Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 61 - 75 of 761
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister consistently avoids accountability by sending his ministers to answer the hard questions. Bill C-29 is no different. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission's call to action 56 clearly calls on the Prime Minister to respond to the national council for reconciliation's annual report, yet according to the bill, in subclause 17(3), the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations is to respond to the national council's annual report.
Yesterday at the technical briefing, the minister stated that Bill C-29 would only answer calls to action 53 to 55. That is actually true, because in the bill it is not the Prime Minister who responds to the national council's report.
Why is the minister blatantly disregarding call to action 56, protecting the Prime Minister and allowing the Prime Minister to abdicate his responsibility of answering to the national council's report?
Monsieur le Président, le premier ministre évite systématiquement de rendre des comptes en envoyant ses ministres répondre aux questions difficiles. Il en est de même du projet de loi C-29. L'appel à l'action 56 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation demande clairement au premier ministre de répondre au rapport annuel du Conseil national de réconciliation. Or, au paragraphe 17(3) du projet de loi, il est prévu que c'est le ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones qui doit y répondre.
Hier, lors de la séance d'information technique, le ministre a déclaré que le projet de loi C-29 ne donnerait suite qu'aux appels à l'action 53 à 55. C'est effectivement le cas, car dans le projet de loi, ce n'est pas le premier ministre qui doit répondre au rapport du Conseil national.
Pourquoi le ministre fait-il fi de l'appel à l'action 56, pourquoi protège-t-il le premier ministre et permet-il à ce dernier de se dérober à sa responsabilité de répondre au rapport du Conseil national?
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, before I begin, I humbly ask for unanimous consent to split my time with the member for Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock.
Monsieur le Président, avant de commencer, je demande humblement le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour partager mon temps de parole avec le député d'Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, while it is always an honour to rise in this place and speak on behalf of the people of Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, this week as we return to Parliament, especially as a member from northern Saskatchewan, I come with a heavy heart. As I begin today, I want to acknowledge the recent tragic events in northern Saskatchewan in the communities of James Smith Cree Nation and Weldon. As the healing journey begins for so many, it is important that in the days and weeks ahead we do not allow our focus to be lost from what is going to be a long and difficult journey for many. Often as the media attention diminishes, so can the help and support. The heavy burden these communities will carry will require a resolve, a resolve to continue to be there for family, friends and neighbours. We must not allow them to walk this journey alone.
It is with these thoughts in mind that I rise to speak on Bill C-29, an act to provide for the establishment of a national council for reconciliation. The work of truth and reconciliation needs to be viewed as a journey rather than a destination. Relationships are not easy, especially ones that have a long history of distrust. That distrust is the reason why a bill like Bill C-29 deserves to be looked at through a lens that focuses on a consensus-building approach. This will create better legislation. It is what is needed and, quite frankly, deserved.
Bill C-29 attempts to honour calls to action 53 to 56 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission by creating an accountability mechanism on the progress of reconciliation across the country. Our party supports accountability. In fact, as the party that established the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, we welcome it. We will support this bill to go to committee and work there to make improvements.
With the purpose of building better legislation and in the advancement of reconciliation, there are a few matters that I feel should be addressed, some concerns, some questions and some suggestions we will make. I would like to take the next few minutes to speak to some of those concerns.
The first concern I will address is around the appointment process of the board of directors of the national council for reconciliation, its transparency and its independence. To help explain this, I want to speak to some of the steps and timelines that led up to Bill C-29 being tabled in the House.
In December of 2017, the Prime Minister announced that he would start the process of establishing a national council for reconciliation by establishing an interim board of directors. By June 2018, only six months later, the interim board of directors presented its final report, with 20 very specific recommendations. It is worth noting, and it was confirmed by the technical briefing last night, that those 20 recommendations were the basis for the draft legal framework. One of those recommendations also included setting up a transitional committee to continue the work that was started.
I want to read a quote from that final report. It states:
As indicated in our interim report, the interim board believes it is important that a transitional committee be set up to continue the work proposed in the interim and final reports. During our tenure, we have heard from various organizations and community members that we need to move forward with speed and maintain the momentum to establish the NCR.
However, inexplicably, it took three and a half years, until December 2021, for the minister to finally get around to appointing the members of the transitional committee. Again, let us be clear. The development of the basis for the legal framework of Bill C-29 was already finished in June 2018. Why the delay?
