Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 212
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2022-09-28 18:44 [p.7887]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I appreciated listening to what the member had to say, and I understand that the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations appointed the interim board of directors, the transitional committee and now, in Bill C-29, he would be responsible to select the directors of the national council.
I wonder if the member could clarify this for me. In a past bill, as it was being discussed in the House and debated, we found out that the environmental council that was being created had already been established. Could she tell me whether or not individuals have already been appointed prior to the debate on the bill finishing in the House, and how many if that is the case?
Madame la Présidente, j'ai aimé écouter ce que la députée avait à dire, et je comprends que le ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones a nommé le conseil d'administration provisoire et le comité de transition et que maintenant, dans le projet de loi C‑29, il serait responsable de choisir les administrateurs du conseil national.
Je me demande si la députée peut clarifier ceci pour moi. Lors des discussions et des débats à la Chambre sur un projet de loi antérieur, nous avons découvert que le conseil environnemental que l'on était en train de créer l'avait déjà été. Pourrait-elle me dire si des personnes ont déjà été nommées avant que le débat sur le projet de loi ne soit terminé à la Chambre et, le cas échéant, combien ont été nommées?
Collapse
View Yvonne Jones Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Yvonne Jones Profile
2022-09-28 18:44 [p.7887]
Expand
Madam Speaker, first of all, all of the appointments that are done by the minister and council are done in consultation with indigenous groups and leadership in Canada. That is the process we have, and that is the mantra we follow as a government. In terms of the transitional piece, it was the same process that occurred, and as we move into the new reconciliation board, there is ample opportunity for people to be considered even at this stage.
Madame la Présidente, tout d'abord, toutes les nominations effectuées par le ministre et le conseil sont faites en consultation avec les groupes et les dirigeants autochtones du Canada. C'est le processus qui est en place et c'est le mantra du gouvernement. Pour ce qui est de la transition, le processus a été le même et, à mesure que nous nous dirigeons vers la création du nouveau conseil de réconciliation, les gens ont toutes les chances possibles d'être considérés, même à cette étape.
Collapse
View Gary Vidal Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, while it is always an honour to rise in this place and speak on behalf of the people of Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, this week as we return to Parliament, especially as a member from northern Saskatchewan, I come with a heavy heart. As I begin today, I want to acknowledge the recent tragic events in northern Saskatchewan in the communities of James Smith Cree Nation and Weldon. As the healing journey begins for so many, it is important that in the days and weeks ahead we do not allow our focus to be lost from what is going to be a long and difficult journey for many. Often as the media attention diminishes, so can the help and support. The heavy burden these communities will carry will require a resolve, a resolve to continue to be there for family, friends and neighbours. We must not allow them to walk this journey alone.
It is with these thoughts in mind that I rise to speak on Bill C-29, an act to provide for the establishment of a national council for reconciliation. The work of truth and reconciliation needs to be viewed as a journey rather than a destination. Relationships are not easy, especially ones that have a long history of distrust. That distrust is the reason why a bill like Bill C-29 deserves to be looked at through a lens that focuses on a consensus-building approach. This will create better legislation. It is what is needed and, quite frankly, deserved.
Bill C-29 attempts to honour calls to action 53 to 56 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission by creating an accountability mechanism on the progress of reconciliation across the country. Our party supports accountability. In fact, as the party that established the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, we welcome it. We will support this bill to go to committee and work there to make improvements.
With the purpose of building better legislation and in the advancement of reconciliation, there are a few matters that I feel should be addressed, some concerns, some questions and some suggestions we will make. I would like to take the next few minutes to speak to some of those concerns.
The first concern I will address is around the appointment process of the board of directors of the national council for reconciliation, its transparency and its independence. To help explain this, I want to speak to some of the steps and timelines that led up to Bill C-29 being tabled in the House.
In December of 2017, the Prime Minister announced that he would start the process of establishing a national council for reconciliation by establishing an interim board of directors. By June 2018, only six months later, the interim board of directors presented its final report, with 20 very specific recommendations. It is worth noting, and it was confirmed by the technical briefing last night, that those 20 recommendations were the basis for the draft legal framework. One of those recommendations also included setting up a transitional committee to continue the work that was started.
I want to read a quote from that final report. It states:
As indicated in our interim report, the interim board believes it is important that a transitional committee be set up to continue the work proposed in the interim and final reports. During our tenure, we have heard from various organizations and community members that we need to move forward with speed and maintain the momentum to establish the NCR.
However, inexplicably, it took three and a half years, until December 2021, for the minister to finally get around to appointing the members of the transitional committee. Again, let us be clear. The development of the basis for the legal framework of Bill C-29 was already finished in June 2018. Why the delay?
The current government, time and again on indigenous issues, makes big announcements, holds press conferences, takes photographs and then proceeds to ignore the real and difficult work. Now we fast-forward to June of 2022, when the minister finally tabled Bill C-29, with just two days left in the spring session I might add. That is four years after the recommendations.
It is not just the unacceptable time frames, but the lack of independence and transparency of the selection process that is concerning. From the interim board of directors to the transitional committee to the board of directors of the council, the process of selecting members has been at the sole discretion of the minister. In June, while Bill C-29 was being introduced, there were indigenous organizations that were very public with their own concerns about this process. These concerns are valid, because according to the TRC’s call to action 53, the national council for reconciliation is supposed to be an independent body. I have a simple question. How is it independent if, per clause 8 of this bill, the first board of directors is “selected by the Minister”?
Does the government really expect us to believe, based on its history, that it deserves the benefit of the doubt, and that it would never put forward any undue pressure to get what it wants? Finally, there are the minister’s own words when explaining how this oversight body is needed. He said, “It isn’t up to Canada to be grading itself.”
I think the concerns around the selection process require the minister to be very clear in the House and, more importantly, to indigenous peoples on why he is comfortable in having so much direct control and influence on a body that will be tasked with holding his own government to account on advancing reconciliation.
My next concern is that there is nothing in Bill C-29 that has anything concrete as far as measuring outcomes. Quantifying reconciliation is difficult, I admit, but a close look at call to action number 55 will show that it includes several items that are, in fact, measurable. I will give a few examples: the comparative number of indigenous children to non-indigenous children in care and the reasons for that; the comparative funding for education of on- and off-reserve first nations children; the comparative education and income attainments of indigenous to non-indigenous people; progress on closing the gap on health outcomes; progress on eliminating overrepresentation of indigenous children in youth custody; progress on reducing the rate of criminal victimization in homicide, family violence and other crimes; and, finally, progress on reducing overrepresentation in the justice and correctional systems.
The concern is that, if we want to measure accountability, we must set targets that determine success from failure. Like the axiom, what gets measured gets done.
The PBO recently released a report in response to a Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs request that was very critical of the departments of ISC and CIRNAC for spending increases without improvements in outcomes. I am going to quote from the report: “The analysis conducted indicates that the increased spending did not result in a commensurate improvement in the ability of these organizations to achieve the goals that they had set for themselves.” That paragraph ends with, “Based on the qualitative review the ability to achieve the targets specified has declined.”
  Maybe this is what the government is afraid of. Not only is there a lack of measurable outcomes in Bill C-29, but the wording seems to be purposely vague, just vague enough to avoid accountability. Chief Wilton Littlechild, who sat on both the interim board of directors and the transitional committee, when referring to the bill, told CBC News that the wording needs to be strengthened.
For example, the purpose section of the bill uses the text “to advance efforts for reconciliation”, but Littlechild said the word “efforts” needs deletion. He says the bill should instead say, “advance reconciliation” because it is building on work that has already laid a foundation. The preamble of the bill states that the government should provide “relevant” information, which Littlechild says leaves the government to determine what is important or not. “We could've taken out those kind of words,” he said.
When added all together, it seems that there is a pattern of reducing the risk of accountability in the wording of the bill and in the lack of measurable outcomes that would require the government to follow through on its words and actions.
My final concern is around who responds to the annual report issued by the national council. Subclause 17(3) of the bill states that the minister must respond to the matters addressed by the NCR’s annual report by “publishing an annual report on the state of Indigenous peoples that outlines the Government of Canada’s plans for advancing reconciliation.” This does not honour the TRC’s call to action number 56, which clearly and unequivocally calls on the Prime Minister of Canada to formally respond.
The Prime Minister has consistently said that, “No relationship is more important to Canada than the relationship with Indigenous Peoples.” Actions speak louder than words and the Prime Minister should be the one responding directly, not delegating that responsibility to the minister.
In closing, as I stated earlier, our party will support Bill C-29 and, in the spirit of collaboration and in response to the minister's own words of being willing to be open to “perfecting” the bill, will work with the members of the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs and will offer some amendments that we believe will make this bill better.
It is now our duty to ensure that Bill C-29 is a piece of legislation that truly advances reconciliation.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre au nom des gens de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill. C'est toutefois le cœur lourd que je reviens cette semaine au Parlement, surtout en tant que député du Nord de la Saskatchewan. Tout d'abord, je tiens à souligner aujourd'hui les événements tragiques qui sont survenus récemment dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan, dans les communautés de la nation crie de James Smith et de Weldon. Alors que le processus de guérison s'amorce pour de nombreuses personnes, il est important de ne pas perdre de vue, dans les jours et les semaines à venir, ce qui sera un long et difficile parcours pour bien des personnes. Souvent, lorsque l'attention des médias diminue, l'aide et le soutien diminuent aussi. Ces communautés devront faire preuve de détermination pour porter leur lourd fardeau; elles devront être déterminées à continuer à être là pour les familles, les amis et les voisins. Nous ne devons pas leur permettre de cheminer seuls.
