Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 42
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-21 14:50 [p.7091]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of National Defence announced our government's plan to modernize our continental defences, including replacing the North Warning System. Through this plan, our government will invest in state-of-the-art capabilities so that we can modernize and enhance our ability to defend Canadians against new and emerging threats. This modernization will benefit all Canadians and all North Americans.
Can the minister please outline the importance of moving forward with these investments, as well as the importance of doing so in partnership with northern and indigenous communities when investing in the defence of the north?
Monsieur le Président, hier, la ministre de la Défense nationale a annoncé le plan du gouvernement pour moderniser notre défense continentale, notamment en remplaçant le Système d'alerte du Nord. Dans le cadre de ce plan, le gouvernement investira dans des capacités de pointe pour que nous puissions moderniser et être mieux à même de défendre les Canadiens contre les nouvelles menaces. Cette modernisation sera bénéfique pour tous les Canadiens et tous les habitants de l'Amérique du Nord.
La ministre pourrait-elle parler de l'importance de procéder à ces investissements et de l'importance de travailler en partenariat avec les collectivités du Nord et autochtones lorsque nous investissons dans la défense du Nord?
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-20 15:08 [p.6973]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, today marks another step in easing restrictions at the border, including dropping the vaccine mandate for outbound and domestic flights. This is certainly welcome news for the tourism industry, both in the Yukon, Canada's greatest tourism destination, and around the country, as we see the tourism sector begin to recover after two years of struggle. Tourists are on the move once more.
Can the Minister of Tourism and Associate Minister of Finance tell this House how our government is supporting the tourism sector?
Monsieur le Président, nous franchissons aujourd'hui une nouvelle étape dans l'allégement des restrictions à la frontière, puisque la vaccination obligatoire n'est désormais plus exigée pour les vols internationaux et intérieurs. Voilà certes de bonnes nouvelles pour l'industrie touristique, tant pour le Yukon — la plus formidable destination touristique au Canada — que pour l'ensemble du pays, alors que le secteur du tourisme commence à reprendre de la vigueur après deux années de grandes difficultés. Les touristes recommencent à voyager.
Le ministre du Tourisme et ministre associé des Finances peut-il dire à la Chambre comment le gouvernement appuie le secteur du tourisme?
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-13 14:04 [p.6580]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Pride Month is well under way in the Yukon, and so is planning for Yukon's Pride celebrations this August. Like so many others, Queer Yukon Society has worked hard in the past two years to adapt to the needs of Yukon's LGBTQ2S+ community in response to public health guidelines.
We are all excited to gather in person and celebrate what has become one of the largest Pride celebrations north of 60 in the world.
Pride celebrations across Canada and around the world are essential opportunities for allies and members of the LGBTQ+ community to stand in solidarity and support a community that still faces discrimination on a regular basis.
As the member for Yukon, I am proud of the work our government has done to build a more inclusive and more tolerant Canada. I know there is still a long way to go.
I am honoured to be an ally to this community. I hope all of my colleagues will join me in celebrating Pride this month and in Pride celebrations across their communities this summer.
Monsieur le Président, le Mois de la Fierté est bien entamé au Yukon, tout comme le sont les préparatifs en vue des célébrations entourant le festival de la Fierté du Yukon en août. La Queer Yukon Society a travaillé fort ces deux dernières années pour s'adapter aux besoins de la communauté LGBTQ2S+ du Yukon compte tenu des directives de la santé publique.
Nous sommes tous fébriles à l'idée de nous retrouver en personne pour célébrer ce qui est devenu une des plus importantes célébrations de la fierté au nord du 60e parallèle dans le monde.
Les événements de la fierté partout au Canada et dans le monde sont des occasions essentielles pour les alliés et les membres de la communauté LGBTQ+ de faire preuve de solidarité et d'apporter leur soutien à une communauté qui fait encore régulièrement face à la discrimination.
En tant que député du Yukon, je suis fier du travail accompli par notre gouvernement pour bâtir un Canada plus inclusif et plus tolérant. Je sais qu'il en reste encore beaucoup à faire.
Je suis fier d'être un allié de cette communauté. J'espère que tous mes collègues se joindront à moi pour célébrer la fierté ce mois-ci et tout au long de l'été dans leurs collectivités.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-08 22:39 [p.6386]
Expand
Madam Speaker, first, I would like to say that I am sharing my time with the hon. member for Kings—Hants. I am pleased to add my perspective on the budget implementation act and discuss some of what this budget would achieve for the Yukon while having something for all Canadians.
According to the 2021 census, the Yukon is Canada's fastest-growing territory or province. It is a wonderful place to call home as a steady influx of new residents will attest, yet like everywhere in Canada, we are experiencing an acute housing crisis. This is felt keenly in Whitehorse, Dawson City and communities across the territory.