The current government, time and again on indigenous issues, makes big announcements, holds press conferences, takes photographs and then proceeds to ignore the real and difficult work. Now we fast-forward to June of 2022, when the minister finally tabled Bill C-29, with just two days left in the spring session I might add. That is four years after the recommendations.
It is not just the unacceptable time frames, but the lack of independence and transparency of the selection process that is concerning. From the interim board of directors to the transitional committee to the board of directors of the council, the process of selecting members has been at the sole discretion of the minister. In June, while Bill C-29 was being introduced, there were indigenous organizations that were very public with their own concerns about this process. These concerns are valid, because according to the TRC’s call to action 53, the national council for reconciliation is supposed to be an independent body. I have a simple question. How is it independent if, per clause 8 of this bill, the first board of directors is “selected by the Minister”?
Does the government really expect us to believe, based on its history, that it deserves the benefit of the doubt, and that it would never put forward any undue pressure to get what it wants? Finally, there are the minister’s own words when explaining how this oversight body is needed. He said, “It isn’t up to Canada to be grading itself.”
I think the concerns around the selection process require the minister to be very clear in the House and, more importantly, to indigenous peoples on why he is comfortable in having so much direct control and influence on a body that will be tasked with holding his own government to account on advancing reconciliation.
My next concern is that there is nothing in Bill C-29 that has anything concrete as far as measuring outcomes. Quantifying reconciliation is difficult, I admit, but a close look at call to action number 55 will show that it includes several items that are, in fact, measurable. I will give a few examples: the comparative number of indigenous children to non-indigenous children in care and the reasons for that; the comparative funding for education of on- and off-reserve first nations children; the comparative education and income attainments of indigenous to non-indigenous people; progress on closing the gap on health outcomes; progress on eliminating overrepresentation of indigenous children in youth custody; progress on reducing the rate of criminal victimization in homicide, family violence and other crimes; and, finally, progress on reducing overrepresentation in the justice and correctional systems.
The concern is that, if we want to measure accountability, we must set targets that determine success from failure. Like the axiom, what gets measured gets done.
The PBO recently released a report in response to a Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs request that was very critical of the departments of ISC and CIRNAC for spending increases without improvements in outcomes. I am going to quote from the report: “The analysis conducted indicates that the increased spending did not result in a commensurate improvement in the ability of these organizations to achieve the goals that they had set for themselves.” That paragraph ends with, “Based on the qualitative review the ability to achieve the targets specified has declined.”
  Maybe this is what the government is afraid of. Not only is there a lack of measurable outcomes in Bill C-29, but the wording seems to be purposely vague, just vague enough to avoid accountability. Chief Wilton Littlechild, who sat on both the interim board of directors and the transitional committee, when referring to the bill, told CBC News that the wording needs to be strengthened.
For example, the purpose section of the bill uses the text “to advance efforts for reconciliation”, but Littlechild said the word “efforts” needs deletion. He says the bill should instead say, “advance reconciliation” because it is building on work that has already laid a foundation. The preamble of the bill states that the government should provide “relevant” information, which Littlechild says leaves the government to determine what is important or not. “We could've taken out those kind of words,” he said.
When added all together, it seems that there is a pattern of reducing the risk of accountability in the wording of the bill and in the lack of measurable outcomes that would require the government to follow through on its words and actions.
My final concern is around who responds to the annual report issued by the national council. Subclause 17(3) of the bill states that the minister must respond to the matters addressed by the NCR’s annual report by “publishing an annual report on the state of Indigenous peoples that outlines the Government of Canada’s plans for advancing reconciliation.” This does not honour the TRC’s call to action number 56, which clearly and unequivocally calls on the Prime Minister of Canada to formally respond.
The Prime Minister has consistently said that, “No relationship is more important to Canada than the relationship with Indigenous Peoples.” Actions speak louder than words and the Prime Minister should be the one responding directly, not delegating that responsibility to the minister.
In closing, as I stated earlier, our party will support Bill C-29 and, in the spirit of collaboration and in response to the minister's own words of being willing to be open to “perfecting” the bill, will work with the members of the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs and will offer some amendments that we believe will make this bill better.