C'est dans cet esprit que je prends la parole au sujet du projet de loi C‑29, Loi prévoyant la constitution d'un conseil national de réconciliation. Le travail de vérité et de réconciliation doit être considéré comme un parcours plutôt qu'une destination. Les relations ne sont pas faciles, surtout celles qui sont marquées par une longue histoire de méfiance. Cette méfiance est la raison pour laquelle une mesure législative comme le projet de loi C‑29 mérite d'être examinée au moyen d'une approche axée sur l'établissement d'un consensus. Cela permettra de créer un meilleur projet de loi. C'est ce qui est nécessaire et, franchement, c'est ce à quoi on est en droit de s'attendre.
Le projet de loi C‑29 tente de répondre aux appels à l'action 53 à 56 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation en créant un mécanisme de reddition de comptes sur les progrès de la réconciliation dans tout le pays. Notre parti est favorable à la reddition de comptes. En fait, en tant que parti qui a créé la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, nous nous en félicitons. Nous appuierons le renvoi de ce projet de loi au comité et travaillerons à y apporter des améliorations.
Dans le but d'élaborer un meilleur projet de loi et de favoriser l'avancement de la réconciliation, il y a quelques préoccupations, quelques questions et quelques sujets qui, selon moi, devraient être abordés, et quelques suggestions que nous ferons. J'aimerais prendre les quelques minutes qui suivent pour parler de certaines de ces préoccupations.
Ma première réserve touche le processus de nomination des membres du Conseil national de réconciliation, sa transparence et son indépendance. Afin d’expliquer mon propos, je vais revenir sur les étapes et l’échéancier qui ont mené au dépôt du projet de loi C‑29 à la Chambre.
En décembre 2017, le premier ministre avait annoncé qu’il lancerait le processus de mise sur pied d’un conseil national de réconciliation en instaurant un conseil d’administration provisoire. En juin 2018, à peine six mois plus tard, ce dernier présentait son rapport final, qui énonçait 20 recommandations très précises. Il est important de préciser que celles-ci ont jeté les assises de l’ébauche du libellé du cadre législatif — ce qui a été confirmé lors de la séance d’information technique tenue hier soir. Il était notamment recommandé de nommer un comité de transition pour poursuivre les travaux amorcés.
J’aimerais vous lire un passage tiré de ce rapport final, qui dit ceci:
Comme nous l’avons indiqué dans notre rapport provisoire, le comité de transition croit qu’il est important qu’un comité de transition soit mis sur pied afin que les travaux proposés dans les rapports provisoire et final puissent se poursuivre. Au cours de notre mandat, divers organismes et membres des collectivités nous ont indiqué que nous devons rapidement aller de l’avant avec l’établissement du Conseil national de réconciliation et maintenir l’élan pour ce faire.
Toutefois, inexplicablement, il a fallu attendre trois ans et demi, jusqu'en décembre 2021, pour que le ministre nomme enfin les membres du comité de transition. Une fois de plus, soyons clairs. L'élaboration du fondement du cadre juridique du projet de loi C‑29 était déjà terminée en juin 2018. Pourquoi ce retard?
Le gouvernement actuel ne cesse de faire de grandes annonces, de tenir des conférences de presse et de prendre des photos au sujet de dossiers concernant les Autochtones, sans s'atteler ensuite aux tâches difficiles. En juin 2022, le ministre a finalement déposé le projet de loi C‑29, deux jours à peine avant la relâche parlementaire estivale, ajouterai-je. C'était donc quatre ans après les recommandations.
Non seulement un tel retard est inacceptable, mais le manque d'indépendance et de transparence du processus de sélection est préoccupant. Du conseil d'administration provisoire au conseil d'administration final du conseil en passant par le comité de transition, le processus de sélection des membres reste à l'entière discrétion du ministre. En juin, au moment de la présentation du projet de loi C‑29, des organismes autochtones ont clamé haut et fort leurs réserves au sujet de ce processus. Ces réserves étaient valables, car selon l'appel à l'action no 53 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, le Conseil national de réconciliation est censé être indépendant. J'ai une question toute simple. Comment peut-il être indépendant si, conformément à l'article 8 de ce projet de loi, le premier conseil d'administration doit être composé de personnes « choisies par le ministre »?
Le gouvernement veut-il vraiment nous faire croire, vu son bilan, qu'il mérite de se faire accorder le bénéfice du doute et qu'il n'exercerait jamais une pression indue pour obtenir ce qu'il veut? Enfin, il y a les propres mots du ministre, qui a dit ceci lorsqu'il a expliqué pourquoi un organisme de surveillance est nécessaire: « Il n'appartient pas au Canada de s'évaluer lui-même. »
À mon avis, les préoccupations concernant le processus de sélection exigent que le ministre dise très clairement à la Chambre et, surtout, aux peuples autochtones pourquoi il est à l'aise avec l'idée d'avoir autant de contrôle et d'influence directs sur un organisme qui aura pour tâche de demander des comptes à son propre gouvernement relativement aux progrès dans la réconciliation.
Autre sujet d'inquiétude: le projet de loi C-29 ne propose rien de concret pour mesurer les résultats. Certes, il est difficile de quantifier la réconciliation, mais, en lisant attentivement l'appel à l'action numéro 55, on constate qu'il comprend plusieurs éléments qui sont bel et bien mesurables. Voici quelques exemples: le nombre d'enfants autochtones pris en charge par comparaison avec les enfants non autochtones et les motifs de la prise en charge; une comparaison en ce qui touche le financement destiné à l'éducation des enfants des Premières Nations dans les réserves et à l'extérieur de celles-ci; une comparaison sur les plans des niveaux de scolarisation et du revenu entre les Autochtones et les non-Autochtones; les progrès réalisés pour combler les écarts en ce qui a trait aux indicateurs de la santé; les progrès réalisés pour ce qui est d’éliminer la surreprésentation des jeunes Autochtones dans le régime de garde; les progrès réalisés dans la réduction du taux de la victimisation criminelle des Autochtones, y compris des données sur les homicides, la victimisation liée à la violence familiale et d’autres crimes, et, enfin, les progrès réalisés en ce qui touche la réduction de la surreprésentation dans le système judiciaire et correctionnel.
Le problème, c'est que si l'on veut mesurer la responsabilité, il faut fixer des cibles qui permettent de distinguer la réussite de l'échec. Comme le veut l'adage, ce qui peut être mesuré peut être accompli.
Le directeur parlementaire du budget a publié récemment un rapport en réponse à une demande du Comité permanent des affaires autochtones et du Nord, où il critique vertement Services aux Autochtones Canada et Relations Couronne-Autochtones et Affaires du Nord Canada pour des hausses de dépenses qui ne se sont pas traduites par une amélioration des résultats. Je cite le rapport: « Il ressort de l’analyse réalisée que l’augmentation des dépenses n’a pas entraîné d’amélioration proportionnelle de la capacité de ces organisations à atteindre les objectifs qu’elles s’étaient fixés. » Le paragraphe se termine sur la phrase suivante: « Selon l’examen qualitatif, la capacité à atteindre les objectifs fixés a diminué. »
  C'est peut-être ce que craint le gouvernement. En plus de ne pas prévoir de résultats mesurables, le projet de loi C‑29 emploie des formulations qui semblent délibérément vagues, juste assez vagues pour éviter une possible reddition de comptes. Le chef Wilton Littlechild, qui a siégé au conseil d'administration provisoire et au comité de transition, a dit à CBC News qu'il fallait renforcer le texte du projet de loi.
À titre d'exemple, la section « Mission » contient la formulation « faire progresser les efforts de réconciliation ». Selon M. Littlechild, il faudrait supprimer le mot « efforts »; le projet de loi devrait plutôt dire « faire progresser la réconciliation », puisqu'il s'appuie sur le travail déjà accompli et les bases établies. Par ailleurs, le préambule du projet de loi dit que le gouvernement devrait communiquer des renseignements « pertinents », ce qui, d'après M. Littlechild, laisse au gouvernement la liberté de déterminer ce qui est important ou non. « On aurait pu enlever les mots de ce genre », a-t-il dit.
Lorsqu'on combine tous ces éléments, on a l'impression que le gouvernement cherche à réduire les risques d'une possible reddition de comptes en utilisant certaines formulations et en ne prévoyant pas de résultats mesurables, qui l'obligeraient à donner suite à ses paroles et à ses gestes.
Ma dernière préoccupation concerne la personne qui doit répondre au rapport annuel publié par le conseil national. Le paragraphe 17(3) du projet de loi précise que le ministre doit répondre aux enjeux visés par le rapport du conseil national de réconciliation en « publiant un rapport annuel sur la situation des peuples autochtones qui décrit les plans du gouvernement du Canada pour faire avancer la réconciliation ». Cela ne respecte pas l'appel à l'action numéro 56 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, qui demande clairement et sans équivoque au premier ministre du Canada d'y répondre officiellement.
Le premier ministre affirme toujours qu'« aucune relation n'est plus importante pour le Canada que celle qu'il entretient avec les peuples autochtones ». Les gestes sont plus éloquents que les paroles, et le premier ministre devrait être celui qui répond directement, sans déléguer cette responsabilité au ministre.
En conclusion, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, notre parti appuiera le projet de loi C‑29 et, dans un esprit de collaboration et en réponse à la déclaration du ministre, qui s'est dit disposé à « perfectionner » le projet de loi, notre parti travaillera avec les membres du Comité permanent des affaires autochtones et du Nord et il proposera certains amendements qui, selon nous, amélioreront ce projet de loi.
Il est maintenant de notre devoir de veiller à ce que le projet de loi C‑29 fasse véritablement progresser la réconciliation.
Collapse
View Todd Doherty Profile
CPC (BC)
View Todd Doherty Profile
2022-09-21 17:36 [p.7505]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to commend my hon. colleague. When she speaks, I listen.
The concern I have is that this would become just another Liberal-appointed or government-appointed board, and then we would have the same inaction that we are faced with today. I wonder if the member has concerns about the appointment process in terms of who would be there, and whether perhaps she has some guidelines as to how we can make that a better process.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à féliciter ma collègue. Lorsqu'elle prend la parole, j'écoute.
