Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 76 - 90 of 808
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-09-28 18:44 [p.7887]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I appreciated listening to what the member had to say, and I understand that the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations appointed the interim board of directors, the transitional committee and now, in Bill C-29, he would be responsible to select the directors of the national council.
I wonder if the member could clarify this for me. In a past bill, as it was being discussed in the House and debated, we found out that the environmental council that was being created had already been established. Could she tell me whether or not individuals have already been appointed prior to the debate on the bill finishing in the House, and how many if that is the case?
Madame la Présidente, j'ai aimé écouter ce que la députée avait à dire, et je comprends que le ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones a nommé le conseil d'administration provisoire et le comité de transition et que maintenant, dans le projet de loi C‑29, il serait responsable de choisir les administrateurs du conseil national.
Je me demande si la députée peut clarifier ceci pour moi. Lors des discussions et des débats à la Chambre sur un projet de loi antérieur, nous avons découvert que le conseil environnemental que l'on était en train de créer l'avait déjà été. Pourrait-elle me dire si des personnes ont déjà été nommées avant que le débat sur le projet de loi ne soit terminé à la Chambre et, le cas échéant, combien ont été nommées?
Collapse
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
View Robert Kitchen Profile
2022-09-27 11:51 [p.7781]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I find it interesting that the member brought up carbon capture and storage. I would be more than happy for the member to come to my riding, and I would give her a tour of what CCS does. It provides a tremendous amount of work, benefits and jobs throughout our very rural environment.
The member talked about capturing carbon out of the air, and that technology is just a mindset. It has not even been developed to see if it is effective. I am interested to know why the member would comment on something like that, without actually understanding what it is, and not recognize that, by capturing that carbon, it actually reduces the emissions, which in turn allows us to reduce the emissions on a carbon tax.
Madame la Présidente, je trouve intéressant que la députée parle du captage et du stockage du carbone. J'aimerais beaucoup qu'elle vienne dans ma circonscription pour que je puisse lui montrer les emplois et les retombées économiques importantes que cela génère dans nos régions rurales.
La députée parle du captage du carbone dans l'air et du fait que la technologie utilisée n'est qu'une chimère et qu'elle n'a pas encore prouvé son efficacité. J'aimerais savoir ce qui pousse la députée à dire cela, sans vraiment comprendre de quoi il s'agit, et à ne pas reconnaître qu'en captant ce carbone, on réduit les émissions, et donc la taxe sur le carbone.
Collapse
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
View Robert Kitchen Profile
2022-09-27 14:10 [p.7802]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the new Conservative leader will put people first: their paycheques, their homes, their retirements and their country, unlike the current government. The people of Saskatchewan are sick and tired of the government promising support and then offering them absolutely nothing. Rural communities are going to be decimated because of it.
While the minister talks publicly about his government's support for the workers who will be out of a job following the shutdown of coal-fired power in 2030, he has taken zero steps to provide them and their communities with the resources needed to avoid this catastrophe. A study showed that the town of Coronach in my riding stands to lose $400 million in GDP, have a 67% loss in population and an 89% loss in household income, yet of the funds provided by the government, only 3.5% were for economic development activities.
The minister put out an op-ed last week on how these workers need certainty, but he needs to put his money where his mouth is. He says he wants to kill the emissions but he is killing an entire industry and communities instead.
Monsieur le Président, le nouveau chef conservateur accordera la priorité aux gens, à leur retraite, à leurs chèques de paie, à leur logement et à leur pays, contrairement au gouvernement actuel. Les gens de la Saskatchewan en ont assez que le gouvernement leur promette de l’aide pour ne leur offrir absolument rien ensuite. Les collectivités rurales vont être décimées à cause de cela.
Alors que le ministre parle publiquement de l’aide qu’apporte son gouvernement aux travailleurs qui se retrouveront sans emploi après la fermeture des centrales alimentées au charbon en 2030, il n’a pris aucune mesure pour leur fournir, ainsi qu’à leurs collectivités, les ressources nécessaires pour éviter cette catastrophe. Une étude a montré que la ville de Coronach, qui se trouve dans ma circonscription, risque de perdre 400 millions de dollars de PIB, 67 % de sa population et 89 % du revenu des ménages. Pourtant, sur les fonds fournis par le gouvernement, seulement 3,5 % ont été consacrés à des activités de développement économique.
Le ministre a publié un article d’opinion la semaine dernière sur le fait que ces travailleurs ont besoin de certitude, mais il doit joindre le geste à la parole. Il dit qu’il veut éliminer les émissions, mais il anéantit plutôt toute une industrie et des collectivités entières.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-27 15:30 [p.7816]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to note off the top that I will be splitting my time this afternoon with the member for Peterborough—Kawartha.
We know that costs are continuing to soar in this country and affordability is becoming a greater stress for more and more Canadians. Families are feeling the pressures of inflation, which continues to be fanned by the Liberal government’s deficit spending, and while inflation takes a bite out of the paycheques of hard-working Canadians, the Liberal government’s tax hikes only dive deeper into their pockets.
Canadians are feeling the squeeze, and if the Liberal government really wanted to, it could take meaningful action to alleviate those pressures. It could cap government spending, cut red tape and scrap its tax increases.
Today’s motion, put forward by our Conservative leader, calls on the government to abandon its plan to triple the carbon tax, and it would make a real difference in the lives of Canadians. Canadians, and certainly my constituents in Battlefords—Lloydminster, cannot afford the tripling of the carbon tax. The Liberal government has burdened Canadians with a carbon tax as it is, a carbon tax that is ineffective and costly.
The Liberals' so-called price on pollution has failed to deliver any meaningful results. Since the Liberal government has imposed the carbon tax on Canadians, it has failed to meet every climate target that it has set for itself. Doubling down on this failed policy, or I should say “tripling down”, will continue to do nothing for the environment. However, the government's failed carbon tax policy has not been without any consequences. Its failure has been at the expense of Canadians.
The carbon tax is making everything more expensive, and the government's plan to hike the carbon tax further could not come at a worse time, as the cost of living continues to skyrocket in this country. Small businesses, which have been doing everything they can to get by during the last few years of uncertainty, cannot afford these added costs, and workers, families and seniors who are struggling to put food on the table or to heat their homes cannot afford another tax hike.
The carbon tax hurts those who can afford it the least, the most. The cost of basic necessities should not be out of reach for Canadians. We know that the carbon tax is making food more expensive. It is making home heating more expensive. Driving to work, appointments or school is more expensive, and that is a direct result of the government’s failed policies.
These costs are even greater for rural Canadians, such as those who are in my riding of in Battlefords—Lloydminster. Every single Canadian living in rural and remote communities are punished more by the federal carbon tax, and that is a reality that really cannot and should not be ignored. The simple fact is that rural Canadians have to drive to get groceries, to get to work and to drive to go to school. Even for medical appointments, they have to drive. There are no other alternatives. There are ridings that do not even have public transit, and often times their drive is a greater distance. Sometimes constituents of mine are driving one to two hours just to see their doctor to have a prescription refilled.
However, we have to realize that at the same time, the cost of shipping foods and goods into our communities also goes up with this failed carbon tax, and as the fall cold air moves in, we cannot forget the reality of our Canadian seasons. Come winter, home heating is not a luxury. It is a necessity. It is a necessity that far too many Canadians are struggling to pay for, and unfortunately, it is going to be harder if the government follows through on its plan to triple the carbon tax.