It is now our duty to ensure that Bill C-29 is a piece of legislation that truly advances reconciliation.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre au nom des gens de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill. C'est toutefois le cœur lourd que je reviens cette semaine au Parlement, surtout en tant que député du Nord de la Saskatchewan. Tout d'abord, je tiens à souligner aujourd'hui les événements tragiques qui sont survenus récemment dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan, dans les communautés de la nation crie de James Smith et de Weldon. Alors que le processus de guérison s'amorce pour de nombreuses personnes, il est important de ne pas perdre de vue, dans les jours et les semaines à venir, ce qui sera un long et difficile parcours pour bien des personnes. Souvent, lorsque l'attention des médias diminue, l'aide et le soutien diminuent aussi. Ces communautés devront faire preuve de détermination pour porter leur lourd fardeau; elles devront être déterminées à continuer à être là pour les familles, les amis et les voisins. Nous ne devons pas leur permettre de cheminer seuls.
C'est dans cet esprit que je prends la parole au sujet du projet de loi C‑29, Loi prévoyant la constitution d'un conseil national de réconciliation. Le travail de vérité et de réconciliation doit être considéré comme un parcours plutôt qu'une destination. Les relations ne sont pas faciles, surtout celles qui sont marquées par une longue histoire de méfiance. Cette méfiance est la raison pour laquelle une mesure législative comme le projet de loi C‑29 mérite d'être examinée au moyen d'une approche axée sur l'établissement d'un consensus. Cela permettra de créer un meilleur projet de loi. C'est ce qui est nécessaire et, franchement, c'est ce à quoi on est en droit de s'attendre.
Le projet de loi C‑29 tente de répondre aux appels à l'action 53 à 56 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation en créant un mécanisme de reddition de comptes sur les progrès de la réconciliation dans tout le pays. Notre parti est favorable à la reddition de comptes. En fait, en tant que parti qui a créé la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, nous nous en félicitons. Nous appuierons le renvoi de ce projet de loi au comité et travaillerons à y apporter des améliorations.
Dans le but d'élaborer un meilleur projet de loi et de favoriser l'avancement de la réconciliation, il y a quelques préoccupations, quelques questions et quelques sujets qui, selon moi, devraient être abordés, et quelques suggestions que nous ferons. J'aimerais prendre les quelques minutes qui suivent pour parler de certaines de ces préoccupations.
Ma première réserve touche le processus de nomination des membres du Conseil national de réconciliation, sa transparence et son indépendance. Afin d’expliquer mon propos, je vais revenir sur les étapes et l’échéancier qui ont mené au dépôt du projet de loi C‑29 à la Chambre.
En décembre 2017, le premier ministre avait annoncé qu’il lancerait le processus de mise sur pied d’un conseil national de réconciliation en instaurant un conseil d’administration provisoire. En juin 2018, à peine six mois plus tard, ce dernier présentait son rapport final, qui énonçait 20 recommandations très précises. Il est important de préciser que celles-ci ont jeté les assises de l’ébauche du libellé du cadre législatif — ce qui a été confirmé lors de la séance d’information technique tenue hier soir. Il était notamment recommandé de nommer un comité de transition pour poursuivre les travaux amorcés.
J’aimerais vous lire un passage tiré de ce rapport final, qui dit ceci:
Comme nous l’avons indiqué dans notre rapport provisoire, le comité de transition croit qu’il est important qu’un comité de transition soit mis sur pied afin que les travaux proposés dans les rapports provisoire et final puissent se poursuivre. Au cours de notre mandat, divers organismes et membres des collectivités nous ont indiqué que nous devons rapidement aller de l’avant avec l’établissement du Conseil national de réconciliation et maintenir l’élan pour ce faire.
Toutefois, inexplicablement, il a fallu attendre trois ans et demi, jusqu'en décembre 2021, pour que le ministre nomme enfin les membres du comité de transition. Une fois de plus, soyons clairs. L'élaboration du fondement du cadre juridique du projet de loi C‑29 était déjà terminée en juin 2018. Pourquoi ce retard?
Le gouvernement actuel ne cesse de faire de grandes annonces, de tenir des conférences de presse et de prendre des photos au sujet de dossiers concernant les Autochtones, sans s'atteler ensuite aux tâches difficiles. En juin 2022, le ministre a finalement déposé le projet de loi C‑29, deux jours à peine avant la relâche parlementaire estivale, ajouterai-je. C'était donc quatre ans après les recommandations.