Je crains que nous nous retrouvions devant un autre conseil nommé par les libéraux ou par le gouvernement, ce qui entraînerait la même inaction que nous voyons aujourd'hui. Je me demande si la députée a des inquiétudes à propos du processus de nomination en ce qui concerne la composition du conseil. Elle a peut-être des lignes directrices à nous proposer sur la façon d'en faire un meilleur processus.
Collapse
View Lori Idlout Profile
NDP (NU)
View Lori Idlout Profile
2022-09-21 17:36 [p.7505]
Expand
Uqaqtittiji, I share the same concerns about the appointment process. I have seen gaps in the text in terms of who could make appointments. At this point, I struggle to share ideas of how that can be improved, because I know that Canada, as a diverse country, has many first nations, Métis and Inuit communities that we must ensure are heard through this whole process. I am sorry, but I cannot answer that question at the moment.
Uqaqtittiji, je partage les mêmes préoccupations concernant le processus de nomination. J'ai constaté des lacunes dans le texte en ce qui concerne les personnes pouvant procéder à des nominations. À ce stade, je ne saurais dire comment améliorer ce processus, car je sais que le Canada, en tant que pays multiculturel, compte de nombreuses communautés de Premières nations, de Métis et d'Inuits qui doivent être entendues tout au long de ce processus. Je suis désolée, mais je ne peux pas répondre à cette question pour le moment.
Collapse
View Blake Desjarlais Profile
NDP (AB)
View Blake Desjarlais Profile
2022-09-21 17:39 [p.7505]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to thank my colleague, the member for Nunavut, for outlining what I think is a really important message to all parliamentarians.
With respect to this file, I have sympathy for the government and even the official opposition. This is a very difficult topic, understanding indigenous people, who are so absent from this place, and the ways we can create laws to have a better outcome. There is a deep irony in that.
When I was first elected I knew, coming from my position as the national director for the Métis of Alberta, that my experience there would in many ways influence my experience here. The conclusion I came to, when deciding whether or not my presence in this place would in fact be beneficial for the outcome of indigenous peoples, I returned to what I learned from folks who were houseless living in Edmonton Griesbach. That was the idea of harm reduction, that for every form of violence or oppression that could be committed by this institution to impact people there is also an ability for it to restrict its ability to harm people.
Where I come from in Alberta this actually happened. To make a quick reference, I was born in a small place called the Fishing Lake Métis Settlement. It is unique in Canada. It is the only place where Métis people have a land base still today. I should note, just to one of the official opposition member's comments, that the people were not consulted, nor are they planning to be consulted on this, which is a huge red flag.
However, returning to the point, indigenous people often see that if we can reduce the level of unilateral impact this place can have on our nations, that is a good thing. Therefore, when I decided finally that it would be a good decision for me to be in this place, it was to understand and share that message with all parliamentarians, through you, Madam Speaker, that we have a role. It is not just to make laws and to govern, but to have a responsibility to reduce harm where we see it.
This piece of legislation is important. It will seek to do that work. The government has tabled what has been a call to action by many survivors and many indigenous nations for a very long time, codified in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action. I really commend the government for its ability to table this legislation, but I agree, in many ways, with many of the speakers who have made mention of the criticisms and failures of the bill as drafted.
One is that the government may unilaterally, by the minister's discretion, appoint two of the board members it feels would be appropriate to sit there. That is a huge concern when we think about the mass diversity of indigenous peoples in Canada. There is no one body or one function that can truly represent the interests of the many nations and the many people who live in Canada who are indigenous. That is a huge concern that I think the current government should be willing to address.
What I heard from the government today is that it is willing, through committee, to listen to these very important aspects presented by both the official opposition and the New Democratic Party. It is important that we understand that consultation, when we do it wrong, creates a generation of people who feel left out. It is my greatest caution to the government that it not replicate the systems that have excluded people for so long.
I invite the minister to come to Alberta and seek permission from indigenous peoples in all provinces, ask what a national body toward the implementation of these TRC calls to action means for them, and do it in a way that is public and transparent so that Canadians can join the conversation. Right now, this happens behind closed doors. Canadians do not know what is happening. Many indigenous people do not know what is happening.
I know my time is limited and I will have another opportunity to speak on this in the future. I just want to make sure that we can do this work at committee. I encourage the government to work with members of the opposition to do that.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à remercier ma collègue, la députée de Nunavut, d'avoir exprimé ce qui me semble être un message très important pour tous les parlementaires.
En ce qui concerne ce dossier, je comprends le gouvernement et même l'opposition officielle. Tenter de comprendre les peuples autochtones, qui sont si peu représentés dans cette enceinte, et la façon de légiférer pour obtenir de meilleurs résultats est un sujet particulièrement difficile. C'est une situation profondément paradoxale.
Lorsque j'ai été élu pour la première fois, je savais, après avoir occupé le poste de directeur national des Métis de l'Alberta, que mon expérience à ce titre influencerait à bien des égards mon travail ici. La conclusion à laquelle je suis parvenu, au moment de décider si ma présence ici serait en fait bénéfique pour les peuples autochtones, je la dois à ce que j'ai appris des sans-abri d'Edmonton Griesbach. Il s'agit du concept de réduction des méfaits, selon lequel pour chaque forme de violence ou d'oppression que cette institution peut commettre et qui peut avoir des répercussions sur les gens, il est également possible de limiter sa capacité de nuire.
D'où je viens, en Alberta, c'est exactement ce qui s'est passé. En un mot, je suis né dans un petit village appelé l'établissement métis de Fishing Lake. C'est un endroit unique au Canada. C'est le seul endroit au Canada où les Métis ont toujours une assise territoriale. Je tiens à souligner, en réponse à un des commentaires du député de l'opposition officielle, que les Autochtones n'ont pas été consultés à ce sujet et qu'il n'est pas prévu qu'ils le soient, ce qui constitue un énorme signal d'alarme.
Cependant, revenons à la question qui nous occupe. Les Autochtones considèrent qu'arriver à réduire l'impact unilatéral que peut avoir le Parlement sur les différentes nations au pays est une bonne chose. Par conséquent, lorsque je suis finalement arrivé à la conclusion que venir ici était la bonne décision, c'était pour comprendre ce message et le communiquer aux autres parlementaires, par votre entremise, madame la Présidente: nous avons un rôle à jouer. Il ne suffit pas d'édicter des lois et de gouverner; nous avons la responsabilité de réduire les méfaits dont nous connaissons l'existence.
Cette mesure législative est importante parce que c'est ce qu'elle cherche à faire. En présentant ce projet de loi, le gouvernement répond à une demande formulée depuis très longtemps par bon nombre de survivants et de nations autochtones, et inscrite dans les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Je félicite sincèrement le gouvernement d'avoir présenté le projet de loi. Cependant, à bien des égards, je suis d'accord avec les nombreux intervenants qui ont critiqué le projet de loi, dans sa forme actuelle, et souligné ses lacunes.
Je pense notamment au fait que le gouvernement pourrait unilatéralement, à la discrétion du ministre, nommer deux des membres du conseil parce que c'est ce qu'il juge approprié. C'est extrêmement préoccupant quand on songe à la vaste diversité des peuples autochtones au Canada. Aucun organisme ni aucune personne ne peuvent représenter véritablement les intérêts du grand nombre de nations et de peuples autochtones habitant dans notre pays. C'est là une préoccupation majeure que le gouvernement actuel devrait, à mon avis, être prêt à régler.
Ce que j'ai entendu de la part du gouvernement aujourd'hui, c'est qu'il est disposé, par la voie du comité, à écouter ces éléments très importants présentés par l'opposition officielle et le Nouveau Parti démocratique. Il est important que nous comprenions que la consultation, lorsqu'elle est mal faite, crée une génération de personnes qui se sentent exclues. Je conseille donc vivement au gouvernement de ne pas reproduire les systèmes qui ont exclu les gens pendant si longtemps.
J'invite le ministre à venir en Alberta et à demander la permission aux peuples autochtones de toutes les provinces, à leur demander ce que signifie pour eux un organisme national chargé de la mise en œuvre des appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, et à le faire d'une manière publique et transparente, afin que les Canadiens puissent se joindre à la conversation. À l'heure actuelle, tout cela se passe à huis clos. Les Canadiens ne savent pas ce qui se passe, à l'instar de nombreux Autochtones.
Je sais que mon temps de parole est limité et que j'aurai plus tard une autre occasion de m'exprimer à ce sujet. Je veux simplement m'assurer que nous pourrons faire ce travail au comité. J'encourage le gouvernement à travailler avec les députés de l'opposition pour y parvenir.
Collapse
View Mélanie Joly Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Mélanie Joly Profile
2022-06-16 10:14 [p.6777]
Expand
moved:
That, in accordance with subsection 53(1) of the Privacy Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-21, and pursuant to Standing Order 111.1(2), the House approve the appointment of Philippe Dufresne as Privacy Commissioner, for a term of seven years.
propose:
Que, conformément au paragraphe 53(1) de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, L.R.C., 1985, ch. P-21, et conformément à l'article 111.1(2) du Règlement, la Chambre approuve la nomination de Philippe Dufresne à titre de commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, pour un mandat de sept ans.
Collapse
View Steven MacKinnon Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Steven MacKinnon Profile
2022-06-16 10:14 [p.6777]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I ask that the vote be deferred to immediately after the time provided for Oral Questions today, in accordance with Standing Order 45(7).
Madame la Présidente, je demande que le vote soit reporté à la fin de la période prévue pour les questions orales aujourd'hui, conformément à l'article 45(7) du Règlement.
Collapse
View Joyce Murray Profile
Lib. (BC)
View Joyce Murray Profile
2022-06-16 10:30 [p.6780]
Expand
moved that Bill C-9, An Act to amend the Judges Act, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
propose que le projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2022-06-16 10:30 [p.6780]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to rise to Bill C-9, an act to amend the Judges Act. I want to acknowledge that I am speaking today on the traditional unceded lands of the Algonquin people.
