Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 12059
View Adam Chambers Profile
CPC (ON)
View Adam Chambers Profile
2022-10-06 10:04 [p.8205]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to present my first petition in this Parliament as the member for Simcoe North.
This petition is from members in my community who are concerned about the ancient water deposits of the Simcoe uplands of Ontario's Tiny, Springwater and Oro-Medonte townships. This is water that sits underneath what is now the territory of Beausoleil First Nation. There is some proposed development of a gravel pit.
The petitioners are asking the government to validate claims of this being some of the most pure and pristine water in the world. The petitioners also call on the government to work with the powers it has under the Canada Water Act to implement a study to confirm the validation of the claims of this water being pristine so that it may be preserved for many generations to come.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai le plaisir de présenter ma première pétition à la Chambre en tant que député de Simcoe-Nord.
La pétition provient de gens de ma collectivité qui s'inquiètent au sujet des eaux souterraines virginales que contiennent d'anciens dépôts sous les hautes-terres de Simcoe, dans les cantons de Tiny, de Springwater et d'Oro-Medonte. Ces eaux sont situées dans ce qui est aujourd'hui le territoire de la Première Nation de Beausoleil. Or, on projette d'exploiter une carrière de gravier à cet endroit.
Les pétitionnaires prient le gouvernement de valider l'affirmation selon laquelle il s'agit des eaux les plus pures au monde. Ils lui demandent également d'exercer les pouvoirs que lui confère la Loi sur les ressources en eau du Canada pour lancer une étude visant à confirmer l'affirmation sur la pureté de ces eaux, en vue de les préserver pour les générations futures.
Collapse
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Madam Speaker, I have listened to the hon. member's speech, and I have to say that only the NDP could think that raising taxes on Canadians would make life more affordable. Talk about topsy-turvy. Raising taxes would make life more affordable, what a fantasy world.
The fact of the matter is that if the NDP were really serious about making life more affordable, it and its Liberal coalition partners would not be tripling the carbon tax. They have allowed housing prices and gas prices to spiral out of control. They are increasing the paycheque taxes. How can we take this member seriously when his logic is just so backwards?
Madame la Présidente, j’ai écouté les propos de mon collègue et je dois dire que seul le NPD peut penser qu’une hausse d’impôt rendrait la vie plus abordable pour les Canadiens. C’est la cour du roi Pétaud. Augmenter les impôts rendrait la vie plus abordable, quelle fantaisie.
Le fait est que si le NPD voulait vraiment rendre la vie plus abordable, ni lui ni ses partenaires de la coalition libérale ne tripleraient la taxe sur le carbone. Ils ont laissé les prix des maisons et de l’essence monter en flèche. Ils augmentent les taxes sur les chèques de paie. Comment peut-on prendre ce député au sérieux alors que sa logique est aussi absurde?
Collapse
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2022-10-06 10:34 [p.8209]
Expand
Madam Speaker, my colleague talked about greed inflation. I prefer to call it unjust inflation. I think that is more appropriate. Right now, all Canadians are feeling the rising cost of absolutely everything.
I wonder why my colleague and the other members of his costly coalition chose to vote against the recent opposition motion calling on the government not to raise taxes on all Canadians, when every Canadian needs more money in their pockets.
Why does the NDP support raising taxes and the government's decision to triple the carbon tax? That is the real question.
Madame la Présidente, mon collègue parle de la « séraphinflation ». Je préfère parler de l'injuste inflation. Je pense que c'est plus pertinent. Actuellement, tous les Canadiens et toutes les Canadiennes subissent le coût de l'augmentation d'absolument tout.
Je me demande pourquoi mon collègue ainsi que ses partenaires de leur coûteuse coalition ont préféré voter, ces derniers jours, contre la motion de l'opposition demandant au gouvernement de ne pas augmenter les taxes et les impôts de tous les Canadiens et de toutes les Canadiennes, alors que chaque Canadien et Canadienne a besoin actuellement de plus d'argent dans ses poches.
Pourquoi est-ce que le NPD appuie l'augmentation des taxes et la décision du gouvernement de tripler la taxe sur le carbone? C'est cela, la bonne question.
Collapse
View Anna Roberts Profile
CPC (ON)
View Anna Roberts Profile
2022-10-06 10:50 [p.8212]
Expand
Madam Speaker, my hon. colleague spoke about the CRA. Could he please explain to the House how he is ensuring that terrorists in this country are not funnelling money to support other countries? What is the CRA doing about that?
Madame la Présidente, mon collègue a parlé de l'Agence du revenu du Canada. Pourrait-il expliquer à la Chambre comment il s'assure que des terroristes intérieurs ne font pas transiter de l'argent pour soutenir d'autres pays? Que fait l'Agence à ce sujet?
Collapse
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
View Garnett Genuis Profile
2022-10-06 11:04 [p.8214]
Expand
Madam Speaker, there is some irony today in the NDP's signing a deal to support three years of Liberal budgets, sight unseen, and then putting forward a motion to call for additional measures that were not contained in the New Democrats' coalition agreement.
For the Liberal member who just spoke, is not the best way to address affordability simply to allow people to keep more of their own money? Would the member acknowledge that with cancelling the scheduled tax increases for next year, the tripling of the carbon tax and the increase in payroll tax, rather than the government taking more of their money to spend for them, it would be better to let people keep more of their own money and choose for themselves how they are going to spend it?
Madame la Présidente, c’est plutôt cocasse que le NPD, après s’être engagé à appuyer les budgets des libéraux pendant trois ans, présente aujourd’hui une motion réclamant des mesures supplémentaires qui ne figuraient pas dans l’accord de coalition des néo-démocrates.
Le député libéral qui vient de parler ne pense-t-il pas que la meilleure façon de protéger le pouvoir d’achat, c’est tout simplement de permettre aux gens de garder un peu plus de leur propre argent? Le député ne reconnaît-il pas qu’en annulant les hausses de taxes prévues l’an prochain, le triplement de la taxe sur le carbone et l’augmentation des taxes sur les salaires, les gens pourraient ainsi garder leur propre argent et décider eux-mêmes comment le dépenser, plutôt que de laisser le gouvernement le leur prendre et décider lui-même comment le dépenser?