I recently spoke to constituents from the village of Mayo who expressed alarm that the lack of housing was a key part of their inability to keep health care workers in the community, particularly those trained to address the opioid crisis we are facing. Our government is taking action to address this national issue through budget 2022 by making a historic $10-billion investment in housing in Canada, including $30 million to the Yukon specifically, for housing. Yukoners will be able to benefit from the measures we are introducing to make housing more affordable and accessible for all Canadians, including expanding the first-time homebuyer incentive and making property flippers pay their fair share.
Housing measures in this budget also include an expansion of the rapid housing initiative by $1.5 billion. This fund has already made a positive mark in Whitehorse and Yukon communities. Already, 149 units are being created in the Yukon, and I look forward to that number continuing to grow.
These are just a few examples of the investments we are making to ensure Canadians have a safe place to live and feel at home. While the housing crisis affects people from all walks of life, we know that first nations communities face unique obstacles.
Adequate housing and infrastructure are both critical determinants of community health and well-being. We will not achieve our goals in reconciliation without ensuring first nation citizens have access to adequate, safe and affordable housing.
In the last Parliament, the human resources committee conducted a study on rural, urban and remote indigenous housing. Its report, “Indigenous Housing: The Direction Home”, included several recommendations to address this crisis. One was to establish a distinct urban, rural and northern indigenous housing strategy, co-developed with CMHC, created for, created by, and led by indigenous peoples. Budget 2022 commits $300 million to create this very important program.
It also commits $565 million to support housing for self-governing first nations and modern treaty holders. Eleven of the 14 first nations in the Yukon are self-governing. They are nations such as Little Salmon Carmacks First Nation, Teslin Tlingit Council or Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation.
These are important investments for Yukoners and Canadians in their journey toward reconciliation. It is a journey that is well under way but with much yet to accomplish.
Providing access to affordable housing is not the only mission we are embarking on today. We must also take bold, decisive action to mitigate and adapt to the impact of climate change on our living environments.
Canada's homes and buildings account for 13% of our GHG emissions. It is imperative that we work to support retrofitting our homes and places of work and adjusting our building standards so that Canada's buildings can be as energy efficient as possible. Greening our homes not only reduces impacts on the environment, but also has substantial savings for Canadians through reductions in heating and other costs.
The government has long been committed to greening our homes and communities. This year, we are providing $150 million to Natural Resources Canada to develop the Canada green buildings strategy.
We are also investing $458.5 million in the Canada greener homes loan program through CMHC to provide low-interest loans and grants to low-income housing providers to support a green retrofit.
Greening our homes and buildings goes a long way toward reducing our emissions and fighting climate change, and it is also a way of dealing with the housing crisis. However, we still have a lot of work to do if we want to succeed in bending the curve of emissions.
The recent IPCC report was clear: We have not been doing enough to combat catastrophic climate change. We are not taking big enough steps to avert a worst-case scenario. If we do not expedite and expand our efforts, we will not be leaving a livable planet for our children.
I look around the House and see a welcome array of ages, but by 2050, when we should have reached net-zero emissions and when we are supposed to have kept global temperatures below a 1.5°C increase, many, even most, of the members making decisions for Canada now may no longer be here.
The decisions we make now will determine the options our successors in the chamber have at their disposal, and it is critical that we do not shortchange them simply because the timelines we are keeping are 30 years into the future.
As a father of two teenagers, I cannot stand by. We are seeing the effects of climate change daily, from severe flooding and devastating fires to dramatic declines in biodiversity and an Arctic warming at two to three times the global rate. Our land, our people, our economies risk devastation across Canada.
We can hope. Although we are behind, we have momentum. What is more, we have an ambitious plan to reduce emissions complete with objectives, timelines and especially obligations that are set out in the legislation.
Since January, I have been pleased to take part in announcements totalling more than $1.5 million to expand zero-emission charging stations across Yukon. Transportation is another key source of emissions, and with $400 million announced in budget 2022 to further expand ZEV infrastructure in suburban or remote communities, I look forward to taking part in more of these announcements, which will support making all road-accessed communities in our territory accessible by ZEVs by 2027.
Our government has committed $9.1 billion in new investments in our emissions reduction plan to build upon the investments we have already made with a road map for economy-wide measures to drive reductions while creating new job opportunities for Canadian workers and businesses as we work to achieve our climate goals.
In doing so, we will be working closely with indigenous communities, utilizing and applying their leadership, their deep understanding of the land and their traditional knowledge to help us move forward together. That is why part of our plan includes almost $30 million to co-develop an indigenous climate leadership agenda to support indigenous climate priorities.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens d'abord à préciser que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Kings—Hants. Je suis ravi de pouvoir donner mon avis sur le projet de loi d'exécution du budget et de parler de certaines mesures qui y sont proposées pour le Yukon ainsi que pour l'ensemble des Canadiens.
Selon le recensement de 2021, parmi les provinces et les territoires du pays, le Yukon est l'endroit qui connaît la croissance la plus rapide. C'est un endroit formidable où vivre, comme en témoigne l'afflux constant de nouveaux résidants. Cependant, comme partout au Canada, le Yukon doit composer avec une grave crise du logement. Elle se fait particulièrement sentir à Whitehorse, à Dawson City et dans des localités de l'ensemble du territoire.