Non seulement un tel retard est inacceptable, mais le manque d'indépendance et de transparence du processus de sélection est préoccupant. Du conseil d'administration provisoire au conseil d'administration final du conseil en passant par le comité de transition, le processus de sélection des membres reste à l'entière discrétion du ministre. En juin, au moment de la présentation du projet de loi C‑29, des organismes autochtones ont clamé haut et fort leurs réserves au sujet de ce processus. Ces réserves étaient valables, car selon l'appel à l'action no 53 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, le Conseil national de réconciliation est censé être indépendant. J'ai une question toute simple. Comment peut-il être indépendant si, conformément à l'article 8 de ce projet de loi, le premier conseil d'administration doit être composé de personnes « choisies par le ministre »?
Le gouvernement veut-il vraiment nous faire croire, vu son bilan, qu'il mérite de se faire accorder le bénéfice du doute et qu'il n'exercerait jamais une pression indue pour obtenir ce qu'il veut? Enfin, il y a les propres mots du ministre, qui a dit ceci lorsqu'il a expliqué pourquoi un organisme de surveillance est nécessaire: « Il n'appartient pas au Canada de s'évaluer lui-même. »
À mon avis, les préoccupations concernant le processus de sélection exigent que le ministre dise très clairement à la Chambre et, surtout, aux peuples autochtones pourquoi il est à l'aise avec l'idée d'avoir autant de contrôle et d'influence directs sur un organisme qui aura pour tâche de demander des comptes à son propre gouvernement relativement aux progrès dans la réconciliation.
Autre sujet d'inquiétude: le projet de loi C-29 ne propose rien de concret pour mesurer les résultats. Certes, il est difficile de quantifier la réconciliation, mais, en lisant attentivement l'appel à l'action numéro 55, on constate qu'il comprend plusieurs éléments qui sont bel et bien mesurables. Voici quelques exemples: le nombre d'enfants autochtones pris en charge par comparaison avec les enfants non autochtones et les motifs de la prise en charge; une comparaison en ce qui touche le financement destiné à l'éducation des enfants des Premières Nations dans les réserves et à l'extérieur de celles-ci; une comparaison sur les plans des niveaux de scolarisation et du revenu entre les Autochtones et les non-Autochtones; les progrès réalisés pour combler les écarts en ce qui a trait aux indicateurs de la santé; les progrès réalisés pour ce qui est d’éliminer la surreprésentation des jeunes Autochtones dans le régime de garde; les progrès réalisés dans la réduction du taux de la victimisation criminelle des Autochtones, y compris des données sur les homicides, la victimisation liée à la violence familiale et d’autres crimes, et, enfin, les progrès réalisés en ce qui touche la réduction de la surreprésentation dans le système judiciaire et correctionnel.
Le problème, c'est que si l'on veut mesurer la responsabilité, il faut fixer des cibles qui permettent de distinguer la réussite de l'échec. Comme le veut l'adage, ce qui peut être mesuré peut être accompli.
Le directeur parlementaire du budget a publié récemment un rapport en réponse à une demande du Comité permanent des affaires autochtones et du Nord, où il critique vertement Services aux Autochtones Canada et Relations Couronne-Autochtones et Affaires du Nord Canada pour des hausses de dépenses qui ne se sont pas traduites par une amélioration des résultats. Je cite le rapport: « Il ressort de l’analyse réalisée que l’augmentation des dépenses n’a pas entraîné d’amélioration proportionnelle de la capacité de ces organisations à atteindre les objectifs qu’elles s’étaient fixés. » Le paragraphe se termine sur la phrase suivante: « Selon l’examen qualitatif, la capacité à atteindre les objectifs fixés a diminué. »
  C'est peut-être ce que craint le gouvernement. En plus de ne pas prévoir de résultats mesurables, le projet de loi C‑29 emploie des formulations qui semblent délibérément vagues, juste assez vagues pour éviter une possible reddition de comptes. Le chef Wilton Littlechild, qui a siégé au conseil d'administration provisoire et au comité de transition, a dit à CBC News qu'il fallait renforcer le texte du projet de loi.