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2022-10-06 11:08 [p.8215]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to rise in the House of Commons today to talk about food inflation, which is at its highest in 40 years.
I will talk about the price increases for a few food items. The price of fish has risen by 10.4%; the price of butter, by 16.9%; the price of eggs, by 10.9%; the price of pasta, by 32%; and the price of coffee, by 14.2%. These are only a few examples of the rising prices Canadians are paying for food. The poorest Canadians are the hardest hit. It is only appropriate that we address this problem.
What are the causes of food inflation? The cost of government is increasing the cost of living. The $500-billion inflationary deficit is increasing the cost of the goods we purchase and the interest we pay. Inflationary taxes are increasing production costs for our businesses and farmers, which further contributes to the increase in prices. The more the government spends, the more expensive it gets. This is the result of the costly coalition between the Liberals and the NDP. The solution is to undo the problems the Liberals have caused.
First, we must limit government spending by passing a law that requires politicians to save one dollar for each new dollar spent. This law used to exist elsewhere in the past. In the 1990s, such a law enabled the U.S. government to eliminate its deficit and pay back $400 billion of its debt while creating jobs. After the law was repealed, they started to accumulate deficits once again. This shows that we must impose legal limits on politicians’ spending. Otherwise, they are undisciplined, and consumers pay the price.
Second, we must eliminate inflationary taxes. This government, with the support of the NDP and the Bloc Québécois, wants to triple the carbon tax on farmers, small businesses and truckers, which will obviously drive up the cost of food. Food does not come from the store, but from farms and farmers. In addition, it is transported by truckers. Every time we increase taxes on these people, consumers pay more.
Since farmers can no longer bear the costs, we are importing food from other countries that are creating far more pollution. We would be able to produce the food here, but the taxes on farmers increase costs and make it impossible to produce food in Canada. We should eliminate these taxes to encourage food production here in Canada. We have the best farmers in the world, and we should be able to feed ourselves.
Third, we must eliminate the bureaucratic hurdles that prevent the production of food and other essential goods, as well as the red tape and delays that prevent the construction of housing units, energy production and, of course, food production. Instead of printing money like this government and the Bank of Canada are doing, we should be producing what money can buy: more food, more housing units and more energy, here in Canada. That means that we have to eliminate obstacles, make it easier to get a construction permit and allow people who work hard to achieve their goals.
Rather than simply printing money, let us produce what we need. This policy will make life more affordable and Canada more self-sufficient. That is the goal we will be pursuing as Conservatives.
I will be splitting my time with the member for Foothills, Madam Speaker.
The New Democrats point out in this motion that corporations should pay what they owe. We agree with that. They say there should be increased penalties for price-fixing. We agree with that, too. They think that the agriculture committee should study high food prices and whether there is something called “greedflation”, including inviting grocery store CEOs to the committee. We agree with that, too. That is all very reasonable. Unfortunately, in some ways, it does not go far enough, because they have a very limited view of greed. They think that it only exists in the private sector. They ignore in the motion government greed.
The New Democrats have this fantastical view of human nature. I would not say that it is optimistic or pessimistic; it is both at the same time. They think that human beings are angels when they work for the state, but demons when they work in the private sector, as though greed is part of human nature only in the free market. However, when these same people who work for a company then transfer over to work for a bureaucracy or as politicians, all of a sudden they are purified of all greed and transformed into an entirely different being.
The reality is that human nature is what it is, warts and all, good and bad. There is greed and that greed exists in government as well. When the government expands itself vastly faster than the economy, increasing costs by $500 billion in the last two years alone, $200 billion of which had nothing to do whatsoever with COVID, and when the government, against the warnings of the Conservatives, gives corporations wage subsidies, even though they can afford to pay out dividends to their shareholders and bonuses to their executives, the government is engaging in feeding that greed.
When the government printed $400 billion, causing inflation to spiral out of control to the benefit of the super-rich, who saw their assets inflate, but to the disadvantage of the poor, who then lost purchasing power and watched house prices go out of reach so they could never get out of their parents' basements or out of that 400-square-foot apartment, it was government greed that had caused that transfer of wealth from the have-nots to the have yachts.
I just wish once in a while the NDP, which believes in the endless expansion of the state, would acknowledge the roll that government greed has played in plaguing the country with the highest inflation in 40 years. The cost of government is driving up the cost of living. Half a trillion dollars in new inflationary spending has bid up the cost of the goods we buy and the interest we pay. The inflationary taxes have bid up the cost for businesses and farmers to produce those goods. The more Liberals and New Democrats spend, the more things cost. That is how we got into this mess in the first place.
The Liberals and the NDP, the costly coalition, want to double down on the problem by further increasing the costs on the backs of Canadians by tripling the carbon tax, which will inevitably be passed on to consumers. We cannot tax farmers, truckers and grocers without having those costs pass on to the people at the end of the grocery aisle. We know they will pay those higher prices; we know they already have.
Conservatives say: enough. The time has come to cap government spending and cut government waste so we can phase out the inflationary deficits and taxes, cancel the plan to triple the carbon tax and, instead, deploy technology to make green alternative energy more affordable. Let us bring down the cost of energy, rather than bring it up.
Speaking of which, let us remove the government gatekeepers who make this the 64th-ranked country in the world when it comes to getting a building permit. Sixty-three other countries give them faster. What does that mean? It means that farmers can put up their barns faster. It means that mines, which would produce lithium, cobalt, copper and other minerals for green electricity, must wait longer and, therefore, costs more money. It means that producing clean, green Canadian nuclear energy, etc., could be coming onto the market faster.
Let us get these gatekeepers out of the way, speed up the production and unleash the mighty force of our free enterprise system, so instead of creating cash, we create more of what cash buys and unleash the production of a cleaner, more affordable economy for all our hard-working people.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureux de me lever à la Chambre des communes pour parler de l'inflation alimentaire, qui a atteint son niveau le plus élevé depuis 40 ans.
