivent à la dure, dans les bois, d’un divan à un autre.
Il dit aussi que plusieurs de nos vétérans ont du mal à se réinsérer dans la vie civile et que le programme Homes For Heroes construit des villages de mini-maisons où l’on offre un soutien social global pour résoudre ce problème. Cela signifie qu’ils sortent de la rue pour vivre dans une maison, qu’ils travaillent avec des travailleurs sociaux et s’attaquent aux problèmes qui les ont poussés à la rue en premier lieu, et qu’ils retrouvent un sentiment d’appartenance. Ils quittent ensuite le programme, la majorité d’entre eux travaillant à temps plein, et ils emménagent dans un logement permanent, laissant la place à d’autres vétérans.
Il ajoute que son organisme est chanceux d’avoir le soutien d’Anciens Combattants Canada, un partenaire qui fournit le financement pour les travailleurs sociaux. La SCHL est un partenaire qui fournit du financement pour les constructions, mais il en faut davantage. M. Howard qui s’occupe des vétérans depuis 25 ans a ajouté que nous avons l’occasion d’éliminer le problème, mais qu'à chaque jour qui passe, le problème s’aggrave. Bref, il faut agir immédiatement.
Il dit qu’il est très difficile de convaincre les administrations municipales et les gouvernements provinciaux de leur donner accès à des terrains pour leurs projets, et il dit également qu’ils ont du mal à trouver des fonds au fédéral, car le gouvernement actuel n’a pas mis de mesures en place en ce qui a trait au logement pour les anciens combattants sans abri dans son mandat. Or, il est moins coûteux de loger nos anciens combattants et de les faire travailler avec des travailleurs sociaux pour faciliter leur retour à la vie civile que de laisser ces héros, qui nous ont protégés, vivre à la rue.
Je terminerai mon intervention aujourd’hui en récapitulant en quelque sorte ce qu'ont dit Stephen, Alan, Debbie et David.
Imaginons si, au lieu de devoir plonger dans l’eau tous les jours pour sauver des gens de la noyade, nous allions en amont pour les empêcher de tomber à l’eau. Qui sert qui, et quand? Le gouvernement ne les empêche pas de tomber à l’eau. Les processus défaillants les y poussent. Les intentions exprimées dans la motion omnipartite de juin 2019, qui fixait à la fois comme objectif de prévenir l’itinérance chez les anciens combattants au Canada et d’y mettre fin d’ici 2025, doivent être honorées. Tous les pouvoirs publics doivent travailler de concert avec des entreprises du secteur privé et des organismes de bienfaisance pour réussir.
Quant au rôle direct du gouvernement fédéral à l’heure actuelle, ici même, il doit consulter et écouter les associations d’anciens combattants — qui ont la confiance des anciens combattants et de leur famille — et mettre en œuvre ce qu'elles disent en connaissance de cause, en fournissant des fonds suffisants pour leur permettre de faire le travail que, très franchement, je ne crois pas que le gouvernement puisse faire directement, et les faits le montrent clairement. Il a le devoir de consulter et d’écouter les anciens combattants et les membres actifs des Forces armées canadiennes et d'agir face à ce qu'ils ont vécu. Il a le devoir de mettre fin au traumatisme du sanctuaire qui nuit de plus en plus à nos anciens combattants depuis sept ans.
J’entends sans cesse dire que les Forces canadiennes n’ont jamais été aussi démoralisées. Il y a même un manque de volonté de s’engager, et les anciens combattants sont encouragés à envisager des options autres que les soins. Nous avons entendu au comité qu’ils peuvent avoir accès à l’aide médicale à mourir en 90 jours, alors qu’ils doivent attendre plus de 265 jours pour recevoir les soins dont ils ont besoin.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-03 13:09 [p.9274]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as a new member of Parliament in 2016, I was dumbfounded when I went to the veterans affairs standing committee for the first time. A new report had been created in 2014 along those same lines, with all kinds of recommendations agreed to by the entire committee, yet there we were considering to restudy those same issues, and we actually did. I said that I was new but could not understand why we were not taking up the previous reports, looking at what recommendations the government agreed to, studying where they were at and why they were or were not accomplished, and moving forward with them.