À titre d'exemple, la section « Mission » contient la formulation « faire progresser les efforts de réconciliation ». Selon M. Littlechild, il faudrait supprimer le mot « efforts »; le projet de loi devrait plutôt dire « faire progresser la réconciliation », puisqu'il s'appuie sur le travail déjà accompli et les bases établies. Par ailleurs, le préambule du projet de loi dit que le gouvernement devrait communiquer des renseignements « pertinents », ce qui, d'après M. Littlechild, laisse au gouvernement la liberté de déterminer ce qui est important ou non. « On aurait pu enlever les mots de ce genre », a-t-il dit.
Lorsqu'on combine tous ces éléments, on a l'impression que le gouvernement cherche à réduire les risques d'une possible reddition de comptes en utilisant certaines formulations et en ne prévoyant pas de résultats mesurables, qui l'obligeraient à donner suite à ses paroles et à ses gestes.
Ma dernière préoccupation concerne la personne qui doit répondre au rapport annuel publié par le conseil national. Le paragraphe 17(3) du projet de loi précise que le ministre doit répondre aux enjeux visés par le rapport du conseil national de réconciliation en « publiant un rapport annuel sur la situation des peuples autochtones qui décrit les plans du gouvernement du Canada pour faire avancer la réconciliation ». Cela ne respecte pas l'appel à l'action numéro 56 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, qui demande clairement et sans équivoque au premier ministre du Canada d'y répondre officiellement.
Le premier ministre affirme toujours qu'« aucune relation n'est plus importante pour le Canada que celle qu'il entretient avec les peuples autochtones ». Les gestes sont plus éloquents que les paroles, et le premier ministre devrait être celui qui répond directement, sans déléguer cette responsabilité au ministre.
En conclusion, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, notre parti appuiera le projet de loi C‑29 et, dans un esprit de collaboration et en réponse à la déclaration du ministre, qui s'est dit disposé à « perfectionner » le projet de loi, notre parti travaillera avec les membres du Comité permanent des affaires autochtones et du Nord et il proposera certains amendements qui, selon nous, amélioreront ce projet de loi.
Il est maintenant de notre devoir de veiller à ce que le projet de loi C‑29 fasse véritablement progresser la réconciliation.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, I look forward to the opportunity to work at committee to make some improvements and add some teeth to this bill. I have several ideas that I would like to propose when we get there.
I would like to remind the member that it was actually the Conservatives who established the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. If it was not for that, we would probably not be having this debate today. If it was left to the Liberal bench to establish the TRC, we would have probably witnessed more announcements, some press conferences and more studies instead of moving on real progress.
I can assure the members that our new leader is committed to advancing reconciliation with indigenous peoples.
Monsieur le Président, j'attends avec impatience l'étude en comité pour apporter quelques améliorations et donner un peu plus de poids à ce projet de loi. J'ai plusieurs idées à proposer lorsque nous arriverons à cette étape
J'aimerais rappeler à la députée que ce sont en fait les conservateurs qui ont créé la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation. À défaut de cette commission, nous ne serions probablement pas en train de débattre cette question aujourd'hui. Si on avait laissé aux libéraux le soin de créer la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, nous aurions probablement assisté à de nombreuses annonces supplémentaires, à des conférences de presse et à de nouvelles études au lieu de progresser réellement.
Je peux assurer aux députés que notre nouveau chef est déterminé à faire avancer la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the work my colleague and I do together on committee. I look forward to the work we can do.
Our team has a number of ideas that we are going to put forward as amendments. We are going to be listening. If you have some ideas, we are more than happy to consider those and work together to improve this bill.
Let us be fair; this is a good starting point. There are some ways we could improve this bill and move it a little farther down the road to advance reconciliation for all people across our country. I am happy to work with you on any of the ideas you would put forward.
Monsieur le Président, j'aime beaucoup travailler avec ma collègue au comité. Je suis impatient de voir ce que nous pourrons accomplir.
Notre équipe a diverses idées de propositions d'amendements. Nous allons garder une oreille attentive. Si vous avez des idées, nous sommes disposés à les examiner et à collaborer pour améliorer le projet de loi.
Soyons justes; c'est un bon point de départ. Il y a différentes façons d'améliorer le projet de loi et de le rendre plus efficace en matière de réconciliation avec toutes les nations au pays. Je suis prêt à me pencher avec vous sur toutes les idées que vous proposerez.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, my understanding would be that the legislative calendar is controlled by that side of the House, not by us. I have not been here that long but that is my understanding of how this works.