J'ai récemment parlé à des résidants du village de Mayo qui se sont dits inquiets que la pénurie de logements soit l'une des principales raisons pour lesquelles la localité peine à garder des travailleurs de la santé, en particulier ceux qui ont la formation nécessaire pour répondre à la crise des opioïdes que nous observons actuellement. Dans le cadre du budget de 2022, le gouvernement s'efforce de résoudre cette crise nationale en consacrant au logement un investissement sans précédent de 10 milliards de dollars pour l'ensemble du pays, dont 30 millions de dollars pour le Yukon seulement. Les Yukonnais pourront bénéficier des mesures que nous proposons afin de rendre le logement plus abordable et accessible pour l'ensemble des Canadiens, dont l'élargissement de l'Incitatif à l'achat d'une première propriété et des mesures pour obliger ceux qui profitent de la revente rapide de propriétés à payer leur juste part.
Le budget prévoit des mesures pour le logement, notamment l'expansion de l'Initiative pour la création rapide de logements grâce à un financement supplémentaire de 1,5 milliard de dollars. Ce fonds a déjà eu un effet positif sur les collectivités de Whitehorse et du Yukon. Déjà, 149 unités sont en cours de construction au Yukon, et j'espère que ce chiffre continuera d'augmenter.
Ce ne sont là que quelques exemples des investissements que nous faisons pour que les Canadiennes et les Canadiens aient un endroit sûr où habiter et se sentir chez eux. Si la crise du logement touche les populations de toutes origines, nous savons que les communautés des Premières Nations sont confrontées à des obstacles particuliers.
Des logements convenables et des infrastructures adéquates sont deux déterminants essentiels de la santé et du bien-être des collectivités. Nous n'atteindrons pas nos objectifs en matière de réconciliation si nous ne veillons pas à ce que les citoyens des Premières Nations aient accès à des logements adéquats, sûrs et abordables.
Au cours de la dernière législature, le comité des ressources humaines a mené une étude sur le logement des Autochtones dans les collectivités rurales, urbaines et éloignées. Son rapport, intitulé Logement autochtone: en route vers chez soi, contenait plusieurs recommandations pour venir à bout de cette crise. L'une d'entre elles était d'établir une stratégie distincte sur le logement des Autochtones vivant dans les régions urbaines, rurales ou nordiques, en collaboration avec la SCHL — une stratégie créée pour des Autochtones par des Autochtones et dirigée par eux. Le budget de 2022 prévoit 300 millions de dollars pour instaurer ce programme de grande importance.
Il prévoit également 565 millions de dollars pour appuyer le logement dans les communautés des Premières Nations autonomes et signataires de traités modernes. Onze des quatorze Premières Nations du Yukon sont autonomes. Mentionnons entre autres la Première Nation de Little Salmon Carmacks, le Conseil des Tlingits de Teslin et la Première Nation des Gwitchin Vuntut.
Il s'agit d'investissements importants pour les Yukonnais et les Canadiens sur la route vers la réconciliation. Ce cheminement est déjà bien entamé, mais il reste encore beaucoup à accomplir.
L'accès à un logement abordable n'est pas la seule mission que nous entreprenons aujourd'hui: nous devons aussi prendre des mesures décisives et audacieuses pour atténuer les répercussions des changements climatiques dans nos milieux de vie et pour nous y adapter.
Les maisons et les immeubles du Canada représentent 13 % de nos émissions de GES. Il est urgent de travailler à appuyer la rénovation de nos maisons et de nos lieux de travail et à ajuster nos normes de construction afin que les immeubles du Canada puissent être aussi écoénergétiques que possible. L’écologisation de nos maisons, en plus de réduire notre effet sur l’environnement, nous permet de réaliser des économies substantielles grâce à la réduction du chauffage et d’autres coûts.
Le gouvernement est depuis longtemps résolu à verdir nos maisons et nos collectivités. Cette année, nous octroyons 150 millions de dollars à Ressources naturelles Canada pour élaborer la stratégie canadienne d'écologisation du parc immobilier.
Nous investissons également, par l’entremise de la SCHL, 458,5 millions de dollars dans la Subvention canadienne pour des maisons plus vertes afin d’offrir des prêts à faible taux d’intérêt et des subventions aux fournisseurs d’habitations à loyer modéré afin de soutenir des rénovations vertes.
Écologiser nos maisons et nos édifices contribue grandement à réduire nos émissions et à lutter contre les changements climatiques, et c'est aussi un moyen de juguler la crise du logement. Cependant, il nous reste encore beaucoup de travail à accomplir si nous voulons réussir à abaisser la courbe des émissions.
Le récent rapport du GIEC était clair: nous n’en avons pas fait assez pour lutter contre le changement climatique catastrophique. Nous ne prenons pas de mesures suffisamment importantes pour éviter le pire. Si nous n’accélérons et n’élargissons pas nos efforts, nous ne laisserons pas une planète habitable à nos enfants.