Je vais parler de l'augmentation du prix de quelques aliments. Le prix du poisson a augmenté de 10,4 %; le prix du beurre, de 16,9 %; le prix des œufs, de 10,9 %; le prix des pâtes, de 32 %; le prix du café, de 14,2 %. Ce ne sont que quelques exemples de l'augmentation des prix que paient les Canadiens pour les aliments. Les Canadiens les moins nantis sont les plus durement touchés. Il est donc tout à fait approprié que nous abordions ce problème.
Quelles sont les causes de ce problème? Le coût du gouvernement augmente le coût de la vie. Les 500 milliards de dollars de déficit inflationniste augmentent le coût des biens que nous achetons et l'intérêt que nous payons. Les taxes inflationnistes augmentent les coûts de production pour nos entreprises et nos fermiers, ce qui augmente encore davantage les prix. Plus le gouvernement dépense, plus cela coûte cher. C'est le résultat d'une coalition coûteuse qui comprend les néo-démocrates et les libéraux en même temps. La solution est d'inverser les problèmes que les libéraux ont causés.
Premièrement, il faut limiter les dépenses du gouvernement en mettant en place une loi qui oblige les politiciens à économiser un dollar pour chaque nouveau dollar dépensé. C'est une loi qui existait ailleurs. Dans les années 1990, une telle loi a permis au gouvernement américain d'éliminer son déficit et de rembourser 400 milliards de dollars de sa dette tout en créant plusieurs emplois. Après l'abrogation de cette loi, on a recommencé à faire des déficits. Cela démontre qu'il est nécessaire d'imposer des limites légales aux dépenses des politiciens. Sans cela, ils manquent de discipline et les consommateurs doivent en payer le prix.
Deuxièmement, il faut éliminer les taxes inflationnistes. Ce gouvernement, avec l'appui des néo-démocrates et des bloquistes, veut tripler la taxe sur le carbone qui est imposée aux fermiers, aux petites entreprises et aux camionneurs, ce qui aura évidemment pour effet d'augmenter le coût des aliments. La nourriture ne provient pas du magasin, mais des fermes et des agriculteurs. De plus, cette nourriture doit être transportée par nos camionneurs. Chaque fois qu'on impose à ces gens une augmentation de taxes, cela coûte plus cher aux consommateurs.
Puisque les fermiers ne peuvent plus payer les coûts, on est en train d'importer les mêmes aliments d'ailleurs, d'autres pays bien plus polluants. Nous serions capables de les produire ici, mais les taxes imposées à nos fermiers augmentent les coûts et rendent impossible la production de nourriture au Canada. On devrait éliminer ces taxes pour inciter la production alimentaire ici au Canada. Nous avons les meilleurs fermiers au monde, et nous devrions pouvoir nous nourrir.
Troisièmement, il faut éliminer les barrières bureaucratiques qui empêchent la production de nourriture et d'autres biens essentiels, la paperasserie et les délais qui empêchent la construction de maisons, la production d'énergie et, évidemment, la production de notre nourriture. Au lieu de créer de la monnaie comme le font ce gouvernement et sa Banque du Canada, on devrait créer ce que la monnaie achète, soit plus de nourriture, plus de maisons et plus d'énergie, ici, au Canada. À cette fin, il faut éliminer les barrières, rendre plus facile l'obtention d'un permis de construction et permettre aux gens qui travaillent fort d'atteindre leurs objectifs.
Plutôt que de créer simplement de l'argent, créons ce dont nous avons besoin. C'est la politique qui va rendre la vie plus abordable et notre pays plus autosuffisant. C'est l'objectif que nous allons poursuivre comme conservateurs.
Madame la Présidente, je compte partager mon temps avec le député de Foothills.
Les néo-démocrates disent, dans cette motion, que les sociétés devraient payer leur dû. Nous sommes d’accord là-dessus. Ils disent qu’on devrait alourdir les sanctions en cas de manipulation des prix. Nous sommes d’accord aussi là-dessus. Ils estiment que le comité de l’agriculture devrait examiner la question de l’inflation des prix de l’alimentation pour voir si elle est causée par ce qu’on appelle la « cupidiflation », et inviter les dirigeants des grandes sociétés alimentaires à comparaître devant lui. Nous sommes d’accord aussi là-dessus. Tout cela est très raisonnable. Malheureusement, à certains égards, la motion ne va pas assez loin, parce que les néo-démocrates ont une conception très limitée de ce qu’est la cupidité. Ils pensent que cela n’existe que dans le secteur privé, ils ne parlent pas dans leur motion de la cupidité du gouvernement.
Les néo-démocrates ont vraiment une conception chimérique de la nature humaine. Je ne dirai pas qu’elle est optimiste ou pessimiste, elle est les deux à la fois. Ils pensent que les êtres humains sont des anges quand ils travaillent pour l’État, mais que ce sont des démons lorsqu’ils travaillent pour le secteur privé, comme si la cupidité ne concernait que ceux qui évoluent dans le libre marché. Cependant, lorsque ces derniers vont ensuite travailler dans une administration publique ou deviennent politiciens, ils sont comme par enchantement purifiés de toute cupidité et deviennent des personnes tout à fait différentes.
En réalité, chaque être humain a ses qualités et ses défauts, c’est la nature humaine. La cupidité existe, et elle existe aussi au sein du gouvernement. Lorsqu’un gouvernement grossit beaucoup plus vite que l’économie, avec une augmentation des dépenses de 500 milliards de dollars au cours des deux dernières années, dont 200 milliards n’avaient absolument rien à voir avec la COVID, et que, faisant fi des mises en garde des conservateurs, il accorde des subventions salariales aux grandes sociétés, alors qu’elles ont les moyens de verser des dividendes à leurs actionnaires et des primes à leurs dirigeants, ce gouvernement encourage la cupidité.
