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Results: 1 - 15 of 716
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
2022-09-23 11:11 [p.7614]
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Mr. Speaker, the new Conservative leader will put people first: their retirements, their paycheques, their homes and their country.
During harvest season, farmers are working hard to feed Canadian families and the world. This task is especially important at a time when there are real concerns about a global food shortage. Unfortunately, the current government seems determined to stand in the way. From a relentless carbon tax to a severe target for reducing fertilizer emissions, its actions are impacting our farmers. With rising food costs, it is clear that this hurts everyone. Another new industry report shows how the Liberals will once again fail to deliver because their fertilizer target is too unrealistic.
Will the Liberals restrict fertilizer use after all, like other countries around the world are trying to do? When I have raised the issue many times in the House, they stop short from ruling it out, yet they also cannot explain what else they are going to do.
One of Saskatchewan’s producers said this week, “We need to feed the world”. Another one said that its biggest threat to its operations is government policy.
The government needs to leave farmers alone and let them do their jobs.
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View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
View Robert Kitchen Profile
2022-09-23 11:43 [p.7621]
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Mr. Speaker, Saskatchewanians are suffering from the government's lack of action on inflation and the skyrocketing cost of living. Winter is on its way, and with temperatures ranging between -10°C and -30°C, we have no choice but to heat our homes. Food prices have increased by 10% since last year and the carbon tax will be tripling, yet the government rebates do not even come close to covering those increased costs.
Will the government stop hurting Canadians and cancel its planned tax hikes on gas, heating and groceries?
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View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, are members surprised that the cost of living in northern Saskatchewan is skyrocketing? Record high gas prices and an ever-increasing carbon tax have led to unprecedented freight costs. Everything, and I mean everything, costs more under this coalition government. In some communities, four litres of milk is nearly $14, a dozen eggs is nine dollars and a kilogram of apples is $12.
The people in northern communities cannot afford more taxes. Will the government cancel today its planned increases on northerners' gas, groceries and heating fuel?
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View Fraser Tolmie Profile
CPC (SK)
View Fraser Tolmie Profile
2022-09-23 14:09 [p.7643]
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Mr. Speaker, I would like to start by saying it is a privilege to be speaking here on behalf of the constituents of Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan. Our thoughts and prayers are with those in eastern Canada as they brace for the storm that is about to hit the shores of Canada. We want to let them know we are with them in our thoughts and prayers.
It is a pleasure today to join the debate on Bill C-210. This bill, put forward by the NDP member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley, would lower the voting age in Canada from 18 to 16. I have some concerns with this bill, but first it is important to give some important background on it.
The last time the voting age in Canada was lowered was back in 1970, the year I was born. We lowered it from 21 to what it is today, 18 years of age. In the 1972 election, right after the voting age was lowered, voter turnout increased just 1%, up to 76.7%. Let us think about that number for a minute. Most of us would be surprised if the voter turnout in the next election was even that high. For the sake of comparison, the turnout in the last election, in 2021, was 62.5%. Turnout in Canadian elections has been hovering around that number for at least the last 15 years.
Today's debate is about the youth's vote, so let us look at that information and the data, according to Statistics Canada, on those aged 18 to 24. Just 66% of that age bracket voted in the last election. That compares with 80% of those aged 55 to 64 and 83% of those aged 65 to 74. One must wonder if lowering the voting age to 16 would do much to increase voter turnout in our country. In fact, a 2004 study from Cambridge University concluded there was no evidence such a change would do anything to increase voter turnout here.
This ties in well with what we have been debating all week in the House: the cost of living and the challenges the next generation is facing. The 18-to-24 demographic has been one of the hardest hit by the skyrocketing costs of living. Someone of that age used to be able to find a decent paying job, save money and maybe buy a nice starter house. Today, that is a fantasy; it is unattainable. Young people are having trouble affording rent while also paying for groceries, gas and other necessities.
However, do not worry; the government is here to help. It is sending renters $500 to put toward a year's worth of rent. Let us hold off on that for just a moment and analyze it. Only one in five renters will qualify for that $500 cheque. Seriously, the government thinks $40 per month will help someone whose rent is well over $2,000 in some markets, and not everybody will qualify. Even in Moose Jaw, the average rent is around $1,000 a month.