I agree with the member that there is a lot of frustration when we study a number of these things over and over again. We hear the right answers from stakeholders and veterans organizations on these issues, but somehow they are not getting through.
Madame la Présidente, jeune députée en 2016, j’ai été stupéfaite lorsque j’ai siégé pour la première fois au Comité permanent des anciens combattants. Un nouveau rapport avait été rédigé en 2014 sur le même thème; toutes sortes de recommandations avaient été approuvées par l'ensemble du comité, et pourtant, nous envisagions de refaire une étude sur ces mêmes sujets, et c’est ce que nous avons fait. J’ai dit que j’étais nouvelle et que je n’arrivais pas à comprendre pourquoi nous ne reprenions pas les rapports précédents pour voir quelles recommandations le gouvernement avait acceptées, pour savoir ce qu'il en était advenu et pourquoi on y avait ou n'y avait pas donné suite, et pour aller de l’avant.
Je suis d’accord avec le député qu’il est très frustrant d’étudier un certain nombre de ces sujets encore et encore. Nous entendons les bonnes réponses des intervenants et des associations d’anciens combattants sur ces sujets, mais apparemment, le message ne passe pas.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-03 13:11 [p.9274]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the member is basically echoing what we heard from the Auditor General regarding where the current government is in its ability to manage the business of providing for our veterans. Its systems are such that it does not know what is happening and where. Even when it has tried to follow something, it has not put the right metrics in place to truly determine what is happening, and I appreciate that. It is part of why I say the government has a role here, a very important role, but there are areas where I believe small businesses, charities and veteran-centric organizations, which truly understand the dynamics, are the ones we should be empowering to do this work.
Madame la Présidente, le député fait essentiellement écho à ce que la vérificatrice générale a dit au sujet de la capacité du gouvernement actuel d'administrer les services aux anciens combattants. Ses systèmes sont conçus de telle sorte que le gouvernement ne sait pas quels sont les services offerts ni où ils sont offerts. Même lorsqu'il essaie de faire un suivi, il ne se fonde pas sur les bons indicateurs pour bien déterminer ce qui se passe. C'est notamment pour cette raison que je dis que, même si je sais que le gouvernement doit jouer un rôle très important, à certains égards, j'estime que les petites entreprises, les organismes de bienfaisance et les organismes d'aide aux anciens combattants, qui sont bien au fait de la situation, devraient être mieux outillés pour faire ce travail.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-01 13:31 [p.9153]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would ask the member if he is aware of the metrics used to determine the number of COVID-infected individuals entering Canada that validated the millions and millions of dollars spent on the ArriveCAN app. Does he have a number?
Madame la Présidente, j’aimerais demander à mon collègue s’il est au courant des mesures utilisées pour calculer le nombre de personnes infectées par la COVID qui entraient au Canada et si ce nombre justifie les millions et les millions de dollars dépensés pour l’application ArriveCAN. Peut-il nous donner un chiffre?
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-01 15:16 [p.9171]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would ask my colleague why she thinks this NDP-Liberal costly coalition becomes so irritated every time we ask it for metrics, for proof behind what they do; in this case, the metrics used to determine the number of COVID-infected individuals entering Canada that validated the $54 million spent on the ArriveCAN app.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais demander à ma collègue pourquoi, selon elle, les députés de la coûteuse coalition néo-démocrate—libérale sont à ce point irrités chaque fois que nous demandons des chiffres, des preuves justifiant ce qu'ils font. Dans le cas présent, nous demandons les données utilisées pour établir le nombre de personnes atteintes de la COVID entrant au Canada qui a servi à justifier des dépenses de 54 millions de dollars pour l'application ArriveCAN.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-11-01 16:57 [p.9186]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, prior to the last election, basically the exact same government was in power. We on this side of the floor, as the opposition, called on it to share the scientific background and all of the evidence that verified its decisions in regard to COVID, and it stymied us on that. Today we are calling on it to explain to us why this ArriveCAN app was so important.