I have been very clear about my desire and intention to have some conversations about this at committee and about proposing some amendments that we think would improve the bill. I guess I would throw that back at the other side of the House. It is on them, not us, to determine the schedule.
Monsieur le Président, je crois comprendre que c'est l'autre côté de la Chambre qui détermine le calendrier législatif, pas nous. Bien que je ne sois pas ici depuis très longtemps, je pense bien que c'est ainsi que la Chambre fonctionne.
J'ai été très clair quant à mon désir et à mon intention de discuter de cette question au sein du comité et de proposer des amendements qui, selon nous, amélioreraient le projet de loi. Je pense que je dois renvoyer la balle aux députés de l'autre côté de la Chambre. C'est à eux, et non à nous, de déterminer le calendrier.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, I have a question for my friend from the Bloc. Once the council is operational, and he referred to it in his speech, the bill would require all levels of government to submit any requested data to show progress on reconciliation, as set out in call to action number 55.
Does the member have any concern with the lack of consultation with the provinces during the process of developing this council, which will impact all levels of government?
Monsieur le Président, j'ai une question à poser au député du Bloc. Une fois que le conseil sera en fonction, comme il en a parlé dans son discours, le projet de loi exigerait que tous les ordres de gouvernement soumettent toutes les données demandées pour faire état des progrès réalisés en matière de réconciliation, comme le prévoit l'appel à l'action numéro 55.
Le député s'inquiète-t-il de l'absence de consultation des provinces dans le cadre du processus de création de ce conseil, qui aura des répercussions sur tous les ordres de gouvernement?
Collapse
View Kelly Block Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kelly Block Profile
2022-09-20 10:43 [p.7346]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Orders 104 and 114, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 13th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding the membership of committees of the House.
If the House gives its consent, I move that the 13th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs be concurred in.
Monsieur le Président, conformément aux articles 104 et 114 du Règlement, j'ai l'honneur de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, le 13e rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre au sujet de la composition des comités de la Chambre.
Si la Chambre donne son consentement, je propose que le 13e rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre soit adopté.
Collapse
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
2022-09-20 10:48 [p.7347]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it is an honour to rise today and present a petition on behalf of Canadians across this country.
The petitioners are concerned about the possibility of the government imposing another values test on charitable organizations. The petitioners are asking that the government protect and preserve the application of charitable status rules on a politically and ideologically neutral basis without discrimination on the basis of political or religious values or the imposition of another “values test”, and that it affirm the right of Canadians to the freedom of expression.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un honneur de prendre la parole aujourd'hui et de présenter une pétition au nom des Canadiens.
Les pétitionnaires sont préoccupés par la possibilité que le gouvernement impose un autre « critère des valeurs » aux organismes de bienfaisance. Les pétitionnaires demandent au gouvernement de protéger et préserver l’application des règles concernant le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance en toute neutralité sur le plan politique et idéologique, sans discrimination fondée sur les valeurs politiques ou religieuses et sans l’imposition d’un nouveau « critère des valeurs », et d'affirmer le droit des Canadiens à la liberté d’expression.
Collapse
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-09-20 10:51 [p.7347]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am rising to present this petition on behalf of Canadians who feel that the Liberal Party of Canada promised in its 2021 platform to deny the charitable status of organizations that have convictions about abortion that the Liberal government views as dishonest. This jeopardizes the charitable status of hospitals, places of worship, schools, homeless shelters and so many charitable organizations that do incredible work in this country and would leave a huge void under these circumstances. Canadians depend upon and benefit from these charities.
The government had previously denied funding, tax dollars, to any organization that was not willing to check a box endorsing the political positions of the governing party. These petitioners believe that charities and non-profit organizations should not be discriminated against on the basis of their political views or religious values. They comment that all Canadians have a right to freedom of expression without discrimination under the Canadian Charter of Rights of Freedoms.
The petitioners are calling on the government to protect and preserve the application of charitable status rules on a politically and ideologically neutral basis and to affirm the rights of Canadians to freedom of expression.