We know members on that side of the House are always very quick to get up in this place to repeat their rhetoric that most Canadians get more back more than they pay in taxes. That is far from the truth. Liberal math fails to give a complete picture of the impact of their carbon tax. Canadians know this. My constituents know this, and the Parliamentary Budget Officer also knows it.
The PBO has clearly stated that under the government's carbon tax plan, most households in Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario will suffer a net loss. These are real families and real businesses that are being punished with this carbon tax. Many of my constituents cannot afford the carbon tax at its current rate, much less if it were tripled.
While the government might operate on endless deficits and expect taxpayers and future taxpayers to pick up the bill, that does not work for Canadians. I hear directly from constituents all the time about the impact of the carbon tax on their families and on their businesses.
For example, Rob, a welder in my riding, shared some energy bills with me. One bill shows that for just 800 dollars' worth of gas delivered, his business paid $450 for the Liberal carbon tax. In another month, he paid over $600 in carbon taxes on just under $1,100 of gas delivered. The carbon tax is 25% of his overall natural gas bill. That is a significant expense for small businesses. What is also worth noting is that those bills were before the latest carbon tax hike in the spring. That was when the carbon tax rate was only $40 a tonne, and 25% of his energy bills went to the carbon tax.
Let us not forget that the carbon tax is hiking the cost of materials and operations. The Liberals are creating a very risky business environment. Red tape is making it harder and harder to do business in this country, and higher taxes are hiking business costs. We need to ensure that businesses have the ability to succeed.
We have not even talked about our farmers yet. Farmers are some of the hardest hit by the ineffective and costly Liberal carbon tax. They are paying tens of thousands of dollars on the failed carbon tax. We heard in question period earlier that farmers get rebated what they pay, but that is not true. They may receive a drop in the bucket of what they pay in carbon taxes.
We need our Canadian farmers. The world needs our Canadian farmers. Food insecurity is an increasing concern globally, and Canadian farmers can be an important part of the solution.
It is not feasible for our farmers to continue to operate if they are overrun with costs. The carbon tax and nonsensical policies like the Liberal plan to cap fertilizer use hurt farm operations and jeopardize food security globally, as I said, and also here at home. I believe the tripling of the carbon tax would be absolutely detrimental to our farmers and farm families.
We need the Liberal government to get serious about affordability. The Liberals cannot keep spending money and driving up inflation. They need to get their hands out of the pockets of hard-working Canadians. Every single person, no matter their background and no matter where they are from, should have the opportunity to succeed in this great country. Canadians should be confident that when they work hard, they will have enough money in their pocket to put food on their table, put gas in their car and put a roof over their head, and still have something left over for their family's own priorities.
If the Prime Minister and his Liberal government truly cared about Canadians who are struggling to make ends meet, they would give Canadians a break. He would support this motion and cancel his ineffective and costly carbon tax increase.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à signaler d’emblée que je partagerai mon temps de parole cet après-midi avec la députée de Peterborough—Kawartha.
Nous savons que les coûts continuent de grimper en flèche au pays et que les prix qui deviennent de moins en moins abordables causent de plus en plus de stress à un nombre croissant de Canadiens. Les familles ressentent la pression inflationniste, qui continue d’être alimentée par les dépenses déficitaires du gouvernement libéral. Tandis que l'inflation ponctionne les chèques de paie des travailleurs canadiens, les hausses de taxe du gouvernement libéral ne font que leur vider davantage les poches.
Les Canadiens ressentent la pression, et si le gouvernement libéral le voulait vraiment, il pourrait prendre des mesures efficaces pour alléger ces pressions. Il pourrait limiter les dépenses gouvernementales, réduire la paperasserie et supprimer ses hausses de taxe.
La motion d’aujourd’hui, présentée par le chef du Parti conservateur, demande au gouvernement d’abandonner son projet de tripler la taxe sur le carbone, et cela ferait toute la différence dans la vie des Canadiens. La population canadienne, y compris certainement mes électeurs de Battlefords—Lloydminster, n’a pas les moyens de payer une telle augmentation. Le gouvernement libéral a imposé aux Canadiens une taxe sur le carbone inefficace et coûteuse.
La prétendue tarification de la pollution imposée par les libéraux n’a pas donné de résultats notables. Depuis que le gouvernement libéral a imposé la taxe sur le carbone aux Canadiens, il n’est pas parvenu à atteindre tous les objectifs climatiques qu’il s’était fixés lui-même. Refaire la même politique ratée en doublant la taxe ou plutôt en la triplant continuera à n’avoir aucun effet sur l’environnement. Cependant, la politique ratée du gouvernement en matière de taxe sur le carbone n’a pas été sans conséquence. Elle a échoué au détriment de la population canadienne.
La taxe sur le carbone rend tout plus cher, et le projet du gouvernement de l’augmenter encore ne pourrait pas tomber à un pire moment, alors que le coût de la vie continue de grimper en flèche au pays. Les petites entreprises, qui ont fait tout ce qu’elles pouvaient pour s’en sortir au cours des dernières années, caractérisées par l'incertitude, ne peuvent pas se permettre ces coûts supplémentaires, et les travailleurs, les familles et les personnes âgées qui ont du mal à mettre du pain sur la table ou à chauffer leur maison ou leur logement ne peuvent pas se permettre une autre hausse de taxe.
La taxe sur le carbone nuit le plus à ceux qui peuvent le moins se le permettre. Le coût des produits de première nécessité ne devrait pas être hors de portée pour les Canadiens. Nous savons que la taxe sur le carbone rend la nourriture plus chère. Elle rend le chauffage domestique plus cher. Il en coûte plus cher de se rendre en voiture au travail, à un rendez-vous ou à l’école, et c’est le résultat direct des politiques ratées du gouvernement.
Ces coûts sont encore plus élevés pour les Canadiens des régions rurales, comme ceux qui vivent dans Battlefords—Lloydminster, ma circonscription. Chaque Canadien résidant dans une collectivité rurale et éloignée est davantage pénalisé par la taxe fédérale sur le carbone, un fait qui ne peut et ne doit pas être ignoré. La réalité est que les Canadiens des régions rurales doivent utiliser leur voiture pour faire leur épicerie, pour aller au travail et à l’école et même pour aller à leurs rendez-vous médicaux. Il n’y a pas d’autres solutions. Dans certaines circonscriptions, il n’y a même pas de transport en commun et, souvent, la distance à parcourir est plus grande. Il arrive que des électeurs de ma circonscription fassent une ou deux heures de route simplement pour voir leur médecin et faire renouveler une ordonnance.
Cependant, nous devons être conscients qu’en même temps, le coût d’expédition des aliments et des produits dans nos collectivités augmente également avec cette taxe sur le carbone qui a échoué, et alors que l’air froid de l’automne commence à se faire sentir, nous ne pouvons pas oublier ce que sont les saisons au Canada. En hiver, le chauffage domestique n’est pas un luxe. C’est une nécessité. C’est une nécessité, mais beaucoup trop de Canadiens ont déjà des difficultés à payer leur chauffage, et ce sera encore plus difficile si le gouvernement donne suite à son projet de tripler la taxe sur le carbone.
Nous savons que les députés de ce côté-là de la Chambre sont toujours très prompts à prendre la parole pour répéter le même argument selon lequel la plupart des Canadiens reçoivent plus en retour que ce qu’ils paient en taxe. C’est loin d’être la vérité. Les calculs des libéraux ne donnent pas une image complète des répercussions de leur taxe sur le carbone. Les Canadiens le savent. Mes électeurs le savent, et le directeur parlementaire du budget le sait aussi.