Je regarde les gens à la Chambre et je vois un bel éventail d’âges différents, mais d’ici 2050, quand nous devrions avoir atteint la carboneutralité et nous devrions avoir maintenu le réchauffement en deçà de 1,5 degré Celsius, il est probable que beaucoup des décideurs canadiens actuels, voire la plupart d’entre eux, ne seront plus là.
Les décisions que nous prenons aujourd'hui détermineront les choix dont nos successeurs à la Chambre disposeront. Il importe de ne pas les priver de choix valables simplement parce que nous discutons de mesures sur un horizon de 30 ans.
En tant que père de deux adolescents, je ne peux pas rester les bras croisés. Nous voyons les effets des changements climatiques au quotidien, que l'on pense aux graves inondations, aux incendies dévastateurs, au déclin considérable de la biodiversité ou au réchauffement de l'Arctique, qui est deux à trois fois plus rapide que la moyenne mondiale. La dévastation menace notre territoire, notre population et notre économie partout au Canada.
Pourtant, il nous est permis d'espérer. Même si nous accusons un certain retard, nous sommes en mouvement. Qui plus est, nous nous sommes dotés d'un ambitieux plan de réduction des émissions assorti d'objectifs, d'échéances et surtout d'obligations qui sont inscrites dans la loi.
Depuis janvier, j'ai eu le plaisir de participer à des annonces totalisant plus de 1,5 million de dollars pour étendre le réseau des bornes de recharge pour véhicules zéro émission à l'échelle du Yukon. Le transport est une autre grande source d'émissions. Comme le budget de 2022 prévoit 400 millions de dollars pour financer le déploiement de l'infrastructure de recharge des véhicules zéro émission dans les banlieues et les régions éloignées, j'ai hâte de participer à beaucoup d'autres annonces du genre. Elles permettront de se rendre en véhicule zéro émission à toutes les collectivités accessibles par route de notre territoire d'ici 2027.
Dans son plan de réduction des émissions, le gouvernement s'est engagé à faire de nouveaux investissements de 9,1 milliards de dollars pour faire fond sur les sommes déjà investies avec une feuille de route qui prévoit des mesures visant l'ensemble de l'économie pour réduire les émissions tout en créant des emplois pour les travailleurs et des possibilités pour les entreprises alors que nous travaillons pour atteindre les objectifs climatiques du Canada.
Pour y arriver, nous collaborerons étroitement avec les collectivités autochtones, en tirant parti de leur leadership, de leur profonde compréhension du territoire et de leurs connaissances traditionnelles pour nous aider à avancer ensemble. C'est pourquoi notre plan inclut près de 30 millions de dollars pour appuyer l'élaboration conjointe d'un programme de leadership climatique autochtone qui répond aux priorités climatiques des peuples autochtones.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-08 22:44
Expand
It is a long haul, but essential. With this plan as a guide, the government does not plan to compromise on the means to build a cleaner, greener future.
To return to Yukon specifics, budget 2022 also commits $32.2 million to the Atlin hydro expansion program, which will literally help power Yukon into the future. Our investment in the Atlin expansion will bring power from an expanded hydro power facility in northern B.C. to further build a reliable and diverse supply of renewable winter energy for the north.
Mining has been a part of Yukon since before the Klondike gold rush. We had to learn the hard way, though, that a mine's impact on a fragile Arctic environment can be permanent and profound and prohibitively expensive to rectify, yet we can literally reap the riches of the earth to fuel a green and revitalized economy with modern regulation, technology and processes to mitigate mining impacts.
The world is watching, and Yukon is full of opportunity for investments and responsible, sustainable mining of critical minerals. More than $1.5 billion has been committed to developing critical mineral supply chains over five years, and we are introducing a new 30% critical mineral exploration tax credit.
While I am pleased to support this budget, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge that there is much more work that needs to be done on many of these files, particularly on creating a pan-Canadian mental health strategy and an aggressive and comprehensive response to the toxic drug crisis, as well as putting necessary investments toward our struggling health care workforce.
Nevertheless, this budget, part one of a series of four progressive and ambitious yet prudent budgets, is great news for Canada and for Yukon.
C'est un travail de longue haleine, mais essentiel. Avec ce plan comme guide, le gouvernement ne compte plus lésiner sur les moyens de se bâtir un avenir plus propre et plus vert.
Si nous revenons à la situation du Yukon en particulier, le budget de 2022 prévoit également 32,2 millions de dollars pour le projet d'agrandissement de la centrale hydroélectrique d'Atlin, qui contribuera à l'alimentation électrique du Yukon dans le futur. Les investissements que nous faisons dans ce projet permettront d'acheminer l'électricité produite dans la centrale agrandie d'Atlin, dans le Nord de la Colombie‑Britannique, afin de garantir un approvisionnement fiable et diversifié en énergie renouvelable pendant l'hiver dans le Nord.