Lorsque le gouvernement a fait imprimer 400 milliards de dollars, il a fait exploser l’inflation. Cela a profité aux Canadiens les plus fortunés, qui ont vu la valeur de leurs actifs s’envoler, mais a nui aux Canadiens les plus défavorisés, qui ont perdu du pouvoir d’achat et qui ont vu le prix des maisons atteindre des niveaux inaccessibles, de sorte qu’ils sont condamnés à rester dans le sous-sol de leurs parents ou dans leur appartement de 400 pieds carrés. C’est la cupidité du gouvernement qui a provoqué ce transfert de richesses à partir des gagne-petit vers les propriétaires de yachts.
J’aimerais bien que, de temps à autre, le NPD, qui est un tenant de l’expansion illimitée de l’État, reconnaisse le rôle que la cupidité du gouvernement a joué dans cette escalade inflationniste, la pire qu’on ait connue depuis 40 ans. Le coût des dépenses publiques fait augmenter le coût de la vie. Un demi-billion de dollars de nouvelles dépenses inflationnistes a fait augmenter le coût des produits que nous achetons et des intérêts que nous payons. L’imposition de taxes inflationnistes a fait augmenter le coût de production des entreprises et des agriculteurs. Plus les libéraux et les néo-démocrates dépensent, plus les choses coûtent cher. C’est d’abord à cause de cela que nous nous retrouvons aujourd’hui dans ce pétrin.
Les libéraux et les néo-démocrates, la coûteuse coalition, veulent en rajouter une couche en alourdissant encore davantage le fardeau des Canadiens par le triplement de la taxe sur le carbone, laquelle sera inévitablement transmise aux consommateurs. On ne peut pas taxer les agriculteurs, les camionneurs et les épiciers sans que ces coûts ne se répercutent sur les étagères. Nous savons que cela va coûter plus cher aux consommateurs, ils en ont déjà fait l’expérience.
Pour les conservateurs, assez c’est assez. Il est temps d’imposer un plafond aux dépenses du gouvernement, de réduire son gaspillage, d’éliminer progressivement les déficits et les taxes inflationnistes, de supprimer le triplement de la taxe carbone et de déployer plutôt des technologies susceptibles de rendre l’énergie verte de remplacement plus abordable. Il faut diminuer le coût de l’énergie plutôt que l’augmenter.
À ce propos, il est temps de se débarrasser de tous ces contrôleurs gouvernementaux qui ont fait de nous le 64 pays en ce qui concerne l’octroi des permis de construction. Autrement dit, 63 autres pays délivrent ces permis plus rapidement que nous. Qu’est-ce que cela signifie? Cela signifie que les agriculteurs pourraient faire construire leur grange plus rapidement. Cela signifie que les mines qui pourraient produire du lithium, du cobalt, du cuivre et d’autres métaux pour fabriquer de l’électricité verte, doivent attendre plus longtemps et, par conséquent, payer plus cher. Cela signifie que la production d’énergie nucléaire canadienne propre et verte pourrait être commercialisée plus rapidement.
Il faut se débarrasser de tous ces contrôleurs, accélérer la production et laisser libre cours au dynamisme de la libre entreprise, de sorte qu’au lieu d'imprimer de l'argent, on pourra créer les choses que l'argent permet d’acheter et on favoriser l’avènement d’une économie plus propre et plus abordable pour tous nos travailleurs.
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2022-10-06 11:19 [p.8216]
Expand
Madam Speaker, CEOs should pay their fair share and pay what they owe, as the motion says. We believe in tax enforcement and we believe the government has done a terrible job cracking down on those who hide their money in offshore accounts and refuse to pay what they owe. The Conservatives do support that, to clearly answer the member's question.
What we do not support is forcing working-class people to pay higher taxes. We do not support higher energy costs. We do not believe that consumers in Vancouver should pay more than $2.40 a litre. We do not support the plan to triple the carbon tax on home-heating oil for Newfoundlanders and to further drive the people of eastern Canada, 40% of whom are in energy poverty, into more poverty still.
We believe that life should be affordable for all of them, and that is why this has not gone far enough.
Madame la Présidente, les PDG devraient effectivement payer leur juste part et payer leur dû, comme le dit la motion. Nous croyons qu'il faut faire respecter les règles fiscales et que le gouvernement fait un piètre travail lorsqu'il s'agit de sévir contre les particuliers et les entreprises qui cachent leur argent dans des comptes à l'étranger et refusent de payer leur dû. Pour répondre clairement à la question de la députée, les conservateurs appuient cette partie de la motion.
Cependant, nous estimons qu'il ne faut pas forcer les gens de la classe ouvrière à payer plus d'impôts. Nous ne sommes pas favorables à une augmentation des coûts de l'énergie. Nous ne croyons pas que le prix de l'essence à Vancouver devrait dépasser 2,40 $ le litre. Nous n'appuyons pas l'idée de tripler la taxe sur le carbone sur le mazout qu'achètent les Terre-Neuviens. Nous sommes d'avis que les mesures prises par le gouvernement appauvriront encore plus les habitants de l'Est du Canada, alors que 40 % d'entre eux vivent déjà dans la précarité énergétique.
Nous croyons qu'il faut rendre la vie plus abordable pour tous les Canadiens, et c'est pourquoi, à notre avis, cette motion ne va pas assez loin.
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2022-10-06 11:21 [p.8217]
Expand
Madam Speaker, we on this side reject all misogyny and all acts of extremism, and we will always stand up to that over here.
I will give the House an example of why the subject of food affordability is so important, because the people who are the least advantaged in our society end up paying the most. Those with the least means, with the least resources, end up spending a larger share of their income on food. The very wealthy can spend a smaller share of income on food. That is why those people are not as affected by inflation.
Two years ago, I warned that we would have an inflation crisis if the government continued with its inflationary taxes and deficits, and that is exactly where we are today.
We, as Conservatives, will reverse the policies that got us here, to make the dollar go further for everybody.
Madame la Présidente, de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, nous nous opposons à la misogynie sous toutes ses formes et à toutes les manifestations d'extrémisme, et nous les dénoncerons toujours.