I have asked it for the metrics of how many people were coming across our borders with COVID, and I did not get any information on that. What is the member's view on the need for the government to come clean on its metrics?
Monsieur le Président, avant les dernières élections, c'est pratiquement le même gouvernement qui était au pouvoir. Nous, de ce côté de la Chambre, en tant qu'opposition, avons demandé au gouvernement de nous faire part du contexte scientifique et de toutes les preuves sur lesquelles il avait fondé ses décisions à propos de la COVID, mais il nous a fermé la porte à ce sujet. Aujourd'hui, nous lui demandons de nous expliquer pourquoi l'application ArriveCAN était si importante.
J'ai demandé au gouvernement de nous donner les chiffres, de nous dire combien de personnes traversaient nos frontières avec la COVID, et je n'ai obtenu aucune information à ce sujet. Quel est le point de vue du député sur la nécessité pour le gouvernement d'être tout à fait transparent à propos de ses chiffres?
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-26 16:32 [p.8911]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, citizens and residents of Canada are drawing the attention of the House of Commons to the following: The Liberal Party of Canada promised in its 2021 platform to deny the charitable status of organizations that have convictions about abortion, which the Liberal Party views as dishonest. This may jeopardize, they say, the charitable status of many other institutions, such as hospitals, churches, schools, homeless shelters and other charitable organizations which do amazing work in Canada. They do not agree with the Liberal Party on this matter for reasons of conscience.
Many Canadians depend on and benefit from charitable work done by such organizations, and the government has previously used a values test, through the summer jobs program, denying funding to organizations not willing to endorse the political positions of the governing party.
They therefore call on the government to recognize that all Canadians have a right under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms to freedom of expression without discrimination. They also call on the government to protect and preserve the application of charitable status rules that are politically and ideologically neutral, without discrimination on the basis of political or religious values and without the imposition of another values test.
Monsieur le Président, des citoyens et des résidents du Canada attirent l'attention de la Chambre des communes sur le fait que le Parti libéral du Canada a promis dans sa plateforme de 2021 de refuser le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance à des organismes ayant des convictions en matière d’avortement que le Parti libéral juge « malhonnêtes ». Ils soutiennent qu'une telle mesure pourrait mettre en péril le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance d’hôpitaux, de lieux de culte, d’écoles, de refuges pour sans-abri et d’autres organismes de bienfaisance qui font de l'excellent travail au Canada, mais qui ne sont pas du même avis que le Parti libéral à ce sujet pour des raisons de conscience.
De nombreux Canadiens comptent sur les œuvres de bienfaisance de tels organismes, et le gouvernement a déjà employé un « critère lié aux valeurs » dans le cadre du programme Emplois d’été Canada, pour refuser d’accorder une aide financière aux organismes qui n’acceptaient pas de souscrire aux positions politiques du parti au pouvoir.
Par conséquent, les pétitionnaires prient le gouvernement de reconnaître que la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés garantit à tous les Canadiens la liberté d’expression sans discrimination. En outre, ils demandent au gouvernement de continuer d'appliquer les mêmes règles déterminant le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance en toute neutralité sur le plan politique et idéologique, sans discrimination fondée sur les valeurs politiques ou religieuses et sans un nouveau « critère lié aux valeurs ».
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-26 17:07 [p.8917]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate this opportunity to challenge the fact that we are doing this today. The minister mentioned that people stand up and repeat and repeat and repeat. It is really important to me to have the opportunity to represent my constituents in this place and speak on issues that are important to me and to them, regardless of who else has spoken on them already. Quite often in this House, different people are in the room at different times, and it is an opportunity to continue that conversation.