Les mines font partie de l'identité du Yukon depuis la ruée vers l'or du Klondike et même avant. Nous avons dû apprendre à la dure que l'impact d'une mine sur l'environnement fragile de l'Arctique peut être permanent et profond et coûter extrêmement cher à réparer, mais nous avons littéralement l'occasion de récolter les richesses de la terre pour propulser une économie verte revitalisée au moyen de la réglementation, des technologies et des procédés modernes afin de limiter les impacts des activités minières.
La planète nous observe, et le Yukon est rempli d'occasions pour les investisseurs et pour l'extraction responsable et durable des minéraux critiques. Plus de 1,5 milliard de dollars ont été dédiés au développement des chaînes d'approvisionnement pour les minéraux critiques sur cinq ans, et nous instaurons un crédit d'impôt pour l'exploration de minéraux critiques de 30 %.
Même si je suis heureux d'appuyer le budget, je m'en voudrais de ne pas souligner qu'il reste beaucoup à faire dans plusieurs de ces dossiers, notamment en ce qui concerne la création d'une stratégie pancanadienne en matière de santé mentale et d'une réponse globale à la crise engendrée par les drogues toxiques, ainsi que les investissements nécessaires pour soutenir les travailleurs de la santé qui en arrachent.
Toutefois, ce budget est le premier d'une série de quatre budgets progressistes et ambitieux, bien que prudents. C'est une excellente nouvelle pour le Canada et le Yukon.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-08 22:49 [p.6388]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank the member for Oshawa for his comments, particularly with regard to the Yukon.
Certainly there are challenges ahead of us to pave the way for the infrastructure needed for zero-emission vehicles, including expansions to the grid. Our budget announced a further $400 million to expand ZEV infrastructure in suburban and remote communities.
In the Yukon context, I am very pleased to see the investments made to the Atlin hydro expansion project, which will provide the equivalent power for almost 4,000 homes in Yukon once it is operational. We are well on the way, but there will undoubtedly be more that we need to invest in and coordinate, particularly with grid harmonization across the country.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député d'Oshawa de ses commentaires, en particulier au sujet du Yukon.
Nous avons certainement de nombreux défis à relever pour installer les infrastructures nécessaires pour les véhicules zéro émission, notamment concernant le développement de notre réseau. Il est annoncé dans le budget que 400 millions de dollars supplémentaires seront versés pour le développement des infrastructures pour les véhicules zéro émission dans les banlieues et les collectivités isolées.
Je suis heureux de constater qu'au Yukon, on investit dans le projet d'agrandissement de la centrale hydroélectrique d'Atlin, qui permettra de fournir en électricité l'équivalent de près de 4 000 foyers une fois le projet opérationnel. Nous sommes sur la bonne voie, mais il ne fait aucun doute que nous devrons faire plus d'investissements et coordonner nos efforts, en particulier pour harmoniser le réseau partout au pays.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-08 22:51 [p.6389]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I often hear people in my riding talk about access to health care, mental health, their housing needs, and investments to fight climate change. Those are Yukon's priorities. I am very pleased to see investments in these areas in budget 2022.
Madame la Présidente, j'entends souvent des citoyens de ma circonscription parler de l'accès aux soins de santé, de la santé mentale, de leurs besoins en matière de logement, ainsi que des investissements pour lutter contre les changements climatiques. Ce sont, entre autres, les priorités pour le Yukon. Je suis très content de voir des investissements dans ces domaines dans le budget de 2022.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-06-08 22:52 [p.6389]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the hon. member's question is an interesting one. I think there has been a lot of discourse and I know there is interest in my own riding about exploring this option. I am looking forward to learning more about the particulars of that bill and what the pros and cons are of such an approach.
Madame la Présidente, la députée pose une question intéressante. Je pense qu'il y a eu beaucoup de discussions, et je sais que cette option suscite de l'intérêt dans ma propre circonscription. J'ai hâte d'en apprendre davantage sur les détails de ce projet de loi, ainsi que sur les avantages et les inconvénients d'une telle approche.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-05-20 11:39
Expand
Madam Speaker, Jimmy Quong came to the Yukon literally to build bridges. A practice-trained engineer, James moved up from Vancouver in 1942 to design bridges for the Alaska Highway that connected Dawson Creek, B.C. to Fairbanks, Alaska in an astounding eight months. One hundred and thirty-four beloved bridges later, Jimmy Quong's legacy expands from the Dempster Highway to Nisutlin Bay, to the Marsh Lake bridge and the magnificent Skagway road connecting Carcross to Alaska.
Jimmy brought his keen eye for detail to photography, illuminating scenes of the Yukon from the forties onward: roads and bridges, paddle wheelers, buildings and the people of his time. His meticulous photographs now tell the Yukon's story in museums and archives around the territory. When I first arrived in the Yukon, in a frigid January in 1995, one of the first to welcome me was Dr. Ken Quong, Jimmy's son, now a respected medical leader and a skilled photographer in his own right.