J'en profite pour mentionner à la Chambre l'une des raisons qui expliquent pourquoi l'abordabilité des aliments est d'une grande importance: c'est que ce sont les personnes les plus démunies de la société qui paient le plus, au final. Les personnes qui ont le moins de moyens et de ressources doivent consacrer une plus grande partie de leurs revenus à l'épicerie que ne le font les mieux nantis. C'est pourquoi les gens très riches sont moins touchés par l'inflation.
Il y a deux ans, j'ai fait une mise en garde en expliquant qu'il y aurait une crise de l'inflation si les taxes et les déficits inflationnistes du gouvernement continuaient, et voilà justement où nous en sommes aujourd'hui.
En tant que conservateurs, nous éliminerons les politiques qui ont causé la situation actuelle afin que tout le monde puisse faire plus avec chaque dollar.
Collapse
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
2022-10-06 11:23 [p.8217]
Expand
Madam Speaker, neither the Bloc Québécois, nor the Liberals, nor the NDP have a plan to deal with climate change. They have a plan to increase taxes. Since the implementation of the carbon tax, the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets have never been met. It simply has not worked.
The hon. member says there will be exceptions, but when? We introduced bills to exempt farmers years ago, but that never happened. We cannot trust the current government or the costly coalition to make it happen.
Madame la Présidente, ni le Bloc québécois, ni les libéraux, ni les néo‑démocrates n'ont de plan concernant les changements climatiques. Ils ont un plan pour augmenter les taxes. Depuis la mise en application de cette taxe sur le carbone, les cibles de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre n'ont jamais été atteintes. Cela n'a pas fonctionné.
L'honorable député dit qu'il va y avoir des exemptions, mais quand? Nous avons présenté des projets de loi pour exempter les agriculteurs il y a des années, mais cela n'est jamais arrivé. Nous ne pouvons pas faire confiance au gouvernement en place ni à la coalition coûteuse pour le faire.
Collapse
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2022-10-06 11:24 [p.8217]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it a difficult task to follow the leader of the official opposition, but I will do my best to carry on with our message about the NDP opposition day motion, which I also agree does not go far enough. It does not put a lot of the blame on the inflationary crisis we face where most of it belongs, which is on government spending.
We cannot say that CEOs, corporate Canada or global companies are driving inflation when we have a federal government that has put in half a trillion dollars in spending, which is having a significant impact on the prices that Canadians are facing all across the board.
I find it interesting that we see a bit of schizophrenia with our NDP colleagues, where with every opportunity they have to support increased spending and the tripling of the carbon tax, they vote with the government, yet their motion today attempts to try to make life more affordable for Canadians.
In question period yesterday, the leader of the NDP had concerns about rising gas prices, especially in his province of B.C. where fuel has hit $2.40 a litre. That is exactly what Liberal and NDP policy wants to achieve. It wants us to have higher fuel prices. It wants to force us to drive our cars less. I am sure that works in many of my colleagues' urban communities. Some days they can park their cars and take public transit or ride their bikes. My riding is almost 30,000 square kilometres.
Public transit does not exist in my riding. My constituents must drive their car. They must drive long distances to work. They must heat their homes and their barns in -40°C weather in January. These are the facts of life. These are the necessities of life. These are not extravagant choices; they have to do that. In response to that, our Liberal colleagues, supported by the NDP, want to triple the carbon tax.
I am going to focus a little on the agricultural sector and the impact that is having on rural economies and rural Canadians. I would argue that rural Canadians, especially our farmers, producers and ranchers, pay the carbon tax over and over again.
It was interesting to hear my Liberal colleague say that while farmers were price-takers, the carbon tax did not have an impact on the price of food. It is true that they are price-takers. However, when we triple the carbon tax, we triple the price of fuel. We saw the price of fertilizer go up 100% last year. That does not include the 35% tariff on fertilizer from Russia and Belarus. That impacts hauling their grain, hauling their cattle and transportation to the terminal. Every single time they are paying that carbon tax over and over again.
The company or rail company hauling their grain passes that carbon tax on to the consumer. Every time those prices go up on those transportation or commodity services, it impacts the price of food. That is why we have seen the cost of groceries go up more than 10%, the highest rate of inflation in more than 40 years.
Therefore, I understand my NDP colleagues when they say that the CEOs in Canada should pay their fair share. I agree with that. Every Canadian should pay their fair share. The Liberal government has been in power for seven years. If there are loopholes, it should be holding taxpayers accountable for paying their fair share. Obviously, it has not done that. However, to shift the blame from where it lies to other parts of the economy is disingenuous.
An interesting statistic came up yesterday at the agriculture committee, and I want to highlight it. We heard it from my Bloc colleague, who I have a lot of respect for as well. Climate change is real, but to put the price of fighting climate change on the backs of Canadian farmers is not fair. Let us be real here, as my colleague was saying. Let us have an honest conversation about this. GHG intensity in agriculture is about 28% globally. What it is in Canada? It is 8%. We are tenfold better than any other country in the world when it comes to GHG emissions and intensity in the agriculture sector in Canada.
With respect to the fertilizer issue, the Liberal government wants to see a 30% reduction in fertilizer use. As I said, grocery prices have gone up 10%. If the Liberals follow through with this policy, all I can say to Canadian consumers is “you ain't seen nothing yet”. When farmers have to see their yields go down between 30% and 50%, depending on what the commodity is, that means significantly lower yields and significantly higher grocery prices. That has nothing to do with the CEO of Loblaws. That has exactly to do with government policy put forward by the Liberals.
Again, what makes that so frustrating is they are saying to Canadian farmers that they are not part of the solution; they are the problem. Canadian farmers are 50% to 70% more efficient in their fertilizer use than any other country on planet earth. Instead of congratulating them for that and going around the world saying that we are the gold standard and here is where everybody else in the world should go, we are apologizing and dragging our farmers down to where everybody else is. That is the wrong philosophy and certainly the wrong policy.
All that is doing is making our farmers worse off. It is also more harmful to the environment, and food prices will go up. It is a triple whammy. Instead of doing the right thing and being a champion and advocate for Canadian farmers, we are going in the exact opposite direction.