Le directeur parlementaire du budget a clairement indiqué que la taxe sur le carbone du gouvernement se soldera par une perte nette pour la plupart des ménages de la Saskatchewan, de l’Alberta, du Manitoba et de l’Ontario. Ce sont de vraies familles et de vraies entreprises que cette taxe pénalise. En effet, bon nombre de citoyens de ma circonscription ne peuvent se permettre de payer la taxe sur le carbone à son taux actuel, et encore moins si le taux était multiplié par trois.
Même si le gouvernement pense pouvoir fonctionner avec des déficits sans fin et s'attend à ce que les contribuables actuels et futurs paient la facture, cela ne fonctionne pas pour les Canadiens. Les contribuables de ma circonscription me parlent constamment des répercussions de cette taxe sur leurs familles et leurs entreprises.
Par exemple, Rob, un soudeur de ma circonscription, m’a montré quelques-unes de ses factures d'énergie. Sur l’une, on peut voir que, pour seulement 800 $ d'essence livrée, son entreprise a payé 450 $ pour la taxe libérale sur le carbone. Un autre mois, il a payé plus de 600 $ pour un peu moins de 1 100 $ d'essence. Cette taxe représente 25 % de sa facture globale de gaz naturel. C'est une dépense importante pour les petites entreprises. Il convient également de noter que ces factures ont été établies avant la dernière augmentation de la taxe, au printemps. À cette époque, le taux de la taxe sur le carbone n'était que de 40 $ la tonne, et 25 % de sa facture d'énergie servait à payer cette taxe.
N'oublions pas que la taxe sur le carbone fait grimper le coût des matériaux et des opérations. Les libéraux créent ainsi des conditions très risquées pour les entreprises. En outre, à cause des tracasseries administratives, il est de plus en plus difficile de faire des affaires dans ce pays, et les taxes plus élevées font grimper les coûts des entreprises. Or, nous devons veiller à ce que les entreprises aient la capacité de réussir.
Nous n'avons même pas encore parlé des agriculteurs, qui sont parmi les gens les plus durement touchés par la taxe libérale sur le carbone, une taxe inefficace et coûteuse. Ils paient des dizaines de milliers de dollars pour une taxe qui rate la cible. Au cours de la période des questions, on nous a dit que les agriculteurs obtiennent un remboursement de ce qu'ils paient, mais ce n'est pas vrai. Ils ne reçoivent qu'une infime fraction de la taxe sur le carbone qu’ils paient.
Le Canada a besoin de ses agriculteurs. Le monde a besoin de nos agriculteurs. L'insécurité alimentaire est une préoccupation croissante à l'échelle mondiale, et les agriculteurs canadiens peuvent constituer une partie importante de la solution.
Nos agriculteurs ne peuvent poursuivre leurs activités s'ils sont écrasés par les coûts. La taxe sur le carbone et des politiques absurdes comme le plan libéral visant à plafonner l'utilisation des engrais nuisent aux activités agricoles et mettent en péril la sécurité alimentaire dans le monde, comme je l'ai dit, et aussi ici, au pays. Le triplement de la taxe sur le carbone serait absolument néfaste pour les agriculteurs et leurs familles.
Le gouvernement libéral doit prendre au sérieux la question de l'abordabilité. Les libéraux ne peuvent pas continuer à dépenser de l'argent et à faire grimper l'inflation. Ils doivent cesser de siphonner l’argent que les Canadiens gagnent durement. Chaque personne, quels que soient ses antécédents et son lieu d'origine, devrait avoir la possibilité de réussir dans ce magnifique pays. Les Canadiens devraient avoir la certitude qu'en travaillant dur, ils auront assez d'argent pour mettre de la nourriture sur la table, de l'essence dans la voiture et un toit sur leur tête, et qu'il leur restera encore quelque chose pour ce qui est important pour leurs familles.
Si le premier ministre et son gouvernement libéral se souciaient vraiment des Canadiens qui ont du mal à joindre les deux bouts, ils leur donneraient un répit. Il appuierait cette motion et annulerait son augmentation inefficace et coûteuse de la taxe sur le carbone.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-27 15:41 [p.7818]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I have been sent here to represent the constituents of Battlefords—Lloydminster, which is in Saskatchewan. I have always been against a carbon tax. I know how ineffective and costly the carbon tax is. I have bills here from a small business owner, and 25% is what he is paying on the carbon tax. That was before the last hike. What is that doing for the environment? I can tell members what it is doing for the business environment: crushing it.
Monsieur le Président, on m'a envoyée ici pour représenter les électeurs de Battlefords-Lloydminster, une circonscription de la Saskatchewan. J'ai toujours été contre une taxe sur le carbone. Je sais à quel point cette taxe est inefficace et coûteuse. J'ai ici les factures d'un propriétaire de petite entreprise sur lesquelles on peut voir que 25 % de ses dépenses servent à payer la taxe sur le carbone. C'était avant la dernière hausse. Qu'est-ce que cela fait pour l'environnement? Je peux toutefois dire aux députés ce qu'elle fait pour les entreprises: elle les écrase.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-27 15:42 [p.7818]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, what is perplexing about “carbon pricing”, or the carbon tax, is this: What is it doing to prevent disasters? What has the federally imposed Liberal carbon tax done for the environment? I ask because I come from a province that it has been imposed on. How come it did not prevent hurricane Fiona? Where are those tax dollars going? What is it doing? It is doing nothing.
Monsieur le Président, ce qui laisse perplexe au sujet de la « tarification du carbone », ou de la taxe sur le carbone, c'est ceci: En quoi prévient-elle les désastres? Qu'est-ce que la taxe sur le carbone imposée par les libéraux au niveau fédéral a fait pour l'environnement? Je pose la question parce que je viens d'une province où elle a été imposée. Comment se fait-il qu'elle n'ait pas empêché l'ouragan Fiona? Où va l'argent des contribuables? À quoi sert-il? La taxe n’a aucune utilité.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-27 15:44 [p.7818]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, what needs to happen is the people who come to this place have to hear what their constituents are saying and bring that forward. I see on a first-hand basis that, because we have to drive where I reside, families have to choose.
That being said, we can look at companies and technology like carbon capture, for example, and things that industry is already doing. There are parties in this place that do not want to acknowledge the work that energy companies and the industry are already doing. It is only good enough if our energy stays in the ground and is not developed, according to certain parties in this place, and that is unacceptable.
Monsieur le Président, ce qu'il faut, c'est que les députés ici présents écoutent ce que les gens qu'ils représentent ont à dire et qu'ils en fassent part à la Chambre. Comme les gens de ma circonscription doivent se déplacer en voiture, je sais d'expérience que les familles que je représente sont obligées de faire des choix.
Cela dit, nous pouvons nous pencher, par exemple, sur les entreprises qui élaborent des moyens technologiques comme le captage du carbone, et sur d'autres solutions qui sont déjà employées par l'industrie. Certains partis dans cette enceinte ne veulent pas reconnaître le travail déjà accompli par des entreprises énergétiques et par l'industrie. Certains partis préfèrent que les ressources énergétiques restent sous terre et ne soient pas exploitées, et c'est inacceptable.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-09-27 18:10 [p.7840]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I ask that the House give unanimous consent to support the Province of Saskatchewan's environmental plan. Saskatchewan's plan mirrors the plan of other provinces that the Liberal government has accepted. Therefore, based on fair and equal treatment of provinces within the dominion of Canada, Saskatchewan's plan should be accepted and approved by the government of the day.