As we commemorate Asian Heritage Month, I salute the life of Jimmy Quong, whose bridges, photographs and family form part of the Yukon's vital fabric.
Madame la Présidente, Jimmy Quong est venu au Yukon pour bâtir des ponts, littéralement. Ingénieur de formation, James est venu de Vancouver en 1942 pour faire la conception de ponts le long de la route de l'Alaska entre Dawson Creek, en Colombie‑Britannique, et Fairbanks, en Alaska, sur une période de seulement huit mois. Avec ses 134 ponts, le legs de Jimmy Quong s'étend de la route Dempster à Nisutlin Bay, au pont du lac Marsh et à la magnifique route Skagway qui relie Carcross à l'Alaska.
Jimmy a mis à profit son souci du détail pour photographier les paysages du Yukon à partir des années 1940: les routes et les ponts, les bateaux à aubes, les édifices et les gens de cette époque. Les photographies qu'il a prises avec minutie racontent l'histoire du Yukon dans les musées et les archives du territoire. Lorsque je suis arrivé au Yukon la première fois, par un froid mois de janvier 1995, une des premières personnes à m'accueillir a été le Dr Ken Quong, le fils de Jimmy, aujourd'hui un chef de file respecté dans le domaine médical et lui-même un photographe accompli.
Alors que nous soulignons le Mois du patrimoine asiatique, je rends hommage à la vie de Jimmy Quong, dont les ponts, les photographies et la famille font partie du tissu du Yukon.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-05-13 12:13
Expand
Mr. Speaker, today I am presenting a petition on behalf of 517 Canadians who are raising concerns about the impact of foreign donations on orphanages in low-income countries. Despite the best intentions of Canadians who donate or volunteer abroad at these orphanages, they may be undermining other nations' child protection systems, which leads to child rights violations.
As Canada has ratified the UNGA's Convention on the Rights of the Child, the petitioners, including some of my constituents, are asking that the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development study the issue and make recommendations to the House on how to address this issue.
Monsieur le Président, je présente aujourd'hui une pétition au nom de 517 Canadiens qui sont préoccupés par l'incidence qu'ont les dons provenant de l'étranger sur les orphelinats dans les pays à faible revenu. Malgré les meilleures intentions des Canadiens qui versent des dons à ces orphelinats ou y font du bénévolat, il est possible qu'ils nuisent à la capacité d'autres pays à protéger les enfants, ce qui donne lieu à des violations des droits de ces derniers.
Comme le Canada a ratifié la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies, les pétitionnaires, dont certains habitent ma circonscription, demandent au Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du développement international d'étudier la question et de recommander au gouvernement des façons de s'y attaquer.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-05-12 14:03 [p.5227]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, today I rise to honour International Nurses Day and the thousands of nurses in this country who dedicate their lives to care for Canadians.
My own family has been blessed with two nurses. My mother was a young nurse in World War II London. I am also deeply proud of my sister Fiona Hanley, who is a devoted environmentalist and nursing instructor at Dawson College in Montreal.
At 50% of our health care workforce, nurses form the backbone of our health care system. Let us be frank; this is a workforce in crisis. Two years of a pandemic have worsened the strain nurses were already experiencing: long hours, staffing shortfalls, lack of supplies and resources, and stress. Today, 45% of nurses experience symptoms of burnout, and half are thinking of leaving their job.
Today is a day to celebrate nurses and honour their critical work, but we must deliver on providing the support nurses need in order to stay and to thrive in their jobs to support the health of Canadians. For today, I thank Fiona, Meghan, Sean, Brooke and all the nurses of the Yukon and of Canada.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour souligner la Journée internationale des infirmières et rendre hommage aux milliers d'infirmières et d'infirmiers de ce pays qui consacrent leur vie à soigner les Canadiens.
Ma propre famille a eu la chance d'avoir deux infirmières. Ma mère était une jeune infirmière à Londres pendant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Je suis également très fier de ma sœur Fiona Hanley, qui est une environnementaliste dévouée et une professeure en soins infirmiers au Collège Dawson à Montréal.
Représentant 50 % de notre main-d'œuvre en soins de santé, le personnel infirmier constitue l'épine dorsale de notre système de soins de santé. Soyons francs: cette main-d'œuvre est en crise. Deux années de pandémie ont aggravé la pression que subissait déjà le personnel infirmier: de longues heures de travail, une pénurie de personnel, un manque d'équipement et de ressources, et du stress. Actuellement, 45 % des infirmières et infirmiers présentent des symptômes d'épuisement professionnel, et la moitié d'entre eux envisagent de quitter leur emploi.
Aujourd'hui, nous célébrons les infirmières et les infirmiers et nous rendons hommage à leur travail essentiel. Toutefois, nous devons leur fournir le soutien dont ils ont besoin pour continuer d'accomplir leurs tâches et de s'épanouir dans leur travail afin de favoriser la santé des Canadiens. Aujourd'hui, je remercie Fiona, Meghan, Sean, Brooke et l'ensemble des infirmières et infirmiers du Yukon et du Canada.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-05-12 20:16 [p.5279]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Berthier—Maskinongé.