Madame la Présidente, je présente aujourd’hui une pétition au nom de Canadiens qui estiment que le Parti libéral du Canada avait promis, dans sa plateforme électorale de 2021, de retirer le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance à des organismes ayant des convictions en matière d’avortement que le gouvernement libéral juge malhonnêtes. Cela compromet le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance d'hôpitaux, de lieux de culte, d'écoles, de refuges pour sans-abri et de bien d’autres organismes caritatifs qui font un travail extraordinaire dans notre pays. En outre, la fin de leurs activités laisserait un grand vide dans notre société. Les Canadiens dépendent du travail de ces organismes de bienfaisance et ils en retirent des avantages.
Le gouvernement avait précédemment refusé d’accorder du financement, des deniers publics, à tout organisme ne voulant pas cocher une case pour attester de leur adhésion aux positions politiques du parti au pouvoir. Les pétitionnaires pensent que les organismes de charité et les organisations sans but lucratif ne devraient pas faire l’objet de discrimination fondée sur leurs opinions politiques ou leurs valeurs religieuses. Ils notent également que tous les Canadiens ont droit, en vertu de la Charte, à la liberté d’expression sans discrimination.
Les pétitionnaires exhortent le gouvernement à protéger et à préserver l’application des règles concernant le statut d’organisme de bienfaisance en toute neutralité sur le plan politique et idéologique, et à affirmer le droit des Canadiens à la liberté d’expression.
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-20 10:56 [p.7348]
Expand
Madam Speaker, we know the Liberal government has previously used a values test to discriminate against worthy applicants to the Canada summer jobs program, and did so by denying funding to any organization that was not willing to check a box endorsing the political positions of the governing party of the day.
Therefore, I am presenting this petition. The undersigned citizens and residents of Canada call upon this House of Commons to protect and preserve the application of charitable status rules on a politically and ideologically neutral basis without discrimination on the basis of political or religious values and without the imposition of another values test; and to affirm the right of Canadians to freedom of expression.
Madame la Présidente, nous savons que le gouvernement a déjà employé le critère des valeurs pour faire de la discrimination à l'endroit de demandeurs légitimes dans le cadre du programme Emplois d’été Canada et que cette discrimination s'est traduite par un refus de financement aux organisations qui refusaient de confirmer dans le formulaire qu'elles endossaient les positions politiques du gouvernement en place.
C'est pour cette raison que je présente la pétition suivante. Les signataires, des citoyens et des résidents du Canada, demandent à la Chambre des communes de protéger et de préserver l'application des règles relatives au statut d'organisme de bienfaisance en toute neutralité sur le plan politique et idéologique, sans discrimination fondée sur les valeurs politiques et religieuses et sans l'imposition d'un critère des valeurs. Ils demandent aussi à la Chambre d'affirmer le droit des Canadiens à la liberté d'expression.
Collapse
View Kelly Block Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kelly Block Profile
2022-09-20 10:58 [p.7349]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am honoured to rise today and present a petition on behalf of Canadians across the country who are deeply concerned by a policy put forward in the Liberal Party's platform in 2021 to deny charitable status to charitable organizations whose strongly held convictions the Liberals disagree with.
More specifically, the petitioners call upon the House of Commons to protect and preserve the application of charitable status rules on a politically and ideologically neutral basis without discrimination on the basis of political or religious values and without the imposition of another values test; and to affirm the right of Canadians to freedom of expression.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai l'honneur de prendre la parole aujourd'hui pour présenter une pétition au nom de Canadiens de partout au pays qui sont profondément préoccupés par une politique proposée dans le programme du Parti libéral en 2021 visant à refuser le statut d'organisme de bienfaisance aux organisations caritatives qui ont des convictions profondes que ne partagent pas les libéraux.
Plus concrètement, les pétitionnaires demandent à la Chambre des communes de protéger et de préserver l'application des règles relatives au statut d'organisme de bienfaisance en toute neutralité sur le plan politique et idéologique, sans discrimination fondée sur les valeurs politiques ou religieuses et sans l'imposition d'un nouveau critère des valeurs; et d'affirmer le droit des Canadiens à la liberté d'expression.
Collapse
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
View Robert Kitchen Profile
2022-09-20 12:21 [p.7403]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, my colleague talked a lot about the bill being incomplete, that it had no details and that it basically needed to be made more specific. These are questions that we all have, at least on this side of the House, about the legislation. We want to see the bill move forward. We are hoping that the government is listening to the conversation we are having right now, so it can pick up some of these points as it moves forward and make those changes so we can see them in the legislation.