As well, this rush the government seems to find itself in so often is because of mismanagement of its programs. An example would be its decision on COVID wage support. It came up with a percentage. We worked hard to convince the government this was not going to be effective enough, and we had to turn around and come back to this place and go through the motions again because of a change there.
On providing loans through the banks, it did not include the credit unions as a means of doing that, and it took time for our constituents and the credit unions to bring that to the forefront. That is why we needed to continue: to ensure things were being handled in certain ways. That is our responsibility in this place.
I am just wondering what the minister's views would be on the fact that these are things the opposition needs to have the opportunity to do.
Monsieur le Président, je suis reconnaissante d'avoir l'occasion de contester la motion dont nous sommes saisis. Le ministre a mentionné que des députés prennent la parole pour sans cesse répéter la même chose. Il est vraiment important pour moi d'avoir l'occasion de représenter les résidants de ma circonscription à la Chambre et d'aborder des questions qui sont importantes pour moi et pour eux, peu importe qui en a déjà parlé. Il arrive très souvent à la Chambre que diverses personnes se trouvent dans l'enceinte à des moments différents, et cela nous offre une bonne occasion de poursuivre le débat.
De plus, si le gouvernement semble se retrouver si souvent pressé, c'est à cause de la mauvaise gestion de ses programmes. Par exemple, il y a sa décision à l'égard de la subvention salariale liée à la COVID. Il a fixé un pourcentage. Nous avons travaillé fort pour tenter de convaincre le gouvernement que cela ne serait pas assez efficace, et nous avons dû revenir ici et recommencer en raison d'un changement.
En ce qui concerne l'octroi de prêts par l'intermédiaire des banques, cette mesure n'incluait pas les coopératives de crédit, et il a fallu du temps aux Canadiens et aux coopératives de crédit pour le mettre en lumière. Voilà pourquoi nous devions continuer: pour nous assurer que les choses seraient traitées d'une certaine manière. C'est notre responsabilité dans cette enceinte.
Je me demande simplement ce que pense le ministre du fait qu'il faut permettre à l'opposition de faire ce que je viens de décrire.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-20 20:12 [p.8656]
Expand
Madam Chair, I am so pleased to have the opportunity to speak in this take-note debate on mental health this evening. I will focus my comments on the challenges that our Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP veterans, and indirectly their families, face with mental health injuries.
Our veterans have unique challenges to their mental health that very few civilians face. They embody the emotional and mental toil of having been deployed to many theatres where they or their comrades face peril, injuries and death. They participate in and witness violence that they cannot and do not want to begin to share with anyone outside of those who have also lived that experience.
Many have experienced mental, physical and sexual abuse from those they thought were their mentors or had their backs no matter what. Many come home with physical and/or mental and emotional injuries after serving and struggling to cope. They struggle on a whole other level, as they know they are failing in their relationships with their spouses and children. Many struggle with trying to fit into a civilian world, where, from their life experience and perspective, they struggle to find their place.
Then there is a challenge that is so counterintuitive and disturbing to me. Having served for seven years on the veterans affairs standing committee in this place, this is something that grieves my heart and keeps me awake, as I think of the added injury sanctuary trauma inflicts on so many of our veterans.
Sanctuary trauma is what happens to the spirit and mind of a veteran when they experience the failure of the government to fulfill its promise to take care of them and their families. The number of veterans who take their own lives is a significantly higher percentage than that of the civilian population. These are the ones who have been failed the most. The recent revelation of a VAC employee pushing a veteran to choose MAID to end his struggles with a brain injury and PTSD shows just how broken our duty to care is.
I will share only one of so many instances where the needs of the veteran are undervalued because those who are making the decisions about their care failed—
Madame la présidente, je suis ravie d'avoir l'occasion de prendre la parole ce soir dans le cadre de ce débat exploratoire sur la santé mentale. Je concentrerai mes commentaires sur les défis auxquels sont confrontés les vétérans des Forces armées canadiennes et de la GRC, ainsi que leur famille de façon indirecte, en raison de blessures psychologiques.