As the resident of a rather remote area, I think it is important to talk about the situation in Yukon.
Yukon has a population of 40,000. Fourteen percent speak French and English and about 5%, or 1,600 people, speak French as their first language. Yukon has Canada's third-largest per capita population of francophones. It is a dynamic, spirited, and engaged community that has made a lot of progress in the past decades.
The francophone renaissance in Yukon started in the 1970s after the passage of the Official Languages Act. Strengthened by the federal government's engagement, Yukon's francophone community has grown in every way ever since.
Culturally speaking, Yukon's francophone community is strong. It has an influence on all of Yukon's communities. The progress continues. In fact, Yukon will soon be opening a bilingual health centre. Recently, we learned that a third French-language school will open in Dawson City for the next school year. Dawson City is located in northern Yukon. It is a small city with a big spirit and a great history.
The number of students in French immersion classes in Yukon has skyrocketed. Now, you can hear people speaking French all over Yukon.
As a francophile, I am proud to see the progress made since the implementation of Canada's Official Languages Act.
Personally, I pretty much grew up with the advancement of French as an official language in Canada. In the 1970s, I found the idea of a bilingual Canada inspiring. I was inspired by none other than Pierre Elliott Trudeau to try to bring the two solitudes together through a better mutual understanding and through the use of the other language.
I went into a French immersion program in Alberta. I travelled. I studied in France. Later on, I lived in Montreal for a few months. I lived and worked in a francophone environment abroad. I did my best to improve my French through the years. Obviously, it is far from perfect, but the basics are there. It is enough to allow me to participate, at least to some extent, in the francophone community, a community that is very open to francophiles.
Now, my wife speaks French as a second language. Both of my children, who grew up in Yukon, went to French institutions for the majority of their preschool and school years and are perfectly bilingual.
Yukon has such a strong francophone population that it attracts people from Canada, Acadia, Quebec, France and other francophone countries who are looking for a life of adventure in a northern community while keeping their ability to speak French.
With Bill C‑13, we can go even further by supporting our official language minority communities and contribute to the richness of everyone's life.
When I was campaigning as a first-time candidate, I learned about the former Bill C‑32 and about how important it was to the francophone community that the bill be improved. The need for swifter, stronger action to amend the Official Languages Act was one of the key measures I had in mind when I arrived as a new member of Parliament.
I am therefore pleased to talk about the successful and hard work of the Minister of Official Languages, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Official Languages and their team, as well as the consultations and analyses that went into the development of Bill C‑13.
This bill is important for all Canadians, including those who live far from the centre and those of us who live in the north. A strong Official Languages Act is important for all languages, including indigenous languages. I know that people in Yukon are familiar with this cross-fertilization, with the active preservation and promotion of language rights, whether they be for official languages or indigenous languages. They each help the other.
It is in this context that I speak not only of the significant progress we have made with Bill C‑13, but also of the improvements that give this new bill more teeth. I am talking about positive measures, a central agency and a scope that will benefit us all.
Madame la Présidente, je vous avise que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Berthier—Maskinongé.
En tant qu'habitant d'une région assez éloignée, je pense que c'est important de parler du contexte yukonais.
La population du Yukon est de 40 000 habitants. Il y en a 14 % qui parlent le français et l'anglais et environ 5 %, 1 600 personnes, ont le français comme première langue. Le Yukon a la troisième plus grande population par habitant de francophones au Canada. C'est une communauté dynamique, pleine d'esprit et engagée qui fait beaucoup de progrès depuis des décennies.
La renaissance francophone du Yukon prend ses racines dans les années 1970, après l'adoption de la Loi sur les langues officielles. Renforcée par cet engagement fédéral, la communauté francophone du Yukon a depuis grandi à tous les égards.
Culturellement, la communauté francophone du Yukon est forte. Elle a une influence sur toutes les communautés du Yukon. Le progrès continue. En fait, le Yukon va bientôt ouvrir un centre de santé bilingue. Récemment, on a appris qu'une troisième école francophone ouvrira à Dawson City pour la prochaine année scolaire. Dawson City est située au nord du Yukon. C'est une petite ville qui possède un grand esprit et une très belle histoire.
Au Yukon, le nombre d'élèves dans les classes d'immersion française a explosé. Maintenant, c'est possible d'entendre parler français un peu partout au Yukon.
En tant que francophile, je suis fier de constater le progrès réalisé depuis la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles du Canada.
Personnellement, j'ai grandi, plus ou moins, avec l'histoire des progrès et de l'avancement du français comme langue seconde au Canada. Oui, dans les années 1970, j'ai été inspiré par l'appel de voir un Canada bilingue. J'ai été inspiré par nul autre que Pierre Elliott Trudeau, pour ce qui est de nous comprendre et de surmonter les deux solitudes avec une meilleure compréhension l'une et de l'autre grâce à l'utilisation de la langue de l'autre.