As lawmakers, it is our cherished responsibility to see to the good stewardship of our justice system. It is also our responsibility to ensure that traditional independence, a principle that lies at the heart of that system, is safeguarded and preserved. These responsibilities go hand in hand. An independent court system, in which every Canadian has confidence that their rights will be protected and that the laws of our country will be enforced with honour and integrity, is the lifeblood of our constitutional democracy. Public confidence in the courts is essential to public confidence in the rule of law, and public confidence depends not only on the status and strength of our courts as institutions but on the integrity of the judges who occupy them.
I rise today to address a matter that engages this responsibility directly: the reform of Canada's system for investigating allegations of misconduct against federally appointed judges. It is tempting to take these observations for granted, but the reality is that they are the product of sustained vigilance and effort. Our institutions are strong because we take care to respect and nourish them. Our judiciary is strong because its members strive continuously to better serve Canadians and hold themselves to the most stringent standards of integrity, impartiality and professionalism.
Canada's superior court judiciary, which includes the judges of the Federal Court and Supreme Court of Canada as well the judges of all provincial and territorial superior courts, enjoys an unparalleled reputation for excellence. Allegations of misconduct against members of the federal judiciary are rare, and allegations so serious that removal from judicial office may be warranted are rarer still. Nevertheless, an effective process for reviewing those few allegations that arise constitutes an integral part of our justice system and helps to secure a cornerstore of the rule of law, which is public confidence in the integrity of justice.
According to our constitutional separation of powers, the judiciary itself must play a leading role in safeguarding the integrity of its members. Since 1971, the Judges Act has empowered its members, the chief justices and associate chief justices of Canada's superior courts, acting through the Canadian Judicial Council, or CJC, to receive and investigate complaints regarding the conduct of superior court judges and to report their findings and recommendations to the Minister of Justice. Only then does it fall to the minister to decide whether to seek removal of a judge. It is a decision that requires ratification by Parliament and an address to the Governor General under section 99(1) of the Constitution Act, 1867.
This power is tempered by the constitutional principle of judicial independence, and the security of tenure it affords to every superior court judge in the absence of their proven incapacity or misconduct.
Recently, the gap between these broader changes and the conduct process prescribed under the Judges Act has grown acute, bringing into jeopardy the public confidence that this process is meant to secure. Allowing the judiciary to regulate the conduct of their own members in this manner is entirely appropriate. It rightly safeguards the courts against interference by the political branches, ensuring that judges can protect the Constitution and the rights of Canadians without fear of reprisal.
While Canadians can thus have confidence in judicial leadership and control over investigations into judicial conduct, the legislative framework that enables this leadership has remained unchanged since 1971. This is despite vast changes to the legal and social landscapes in which the framework must operate.
The most serious judicial conduct cases, and those that attract the greatest public attention through the inquiry committee process, are notoriously long and costly, and are beset with parallel court challenges that take years to resolve. One of these is the length and cost of judicial conduct proceedings. As federal administrative tribunals, inquiry committees constituted by the CJC are reviewable first in the Federal Court, then by the Federal Court of Appeal and then possibly the Supreme Court of Canada.
This gives a judge who is subject to the process an opportunity to initiate as many as three stages of judicial review. This was seen recently in the case of former Justice Girouard.
Because the Judges Act lacks alternatives to full-scale divisional inquiries, all cases that raise valid concerns regardless of their gravity are forced into a procedurally complex, public and adversarial inquiry mechanism. At the conclusion of that mechanism, rather than allowing an inquiry committee to report directly to the minister, the Judges Act requires that a report and recommendation be submitted by the CJC as a whole.
The fact that judicial independence warrants the provision of publicly funded counsel to a judge has meant that in some cases, lawyers have collected millions of dollars in fees for launching exhaustive legal challenges that are ultimately proven to be without merit. The public is rightly outraged by this lack of efficiency and accountability in a process carried out in its name. The situation demands correction.
In other words, a body of at least 17 chief justices and associate chief justices from across Canada who have not had any direct involvement in the scrutiny of a given case must review the work of an inquiry committee and decide whether or not to recommend a judge's removal to the minister. This process is burdensome, inefficient and costly. Rather than having confidence that concerns about judicial conduct will receive a fair and effective resolution, Canadians see this process as duplicating features of procedural complexity and the adversarial model that can be so alienating in the justice system at large.
Another shortcoming of the current process is that the Judges Act empowers the CJC only to recommend for or against the removal of a judge. There are no lesser sanctions available. As a result, instances of misconduct may fail to be sanctioned because they do not warrant removal. There is also a risk that judges may be exposed to full-scale inquiry proceedings and to the stigma of having their removal publicly considered for conduct that is more sensibly addressed by alternative procedures and lesser sanctions.
The bill before us would thus comprehensively reform and modernize the judicial conduct process while honouring a fundamental commitment to fairness, independence and procedural rigour. Allow me to offer a brief summary emphasizing the objectives that the bill is intended to achieve.
First and foremost, the bill would streamline the judicial conduct process. It would replace the current availability of judicial review with an efficient internal appeal mechanism for judges whose conduct has been found lacking by a hearing or a review panel. In other words, rather than allowing judges to step outside the process and launch multiple court challenges that can interrupt and delay proceedings for years, the reformed process would include its own internal system of review to ensure the fairness and integrity of any findings made against a judge.
At the conclusion of the hearings process and before the report on removal is issued to the minister, both the judge whose conduct is being examined and the lawyer responsible for presenting the case against them would be entitled to appeal the outcome to an appeal panel. Rather than making CJC hearings subject to external review by multiple levels of court with the resulting costs and delays, the new process would include a fair, efficient and coherent appeal mechanism internal to the process itself.
A five-judge appeal panel would hold public hearings akin to those of an appellate court and have all the powers it needs to effectively address any shortcomings in the hearing panel's process. Once it has reached a decision, the only remaining recourse available to the judge and to presenting counsel would be to seek leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada. Entrusting process oversight to the Supreme Court would reinforce public confidence and avoid lengthy judicial review proceedings through several levels of court.
These steps on appeal would be governed by strict deadlines, and any outcomes reached would form part of the report and the recommendations ultimately made to the Minister of Justice. In addition to giving confidence in the integrity of judicial conduct proceedings, these reforms are expected to reduce the length of proceedings by a matter of years.
This would avoid situations we have seen in the past where repeated appeals to the Federal Court have drawn the process out to obscene lengths.
The new process would also provide opportunities for early resolution of conduct complaints, avoiding the need in many instances to resort to adversarial public hearings. Rather than treating all cases as though they might warrant judicial removal, the CJC would be empowered to impose alternate remedies that were proportionate to the conduct at issue and better tailored to the public interest. The public at large would be better represented in these proceedings with the bill codifying a place for public representatives in the review of complaint processes.
For example, it may require a judge to take a continuing education course or apologize for the harm caused by their misconduct.
As far as conduct that warrants judicial removal is concerned, the bill requires that robust public hearings be held. The bill includes a role that will allow the presenting counsel to act as a public prosecutor in presenting a case against a judge. What is more, the judge will have ample opportunity to provide responses and present a defence with the assistance of their own lawyer.
If the hearing panel recommends the judge's removal, those recommendations will be sent to the Minister of Justice subject only to the disposition of the appeal. It will not be necessary for the entire Canadian Judicial Council to take part in the process.
These steps alone would render the judicial conduct process more flexible, timely and efficient without compromising fairness or investigative rigour. In doing so, it would also render the process less costly, more accessible and more accountable to Canadians.
Beyond mere process reforms, the bill would introduce a stable funding mechanism to support the CJC's role in investigating judicial conduct and one appropriate to the constitutionally imperative nature of this duty. It would also add safeguards requiring that the responsible officials establish guidelines consistent with government-wide standards for the administration of public funds, that the administration of those funds be subject to regular audits, and that the results of those audits be made available in public reports. This combination of financial accountability and transparency is critical in ensuring public confidence in the judicial conduct process, and it is overdue.
The provisions established in the appropriation clearly limit the categories of expenses it captures to those required to hold public hearings. Moreover, these would be subject to regulations made by the Governor in Council. Planned regulations include limiting how much lawyers involved in the process can bill, and limiting judges who are subject to proceedings to one principal lawyer. The bill also would require that the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs make guidelines affixing or providing for the determination of any fees, allowances and expenses that may be reimbursed and that are not specifically addressed by the regulations. These guidelines must be consistent with any Treasury Board directives pertaining to similar costs, and any difference must be publicly justified.
Finally, the bill would require that a mandatory independent review be completed every five years into all costs paid through the statutory appropriation. The independent reviewer would report to the Minister of Justice, the Commissioner and the chair of the CJC. The report would assess the efficacy of all applicable policies establishing financial controls and would be made public. Taken together, these measures would bring a new level of fiscal accountability to judicial conduct costs, while replacing the cumbersome and ad hoc funding approach currently in place.
All of these reforms were informed by an extensive process of public consultation. In addition to hearing from Canadians, academic experts and members of the legal profession, the government has had a sustained engagement with two judicial organizations in particular: the CJC and the Canadian Superior Courts Judges Association.
The government is deeply grateful for the commitment of these organizations to supporting reform and sharing their perspectives and expertise in a spirit of respectful collaboration with officials from the Department of Justice Canada. I know that passage of these reforms is of the highest priority to judicial leaders, and the government is committed to answering their rightful requests for legislation that would support them in fulfilling their critical role.
I will conclude simply by recommending to my colleagues that we seize the opportunity to renew an institution that is vital to the trust that Canadians place in their justice system. I am convinced that Canada has the strongest justice system in the world, in no small part because we have the most exceptional and committed judiciary in the world. That reality is not inevitable, but it is the result of our sustained commitment and effort to keeping our institutions healthy and keeping our judiciary independent and strong.