Madame la Présidente, je demande le consentement unanime de la Chambre afin d'appuyer le plan environnemental de la Saskatchewan. Ce plan reflète ceux d'autres provinces qui ont été acceptés par le gouvernement libéral. Par conséquent, en se fondant sur un traitement juste et équitable de toutes les provinces au sein du Dominion du Canada, le plan de la Saskatchewan devrait être accepté et approuvé par le gouvernement du jour.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-09-27 18:39 [p.7845]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am happy to take to my feet tonight to try to get some answers regarding the carbon tax that the NDP-Liberal government is going to force upon the people of Canada. Not only was a commitment made in the 2019 campaign that the Liberals would never increase the carbon tax by more than $30 per tonne, but now we are going to see it go to $150 per tonne.
The question that I asked the Minister of Agriculture a couple of months ago was this: What are people supposed to do on the farms?
I have a friend now who is paying $90,000 a week in fuel, and a big chunk of that is from the carbon tax. I have another friend who runs a restaurant in Regina. His name is Raul. He said that if he did not have to pay a carbon tax on the heating and utilities to operate his restaurants, he could hire one new employee in each restaurant. He could give someone else a living wage so they could support their family, go to work, earn a paycheque and do better. It would make sure they do well in society.
These are a couple of things that I would like to have answered.
Another burning question I have right now is this: When is the carbon tax going to kick in enough that it actually lowers emissions? I also hope my friend from Glengarry—Prescott—Russell can answer this question: How much has the carbon tax lowered emissions across the country? I believe that in their seven years of being in government, the Liberals have never actually hit an environmental target. They have not planted their billion trees. They have not lowered CO2 emissions. Really, they have just been punishing everyday families, punishing ordinary Canadians and making it harder for them to get by.
We see the rising cost of inflation, and no one believes that the carbon tax has not had a negative effect on it. We have to pay more to truck fruits and vegetables and other groceries into different areas, especially rural and remote Canada. The carbon tax affects the price at the grocery store. I would like to know from my friend as well whether he believes that the carbon tax has not negatively affected the price of groceries. Does he think the carbon tax might actually make the price of groceries go down once it hits $150 a tonne?
These are a few things that I hope he can answer in his response.
Finally, the government has had some trials and tribulations, obviously of its own making, and I would ask him about the commitment the Liberals made to Canadians that they would not increase the carbon tax past $30 a tonne. I think that is very important, and people across Saskatchewan and Canada want to hear the answer to this: Why did they break that promise? Why did they feel it was okay for the Liberal government to make a promise in that campaign and then not follow through? It is not doing anything for the environment. If they are not lowering emissions and this carbon tax is still making everything less affordable for Canadians, what is the point?
I know he is going to answer with this: “Oh, we are just going to give it back in a rebate.” No one in Saskatchewan believes that, because the Liberals are making life less affordable and the rebate does not cover the price at the pumps or the price we are paying at the grocery stores.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureux de prendre la parole ce soir pour tenter d'obtenir des réponses concernant la taxe sur le carbone que le gouvernement néo-démocrate—libéral imposera aux Canadiens. Non seulement les libéraux ont promis, lors de la campagne électorale de 2019, qu'ils n'augmenteraient jamais la taxe sur le carbone de plus de 30 $ la tonne, mais celle-ci passera maintenant à 150 $ la tonne.
Il y a quelques mois, j'ai posé la question suivante à la ministre de l'Agriculture: qu'est-ce que les exploitants agricoles sont censés faire?
J'ai un ami qui dépense actuellement 90 000 $ par semaine en carburant, et la taxe sur le carbone compte pour une grande partie de ce montant. J'ai un autre ami qui tient un restaurant à Regina. Il s'appelle Raul. Il m'a dit que, s'il n'avait pas à payer la taxe sur le carbone sur le chauffage et les services publics pour exploiter ses restaurants, il pourrait embaucher un nouvel employé dans chaque restaurant. Il pourrait offrir un emploi à une personne, qui obtiendrait ainsi un salaire suffisant pour soutenir sa famille et améliorer sa situation, ce qui lui permettrait de bien s'en tirer dans la société.
Voilà quelques questions auxquelles j'aimerais qu'on réponde.
J'ai aussi une autre question brûlante: à quel moment la taxe sur le carbone va-t-elle être suffisamment élevée pour vraiment réduire les émissions? J'espère aussi que mon ami de Glengarry—Prescott—Russell pourra répondre à cette question: dans quelle mesure la taxe sur le carbone a-t-elle permis de réduire les émissions au pays? Je crois qu'en sept ans au pouvoir, les libéraux n’ont jamais atteint une cible environnementale. Ils n'ont pas planté leur milliard d'arbres. Ils n'ont pas réduit les émissions de CO2. En fait, ils ont simplement puni les familles et les Canadiens ordinaires en faisant en sorte qu'ils aient plus de difficulté à joindre les deux bouts.
L'inflation ne cesse d'augmenter, et personne ne croit que la taxe sur le carbone n'y est pas pour quelque chose. Le transport des fruits, des légumes et des autres produits d'épicerie partout au pays, et plus particulièrement dans les régions rurales et éloignées, coûte de plus en plus cher. La taxe sur le carbone a une incidence sur le prix du panier d'épicerie. J'aimerais que mon ami me dise s'il croit que la taxe sur le carbone n'a pas eu d'effet négatif sur le prix du panier d'épicerie. Croit-il que la taxe sur le carbone pourrait vraiment faire baisser le prix du panier d'épicerie lorsqu'elle atteindra 150 $ la tonne?
J'espère qu'il pourra me fournir quelques réponses.
Enfin, le gouvernement a connu pas mal de déboires — dont il est, bien sûr, entièrement responsable —, et je voudrais poser au député une question sur l'engagement que les libéraux ont pris envers les Canadiens de ne pas augmenter la taxe sur le carbone au-delà de 30 $ la tonne. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un engagement très important, et les gens de la Saskatchewan et du Canada veulent entendre la réponse à la question suivante: pourquoi les libéraux ont-ils rompu cet engagement? Pourquoi le gouvernement libéral a-t-il estimé qu'il était acceptable de faire une promesse pendant cette campagne et de ne pas la respecter? Il ne fait rien pour l'environnement. S'il ne réduit pas les émissions et cette taxe sur le carbone continue de rendre tout moins abordable pour les Canadiens, à quoi sert cette mesure?
Je sais que le député va répondre: « Oh, nous rendrons simplement l'argent sous forme de remboursement. » Personne en Saskatchewan n'y croit, car les libéraux rendent la vie moins abordable et le remboursement ne couvre pas les prix que nous payons à la pompe ou à l'épicerie.
Collapse
View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-09-27 18:45 [p.7846]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I appreciate my friend's comments from across the aisle.
One thing that I will not disagree with him on at all is that I firmly believe that Liberals know how to spend taxpayers' dollars. I believe that he could read a huge list of spending that this government has done, whether it is effective and efficient is a totally different debate.
However, one thing the member did bring up was fertilizer targets, and the fact that last year farmers lost about 35.8% of some of the crops that they planted. However, this government wants to bring in a fertilizer reduction target where it is going to put 30% less fertilizer in the fields for farmers. We talked to farmers in Saskatchewan and across the country, and they said that they would not be able to grow the same number of crops with that amount of fertilizer.