Disabled people do not want to be recognized. They do not want a big sign put above their heads saying “I am disabled.” They want to be able to move forward. I know many people who are disabled and they wonder if the people they talk to day in and day out even understand that they have a disability, These issues are invisible to a lot of Canadians.
I wonder if the member could comment a little more about those people who are possibly included in this legislation. Unfortunately, we heard an answer from across the way a minute ago basically saying that the government was not putting that information in the legislation. Could the member comment on whether it should be and on other things she would like to see in the legislation?
Monsieur le Président, ma collègue a beaucoup parlé du caractère incomplet du projet de loi, du fait qu'il manque de substance et de la nécessité de le rendre plus précis. Ce sont les mêmes questions que tous les députés se posent, du moins de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, au sujet du projet de loi. Nous voulons que le projet de loi soit adopté. Nous espérons que le gouvernement tient compte des discussions en cours et qu'il apportera les changements demandés dans le projet de loi.
Les personnes handicapées ne veulent pas être reconnues. Elles ne veulent pas d'un écriteau sur lequel est écrit « je suis handicapé » pointé vers eux. Ce qu'elles veulent, c'est de pouvoir vivre leur vie. Je connais beaucoup de personnes handicapées, et elles se demandent si les gens qu'elles côtoient au quotidien réalisent qu'elles sont handicapées. Il est question d'enjeux qui passent sous le radar de bien des Canadiens.
Je me demande si la députée pourrait en dire un peu plus au sujet des gens qui seront peut-être ciblés par cette mesure législative. Malheureusement, quelqu'un en face a dit un peu plus tôt que le gouvernement ne souhaitait pas inclure cette information dans le projet de loi. La députée pourrait-elle dire si elle croit que cette information devrait être incluse dans le projet de loi et si d'autres informations devraient aussi s'y retrouver?
Collapse
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-20 14:54 [p.7427]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Canadians should feel confident that when they work hard, they will have a roof over their heads and food on their tables, but under this NDP-Liberal government, Canadians are working harder and harder but falling farther and farther behind. This government's uncontrolled spending is driving up the cost of living, and increased taxes like the failed carbon tax is diving deeper and deeper into their pockets.
When will this NDP-Liberal government stop driving up costs and cutting the paycheques of Canadians?
Monsieur le Président, les Canadiens devraient avoir l'assurance qu'ils pourront se loger et se nourrir s'ils travaillent fort. Cependant, sous ce gouvernement néo-démocrate—libéral, les Canadiens travaillent de plus en plus fort, mais perdent de plus en plus de terrain. Les dépenses effrénées du gouvernement font grimper le coût de la vie, et l'augmentation des impôts, comme la taxe inefficace sur le carbone, puise de plus en plus dans leurs poches.
Quand le gouvernement néo-démocrate—libéral cessera-t-il de faire grimper les coûts et de réduire les chèques de paie des Canadiens?
Collapse
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-20 15:00 [p.7428]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the cost of government is driving up the cost of living. A half trillion dollars of Liberal inflationary deficits have bid up the cost of the goods we buy and the interest we pay. Inflation is running at historic highs and taking a massive bite out of the ability of Canadians to pay the bills.
Now, if one thought it could not get much worse, one would be wrong, because the Liberals are planning on raising taxes on the paycheques of Canadians by hiking CPP and EI premiums.
Instead of making the problem worse, will the government commit to cancelling its planned tax hikes and cancel its tripling of the carbon tax?
Monsieur le Président, les dépenses du gouvernement font augmenter le coût de la vie. Un demi-billion de dollars de déficits inflationnistes libéraux ont fait grimper le coût des biens que nous achetons et des intérêts que nous payons. L'inflation atteint des sommets historiques et elle réduit considérablement la capacité des Canadiens à payer leurs factures.
Maintenant, les personnes qui pensaient avoir vu le pire devront se raviser, car les libéraux prévoient hausser les impôts prélevés sur les chèques de paie des Canadiens en augmentant les cotisations au Régime de pensions du Canada et à l'assurance-emploi.
Au lieu d'aggraver le problème, le gouvernement s'engagera-t-il à annuler les hausses d'impôts qu'il a prévues et à renoncer à tripler la taxe sur le carbone?
Collapse
Results: 61 - 75 of 761 | Page: 5 of 51

|<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data