Les vétérans sont confrontés à des défis uniques en matière de santé mentale, auxquels très peu de civils doivent faire face. Ils incarnent le stress émotionnel et mental qu'implique le fait d'avoir été déployés à de nombreux endroits où eux-mêmes et leurs camarades ont bravé des périls, des blessures et la mort. Ils sont à la fois acteurs et témoins d'une violence qu'ils ne peuvent pas et ne veulent pas raconter à quiconque en dehors de ceux qui ont également vécu cette expérience.
Beaucoup ont été victimes d'agressions psychologiques, physiques et sexuelles de la part de ceux qu'ils pensaient être leurs mentors ou sur qui ils croyaient pouvoir compter quoi qu'il arrive. Beaucoup rentrent chez eux avec des blessures corporelles, psychologiques ou psychiques après avoir servi et lutté pour s'en sortir. Ils luttent aussi, d'une tout autre façon, lorsqu'ils s'aperçoivent de l'échec de leurs relations avec leur conjoint et leurs enfants. Beaucoup ont du mal à s'intégrer au monde civil, dans lequel, d'après leur expérience et leur perspective, ils peinent à trouver leur place.
À cela s'ajoute un problème que je trouve très paradoxal et très troublant. Ayant siégé pendant sept ans au Comité permanent des anciens combattants de la Chambre, c'est quelque chose qui me fend le cœur et qui me tient éveillée, car je pense à la blessure supplémentaire que le traumatisme du sanctuaire inflige à tant de nos anciens combattants.
Le traumatisme du sanctuaire est ce qui détruit l'esprit et l'âme d'un ancien combattant lorsque le gouvernement ne tient pas sa promesse de prendre soin de lui et de sa famille. Le nombre d'anciens combattants qui s'enlèvent la vie constitue un pourcentage nettement plus élevé que celui au sein de la population civile. Ce sont eux qui ont été les plus délaissés. Nous avons appris récemment qu'un employé du ministère des Anciens Combattants aurait incité un ancien combattant à choisir l'aide médicale à mourir pour venir à bout de ses souffrances causées par une lésion cérébrale et un trouble de stress post-traumatique. Cette révélation montre à quel point le devoir de prendre soin n'est pas respecté.
Je ne vais donner qu'un exemple montrant comment les besoins des anciens combattants sont sous‑estimés parce que les personnes qui prennent les décisions concernant leurs soins ne...
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-20 20:14 [p.8656]
Expand
Madam Chair, I have so much to say in so little time.
I will share only one of the instances where the needs of the veterans are undervalued, because those who make the decisions about their care fail to consult the best sources for the answers, answers to the dilemma of backlogs, the best treatment, and how to release, retain and enlist with dignity. I will give one example of an instance of inflicting sanctuary trauma.
An article posted by the Canadian Press on August 7 stated that the federal government is “reimbursing a record number of veterans for medical marijuana”. This article prompted VAC to immediately limit when veterans can order their product within their monthly prescription. This caused veterans to suddenly not have any marijuana products for three months and caused a loss of cannabinoid buildup. For three weeks, veterans suffered physical pain, lack of sleep, nightmares and mental anguish. Why? It was because Veterans Affairs responded to a news story without any consultation with veterans who had turned to using cannabis rather than pharmaceuticals. Every veteran had to suddenly reconfigure their usage. VAC conducted a snap internal audit and now, because of another article in September by the same journalist, veterans are going to face harder thresholds to qualify for cannabis, as well as losing certain products that they depend upon.
One veteran from my riding said, “I need dry cannabis, CBD oils, concentrates, topicals and edibles. I use each product for a specific purpose and now it will be taken away.” He asked, “Why? Is it to save money? It can't be about the veterans' health, because they didn't consider consultation with them a priority in their response to what the media 'reported'.” He spoke to the difference in quality of life for him and asked why veterans are then being required to use pharmaceuticals. He said that he felt like a zombie under those conditions, and now with his cannabis prescription his life is so much better.