Let us renew these commitments again with the passage of this legislation. I look forward to our deliberation and debate.
Madame la Présidente, j'ai le plaisir de prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges. Je tiens à souligner que je prends la parole aujourd'hui sur les terres ancestrales non cédées du peuple algonquin.
En tant que législateurs, nous avons la responsabilité importante de voir à la bonne gouvernance du système de justice. Il nous incombe aussi de veiller à ce que l'indépendance traditionnelle, élément central de ce système, soit protégée et maintenue. Ces responsabilités vont de pair. C'est ce système judiciaire indépendant qui est le moteur de notre démocratie constitutionnelle, car il procure aux Canadiens la certitude que leurs droits seront protégés et que les lois du pays seront appliquées avec honneur et intégrité. Il est essentiel que le public ait confiance dans les tribunaux pour qu'il ait aussi confiance dans la primauté du droit, et cette confiance du public dépend non seulement du statut et de la solidité de nos tribunaux en tant qu'institutions, mais aussi de l'intégrité des juges qui y siègent.
Je prends la parole pour traiter d’une question qui se rapporte directement à cette responsabilité: la réforme du système canadien d’enquête sur les allégations d’inconduite contre les juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral. Il est tentant de tenir ce système pour acquis. Il ne faut pas oublier qu’il est le fruit d’une vigilance et d’un effort soutenus. Nos institutions sont fortes parce que nous les respectons et nous les nourrissons. Notre magistrature est forte parce que ses membres cherchent constamment à mieux servir les Canadiens et à respecter les normes d’intégrité, d’impartialité et de professionnalisme les plus rigoureuses.
La magistrature des cours supérieures du Canada, qui comprend les juges de la Cour fédérale et de la Cour suprême du Canada, ainsi que les juges de toutes les cours supérieures provinciales et territoriales, jouit d’une réputation d’excellence inégalée. Les allégations d’inconduite contre des membres de la magistrature fédérale sont rares, et les allégations suffisamment graves pour justifier la révocation de la fonction judiciaire sont encore plus rares. Néanmoins, un processus efficace d’examen de ces rares allégations fait partie intégrante de notre système de justice et contribue à garantir un élément essentiel de la primauté du droit, à savoir la confiance du public dans l’intégrité de la justice.
Conformément à la séparation des pouvoirs prévue dans la Constitution, le système judiciaire joue un rôle de premier plan dans la protection de l’intégrité de ses membres. Depuis 1971, la Loi sur les juges habilite ses membres, soit les juges en chef et les juges en chef adjoints des cours supérieures du Canada, à recevoir et à examiner, par l’entremise du Conseil canadien de la magistrature, les plaintes concernant la conduite de juges des cours supérieures et à faire rapport de leurs conclusions et recommandations au ministre de la Justice. Ce n’est qu’ensuite qu’il revient au ministre de décider s’il faut demander la révocation d’un juge. Cette décision doit être ratifiée par le Parlement et transmise au gouverneur général conformément au paragraphe 99(1) de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867.
Ce pouvoir est tempéré par le principe constitutionnel de l’indépendance de la magistrature et de l’inamovibilité conférée à tout juge d’une cour supérieure en l’absence d’incapacité ou d’inconduite avérée.
Récemment, l’écart entre ces changements globaux et le processus d’examen de la conduite prévu dans la Loi sur les juges s’est accentué, ce qui met en péril la confiance du public que ce processus est censé garantir. Il est tout à fait approprié de permettre à la magistrature de régir ainsi la conduite de ses propres membres. Cela protège à juste titre les tribunaux contre l’ingérence du politique et permet ainsi aux juges de protéger la Constitution et les droits des Canadiens sans crainte de représailles.
Si les Canadiens peuvent donc avoir confiance dans le leadership et le contrôle judiciaires des enquêtes sur la conduite des juges, le cadre législatif qui permet ce leadership n’a pas changé depuis 1971, et ce, malgré les vastes changements apportés au paysage juridique et social dans lequel ce cadre doit fonctionner.
Les affaires d’inconduite des juges les plus graves, et celles qui attirent le plus l’attention du public par l’entremise du processus du comité d’enquête, sont notoirement longues et coûteuses, et font l'objet de contestations judiciaires parallèles qui prennent des années à trancher. La longueur et le coût des procédures relatives à la conduite des juges en sont un exemple. En tant que tribunaux administratifs fédéraux, les comités d’enquête constitués par le CCM peuvent être contrôlés d’abord par la Cour fédérale, puis par la Cour d’appel fédérale et, éventuellement, par la Cour suprême du Canada.
Ainsi, un juge visé par un processus peut se prévaloir d'un maximum de trois étapes de contrôle judiciaire. On l’a vu récemment dans l’affaire de l’ancien juge Girouard.
Étant donné que la Loi sur les juges ne prévoit pas d’autres solutions que les enquêtes divisionnaires à grande échelle, tous les cas qui soulèvent des préoccupations valables, quelle qu’en soit la gravité, sont soumis à un mécanisme d’enquête publique et accusatoire à la procédure complexe. Aux termes de ce mécanisme, au lieu de permettre à un comité d’enquête de faire directement rapport au ministre, la Loi sur les juges exige qu’un rapport et une recommandation soient soumis par le CCM dans son ensemble.
Le fait que l’indépendance de la magistrature justifie la mise à disposition à un juge d’un avocat financé par des fonds publics signifie que, dans certains cas, des avocats ont touché des millions de dollars en honoraires pour lancer des constatations judiciaires exhaustives qui se sont révélées sans fondement. Le public est à juste titre indigné par ce manque d’efficacité et de responsabilisation dans un processus mené en son nom. La situation doit être corrigée.
Autrement dit, un organe composé d’au moins 17 juges en chef et juges en chef adjoints de partout au Canada qui n’ont pas directement participé à l’examen d’un dossier donné doit contrôler le travail d’un comité d’enquête et décider de recommander ou non au ministre de révoquer un juge. Ce processus est lourd, inefficace et coûteux. Au lieu de croire que les préoccupations relatives à la conduite de juges seront résolues avec équité et efficacité, les Canadiens considèrent que ce processus reproduit les caractéristiques de la complexité procédurale et du modèle accusatoire qui peuvent être si aliénantes dans le système de justice en général.
Une autre lacune du processus actuel est que la Loi sur les juges habilite le CCM seulement à recommander la révocation d’un juge ou à s’y opposer. Aucune sanction moins sévère n’est prévue. Par conséquent, certains cas d’inconduite peuvent ne pas être sanctionnés parce qu’ils ne justifient pas la révocation. Il y a également un risque que les juges soient exposés à des procédures d’enquête à grande échelle et à ce que leur révocation soit envisagée publiquement, avec les conséquences que cela suppose pour leur réputation, pour une conduite qu’il serait plus raisonnable de traiter par d’autres procédures et des sanctions moins sévères.
Le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis réformerait et moderniserait donc en profondeur le processus d’examen de la conduite des juges tout en respectant l’engagement fondamental d’équité, d’indépendance et de rigueur procédurale. Je vais présenter un bref résumé mettant en évidence les objectifs du projet de loi.
D’abord et avant tout, le projet de loi simplifierait le processus judiciaire. Il remplacerait l’actuel contrôle judiciaire par un mécanisme d’appel interne efficace dans le cas des juges dont la conduite a été jugée déficiente à l’occasion d’une audience ou par un comité d’examen. Autrement dit, plutôt que de permettre aux juges de se retirer du processus et de lancer de multiples contestations judiciaires susceptibles d’interrompre les procédures et de les retarder pendant des années, le processus réformé comporterait son propre système d’examen interne visant à garantir l’équité et l’intégrité de toute conclusion tirée contre un juge.
À la fin du processus d’audience et avant que le rapport sur le renvoi ne soit remis au ministre, le juge dont la conduite fait l’objet de l’examen et l’avocat chargé de présenter la preuve contre lui auraient le droit d’interjeter appel devant un comité d’appel. Plutôt que de soumettre les audiences du CCM à un examen externe par de multiples paliers de tribunaux, avec les coûts et les retards qui en découlent, le nouveau processus comprendrait un mécanisme d’appel équitable, efficace et cohérent interne au processus.
Un comité d’appel composé de cinq juges tiendrait des audiences publiques semblables à celles d’une cour d’appel et disposerait de tous les pouvoirs nécessaires pour combler efficacement les lacunes du processus d’audience. Une fois que ce comité aurait rendu sa décision, le juge et l’avocat de l’accusation n’auraient plus pour seul recours que de demander l’autorisation d’interjeter appel devant la Cour suprême du Canada. Le fait de confier la surveillance du processus à la Cour suprême permettrait de renforcer la confiance du public et d’éviter les longues procédures de contrôle judiciaire devant plusieurs paliers de tribunaux.
Ces étapes en appel seraient soumises à des délais stricts, et les résultats obtenus feraient partie du rapport et des recommandations ultimement présentés au ministre de la Justice. Outre qu’elles donneraient confiance dans l’intégrité des procédures judiciaires, ces réformes devraient réduire la durée des procédures de quelques années.
Cela éviterait des situations comme celles que nous avons vues dans le passé, où des appels répétés à la Cour fédérale ont rallongé le processus de façon scandaleuse.
Le nouveau processus offrirait également des possibilités de règlement rapide des plaintes pour inconduite, ce qui éviterait, dans bien des cas, de recourir à des audiences publiques antagonistes. Plutôt que de traiter tous les cas comme s’ils pouvaient justifier une révocation judiciaire, le CCM aurait le pouvoir d’imposer d’autres recours proportionnels à la conduite en cause et mieux adaptés à l’intérêt public. Le public en général serait mieux représenté dans ces délibérations si le projet de loi codifiait une place pour des représentants du public dans l’examen des processus de plainte.