I am not sure if the member went out to Ag in Motion in Saskatchewan, but I would love him to come out for that tour. I think he might have actually, but it is doing amazing things in agriculture with technology. I went to the YARA incubator, where they actually can scan leaves in a field—
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue d'en face de ses observations.
Je suis entièrement d'accord avec lui sur un point: je suis convaincu que les libéraux savent comment dépenser l'argent des contribuables. Je crois sincèrement qu'il pourrait énumérer une liste interminable de dépenses que le gouvernement a faites. Pour ce qui est de déterminer si ces dépenses sont efficaces, c'est une tout autre histoire.
Cela dit, le député a notamment parlé des cibles par rapport aux engrais et du fait que les agriculteurs ont perdu environ 35,8 % de certaines de leurs récoltes l'an dernier. Or, le gouvernement veut imposer une cible de réduction des engrais selon laquelle les agriculteurs devraient utiliser 30 % moins d'engrais. Nous avons parlé à des agriculteurs en Saskatchewan et ailleurs au pays, et ils nous ont dit qu'ils ne seraient pas en mesure de produire les mêmes récoltes avec cette quantité d'engrais.
Je ne sais pas si le député est déjà allé à Ag in Motion, en Saskatchewan, mais j'aimerais bien qu'il vienne faire un tour. Je pense qu'il y est peut-être allé en fait. On peut y voir des percées technologiques incroyables dans le domaine de l'agriculture. J'ai visité la ferme-incubateur YARA, où il est possible de numériser les feuilles dans un champ...
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-09-26 14:03 [p.7673]
Expand
Madam Speaker, our new Conservative leader will put people first: their retirement, their paycheques, their homes and their country. That is why, this past June, I introduced my first private member's bill, Bill C-286, the recognition of foreign credentials act. This legislation will streamline the process of connecting skilled immigrants with jobs that our economy desperately needs. This is a vital step in making life more affordable for Canadians.
I spent the summer consulting with stakeholders and constituents to discuss this legislation. The feedback is overwhelming. Canada's foreign credentials system is broken. It is a 19th-century system governing a 21st-century labour market.
Having doctors drive taxis is unacceptable. The NDP-Liberal coalition is too busy fuelling the inflation fire and has not done anything to help newcomers work in their fields. Conservatives, under our new leader, are committed to helping newcomers get the jobs they were trained for.
I urge every single MP to lay down their instruments, get to work and pass this important legislation for our country.
Madame la Présidente, notre nouveau chef conservateur fera passer les gens en premier: leur retraite, leur chèque de paie, leur maison et leur pays. C'est pourquoi, en juin dernier, j'ai présenté mon premier projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C-286, Loi sur la reconnaissance des titres de compétences étrangers. Cette mesure législative simplifiera le processus de jumelage d’immigrants qualifiés avec les emplois que notre économie a désespérément besoin de pourvoir. Il s'agit d'une étape essentielle pour rendre la vie plus abordable pour les Canadiens.
J'ai passé l'été à consulter les intervenants et les électeurs pour discuter de ce projet de loi. Tous abondent dans le même sens: le système canadien d'évaluation des titres de compétences étrangers ne fonctionne pas. C'est un système du XIXe siècle qui régit un marché du travail du XXIe siècle.
Il est inacceptable que des médecins conduisent des taxis. La coalition néo-démocrate-libérale, trop occupée à alimenter le feu de l'inflation, n'a rien fait pour aider les nouveaux arrivants à travailler dans leur domaine. Les conservateurs, sous la direction de notre nouveau chef, sont déterminés à aider les nouveaux arrivants à obtenir les emplois pour lesquels ils ont été formés.
J'exhorte chaque député à se mettre au travail et à adopter ce projet de loi important pour notre pays.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-09-26 15:06 [p.7685]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, with Fiona top of mind, people in my communities and across Canada are crying out for compassion from the Liberal government. Increased payroll taxes are hitting at a time when a lot of our small businesses are struggling to recover and maintain their employees. Those same workers are struggling to put food on their families' tables, put gas in their family vehicles and keep a roof over their families' heads.
Will the government restore Canadians' hope and cancel its planned tax increase for Canadians' paycheques?
Monsieur le Président, étant donné que Fiona est une priorité, les gens dans ma circonscription et dans l'ensemble du Canada réclament la compassion du gouvernement libéral. L'augmentation des taxes sur les chèques de paie frappe à un moment où beaucoup de petites entreprises peinent à réembaucher et à conserver leurs employés. Ces mêmes travailleurs ont du mal à nourrir leur famille, à mettre de l'essence dans les véhicules familiaux et à loger leur famille.
Le gouvernement va-t-il redonner espoir aux Canadiens en annulant l'augmentation des taxes prévue sur les chèques de paie des Canadiens?
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-09-26 15:20 [p.7687]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am presenting this petition today on behalf of Canadians who have mobilized because of a concern over a promise made by the Liberal Party of Canada in its 2021 platform to deny charitable status to organizations that have convictions about abortion that the Liberal Party views as dishonest. The petitioners feel that this is another opportunity for the government to use a values test, as it did to discriminate against worthy applicants to the Canada summer jobs program, and in the same way this will jeopardize the charitable status of many organizations, such as hospitals, houses of worship, schools, homeless shelters and so many others that play such an intricate role in taking care of the needs of Canadians.
Therefore, the petitioners are calling on the Liberal government to protect and preserve the application of charitable status rules on a politically and ideologically neutral basis, without discrimination on the basis of political or religious values and without the imposition of another values test. Certainly of significance is that the petitioners are very concerned that the current government affirm the rights of Canadians to freedom of expression.
Monsieur le Président, je présente aujourd'hui une pétition au nom de Canadiens qui se sont mobilisés parce qu'ils s'inquiètent d'une promesse incluse dans le programme électoral du Parti libéral du Canada en 2021, soit la promesse de refuser le statut d'organisme de bienfaisance aux organismes dont les convictions au sujet de l'avortement sont considérées comme malhonnêtes par le Parti libéral. Les pétitionnaires estiment que c'est un autre moyen employé par le gouvernement pour imposer un critère des valeurs, comme celui employé pour faire de la discrimination à l'endroit de demandeurs admissibles dans le cadre du programme Emplois d’été Canada, et que cela mettra en péril le statut de nombreux organismes de bienfaisance, dont des hôpitaux, des lieux de culte, des écoles, des refuges pour sans-abri et bien d'autres organismes qui jouent un rôle complexe lorsqu'il s'agit de répondre aux besoins des Canadiens.
Les pétitionnaires demandent donc au gouvernement libéral de protéger et de maintenir les règles relatives à l'obtention du statut d'organisme de bienfaisance et de s'assurer qu'elles soient appliquées de façon neutre, sans biais politique ou idéologique, sans discrimination fondée sur les valeurs politiques ou religieuses et sans l'imposition d'un nouveau critère des valeurs. Autre élément important: les pétitionnaires exhortent le gouvernement actuel à affirmer le droit des Canadiens à la liberté d'expression.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-09-26 18:09 [p.7712]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the member for Kenora.
It is an honour to rise to speak on behalf of the constituents of Saskatoon West, but before I speak to this legislation, I would like to let everyone in Atlantic Canada know that my thoughts and prayers are with them as they recover from this weekend's terrible storm. This is a very difficult time, with property destruction, injuries and deaths, and I know that the rest of the country stands with them and is ready to help with whatever they need.