This is something we need to consider and research at VAC, and we need listen to veterans. What is the difference in outcomes? What is the difference in the cost of treatments?
The government reassessed its decision and the ordering period has been changed back to the original format. However, the original decision needs to be evaluated. Who authorized this change to the ordering period, and what did they base their decision on? Whoever it was had no perspective on how they ruined thousands of veterans that day and in subsequent weeks. It sent them into a very deep state of anxiety.
The veteran who shared this issue with me is only one of many veterans who have had to face heightened anxiety, depression and battles within their minds about the value placed on their lives after service. I will end with a very brief description of his service, so that perhaps those who hear it will more deeply appreciate his amazing service.
In 1996, he joined the Canadian Forces and then after a year of boot camp in the PPCLI battle school, he was posted to the 2nd Battalion in Manitoba. From 1998 to 2004, he was deployed to Bosnia, and in 2002, to Afghanistan. He was on the first Canadian combat mission since the Korean War. He was also deployed to Operation Peregrine, a domestic firefighting mission in B.C., in 2005. He was promoted to master corporal and posted as an instructor to the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School in Quebec. In 2008, upon promotion to sergeant, he was posted to the 1st Battalion in Edmonton, where he deployed to Afghanistan as headquarter commander. Sergeant Perry attended a year-long French language course and upon—
Madame la présidente, j'ai tant de choses à dire en si peu de temps.
Je ne vais donner qu'un exemple montrant comment les besoins des anciens combattants sont sous‑estimés parce que les personnes qui prennent les décisions sur leurs soins ne consultent pas les meilleures sources pour trouver des solutions au problème des arriérés, pour déterminer le traitement le plus approprié et les façons de les libérer, de les maintenir en poste et de les recruter avec dignité. Je vais parler d'un cas où on a fait subir un traumatisme du sanctuaire à des anciens combattants.
Dans un article publié par La Presse canadienne le 7 août, on pouvait lire que le gouvernement fédéral « rembourse un nombre record d’anciens combattants pour l’utilisation de cannabis médical ». Cet article a poussé le ministère des Anciens Combattants à limiter immédiatement la quantité de marijuana que les anciens combattants pouvaient commander dans le cadre de leur ordonnance mensuelle. À cause de cela, des anciens combattants ont soudainement été privés de marijuana pendant trois mois, ce qui a entraîné la perte de l'accumulation de cannabinoïdes. Pendant trois semaines, les anciens combattants ont souffert de douleurs physiques, d'insomnie, de cauchemars et d'angoisse. Pourquoi? C'est parce que le ministère des Anciens Combattants a réagi à un article sans même consulter les anciens combattants qui utilisaient désormais du cannabis au lieu de produits pharmaceutiques. Tous les anciens combattants ont soudainement été forcés de modifier leur usage. Le ministère a effectué une vérification interne éclair et, maintenant, à cause d'un autre article publié en septembre par le même journaliste, les anciens combattants devront respecter des critères plus sévères pour pouvoir se procurer du cannabis, et ils perdront certains produits dont ils dépendent.
Un vétéran de ma circonscription m'a dit: « J'ai besoin de cannabis sec, d'huiles de CBD, de concentrés, de topiques et de produits comestibles. J'utilise chaque produit dans un but précis, et maintenant on va me les enlever. » Il m'a demandé: « Pourquoi? Est-ce pour économiser de l'argent? Ce ne peut pas être dans l'intérêt de la santé des anciens combattants, car on n'a pas considéré que les consulter était une priorité pour prendre cette décision, qui a été motivée par ce qui se dit dans les médias ». Il a parlé de la différence que cela faisait pour lui sur le plan de la qualité de vie. Il a demandé pourquoi les anciens combattants sont alors obligés d'utiliser des produits pharmaceutiques. Il a dit qu'il se sentait comme un zombie avec ces derniers, alors qu'aujourd'hui, avec son ordonnance pour du cannabis, sa vie est tellement plus agréable.