Par exemple, il pourrait imposer à un juge de suivre une formation continue ou de présenter des excuses pour les torts causés par son inconduite.
En ce qui concerne les affaires qui pourraient donner lieu à la révocation d'un juge, le projet de loi exige la tenue d'audiences publiques robustes. Le projet de loi inclut un rôle qui va permettre à l'avocat désigné de présenter une affaire contre un juge à la manière d'un procureur public. En outre, le juge aura amplement l'occasion de donner des réponses et de présenter une défense à l'aide de son propre avocat.
Si le comité d'audience recommande la révocation d'un juge, ces recommandations vont être transmises au ministre de la Justice sous réserve seulement du règlement des appels. Il ne sera pas nécessaire que l'ensemble du Conseil canadien de la magistrature participe au processus.
À elles seules, ces mesures rendraient le processus d'enquête sur la conduite des juges plus souple, rapide et efficace sans compromettre l’équité ou la rigueur de l’enquête. Ce faisant, le processus serait moins coûteux, plus accessible et plus responsable envers les Canadiens.
Au-delà de la simple réforme des processus, le projet de loi instaurerait un mécanisme de financement stable pour appuyer le rôle du Conseil canadien de la magistrature dans les enquêtes sur la conduite des juges et un mécanisme adapté à la nature impérative de cette obligation sur le plan constitutionnel. Il ajouterait également des mesures de protection exigeant que les fonctionnaires responsables établissent des lignes directrices conformes aux normes pangouvernementales en matière d’administration des fonds publics, que l’administration de ces fonds fasse l’objet d’audits réguliers et que les résultats de ces audits soient rendus publics. Cette combinaison de responsabilité financière et de transparence est essentielle pour assurer la confiance du public dans le processus d'enquête sur la conduite des juges, et elle se fait attendre depuis longtemps.
Les dispositions établies dans la mesure portant affectation de crédits limitent clairement les catégories de dépenses visées à celles qui sont nécessaires pour tenir des audiences publiques. De plus, elles seraient assujetties aux règlements pris par le gouverneur en conseil. Les règlements prévus limitent le montant que les avocats participant au processus peuvent facturer, et les juges qui font l’objet de procédures sont limités à un avocat principal. Le projet de loi obligerait également le commissaire à la magistrature fédérale à établir des lignes directrices fixant ou prévoyant la détermination des honoraires, indemnités et dépenses qui peuvent être remboursés et qui ne sont pas expressément visés par les règlements. Ces lignes directrices doivent être conformes aux directives du Conseil du Trésor s’appliquant à des coûts semblables, et tout écart doit être justifié publiquement.
Enfin, le projet de loi exigerait qu’un examen indépendant obligatoire soit effectué tous les cinq ans pour tous les coûts payés au moyen du crédit législatif. L’examinateur indépendant relèverait du ministre de la Justice, du commissaire et du président du Conseil canadien de la magistrature. Le rapport évaluerait l’efficacité de toutes les politiques applicables établissant des contrôles financiers et serait rendu public. Ensemble, ces mesures établiraient un nouveau niveau de responsabilité financière à l’égard des coûts d’enquête sur la conduite des juges, tout en remplaçant l’approche de financement fastidieuse et ponctuelle actuellement en place.
Toutes ces réformes ont été éclairées par un vaste processus de consultation publique. En plus d’entendre le point de vue de Canadiens, d’universitaires et de membres de la profession juridique, le gouvernement a entretenu un dialogue soutenu avec deux organisations judiciaires en particulier, soit le Conseil canadien de la magistrature et l’Association canadienne des juges des cours supérieures.
Le gouvernement est profondément reconnaissant de l’engagement de ces organisations à appuyer la réforme et à partager leurs points de vue et leur expertise dans un esprit de collaboration respectueuse avec les fonctionnaires du ministère de la Justice du Canada. Je sais que l’adoption de ces réformes est de la plus haute priorité pour les dirigeants judiciaires, et le gouvernement est déterminé à répondre à leurs demandes légitimes de mesures législatives qui les aideraient à remplir leur rôle essentiel.
Je conclurai simplement en recommandant à mes collègues de saisir l’occasion de renouveler une institution essentielle à la confiance que les Canadiens accordent à leur système de justice. Je suis convaincu que le Canada a le système de justice le plus solide au monde, en grande partie parce que nous avons la magistrature la plus exceptionnelle et la plus engagée au monde. Cette réalité n’est pas inévitable, mais elle est le résultat de notre engagement et de nos efforts soutenus pour maintenir nos institutions en santé et maintenir notre magistrature indépendante et forte.
Renouvelons ces engagements en adoptant ce projet de loi. J’attends avec impatience nos délibérations et notre débat.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 10:47 [p.6782]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I listened intently to the parliamentary secretary's speech, but I am concerned with the timing. This bill has sat dormant for so long and is now being brought forward just before we go into summer. It brings me to another issue. We cannot talk about the judicial process or the justice system without speaking about victims and the unique place they have. They are often overlooked, I am afraid.
I would like the parliamentary secretary to comment on the fact that the position of victims ombudsman has remained vacant for far too long. It was supposed to be filled back in October. I wonder if he could comment on the process for that and why it has not been filled to date.
Madame la Présidente, j’ai écouté attentivement le discours du secrétaire parlementaire, mais le moment choisi pour présenter ce projet de loi m’inquiète un peu, parce qu’il est en veilleuse depuis très longtemps. On le présente maintenant juste avant le début de l’été. Cela m’amène à une autre question. Nous ne pouvons pas parler du processus judiciaire ou du système de justice sans parler des victimes et de la place très particulière qu’elles occupent. Elles sont souvent négligées, malheureusement.
J’aimerais que le secrétaire parlementaire nous dise ce qu’il pense du fait que le poste d’ombudsman des victimes est vacant depuis bien trop longtemps. Il devait être pourvu en octobre. Je me demande si notre collègue pourrait nous expliquer le processus et nous dire pourquoi ce poste n’est pas encore pourvu.
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2022-06-16 10:48 [p.6782]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I appreciate my colleague. I work with him at the justice committee and always appreciate his interventions, but I am a little perplexed as to why we are not talking about the bill itself and are speaking about issues that are ancillary to the bill.
With respect to the bill itself, there is a process allowing different parties to be involved in the process. Ours is an outdated way of reviewing judges' conduct. It is 51 years old, to be exact. We look forward to a proper debate on this. We introduced this bill back in December of last year, and obviously our legislative calendar has been extensive. It has included the passage of Bill C-5, which we were able to get through yesterday. We are very much committed to moving this bill forward.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue. Je travaille avec lui au comité de la justice et j’apprécie toujours ses interventions. Toutefois, je suis un peu perplexe de constater qu’il ne parle pas du projet de loi lui-même et qu’il invoque des enjeux secondaires.
En ce qui concerne le projet de loi lui-même, le processus permet à différents intervenants d’y participer. Notre façon d’examiner la conduite des juges est désuète. Elle date exactement de 51 ans. Nous attendons avec impatience la tenue d’un débat en bonne et due forme à ce sujet. Nous avons présenté ce projet de loi en décembre dernier, et il est évident que notre calendrier législatif est très chargé. Il comprend l’étude du projet de loi C‑5, que nous avons pu faire adopter hier. Nous sommes déterminés à faire avancer le projet de loi à l'étude.
Collapse
View Jean-Denis Garon Profile
BQ (QC)
View Jean-Denis Garon Profile
2022-06-16 10:48 [p.6782]
Expand
Madam Speaker, everyone has heard about the case of Justice Girouard, who committed wrongdoing two weeks before his appointment in 2010. After all the appeals, his sanctions process took 10 years. I am wondering if the timeline could be tightened up drastically through the changes proposed by the Bill C-9. That would improve public confidence in the justice system.
I would also like to know whether my hon. colleague believes that the federal government will be able to make significant savings in this process, which is often too long and complex and, at times, undermines the confidence of Quebeckers and Canadians in the justice system.
Madame la Présidente, nous avons tous entendu parler du cas du juge Girouard, qui avait commis des actes répréhensibles deux semaines avant sa nomination en 2010, et pour qui le processus de sanctions, après toutes les procédures d'appel, avait duré 10 ans. J'aimerais savoir si, en vertu des changements qui seront opérés par le projet de loi C‑9, on sera en mesure de raccourcir substantiellement ces délais, de façon à améliorer la confiance du public dans le système de justice.
Par ailleurs, j'aimerais savoir si mon honorable collègue est d'avis que le gouvernement fédéral sera en mesure de faire des économies importantes dans ce processus, qui est souvent trop long et complexe et qui mine parfois la confiance des Québécois et des Canadiens dans le système de justice.
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2022-06-16 10:49 [p.6783]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I fully agree with my colleague. We have heard from the Canadian Judicial Council about the delays, and we have heard the frustration from the public about the delays. One of the things this bill tries to do is streamline the process, make it more efficient and make it more cost-effective to ensure justice is served in a timely manner.
We have an incredible justice system and incredible judiciary, but for the odd time when there is a lapse, it is important to have continued public confidence in our system. We are grateful for the support of my friend opposite.
Madame la Présidente, je suis tout à fait d’accord avec mon collègue. Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature nous a mentionné ces retards, et le public nous a fait part de sa frustration. L’un des objectifs du projet de loi est de simplifier le processus, de le rendre plus efficient et moins coûteux pour que justice soit rendue sans tarder.
Nous avons un système de justice et une magistrature incroyables, mais malgré les rares fois où le système fait défaut, il est important que le public continue à lui faire confiance. Nous sommes reconnaissants de l’appui de mon collègue d’en face.
Collapse
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2022-06-16 10:50 [p.6783]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank the hon. parliamentary secretary for setting out so clearly the legislation before us. It has obviously been delayed, and we obviously need to update the Canadian Judicial Council. I hope he will not mind if I stray from what the bill would do and ask if the government would be prepared to expand it to what judges do after they retire.