There are other policies the Liberals have put forward that have made the cost of groceries and the cost of food go up, and I really want to focus on this part. I am going to backtrack a little to the carbon tax again. My colleague from the Bloc brought that up. In the agriculture committee, we are talking about Bill C-234, a private member's bill brought forward by the Conservatives to exempt natural gas and propane from the carbon tax on farms. This is a critical piece of legislation that would ensure our farmers are able to remain competitive on the global stage. However, the Liberals are arguing that we do not need Bill C-234 because farmers get a rebate through Bill C-8.
We now know from Finance Canada officials that the average farmer will get about $800 back a year through that rebate. We also know that farmers pay close to $50,000 a year on average in carbon tax. I asked a representative from Finance Canada how they could argue that the carbon tax is revenue-neutral when they were admitting that the average farmer is getting about $800 to $860 back. His answer was that if we made it revenue-neutral, urban Canadians would have to subsidize that. Okay. He was telling me that rural Canadians were subsidizing the carbon tax and wealth redistribution for urban Canadians. That is what he was telling me.
That is not what the Liberal policy on the carbon tax was. They said it was going to be revenue-neutral and that eight out of 10 families would get more back than they paid. That is baloney. Rural Canadians are suffering and certainly paying significantly more in carbon tax than other Canadians. That is not what the Liberals are selling. Again, it is Liberal policy that is driving inflation and driving up the price of food.
It is going to get worse. Although we had a bit of a win this spring when we got the Liberals to back down on front-of-pack labelling on ground beef and pork, they are still going ahead with front-of-pack labelling on most other products. The cost of that is going to be $1.8 billion to the industry. Who do we think pays for that? I can guarantee that Galen Weston at Loblaws is not covering that cost. I can guarantee that French's ketchup is not covering that cost. They are passing that right on to the consumer.
Again, a Liberal policy that no one asked for and serves very little purpose is going to be passing on $2 billion in costs to the Canadian consumer for no reason. That is not to mention that the United States has already identified this policy as a trade irritant. Therefore, not only are we upsetting Canadian consumers, but we are also upsetting our number one trading partner, which is looking for every excuse possible to fight back against Canadian trade.
In conclusion, I appreciate what my NDP colleague is trying to achieve with this motion, and there are many portions of it that we agree with. Certainly CEOs should pay their fair share and affordable food should be available for every Canadian, but the facts are the facts. Inflation is being driven by ideological, activist policy by the Liberal government. That should be the focus of the House.
Madame la Présidente, il est difficile de prendre la parole après le chef de l’opposition officielle, mais je ferai de mon mieux pour porter notre message au sujet de la motion de l'opposition du NPD, qui, j'en conviens également, ne va pas assez loin. La motion omet de rejeter une grande partie du blâme de la crise inflationniste qui nous touche sur ce qui en est la cause principale, c'est-à-dire les dépenses gouvernementales.
Nous ne pouvons pas affirmer que ce sont les PDG, les entreprises canadiennes ou les multinationales qui alimentent l'inflation alors que le gouvernement fédéral a engagé des dépenses d'un demi-billion de dollars, ce qui a une incidence considérable sur les prix que les Canadiens doivent payer dans tous les secteurs.
Je trouve intéressant que nos collègues du NPD se montrent un brin schizophrènes: chaque fois qu'ils ont l'occasion d'appuyer une augmentation des dépenses ou le triplement de la taxe sur le carbone, ils votent dans le même sens que le gouvernement, et pourtant, leur motion d'aujourd'hui tente de rendre la vie plus abordable pour les Canadiens.
Hier, pendant la période des questions, le chef du NPD s’inquiétait de la hausse du prix de l’essence, surtout dans sa province, la Colombie‑Britannique, où le carburant a atteint 2,40 $ le litre. C’est exactement ce que visent les politiques libérales et néo-démocrates. Elles veulent que nous payions l’essence plus cher. Elles veulent nous forcer à moins utiliser nos voitures. Je suis convaincu qu’elles réussissent à le faire dans les collectivités urbaines de bon nombre de députés. Certains jours, ils peuvent laisser leur voiture à la maison et se déplacer en transport en commun ou à vélo. Ma circonscription, elle, a une superficie de près de 30 000 kilomètres carrés.
Le transport en commun n’existe pas dans ma circonscription. Mes concitoyens ont besoin de leur voiture. Ils doivent parcourir de longues distances pour se rendre au travail. Ils doivent chauffer leurs maisons et leurs granges lorsqu’il fait -40 degrés Celcius en janvier. Cela fait partie du quotidien. Ce sont des besoins fondamentaux. Ce ne sont pas des choix extravagants: mes concitoyens doivent le faire. En guise de réponse, nos collègues libéraux, appuyés par le NPD, veulent tripler la taxe sur le carbone.
Je parlerai un peu sur le secteur agricole et des répercussions de cette situation sur l'économie et les habitants des régions rurales. À mon avis, les Canadiens des régions rurales, surtout les agriculteurs, les producteurs et les éleveurs, paient la taxe sur le carbone à maintes reprises.
Il était intéressant d’entendre mon collègue libéral dire que la taxe sur le carbone n’avait pas d’incidence sur le prix des aliments, et ce, même si les agriculteurs sont des preneurs de prix. Il est vrai qu’ils sont des preneurs de prix. Cependant, lorsque la taxe sur le carbone triple, le prix du carburant triple. L’an dernier, le prix de l’engrais a grimpé de 100 %. Cela n’inclut pas les droits de douane de 35 % imposés sur les engrais en provenance de Russie et de Biélorussie. Cette augmentation a des répercussions sur le transport des céréales, le transport du bétail et le transport jusqu’au terminal. Chaque fois qu’ils paient cette taxe sur le carbone à maintes reprises.