C'est une question que le ministère des Anciens Combattants doit examiner et étudier, en écoutant ce que les anciens combattants ont à dire. Les résultats sont-ils différents? Quelle est la différence pour ce qui est du coût des traitements?
Le gouvernement a reconsidéré sa décision, et la période de commande a été modifiée pour revenir au format initial. Cependant, la décision de départ doit être évaluée. Qui a autorisé cette modification de la période de commande, et sur quoi s'est fondée cette décision? Qui que ce soit, il n'avait aucune idée qu'il avait ruiné la vie de milliers d'anciens combattants ce jour-là et dans les semaines qui ont suivi. Cela les a plongés dans un état d'anxiété très prononcé.
L'ancien combattant qui m'a parlé de ce problème n'est qu'un cas parmi tant d'autres qui ont dû composer avec une anxiété accrue, l'accentuation de leurs symptômes de dépression et l'intensification des combats qu'ils mènent dans leur tête concernant la valeur accordée à leur vie après le service militaire. Je termine par une brève description de son incroyable service militaire, de sorte que ceux qui sont à l'écoute puissent mieux l'apprécier.
En 1996, il s'est enrôlé dans les Forces canadiennes et après un an de camp d'entraînement à l'école de combat du Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, il a été affecté au 2e Bataillon, au Manitoba. Il a été déployé en Bosnie de 1998 à 2004, et en Afghanistan en 2002. Il a participé à la première mission canadienne de combat depuis la guerre de Corée. En 2005, il a participé à l'opération Peregrine, une mission intérieure de combat des incendies de forêt en Colombie‑Britannique. Il a été promu caporal-chef et nommé instructeur à l'École de leadership et de recrues des Forces canadiennes, au Québec. En 2008, après avoir obtenu le grade de sergent, il a été affecté au 1er Bataillon, à Edmonton, et déployé en Afghanistan à titre de commandant du quartier général. Le sergent Perry a suivi des cours de français pendant un an et lorsque...
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-20 20:18 [p.8657]
Expand
Madam Chair, I will continue with the veteran's service.
Upon promotion to warrant officer, he was posted back to the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School where he was course commander for the next generation of army officers. In 2014, he survived a domestic terrorist attack in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec. He was the “other person”. After that event, he retired in December 2016. Throughout his career, he deployed on countless exercises and training courses. He has earned three Operational Service Medals as well as individual recognition, having received the Canadian Forces' Decoration, the Sacrifice Medal and the Governor General's citation. He currently resides in my riding, in Spalding, with his wife. I think this is a man we need to listen to.
Madame la présidente, je vais continuer de parler des états de service du vétéran en question.
Après avoir été promu adjudant, il a de nouveau été envoyé à l'École de leadership et de recrues des Forces canadiennes à titre de commandant de cours chargé de former la prochaine génération d'officiers. En 2014, il a survécu à l'attentat terroriste survenu à Saint‑Jean‑sur‑Richelieu, au Québec. C'était lui, « l'autre personne ». Après cet événement, il a pris sa retraite en décembre 2016. Pendant toute sa carrière, il a été déployé pour de nombreux exercices et entraînements. Il a reçu trois Médailles du service opérationnel, ainsi que des reconnaissances individuelles, dont la Décoration des Forces canadiennes, la Médaille du sacrifice et la Citation du gouverneur général. Il habite maintenant dans ma circonscription, à Spalding, avec sa femme. Je crois que nous devrions écouter ce que cet homme a à dire.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-20 20:20 [p.8657]
Expand
Madam Chair, it is absolutely imperative that we create an environment, a culture and a society where people's basic needs are met. Certainly, in this circumstance, all of those things apply. A veteran without a home cannot heal. A veteran with family concerns struggles. It is a known fact that when veterans deploy, what they eat is not all that great. I went up north and experienced it.