I am personally very concerned that Supreme Court of Canada judges, upon retirement, are available for hire to private sector lobby interests, and that the advice they provide is bought and paid for. I think of those who have worked for SNC-Lavalin, as an example. They really should be precluded from taking private sector work after leaving the bench.
I wonder if the hon. parliamentary secretary has heard of any current discussions of whether that might be a good idea.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le secrétaire parlementaire d’avoir exposé si clairement le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis. De toute évidence, il a été retardé, et il est bien évident que nous devons moderniser le Conseil canadien de la magistrature. J’espère qu’il ne m’en voudra pas de m’écarter du débat sur le projet de loi et de demander si le gouvernement serait disposé à étendre la portée de ce projet de loi aux juges retraités.
Je suis personnellement très préoccupée par le fait que les juges de la Cour suprême du Canada, à leur retraite, peuvent être embauchés par des lobbyistes du secteur privé et que les conseils qu’ils fournissent sont achetés et payés. Je pense à ceux qui ont travaillé pour SNC-Lavalin, par exemple. Il faudrait vraiment les empêcher d’accepter du travail dans le secteur privé après avoir quitté la magistrature.
Je me demande si le secrétaire parlementaire a déjà entendu des discussions sur cette question.
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2022-06-16 10:51 [p.6783]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I look forward to speaking to my colleague about this issue further. However, what she has cited is not the subject of this particular bill. This bill is focused on the reform of the complaints process to make sure that it is fair, it is efficient, it is expedient and it is cost-effective. Of course, for any other issues relating to judges, I look forward to talking to any member about their concerns, and I will take them back to the minister.
Madame la Présidente, je suis impatient de discuter plus à fond de cette question avec ma collègue. Toutefois, ce qu’elle vient de dire ne fait pas l’objet de ce projet de loi. Ce projet de loi porte sur la réforme du processus de traitement des plaintes pour s’assurer qu’il est juste, efficace, rapide et rentable. Bien sûr, pour toute autre question concernant les juges, je suis disposé à entendre les préoccupations de n’importe quel député et à les transmettre au ministre.
Collapse
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
2022-06-16 10:52 [p.6783]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank the parliamentary secretary for once again laying out what the bill intends to do.
I found it quite interesting that the first question he got from the Conservatives was about timing and why it is taking so long, as though the Conservatives have not been here to witness the antics they have been up to for the last five or six months. Our fall economic statement did not get voted on until late spring because of Conservative shenanigans. I am pretty certain that even if the Conservatives completely agreed with every part of this bill, they would still not let is pass through the House for no reason other than just to be obstructive.
The member is the parliamentary secretary for a ministry that has introduced a lot of legislation in the last few months. I wonder if he can comment a bit on the frustration that he sees with respect to moving legislation through the House.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le secrétaire parlementaire d’avoir exposé à nouveau l’intention du projet de loi.
J’ai trouvé très intéressant que la première question que lui ont posée les conservateurs portait sur le moment choisi pour déposer le projet de loi et la raison de ce long délai, comme si les conservateurs n’avaient pas été témoins des bouffonneries auxquelles ils se livrent ici depuis cinq ou six mois. Notre énoncé économique de l’automne n’a été soumis au vote qu’à la fin du printemps à cause des manigances des conservateurs. Je suis presque certain que, même s’ils étaient tout à fait d’accord avec l’ensemble de ce projet de loi, les conservateurs ne laisseraient pas la Chambre l’adopter, uniquement pour faire de l’obstruction.
Le député est secrétaire parlementaire auprès d’un ministère qui a présenté beaucoup de projets de loi au cours des derniers mois. J’aimerais qu’il nous parle un peu de la frustration qu’il ressent quand il propose un projet de loi à la Chambre.
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2022-06-16 10:53 [p.6783]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I ran on a platform of hope and hard work, and we have been working very hard with a great deal of optimism to bring forward legislation.
While I concur with my friend on the many obstructionist tactics of the opposition, I do want to say that there were moments when we came together. The motion on amendments to the Saskatchewan Act is an example of that, and I congratulate my friend opposite.
I believe this is a bill that we can all come together on and get passed right away.
Madame la Président, j’ai fait campagne en promettant de donner de l’espoir et de travailler avec acharnement. Nous avons travaillé d’arrache-pied et avec beaucoup d’optimisme pour présenter des projets de loi.
Bien que je sois d’accord avec mon collègue au sujet des nombreuses tactiques d’obstruction de l’opposition, je tiens toutefois à dire qu’à certains moments, nous avons été sur la même longueur d’onde. La motion visant à modifier la Loi sur la Saskatchewan en est un exemple, et j’en félicite mon collègue d’en face.
Je crois que nous pouvons tous nous entendre sur ce projet de loi et l’adopter immédiatement.
Collapse
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2022-06-16 10:53 [p.6783]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I notice that the two Liberals who have gotten up in the House to speak about the bill and ask questions have resiled from a discussion about victims. My colleague for Fundy Royal specifically asked a question on how victims are implicated by the bill and how they would benefit from an improved complaints process. However, all they did, both the parliamentary secretary and my colleague from Kingston and the Islands, was deflect. They do not want to talk about victims; they want to talk about something else.
Could the hon. member please explain to the House how victims will benefit from this legislation? At the end of the day, we are talking about judges, the ones who render judgment in many criminal cases across this country, and it is the victims of crime who are often left hanging and fall through the cracks.
Madame la Présidente, je constate que les deux libéraux qui se sont levés à la Chambre pour parler du projet de loi et poser des questions ont esquivé une question sur les victimes. Mon collègue de Fundy Royal a posé une question pour savoir quelle est l’incidence du projet de loi sur les victimes et comment ces dernières pourraient profiter d’un meilleur processus de traitement des plaintes. Tout ce qu’ils ont fait, autant le secrétaire parlementaire que mon collègue de Kingston et les Îles, a été de détourner l’attention. Ils ne veulent pas parler des victimes, ils changent de sujet.
Le député pourrait-il expliquer à la Chambre comment les victimes profiteront de cette mesure législative? Au bout du compte, nous parlons de juges, de ceux qui rendent des jugements dans de nombreuses affaires criminelles dans ce pays, et ce sont souvent les victimes d’actes criminels qui sont laissées pour compte.
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2022-06-16 10:54 [p.6783]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I appreciate my friend's question, and I want to remind him that the Conservative Party does not have exclusivity on protecting victims. I think all of us in the House absolutely have a responsibility there, and we are very much committed to ensuring that the voices of those who are particularly impacted are heard.
Bill C-9 would allow for complaints to come forward, including from victims and other actors within the overall justice system. The bill would make it easier for these complaints to go through the process so they will not have to wait seven, eight or 10 years. They would be dealt with expeditiously. The levels of appeal that are available currently would be curtailed so that the process is more efficient.
I fundamentally believe that this would enhance the confidence that Canadians have, including victims, in coming forward with complaints. What we want to do is establish the space for people to come forward and have confidence that they can complain and still get a fair hearing in a timely manner.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député de sa question, et je tiens à lui rappeler que le Parti conservateur n’a pas l’exclusivité de la protection des victimes. Il me semble que nous tous à la Chambre avons assurément une responsabilité à cet égard, et nous sommes fermement résolus à faire en sorte que les personnes les plus touchées soient entendues.
Le projet de loi C‑9 permettrait que des plaintes soient déposées, notamment par des victimes et d’autres acteurs du système judiciaire dans son ensemble. Grâce au projet de loi, ces plaintes seraient traitées plus rapidement, de sorte que les parties n’auraient pas attendre sept, huit ou dix ans. Les plaintes seraient traitées sans tarder. Les niveaux d’appel actuels seraient réduits pour que le processus soit plus efficace.
Je suis convaincu que les Canadiens, y compris les victimes, se sentiraient plus confiants pour porter plainte. Nous voulons créer un espace qui permet aux citoyens de se manifester en sachant qu’ils peuvent porter plainte et qu’ils seront entendus rapidement et de manière impartiale.
Collapse
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
2022-06-16 10:56 [p.6784]
Expand
Madam Speaker, on the question of timing, I have to note that one thing that helps governments accomplish their legislative priorities is time. In the last Parliament, the Prime Minister chose to call an election needlessly when all the opposition parties pledged not to cause an election. I wonder how these priorities factor into the decision-making of the government, and how the Liberals can call it a priority when they showed that they were so clearly willing to put what they thought were their partisan interests ahead of the priorities in the bill.
Madame la Présidente, sur la question du moment, je me dois de souligner qu’il y a une chose qui aide les gouvernements à réaliser leurs priorités législatives et c’est le temps. Au cours de la dernière législature, le premier ministre a choisi de déclencher inutilement des élections, alors que tous les partis d’opposition s’étaient engagés à ne pas en provoquer. Je me demande quelle place ces priorités occupent dans le processus décisionnel du gouvernement et comment les libéraux peuvent parler de priorité, alors qu’ils ont montré qu’ils étaient manifestement prêts à faire passer ce qu’ils pensent être leurs intérêts partisans avant les priorités énoncées dans le projet de loi.
Collapse
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
2022-06-16 10:56 [p.6784]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the Minister of Justice has brought forward a number of pieces of legislation, including Bill C-5, which passed yesterday. A motion on the Saskatchewan Act was passed several months ago. We have Bill C-9 too, which is currently in the works.
We will continue to bring forward all of our priorities. We believe this bill is a priority and we want to get it passed.
Madame la Présidente, le ministre de la Justice a présenté un certain nombre de projets de loi, dont le projet de loi C‑5, qui a été adopté hier. Une motion sur la Loi de la Saskatchewan a été adoptée il y a plusieurs mois. Nous avons également le projet de loi C‑9, qui est actuellement à l’étude.