L’entreprise ou la compagnie de chemin de fer qui transporte les céréales transfère cette taxe sur le carbone au consommateur. Chaque augmentation du prix des services de transport ou des produits de base se fait sentir sur le prix de la nourriture. C’est pourquoi le coût de l’épicerie a augmenté de plus de 10 %; c’est pourquoi nous sommes aux prises avec le taux d’inflation le plus élevé depuis plus de 40 ans.
Je comprends donc mes collègues néo-démocrates lorsqu’ils disent que les PDG du Canada doivent payer leur juste part. Je suis d'accord avec eux. Chaque Canadien doit payer sa juste part. Le gouvernement libéral est au pouvoir depuis sept ans. S’il y a des échappatoires, il devrait tenir les contribuables responsables du paiement de leur juste part. Manifestement, il ne l’a pas fait. Il est toutefois malhonnête de rejeter le blâme sur d’autres secteurs de l’économie.
Une statistique intéressante a été présentée hier au comité de l’agriculture, et je tiens à la présenter. C’est mon collègue du Bloc, pour qui j’ai beaucoup de respect également, qui l’a présentée. Les changements climatiques sont réels, mais il est injuste de faire payer la lutte contre les changements climatiques par les agriculteurs canadiens. Soyons réalistes, comme le disait mon collègue. Discutons-en franchement. L'intensité des gaz à effet de serre émis par le secteur agricole est d’environ 28 % dans le monde. Au Canada, quel pourcentage atteint-elle? Elle est de 8 %. Nous faisons dix fois mieux que n’importe quel autre pays du monde en ce qui concerne les émissions et l’intensité des gaz à effet de serre dans le secteur agricole au Canada.
En ce qui concerne la question des engrais, le gouvernement libéral veut que l’utilisation des engrais baisse de 30 %. Je l’ai dit: le prix du panier d’épicerie a augmenté de 10 %. Si les libéraux donnent suite à cette politique, tout ce que je peux dire aux consommateurs canadiens, c’est qu’ils n’ont encore rien vu. Si les agriculteurs doivent voir leurs récoltes diminuer de 30 à 50 %, selon le produit de base, cela signifie des récoltes considérablement plus faibles et un prix du panier d’épicerie beaucoup plus élevé. Cela n’a rien à voir avec le PDG de Loblaws. Cela a à voir avec la politique du gouvernement proposée par les libéraux.
Encore une fois, ce qui rend cette situation si frustrante, c’est qu’on dit aux agriculteurs canadiens qu’ils ne font pas partie de la solution et que ce sont eux le problème. Les agriculteurs canadiens utilisent l’engrais de manière 50 à 70 % plus efficace que n’importe quel autre pays de la planète. Au lieu de les féliciter pour cela et de faire le tour du monde en disant que nous sommes la référence, et que c’est ici que le reste du monde devrait venir, nous nous excusons et nous rabaissons nos agriculteurs au niveau où tout le monde se situe. C’est la mauvaise philosophie, et certainement la mauvaise politique.
Ce faisant, cela ne fait qu’aggraver la situation de nos agriculteurs. C’est également plus dommageable pour l’environnement et le prix des aliments va augmenter. C’est une triple menace. Au lieu de faire ce qui s’impose, c’est-à-dire être un champion et défendre les agriculteurs canadiens, nous faisons exactement le contraire.
Les libéraux ont présenté d’autres politiques qui ont fait augmenter le coût du panier d’épicerie et celui des aliments, et je veux surtout m’attarder sur cet aspect. Je vais revenir un peu à la taxe sur le carbone. Mon collègue du Bloc a soulevé cette question. Au comité de l’agriculture, nous parlons du projet de loi C‑234, un projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire présenté par les conservateurs pour exempter le gaz naturel et le propane de la taxe sur le carbone applicable aux exploitations agricoles. Il s’agit d’une mesure législative essentielle qui permettrait à nos agriculteurs de demeurer concurrentiels sur la scène mondiale. Cependant, les libéraux soutiennent que nous n’avons pas besoin du projet de loi C‑234 parce que les agriculteurs reçoivent un remboursement par l’intermédiaire du projet de loi C‑8.
Nous savons maintenant, d’après les fonctionnaires du ministère des Finances Canada, que l’agriculteur moyen recevra environ 800 $ dans le cadre de ce programme de remboursement. Nous savons également que les agriculteurs paient en moyenne près de 50 000 $ par année en taxe sur le carbone. J’ai demandé à un représentant du ministère des Finances comment il pouvait soutenir que la taxe sur le carbone n’a aucune incidence sur les recettes, quand il reconnaissait que l’agriculteur moyen récupère environ 800 $ à 860 $. Il a répondu que ce sont les Canadiens des régions urbaines qui devraient subventionner le remboursement si celui-ci était sans incidence sur les recettes. D’accord. Il me disait donc que les Canadiens des régions rurales subventionnent la taxe sur le carbone et la redistribution de la richesse pour les Canadiens des régions urbaines. C’est ce qu’il me disait.
Ce n’est pas cela que la politique libérale de taxe sur le carbone devait être. Selon les libéraux, cette politique n’aurait aucune incidence sur les recettes, et huit familles sur dix recevraient plus d'argent qu’elles n’en paieraient. C’est de la foutaise. Les Canadiens des régions rurales souffrent et paient certainement beaucoup plus de taxe sur le carbone que les autres Canadiens. Ce n’est pas ce que les libéraux nous font miroiter. Encore une fois, ce sont les politiques du Parti libéral qui alimentent l’inflation et qui sont à l’origine de la montée en flèche du prix des aliments.
Cela ne fera qu’empirer. Nous avons remporté une petite victoire au printemps dernier, lorsque nous avons amené les libéraux à abandonner leur projet d’étiquetage sur le devant des emballages de bœuf haché et de porc. Pourtant, ils persistent à appliquer cette mesure pour la plupart des autres produits. Elle coûtera 1,8 milliard de dollars à l’industrie. Qui, à notre avis, paie pour cela? Je peux garantir à la Chambre que ce n'est pas Galen Weston, de Loblaws. Ce n'est pas non plus le ketchup French’s. C'est le consommateur qui paie la facture.