When they get home, one of the first things they should have is an opportunity to go somewhere where their bodies get to heal and they get the food, nutrition and supports they need. In the broader sense as well, that is of absolute importance.
Madame la présidente, il est absolument impératif de créer un milieu, une culture et une société où les besoins fondamentaux des gens sont satisfaits. Dans le cas de la santé mentale, tous ces facteurs ont un rôle à jouer. Sans logement, les anciens combattants ne peuvent pas guérir. Les anciens combattants qui ont des problèmes familiaux connaissent énormément de difficultés. On sait bien que lorsque les anciens combattants ne sont plus pris en charge, ils se nourrissent mal. Je suis allée dans le Nord et j'ai pu le voir de mes yeux.
Lorsqu'ils rentrent chez eux, l'une des premières choses à laquelle ils devraient avoir accès, c'est un endroit où leur corps peut guérir et où ils peuvent recevoir l'alimentation et le soutien dont ils ont besoin. Cela revêt une importance capitale au sens large.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-20 20:22 [p.8658]
Expand
Madam Chair, I so appreciate the work that my colleague does on this file.
That is one of the things that broadens that sense of sanctuary trauma for our veterans. They come home; they know they are not well; they want to get well; they see what they are doing within their own families and their spouses and children suffering greatly. It makes it that much worse for the veteran when they realize that. Sometimes I honestly think that is the tipping point for many of them.
Therefore, it is absolutely crucial that we realize that when we send someone into theatre, we are sending the whole family, and we need to make sure they are cared for in ways that they ask us to care for them.
Madame la présidente, j'aime beaucoup le travail de mon collègue sur ce dossier.
C'est l'une des choses qui exacerbent le traumatisme du sanctuaire que subissent les anciens combattants. Ils rentrent chez eux, ils savent qu'ils ne vont pas bien, ils veulent se rétablir, ils voient ce qu'ils font au sein de leur propre famille et ils voient leur conjoint et leurs enfants qui souffrent énormément. La situation est d'autant plus difficile pour l'ancien combattant lorsqu'il s'en rend compte. Parfois, je pense honnêtement que c'est le point de bascule pour beaucoup d'entre eux.
C'est pourquoi nous devons absolument nous rendre compte que lorsque nous envoyons quelqu'un sur le théâtre des opérations, nous envoyons tous les membres de sa famille. Nous devons nous assurer qu'ils sont pris en charge de la manière qui leur convient.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-10-19 16:54 [p.8534]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am presenting a petition today on behalf of Canadians who are aware that the Liberal Party of Canada was elected with a promise to revoke charitable status for pro-life organizations.
The petitioners are specifically focused on crisis pregnancy centres at this time. They feel these centres serve young women who are seeking assistance in carrying their child to term in a scenario where possibly it is an unexpected pregnancy. They also provide incredible assistance to families, to both parents, and provide for the needs and encouragement of those young mothers. They are calling on the government and members of Parliament to do everything in their power to prevent, block, organize and vote against any effort by the government to revoke the charitable status of pro-life organizations in Canada and, specifically, crisis pregnancy centres.
Madame la Présidente, je présente aujourd'hui une pétition au nom de Canadiens qui savent que le Parti libéral du Canada a été élu en promettant de révoquer le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance des organisations pro-vie.
Les pétitionnaires se concentrent en l'occurrence sur les centres d’aide à la grossesse. Ils estiment que ces centres fournissent des services aux jeunes femmes qui cherchent de l'aide pour mener leur grossesse, peut-être imprévue, à terme. Ces centres offrent également un soutien incroyable aux familles et aux deux parents, ils encouragent les jeunes mères et ils répondent aux besoins de celles-ci. Ils demandent au gouvernement et aux députés de faire tout ce qui est en leur pouvoir pour empêcher, bloquer, dénoncer et refuser tout effort fait par le gouvernement pour révoquer le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance des organisations pro-vie au Canada et, en particulier, des centres d’aide à la grossesse.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 88 | Page: 1 of 6

1
2
3
4
5
6
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data