The fact is, life for young Canadians has become harder and more expensive under the Liberal government. While this bill would lower the voting age, we know there are several other demographics that historically have had lower voting rates than average: first nations, those with disabilities and many more. We have many well-thought-out ideas and recommendations on how to encourage these groups to vote.
I know that, prior to the last election, my colleagues on the procedure and House affairs committee did tremendous work on a study on how to safely hold an election during the pandemic. I would like to thank my friends from Perth—Wellington and Elgin—Middlesex—London for their work on that committee. They heard from advocates for all these groups about lower voter turnouts. They heard several ideas on how to get more people to vote. Ultimately, this study and all its recommendations were ignored. The first goal of this place should be to encourage those who are currently eligible to vote to go out and vote.
My colleague, the member for Calgary Shepard, spoke of this bill earlier. He spoke about the responsibilities of citizenship and that is something that I would like to talk about. Canadians can join the military reserves at the age of 16 with parental consent. In Saskatchewan, someone can get a learner's driver's licence at the age of 16, but they must drive with an adult. In other areas, it is about earning the responsibility and earning the respect. The purchase of alcohol and cannabis in Saskatchewan is limited to those who are age 19. The fact is that we place limits on young people in Canada. People get the full benefits of citizenship as they get older.
Democracy is important to me. My grandfather fought alongside Canadians in World War II. Canadians were kind and generous. They went overseas. My mother, who was growing up in Scotland, met lots of Canadian soldiers. These Canadian soldiers would bring chocolates, candy, dolls and other things my parents could not get. They were kind and generous. On the front, my grandfather fought alongside Canadians, and he saw the sacrifices they were willing to make in order to preserve democracy and freedom.
Democracy and the ability to vote is a privilege and it requires careful thought and consideration. Ultimately, I do not see a compelling argument that this bill would do anything to address the issue of lower voter turnouts. We have known for years how to address this ongoing issue. We need to lower barriers to make it easier to vote, yes, but we also have to encourage those existing voters by giving them good policies and a positive direction for the future of this country.
Most importantly, we need to give people a reason to vote for good things. This legislation will not do it. Ultimately, we have to earn the voter's respect.
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View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-22 11:24 [p.7529]
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Madam Speaker, I want to thank my hon. colleague for raising this issue, which really affects us all. It was directed at him, and I certainly sympathize with how that must have felt, to see that member of the press gallery openly calling for him to be shot after he did not like the question that was asked.
I would like to point out that, as we move around the very building we are in right now, we can see that the House administration has put up signs in every hallway and near every entrance to stop harassment. They are signs with a big red stop sign that encourage all who work here, staff, MPs and visitors, to stop and call out incidents of sexual harassment, bullying and intimidation. I just wanted to flag that.
We have all been seized with this, as an institution, over the last few years, and members must, after every election, take training to make sure we are aware of the very highest standards of professionalism as to how we conduct ourselves individually, how we structure our offices and how we expect our staff to interact with each other. We gladly do that. In fact, members of Parliament from all parties got together to enhance the code of conduct for members and their staff.
As my hon. colleague pointed out, there is a direct relationship with the parliamentary press gallery. Its members' accreditations for security run through the House administration. I believe it is entirely reasonable for you and the Speaker's office to look into this matter to find a prima facie case of privilege. To not find a question of privilege, I believe, would seriously undermine the efforts that are constantly being made to make this building and this environment more safe and secure.
I sincerely hope that you, Madam Speaker, will find for my hon. colleague's question of privilege.
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View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-22 12:19 [p.7537]
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Mr. Speaker, the leader of the NDP talks a lot about affordability, the pressures Canadians are facing, respect and dignity, and how his party is fighting for Canadians.
Is this done by propping up the Liberal government, by voting with the Liberals to increase taxes, to increase bureaucracy, to increase red tape that makes life difficult for everyday Canadians? For example, the New Democrats have been supporting the failed carbon tax that does not work, but it does make food more expensive and home heating more expensive. It makes driving kids to and from sports more expensive.
Why does the leader of the NDP brag that he and his party are fighting for Canadians when they keep voting for tax increases and increased bureaucratic red tape?
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View Rosemarie Falk Profile
CPC (SK)
View Rosemarie Falk Profile
2022-09-22 12:51 [p.7541]
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Mr. Speaker, my colleague across the way mentioned there is a lot more the government can do to increase affordability for Canadians. One thing I would suggest is abolishing the carbon tax, because it is a tax on the most basic of necessities, like food, home heating and fuel in vehicles to get from point A to point B.