J'ai commencé à suivre un cours d'immersion française en Alberta. J'ai voyagé, j'ai étudié en France. Plus tard, j'ai déménagé à Montréal pendant quelques mois. J'ai vécu et travaillé dans un milieu francophone à l'étranger. J'ai fait de mon mieux pour améliorer mon français au fil des années. Mon français est évidemment loin d'être parfait, mais le noyau est là. C'est assez pour que je puisse participer, au moins dans une certaine mesure, à la communauté francophone, une communauté si ouverte aux francophiles.
Maintenant, ma femme parle le français comme langue seconde. Mes deux enfants, élevés au Yukon, ont fréquenté des établissements francophones pour la majeure partie de leurs années préscolaire et scolaire et sont donc parfaitement bilingues.
Le Yukon a maintenant un si bon noyau de population francophone qu'il attire des gens du Canada, de l'Acadie, du Québec, de la France et d'autres pays francophones qui désirent vivre une vie aventureuse dans une communauté nordique, tout en préservant leur capacité à parler en français.
Au moyen du projet de loi C‑13, nous pouvons aller encore plus loi en appuyant nos communautés de langue officielle en situation minoritaire et ainsi améliorer la richesse de la vie pour nous tous.
Lorsque j'étais en campagne électorale, candidat pour la première fois, j'ai pris connaissance de l'ancien projet C‑32 et de l'importance pour la communauté francophone d'améliorer davantage le projet de loi. La nécessité d'aller plus vite et plus résolument vers une loi révisée modifiant la Loi sur les langues officielles était l'une des mesures clés que j'avais en tête en tant que nouveau député.
Je suis donc heureux de parler du succès du travail acharné de la part de la ministre des Langues officielles, du secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Langues officielles et de leur équipe, ainsi que des consultations et des analyses qui ont mené au projet de loi C‑13.
Ce projet de loi est important pour tous les Canadiens, y compris ceux d'entre nous qui vivent loin du centre et ceux d'entre nous qui vivent dans le Nord. Une loi sur les langues officielles forte est importante pour toutes les langues, y compris les langues autochtones. Je sais que cette fertilisation croisée est bien reconnue au Yukon, avec la préservation et la promotion actives des droits linguistiques, qu'il s'agisse des langues officielles ou des langues autochtones. Chacune sert l'autre.
C'est dans ce contexte que je parle non seulement des importants progrès que nous avons faits, des progrès du projet de loi C‑13, mais aussi des améliorations qui donnent des dents à ce nouveau projet de loi, c'est-à-dire des mesures positives, une agence centrale et une portée dont nous bénéficierons tous.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-05-12 20:24 [p.5279]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his interesting question.
I will add that with a strong core, it becomes a positive measure that draws more and more interest from immigrants and people who are on the move.
The growth of the community has always been supported by the federal government, who acted as a catalyst. There is a positive return that makes the francophone community stronger.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de son intéressante question.
Je peux compléter en disant qu'avec un noyau, cela devient une mesure positive qui attire de plus en plus d'attention, d'immigration et de gens qui se déplacent.
La croissance de la communauté s'est toujours accompagnée du soutien du gouvernement fédéral qui a amorcé un mouvement accélérateur. Il y a un retour positif qui renforce la communauté francophone.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-05-12 20:26 [p.5280]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague and commend her on her French. We work together on the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans.
In answer to her question, I would say that our government recognizes that we can always do more to protect the official language rights of all Canadians. We are also strengthening the powers of the Commissioner of Official Languages to ensure that he has the tools he needs to enforce the act. That is why we are centralizing the coordination of the act under a single department, which will have access to the resources of a central agency.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue et je la félicite pour son français. Nous travaillons ensemble au Comité permanent des pêches et des océans.
En réponse à sa question, je dirai que notre gouvernement reconnaît que nous pouvons toujours en faire plus pour protéger les droits linguistiques officiels de tous les Canadiens. Nous renforçons également les pouvoirs du commissaire aux langues officielles afin de nous assurer qu'il dépose les outils nécessaires pour faire appliquer la loi. C'est pourquoi nous centralisons la coordination de la loi sous un seul ministère qui aura accès aux ressources d'une agence centrale.
Collapse
View Brendan Hanley Profile
Lib. (YT)
View Brendan Hanley Profile
2022-05-12 20:28 [p.5280]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank the minister for her question, her support and her encouragement.
As we have seen, for the past 40 years, the francophone community has been growing, and every bit of federal support enhances the vitality of the francophone community. The ripple effect of this support for first-language education lasts for generations; it attracts more people and that gives—
Madame la Présidente, je remercie la ministre de sa question, de son appui et de son encouragement.
Comme on l'a vu, depuis 40 ans, la communauté francophone croît, et chaque étape de l'appui fédéral est liée à la vitalité de la communauté francophone. Ce soutien à l'éducation en langue première a un effet qui dure sur des générations, qui attire plus de gens et qui donne...
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 42 | Page: 1 of 3

1
2
3
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data