Voilà encore qu'une politique libérale que personne n’avait demandée et qui n’a que très peu d’utilité transférera aux consommateurs canadiens des coûts de 2 milliards de dollars, sans raison. Sans compter que les États-Unis ont déjà qualifié cette politique d’irritant commercial. Par conséquent, en plus de déplaire aux consommateurs canadiens, nous contrarions notre principal partenaire commercial, qui cherche toutes les excuses possibles pour réduire l'accès des produits canadiens à son marché.
Enfin, je comprends ce que mon collègue néo-démocrate essaie de faire avec cette motion, et nous en approuvons de nombreux aspects. Il est certain que les PDG devraient payer leur juste part et que tous les Canadiens devraient avoir accès à des aliments abordables, mais les faits sont les faits. L’inflation est alimentée par une politique idéologique et militante du gouvernement libéral. Voilà ce qui devrait retenir l'attention de la Chambre.
Collapse
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2022-10-06 11:35 [p.8219]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as I said, we agree with the portion of the motion about CEOs paying their fair share. As we said, every Canadian should pay their fair share.
His colleague, the member for Cowichan—Malahat—Langford, in his opening speech asked why the Conservatives are moaning about taxes all the time. Well, what our constituents are telling us every single day is that the tax increases by the Liberal government are punishing.
To answer my colleague's question, how is increasing a tax on Loblaws and Sobeys going to reduce food prices? Does he think that by increasing taxes on Galen Weston, he is going to turn around and reduce food prices?
Madame la Présidente, comme je l'ai dit, nous souscrivons à la partie de la motion qui exige que les PDG paient leur juste part. Comme nous l'avons dit, tous les Canadiens devraient payer leur juste part.
Dans son discours d'ouverture, son collègue le député de Cowichan—Malahat—Langford a demandé pourquoi les conservateurs ne cessent jamais de se plaindre des impôts. C'est parce que nos concitoyens nous disent chaque jour que les hausses de taxes du gouvernement libéral sont accablantes.
Pour répondre à la question de mon collègue, comment une augmentation des impôts de Loblaws et de Sobeys va-t-elle réduire le prix des aliments? Pense-t-il que le fait d'augmenter les impôts de Galen Weston va le convaincre de réduire le prix des aliments?
Collapse
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2022-10-06 11:37 [p.8219]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would argue that the Conservatives, especially under the leader of the official opposition, have been talking about affordability every day in this House for the last two weeks. I do appreciate the motion brought forward by the NDP, but it is the Conservative Party that has addressed and highlighted that Liberal policy, Liberal tax hikes and planned new tax hikes are making life unaffordable for Canadians.
Grocery prices are up 10%. I did not even talk about interest rates, which have gone up several points and have put thousands of family farms on the brink of possible foreclosure. I cannot imagine what that is doing to many Canadians. I have had constituents in my riding say that interest rates have made their mortgage go up $500 a month. Not many Canadians have the resources to cover that new cost.
Madame la Présidente, je réponds que les conservateurs, particulièrement sous la direction du chef de l'opposition officielle, parlent d'abordabilité tous les jours depuis deux semaines à la Chambre. Je remercie le NPD d'avoir présenté cette motion, mais c'est le Parti conservateur qui a critiqué la politique libérale et qui en a mis les failles en lumière, notamment les hausses de taxes qui sont prévues pour bientôt et qui rendent la vie inabordable pour les Canadiens.
Le prix des aliments a augmenté de 10 %, et je n'ai même pas parlé de l'augmentation de plusieurs points de pourcentage des taux d'intérêt, qui poussent des milliers de familles au bord de la faillite. Je ne peux même pas imaginer le tort que cette mesure cause à de nombreux Canadiens. Des résidants de ma circonscription m'ont indiqué que la hausse des taux d'intérêt a fait grimper de 500 $ leur paiement hypothécaire mensuel. Peu de Canadiens ont les moyens d'absorber cette nouvelle hausse.
Collapse
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2022-10-06 11:40 [p.8220]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as a brief answer, we are not the government. The Liberals are. If the member has an issue with tax havens, he should take it up with the government.
Madame la Présidente, pour répondre brièvement, nous ne dirigeons pas le gouvernement. Ce sont les libéraux qui le dirigent. Si le député a un problème avec les paradis fiscaux, il devrait s'adresser au gouvernement.
Collapse
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2022-10-06 11:54 [p.8222]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I agree with my colleague on two points.
I agree with his view of the government's incompetence in fighting inflation and improving the cost of living for everyone. I also agree with him when he talks about acting wisely to provide quick solutions for Canadians.
Acting wisely would have meant voting for our motion to stop the government from going ahead with its plan to raise taxes, which will increase the cost of absolutely everything for Canadians in the coming months. That would have been wise.
Madame la Présidente, je suis en accord avec mon collègue sur deux points.
Je suis d'accord avec lui lorsqu'il parle de l'incompétence du gouvernement pour combattre l'inflation et pour améliorer le coût de la vie de tous les citoyens. Je suis aussi d'accord avec lui quand il parle d'agir intelligemment pour offrir des solutions rapides aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes.
Agir intelligemment, cela aurait été de voter pour notre motion afin d'empêcher le gouvernement d'aller de l'avant avec son plan de hausser les taxes, ce qui augmentera le coût d'absolument tout pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes au cours des prochains mois. Cela aurait été agir intelligemment.
Collapse
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2022-10-06 11:55 [p.8222]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I think my colleague ought to apologize. I am not stupid. I am not someone who repeats words and uses words like that. I find this totally unacceptable.
This is the second time today that my colleague has used this type of language. I would like him to withdraw his remarks and apologize.
Madame la Présidente, je crois que mon collègue devrait s'excuser. Je ne suis pas stupide, je ne suis pas une personne qui répète des mots et qui utilise des mots comme cela. Je crois que c'est totalement inacceptable.
Aujourd'hui, cela fait deux fois que mon collègue utilise ce genre de discours. J'aimerais qu'il retire ses paroles et qu'il s'excuse.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 15 of 12059 | Page: 1 of 804

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data