Over the summer, I spoke with many constituents, and all of them had the same message: The cost of living is really starting to hurt. Seniors are struggling to get by on their fixed incomes, and all Canadians know about the high cost of groceries, at least those of us who actually buy our own groceries. I am talking about grocery prices that are up by almost 11%. They are rising at the fastest pace in 40 years.
Here we are in week two of our new parliamentary session. Is the government talking about reducing the sky-high cost of food? Is the government talking about stopping planned payroll tax hikes, such as the tax increases on January 1 that will reduce everybody's paycheques, or the coming carbon tax price increase on April Fool's Day, which is all part of the government's plan to triple the carbon tax? Is this what we are debating? No, we are here debating legislation that was born out of a cynical coalition deal between the NDP and the Liberals to keep this tired, worn-out government in power.
Yes, this legislation, Bill C-30, is nothing more than a scheme cooked up between the NDP and the Liberals through a tweet. In the summer, the NDP leader tweeted that the Liberals needed to do this or that to count on his unwavering support, and the government responded with Bill C-30 and Bill C-31. Close to $5 billion will be used and, to use the words of the Minister of Tourism last week, thrown into the lake to keep the NDP happy.
I do not believe that government should be throwing money into the lake just to cling to power. Governments exist to serve the people who elected them, so today I have good news for Canadians. Our party just elected a new leader who is well versed in economics. He is a man who actually understands how economic works. For years, the member for Carleton warned the government about reckless and out-of-control spending. What was his simple message? It was that excessive government spending would lead to out-of-control inflation. Well, guess what? Inflation is rampant and out of control. Our new leader predicted this, and he has a solid plan to get us out of this. In the meantime, we will continue to hold our Prime Minister to account and work hard to encourage the government to implement sensible policy.
Let us talk about this piece of legislation, Bill C-30, and the financial implications for our treasury, our economy and, most importantly, the everyday taxpayer. The government is telling us that this a limited, one-time doubling of the GST rebate that will provide $467 for the average family. When I look at this, on the one hand, who will argue if the government wants to hand them some cash? It is welcomed relief coming at a difficult time, but it is a short-term band-aid that does not get to the heart of the problem. If we do not fix the core problem, then more band-aids will be proposed, and indeed we are already seeing this. While the government says that this is a one-time payment, it is openly admitting that this is just the start of a larger government spending package. Bill C-31, for example, includes more inflation boost in cash injections, which is just the start of an even bigger spending program that the health minister cannot even quantify right now.
I think this would be a good opportunity to take a moment to provide the government with some information that it may not understand. You see, I, like many of my Conservative colleagues, studied economics. Like me, many of my Conservative colleagues have run businesses and created jobs prior to being elected to this great House. I used sound economic principles to build my successful business and run my own household with the help of my wife. Together, we understood some of the basic economic principles and used them successfully. Now, we are not particularly smarter than other Canadians. In fact, I would suggest that most Canadians understand these basic economic principles and use them every day to manage their own households.
What are some of these basic principles? First, there is only so much money. It is not infinite. There is not a magic money tree in the backyard where we can go when we need a little extra cash. No, we have to make some hard choices. We have a limited amount of money with unlimited ways to spend it, and so we have to sit down together, weigh the pros and cons of the various options available and make a choice. Sometimes that choice is hard, especially right now. Families have to choose between inflated food prices and paying the carbon tax on their heating bills. These are not easy choices, but people are creative. Families find ways to scrimp and save in one area to allow them to spend in another. That is the first principle: Money is finite.
The next principle is that borrowing money is like playing with fire. It needs to be done very carefully and in a controlled manner. Yes, sometimes we need to borrow money, when we are borrowing to purchase a house, for example, but loan payments can become a heavy financial burden, especially when interest rates start to rise.
That is why most families understand that borrowing should be temporary, and that is why, when loans get paid off, there is great celebration in a household and a wonderful feeling of freedom. That is the second principle: borrow with caution. How does this apply to the government? If the government applied these two simple principles, the results would be lower taxes and lower debt. Canadians could keep more money in their pockets and have the freedom to spend their money the way they choose.
There is a third, very important principle I also want to talk about. This one is a larger principle that governments really must understand and apply. The third principle is the law of supply and demand. The easiest way to understand this is through an example. If consumers have $10, and the store has 10 loaves of bread, then consumers will pay $1 for each loaf of bread. If the government suddenly gives consumers an extra $10, but the amount of bread does not increase, now people are going to pay $2 for each loaf of bread. That is inflation. The loaf of bread goes from costing $1 to $2, and that is exactly what is happening in our country right now.
The government has dramatically boosted the amount of money available to people with $500 billion in the last two years. This extra money has bid up the price of everything that we buy. This extra money has also been tacked onto our national debt, resulting in increased interest payments, an obligation that our children's children will have to deal with long after we are gone from this place. When the Prime Minister famously said he does not think about economic policy, this simple principle is what he was not thinking about, and because he was not thinking, we are in this mess today.
I will once again remind everyone that the Conservative leader does understand these principles and is committed to running government according to them. What would it look like if Conservatives were in charge right now? Let us say we had a Conservative prime minister and that we believed the government should provide some GST tax relief to Canadians, just as Bill C-30 proposes. How would we implement something like this?
First, we would understand that money is finite and that we cannot go to a magic money tree to implement this bill. We would task our government to find savings somewhere else to pay for this new program. We would recognize that a new dollar spent would require a dollar to be saved somewhere else, just like all Canadians do every day when they manage their own households. If the government behaved like this, it would not take long for inflation to back down and for taxes to be reduced. That is how Conservatives would govern.
I need to come back to the topic of high prices and the rampant inflation that we see every day. There is a grocery store a few blocks down 22nd Street from my constituency office. The folks who shop there know that I sometimes set up shop there on the weekends to shake hands, hand out reusable grocery bags and chat with my constituents in Saskatoon West.
I also shop there for groceries with my wife Cheryl. Cheryl and I have seen our grocery bill go up every month. It may be salad ingredients, such as lettuce and tomatoes. It might be meat and potatoes, or the side dishes and vegetables. Bread, milk, coffee, pop and chips, everything, has increased in price, and prepackaged portions are decreasing. I am not just talking about small increases. Look at the cost of meat today versus two years ago. It has nearly doubled in price. That is 100% inflation.
Chicken breasts used to go for five in a package for $10. Now we only get three for that same price. They have cut the portion size to hide the cost increase. I was just at Costco this weekend, and I bought a four-pack of bacon. It used to cost $20, but now it costs $30. That is 50% more.
Is this a result of Russia invading Ukraine, as the Liberals would have us believe? How much beef, chicken, lettuce, potato chips, rice, coffee and milk do we get from Ukraine? It is probably zero. The vast majority is farmed and harvested right here in Canada. It is the domestic policy of the federal government, such as printing cash for the past two years, that has put Canada in this inflation period. It is domestic policies, such as the Bank of Canada aiding and abetting the federal government by underwriting its massive debt load instead of sticking to its mandate to control inflation. It is domestic policies, such as the carbon tax and fertilizer reductions, that are hurting our farmers and causing food prices to soar. It is domestic policies, such as ramming massive spending legislation through the House of Commons to keep a marriage of convenience with the NDP alive.