There is one thing, though, that I want to mention. I received lots of calls in my office throughout the summer regarding passport delays. I definitely like decreased red tape and programs that are very effectively run.
Does the member believe that her government will be able to successfully and efficiently run a dental care program with little wait time, little red tape and quick service delivery?
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View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
View Robert Kitchen Profile
2022-09-22 14:01 [p.7551]
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Mr. Speaker, as the world mourns the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, I know the city of Estevan is also mourning the loss of a man who was a pillar of the community, Ross LeBlanc. He passed away on August 29, at the age of 86, leaving a legacy that will carry on for generations to come.
Ross LeBlanc embodied the very definition of a hard-working farmer and saw the development of farming technology go from horse-drawn equipment to hydraulic automated systems. While his sons took over the farming business, Ross was still on the farm, watching the harvest just a few days before his passing.
Ross was also known for his music, performing as part of the Ross LeBlanc Trio. I recall just a couple of months ago hearing them play at the Red Market Barn, Kenosee Lake.
As a huge supporter of the Estevan Bruins hockey team from its inception, he purchased the team's first bus and attended every game he could.
I would like to extend my condolences to his wife Mary, their children Gwen, Marlin and Jason, and his many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Ross was an incredible man and he will be deeply missed.
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View Kelly Block Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kelly Block Profile
2022-09-22 15:03 [p.7562]
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Mr. Speaker, the cost of the Liberal government is driving up the cost of living.
Over the past number of months, I have met with too many constituents who are barely getting by. They are finding it more difficult to pay their bills, feed their families and are worried about losing their homes. In short, there is too much month left at the end of the money. They simply cannot afford higher taxes.
Will the Prime Minister cancel his planned tax increases?
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View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
2022-09-22 15:06 [p.7563]
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Mr. Speaker, Canadians are looking for hope.
Every day, Conservatives stand up in the House to tell the stories of real Canadians who are facing the worst financial struggles of their lives, thanks to the mismanagement of the government.
Day after day in the House, the Liberals stand up to tell us how well Canadians are doing. Talk about a government being tone deaf and out of touch with Canadians.
Will the government finally give Canadians hope and cancel the planned tax increases on paycheques?
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View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-22 15:12 [p.7564]
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Mr. Speaker, yes, I have the one question everyone has been waiting for, the Thursday question.
I am wondering if the hon. House leader of the government could update the House as to what we can expect next week. Specifically, will he bring in legislation cancelling the Liberal tax hikes that are due to come into effect January 1?
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View Warren Steinley Profile
CPC (SK)
View Warren Steinley Profile
2022-09-22 16:59 [p.7577]
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Madam Speaker, I would ask the shadow minister of finance if he believes these tax credits will be vaporized by the ever-increasing inflation and cost of living that Canadians are facing now and into the future.
Has he done some research and has he heard anyone say that these cheques coming at the end of the year are going to offset what people would be paying for in the long term and what they have been paying for years now in inflation and the carbon tax? Especially on January 1 with the increases in payroll taxes and on April 1 with the increase in the carbon tax, are these cheques going to help or is it just going to be too little too late?
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View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2022-09-21 15:15 [p.7484]
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Mr. Speaker, there seemed to be some confusion on the government's part during question period, so I would like to seek unanimous consent to table a document showing that combined CPP and EI premiums have gone up almost $700 under the current government. I would like to be able to—
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View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
2022-09-21 15:44 [p.7488]
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Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise to present a petition in support of Bill S-223, a bill that seeks to combat forced organ harvesting and trafficking. The bill has passed the Senate twice and the House once in its current form. It is currently stalled before the foreign affairs committee and petitioners are hoping that this bill will be passed through the committee soon.
Families of victims of forced organ harvesting and trafficking have now waited almost 15 years for this legislation to pass, so let us end the delays. Let us work to get this done.
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View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-09-21 15:45 [p.7488]
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Mr. Speaker, I am tabling this petition in support of Bill S-223, a bill that seeks to combat forced organ harvesting and trafficking. This bill has passed in the Senate twice and in the House once in its current form. It is currently stalled before the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, and petitioners hope that it will be passed soon.
The families of victims of forced organ harvesting and trafficking have now waited almost 15 years for Canada to pass this legislation. We need to end the delays and get this done.
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