As I wrap up, I want to focus on accountability. Who is accountable for the $5 billion the government is shovelling out the door to satisfy a Twitter outburst from the NDP leader? I know it will not be the Liberals and the NDP, as they ram the legislation through Parliament and pat themselves on the back like they like to do. Instead, it will be the people of Saskatoon West left holding the bag through more inflation, higher taxes and reduced benefits from the government. Rodney Dangerfield famously said he gets no respect. Unfortunately for Canadians, from the Liberal government, they get no respect either.
Monsieur le Président, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Kenora.
C'est un honneur de prendre la parole au nom des habitants de Saskatoon-Ouest, mais avant de parler du projet de loi, je tiens à ce que tous les habitants du Canada atlantique sachent que mes pensées et mes prières les accompagnent alors qu'ils se remettent de la terrible tempête de la fin de semaine. C'est une période très difficile: il y a eu des dommages matériels, des blessés et des morts. Je sais que le reste du pays est de tout cœur avec les habitants de cette région et qu'il est prêt à leur offrir tout ce dont ils ont besoin.
Au cours de l'été, j'ai discuté avec bon nombre de mes concitoyens, et ils avaient tous le même message: le coût de la vie commence vraiment à causer du tort. Les aînés ont du mal à joindre les deux bouts avec leur revenu fixe, et tous les Canadiens savent que le coût de l'épicerie a augmenté, du moins ceux qui font l'épicerie. Je parle ici de l'augmentation de près de 11 % du prix de l'épicerie. C'est l'augmentation la plus rapide en 40 ans.
Alors que nous amorçons notre deuxième semaine de la session parlementaire, le gouvernement a-t-il parlé de réduire le coût exorbitant des aliments? Parle-t-il d'annuler ses hausses de taxes sur les salaires, dont celles qu'il prévoit imposer le 1er janvier et qui réduira les salaires de tout le monde, ou encore de la hausse de la taxe sur le carbone prévue le jour du poisson d'avril, puisque le gouvernement compte tripler la taxe sur le carbone? Est-ce de cela que nous débattons? Non, nous sommes en train de débattre d'un projet de loi qui découle d'une entente de coalition conclue de façon cynique entre le NPD et le Parti libéral afin de maintenir ce gouvernement usé au pouvoir.
Ce projet de loi, le projet de loi C‑30, n'est qu'un stratagème élaboré par le NPD et le Parti libéral pour donner suite à un gazouillis. En effet, dans un gazouillis publié en été, le chef du NPD a dit que les libéraux devaient faire telle ou telle chose s'il voulait pouvoir compter sur son appui indéfectible, et le gouvernement a répondu en présentant les projets de loi C‑30 et C‑31. Pour contenter le NPD, près de 5 milliards de dollars seront dépensés et jetés dans le lac, pour reprendre les propos tenus la semaine dernière par le ministre du Tourisme.
Je ne crois pas que le gouvernement devrait jeter de l'argent dans le lac juste pour se maintenir au pouvoir. Les gouvernements sont là pour servir la population qui l'a élu. J'ai donc une bonne nouvelle pour les Canadiens. Notre parti vient d'élire un nouveau chef bien versé en économie. C'est un homme qui sait vraiment comment l'économie fonctionne. Cela fait des années que le député de Carleton nous met en garde contre les dépenses irresponsables et effrénées du gouvernement. Son message était simple. Il nous a prévenus que les dépenses excessives du gouvernement allaient mener à une inflation débridée. Or, devinez quoi? On assiste maintenant à une inflation galopante et incontrôlée. Notre nouveau chef l'avait prédit, et il a un plan rigoureux pour nous sortir de cette situation. En attendant, nous allons continuer de demander des comptes au premier ministre, et nous allons redoubler d'efforts pour encourager le gouvernement à adopter des politiques raisonnables.
Parlons du projet de loi C-30 et des répercussions financières pour le Trésor, l'économie et, ce qui importe le plus, le contribuable ordinaire. Le gouvernement affirme que, grâce à la mesure limitée et ponctuelle consistant à doubler le remboursement de la TPS, une famille moyenne recevrait 467 $. D'une part, qui se plaindra que le gouvernement veut lui remettre de l'argent? Certes, il s'agit d'un répit qui arrive à point nommé en période difficile, mais il s'agit d'une solution de fortune, à court terme, qui ne s'attaque pas aux racines du problème. Si on ne règle pas le problème principal, d'autres solutions de fortune seront proposées. En fait, c'est déjà le cas. Le gouvernement dit qu'il s'agit d'un paiement ponctuel, tout en admettant ouvertement que ce n'est que le début d'un programme de dépenses gouvernementales de plus grande envergure. Le projet de loi C-31 prévoit, par exemple, d'autres injections d'argent qui alimenteront l'inflation. Cela n'est que le début d'un programme de dépenses plus vaste que le ministre de la Santé ne peut même pas quantifier à l'heure qu'il est.
Voici donc une bonne occasion de prendre un instant pour fournir au gouvernement certains renseignements qu'il ne comprend peut-être pas. Voyez-vous, j'ai fait des études en économie, comme beaucoup de mes collègues conservateurs. Comme moi, bon nombre des députés conservateurs ont dirigé une entreprise et créé des emplois avant d'être élus dans cette illustre enceinte. Je me suis appuyé sur de solides principes économiques pour bâtir une entreprise prospère et gérer mon ménage avec l'aide de mon épouse. Tous les deux, nous avons compris certains principes économiques de base et les avons appliqués de manière fructueuse. Nous ne sommes pas nécessairement plus intelligents que les autres Canadiens. En fait, je suis prêt à affirmer que la plupart des Canadiens comprennent ces principes économiques de base et les appliquent dans la gestion de leur propre ménage.
Voyons certains de ces principes de base. D'abord, l'argent dont nous disposons est limité. Il n'est pas infini. Dans notre jardin, il n'y a pas d'arbre magique où pousse de l'argent que nous pourrions aller cueillir au besoin. Non. Nous sommes forcés de faire des choix difficiles. Nous disposons d'une quantité limitée d'argent, et les possibilités de le dépenser sont illimitées. Nous devons donc nous asseoir ensemble, peser le pour et le contre des différentes options et faire un choix. Il arrive que ce choix soit difficile, surtout en ce moment. Des familles se retrouvent coincées entre la flambée des prix des denrées alimentaires et la taxe sur le carbone qui fait grimper leur facture de chauffage. De tels choix sont difficiles, mais les Canadiens sont créatifs. Les familles trouvent des moyens d'économiser à certains endroits pour pouvoir dépenser ailleurs. Voilà le premier principe: l'argent dont nous disposons est limité.
Le principe suivant veut qu'emprunter de l'argent, ce soit comme jouer avec le feu. Il faut y aller avec beaucoup de précaution et de façon contrôlée. Bien entendu, il faut parfois emprunter de l'argent, pour acheter une maison, par exemple, mais le remboursement du prêt peut devenir un lourd fardeau financier, surtout lorsque les taux d'intérêt commencent à grimper.
C'est pourquoi la plupart des familles comprennent que les emprunts devraient être temporaires et que, lorsque des prêts sont remboursés, elles sont enchantées et se sentent merveilleusement libres. C'est là le deuxième principe: emprunter avec prudence. Comment cela s'applique‑t‑il au gouvernement? Si le gouvernement avait appliqué ces deux principes simples, cela aurait réduit le fardeau fiscal et la dette. Cela aurait permis aux Canadiens de garder plus d’argent dans leurs poches et de dépenser à leur guise.
Je veux aussi parler d'un troisième principe fort important. Il s'agit d'un principe général que les gouvernements doivent vraiment comprendre et appliquer: c'est la loi de l'offre et de la demande. La meilleure façon de l'expliquer, c'est en donnant un exemple. Si les consommateurs ont 10 $ et que le magasin vend 10 miches de pain, les consommateurs paieront 1 $ pour chaque miche. Cependant, si le gouvernement leur donne soudainement 10 $ de plus, mais que la quantité de pain n'augmente pas, les gens paieront désormais 2 $ pour chaque miche. C'est cela l'inflation. Le prix du pain passe de 1 $ à 2 $. C'est exactement ce qui est en train de se passer dans notre pays.
En offrant aux Canadiens une série de mesures d'aide d'une valeur de 500 milliards de dollars au cours des deux dernières années, le gouvernement a augmenté de façon spectaculaire le montant d'argent en circulation. Cet argent supplémentaire a fait augmenter le prix de tous les biens à la consommation. Cela a également fait augmenter notre dette nationale, donnant lieu à une hausse des intérêts à payer, une obligation avec laquelle nos petits-enfants devront composer bien longtemps après que nous ne serons plus ici. Cela revient à la célèbre déclaration du premier ministre comme quoi il ne réfléchit pas vraiment à la politique économique. Ce principe pourtant simple est exactement ce à quoi il n'a pas réfléchi, et parce qu'il n'a pas réfléchi, nous nous retrouvons aujourd'hui dans ce bourbier.
Je rappelle à tous que le chef conservateur comprend ces principes et est déterminé à diriger le gouvernement en les respectant. À quoi ressemblerait la situation à l'heure actuelle si les conservateurs étaient au pouvoir? Si par exemple nous avions un premier ministre conservateur et que nous estimions que le gouvernement devrait alléger le fardeau de la TPS pour les Canadiens, comme il est proposé dans le projet de loi C‑30. Comment nous y prendrions-nous?
Premièrement, nous comprendrions que l'argent n'est pas une ressource renouvelable et qu'on ne peut pas la faire pousser dans les arbres, comme par magie, pour mettre en œuvre ce projet de loi. Nous chargerions donc le gouvernement de trouver des économies ailleurs pour payer ce nouveau programme. Nous reconnaîtrions que pour chaque dollar dépensé, il faut économiser un dollar ailleurs, exactement comme le font les Canadiens lorsqu'ils gèrent les finances de leur ménage au quotidien. Si le gouvernement agissait ainsi, l'inflation diminuerait rapidement et les taxes aussi. Voilà comment les conservateurs gouverneraient.
Je reviens sur les prix exorbitants et l'inflation généralisée que nous observons jour après jour. Il y a une épicerie située à quelques pâtés de maisons de mon bureau de circonscription, sur la 22e rue. Les gens qui y font leurs emplettes savent que je m'y installe parfois la fin de semaine pour serrer la main des citoyens de ma circonscription, Saskatoon‑Ouest, leur remettre des sacs réutilisables et discuter avec eux.
J'y fais aussi mes courses avec ma femme, Cheryl. Cheryl et moi avons vu notre facture d'épicerie augmenter chaque mois. Qu'il s'agisse de ce que nous mettons dans nos salades, comme de la laitue et des tomates, ou encore de la viande, des pommes de terre, des plats d'accompagnement, des légumes, du pain, du lait, du café, des boissons gazeuses ou des croustilles, tout a augmenté, et les portions des produits préemballés diminuent. Je ne parle pas que de petites augmentations. Comparons le prix de la viande aujourd'hui à celui d'il y a deux ans. Il a presque doublé. C'est une inflation de 100 %.
Autrefois, on pouvait acheter un paquet de cinq blancs de poulet pour 10 $. Maintenant, nous n'en avons que trois pour le même prix. On a réduit la taille des portions pour masquer l'augmentation des prix. J'étais chez Costco en fin de semaine et j'y ai acheté quatre paquets de bacon, qui coûtaient auparavant 20 $, mais qui coûtent aujourd'hui 30 $. Cela représente une augmentation de 50 %.
Est-ce que c'est attribuable à l'invasion de l'Ukraine par la Russie, comme tentent de nous le faire croire les libéraux? Quelle est la quantité de bœuf, de poulet, de laitue, de croustilles, de riz, de café et de lait que nous importons d'Ukraine? C'est probablement zéro. La majeure partie de ces produits sont cultivés et récoltés ici même, au Canada. Ce sont les politiques intérieures du gouvernement fédéral, comme l'impression effrénée de billets depuis deux ans, qui ont poussé le Canada vers une période d'inflation. Ce sont les politiques intérieures comme celles de la Banque du Canada, qui a soutenu le gouvernement fédéral en se portant garante de la dette massive qu'il a engendrée, au lieu de jouer le rôle qui lui incombe, soit de limiter l'inflation. Ce sont les politiques intérieures comme la taxe sur le carbone et l'imposition d'une réduction de l'utilisation d'engrais qui nuisent aux agriculteurs canadiens et qui provoquent une explosion du prix des aliments. Ce sont les politiques intérieures comme l'adoption forcée de mesures législatives ultracoûteuses par la Chambre des communes dans le seul but de maintenir en vie le mariage de convenance intervenu entre les libéraux et le NPD qui sont en cause.
En terminant, je voudrais parler de responsabilité. Qui assumera la responsabilité des 5 milliards de dollars que le gouvernement jette par la fenêtre dans le seul but d'apaiser une crise que le chef du NPD a faite sur Twitter? Je sais que ce ne seront ni les libéraux ni les néo-démocrates parce qu'ils forcent l'adoption de projets de loi au Parlement et qu'ils s'en félicitent, comme d'habitude. Ce seront plutôt les gens de Saskatoon‑Ouest, qui devront subir l'inflation galopante, la hausse du fardeau fiscal et la réduction des prestations gouvernementales. Malheureusement, cela me fait penser à la célèbre déclaration de Rodney Dangerfield, qui avait affirmé que personne ne le respecte; hélas, personne au gouvernement libéral ne respecte les Canadiens non plus.
Collapse
View Brad Redekopp Profile
CPC (SK)
View Brad Redekopp Profile
2022-09-26 18:20 [p.7714]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I think the member's question demonstrates quite clearly the issue that we have here. The government does not really understand how economics work. All economists are willing and very happy to explain to people that, when governments add a lot of money to the economy, it causes inflation. It is a proven fact. It happens all the time, and we are seeing it right now.
Yes, it is happening in different countries around the world, but it gets worse depending on how the government impacts that. In Canada, our government has shovelled so much money into the economy that our inflation is actually hurting us more than it needs to. That is what we will be fixing with the new Conservative government.
Monsieur le Président, je pense que la question du député montre clairement le problème actuel. Le gouvernement ne comprend pas vraiment les rouages de l’économie. Tous les économistes peuvent expliquer — et ils se feront un plaisir de le faire — que lorsque les gouvernements ajoutent beaucoup d’argent dans l’économie, l'inflation grimpe. C’est prouvé. Cela se produit régulièrement, et nous le constatons dans la présente conjoncture.
C’est vrai que d’autres pays connaissent une crise inflationniste, mais la gravité de la situation dépend de ce que fait le gouvernement. Au Canada, le gouvernement a injecté tellement d’argent dans l’économie que notre taux d’inflation est plus dommageable qu'il devrait l'être. Voilà le problème que réglera le nouveau gouvernement conservateur.
Collapse
Results: 76 - 90 of 808 | Page: 6 of 54

|<
<
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data