Nous continuerons de présenter toutes nos priorités. Nous pensons que ce projet de loi est une priorité et nous voulons le faire adopter.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 10:57 [p.6784]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as we approach the final sitting days of the House before it rises, this is likely my last opportunity to speak before we all return to our ridings for the summer months. In light of this, I would like to start off my remarks today by acknowledging the great people of my riding of Fundy Royal, whom I am honoured to represent here in this 44th Parliament.
On the topic at hand, we are here today to discuss Bill C-9, an act to amend the Judges Act. I will begin by going over a bit of a summary of the bill.
The legislation would amend the Judges Act to replace the process through which the conduct of federally appointed judges is reviewed by the Canadian Judicial Council. It would establish a new process for reviewing allegations of misconduct that are not serious enough to warrant a judge’s removal from office and would make changes to the process by which recommendations regarding removal from office can be made to the Minister of Justice. As with the provisions it replaces, this new process would also apply to persons, other than judges, who are appointed under an act of Parliament to hold office during good behaviour.
In short, the objective of the legislation is to update the Judges Act to strengthen the judicial complaints process. The existing process was established in 1971, so it is due for a refresh. We can all agree that strengthening and increasing confidence in the judicial system, and taking action to better respond to complaints that it may receive from Canadians, are good things. Canadians are really depending on this Parliament to strengthen our judicial system.
As it stands, the judicial system in Canada has been weakened by COVID delays and a lack of resources for victims in particular, like, as I have mentioned, the vacant victims ombudsman position. There really is no excuse today for that when we see so many stories ripped from the headlines that impact Canadian victims. We also see legislation like the bill the parliamentary secretary just mentioned, Bill C-5. The victims we have talked to, whom we have seen and heard from at committee, are concerned about that bill and its predecessor bill, Bill C-22. The victims ombudsman had a lot to say about it.
I would love the benefit of hearing from a victims ombudsman, except we do not have one. We were supposed to have that position filled back in October, so for many, many months it has been vacant. That is completely unacceptable, not only for victims and their families but also for all Canadians. I should note that when the position of the federal ombudsman for federal offenders in our federal prison system became vacant, it was filled the next day. We can see where the government's priorities are.
Bill C-9 was originally introduced in the Senate as Bill S-5 on May 25, 2021. The previous version of the bill did not complete second reading. We heard commentary across the way about delays, with some asking why we are talking about delays. Why was that bill not passed? Well, the Prime Minister called his snap pandemic election in August 2021. That is what happened with that version of the bill.
The bill was reintroduced in the Senate last year as Bill S-3, but the government had an apparent change of heart, dropping Bill S-3 from the Senate Order Paper in December of 2021 and introducing that bill in the House of Commons as Bill C-9. That is where it has languished for months until today, just days before we go into our summer recess.
The bill would modify the existing judicial review process by establishing a process for complaints serious enough to warrant removal from office, and another process for offences that would warrant sanctions other than removal, such as counselling, continuing education and reprimands. Currently, if misconduct is less serious, a single member of the Canadian Judicial Council who conducts the initial review may negotiate with a judge for an appropriate remedy.
It may be helpful at this point to provide a bit of background on the Canadian Judicial Council, what it does and who its members are.
Established by Parliament in 1971, the Canadian Judicial Council is mandated to “promote the efficiency, uniformity, and to improve the quality of judicial services in all superior courts in Canada.” Through this mandate, the Canadian Judicial Council presides over the judicial complaints process.
The Canadian Judicial Council is made up of 41 members and is led by the current Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, the Right Hon. Richard Wagner, who is chairperson of the council. The membership is made up of chief justices and associate chief justices of the Canadian provincial and federal superior courts. The goal of the members is to improve consistency in the administration of justice before the courts and the quality of services in Canada's superior courts.
Returning back to the bill itself, the reasons a judge could be removed from office are laid out. These include infirmity, misconduct, failure in the due execution of judicial office and “the judge [being] in a position that a reasonable, fairminded and informed observer would consider to be incompatible with the due execution of judicial office.” A screening officer can dismiss complaints should they seem frivolous or improper, rather than referring to them to the review panel. A complaint that alleges sexual harassment or discrimination may not be dismissed. The full screening criteria will be published by the Canadian Judicial Council.
The minister or Attorney General may themselves request the Canadian Judicial Council establish a full hearing panel to determine whether the removal from the office of a superior court judge is justified. The Canadian Judicial Council is to submit a report within three months after the end of each calendar year with respect to the number of complaints received and the actions taken. The intention of this bill, as stated by the government, is to streamline the process for more serious complaints for which removal from the bench could be an outcome.
As I mentioned earlier, these amendments would also address the current shortcomings of the process by imposing mandatory sanctions on a judge when a complaint of misconduct is found to be justified but not to be serious enough to warrant removal from office. Again, such sanctions could include counselling, continuing education and reprimands. In the name of transparency, this legislation would require that the Canadian Judicial Council include the number of complaints received and how they were resolved in its annual public report.
To clarify, the Canadian Judicial Council’s process applies only to federally appointed judges, which are the judges of the Supreme Court of Canada and the federal courts, the provincial and territorial superior trial courts and the provincial and territorial courts of appeal. The provinces and territories are responsible for reviewing the conduct of the judges at the provincial-territorial trial court level, who are also provincially appointed.
Since its inception in 1971, the Canadian Judicial Council has completed inquiries into eight complaints considered serious enough that they could warrant a judge's removal from the bench. Four of them, in fact, did result in recommendations for removal. A ninth inquiry is under way, but has faced delays due to public health restrictions imposed by the Province of Quebec, such as curfew and indoor capacity limits.
Under the proposed new process laid out in Bill C-9, the Canadian Judicial Council would continue to preside over the judicial complaints process, which would start with a three-person review panel deciding to either investigate a complaint of misconduct or, if the complaint is serious enough that it might warrant removal from the bench, refer it to a separate five-person hearing panel. If appropriate, a three-person review panel made up of a Canadian Judicial Council member, a judge and a layperson could impose such sanctions as public apologies or courses of continuing education. If warranted, a five-person hearing panel made up of two Canadian Judicial Council members, a judge, a lawyer and a layperson could, after holding a public hearing, recommend removal from the bench to the Minister of Justice.
Judges who face removal from the bench would have access to an appeal panel made up of three Canadian Judicial Council members and two judges and finally to the Supreme Court of Canada, should the court agree to hear the appeal.
I know that sounded very convoluted and lengthy, but believe it or not, this would actually streamline the current process for court review of council decisions, which currently involves judicial review by two additional levels of court, those being the Federal Court and the Federal Court of Appeal, before a judge can ask the Supreme Court to hear the case.
The amendments would provide for a funding mechanism for the new process. The financial impact of the review process has been raised by a number of stakeholders. I want to encourage the Liberal government to take its fiscal responsibility to taxpayers into consideration with all government policies, but this bill is as good a start as any.
I would like to take a moment to point out that we have the former leader of the Conservative Party to thank for paving the way to having this bill before the House of Commons today. The Hon. Rona Ambrose introduced her private member's bill, Bill C-337, in 2017. This legislation would require the Canadian judiciary to produce a report every year that detailed how many judges had completed training in sexual assault law and how many cases were heard by judges who had not been trained, as well as a description of the courses that were taken. It would also require any lawyer applying for a position in the judiciary to have first completed sexual assault case training and education. Last, it would result in a greater number of written decisions from judges presiding over sexual assault trials, thus providing improved transparency for Canadians seeking justice.
The original premise of Bill C-337 was in response to a complaint about the behaviour a federal judge who was presiding over a case of sexual assault in 2014. The Canadian Judicial Council of which we speak today launched an investigation into the behaviour of that judge. Ultimately, in March 2017, the Canadian Judicial Council sent a letter to the federal Minister of Justice recommending that this judge be removed from the bench, and the minister accepted the recommendation.
The bill before us today works to expedite and facilitate the complaints process so that extreme cases like the one I just referenced can be fully and properly reviewed without causing too much disruption in terms of time, costs and delays in processing smaller but still important complaints.
Earlier this year, the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights received correspondence from the Canadian Bar Association stating its support for the legislation as written in Bill C-9. In part, its letter reads as follows:
The CBA commented on the state of the judicial discipline process in its 2014 submission to the Canadian Judicial Council (CJC). On the subject of judicial discipline proceedings, our 16 recommendations were to ensure that the objectives of balancing the independence of the judiciary and the public’s confidence in the administration of justice were respected in the process. The CJC and Justice Canada responded with its own reports, which culminated in the present amendments to the Judges Act proposed by the Minister of Justice.
The letter from the Canadian Bar Association goes on to say:
In the view of the CBA Subcommittee, Bill C-9 strikes a fair balance between the right to procedural fairness and public confidence in the integrity of the justice system with the discipline of judges who form the core of that system. The proposed amendments enhance the accountability of judges, builds transparency, and creates cost-efficiencies in the process for handling complaints against members of the Bench.
I would like to pause here briefly just to say that at a moment like this, looking at a bill like this, it seems to me that it would be a very good time to have a federal ombudsman for victims of crime to hear the perspective on how the judicial complaints process is or is not currently working and how this bill would or would not be able to meet those challenges or rectify those concerns.
In testimony given to the justice committee on June 3, 2021, the federal ombudsman for victims of crime at that time raised what she described as a “most critical” issue, which was the legal recourse or remedy that victims have if their rights are violated.
She stated:
Currently, victims do not have a way to enforce the rights given to them in law; they only have a right to make a complaint to various agencies. This means that victims have to rely on the goodwill of criminal justice officials and corrections officials to give effect to or implement their statutory rights under the bill. This means victims count on police, Crown prosecutors, courts, review boards, corrections officials and parole boards to deliver, uphold and respect their rights.
But my office continues to receive complaints from victims that are common across all jurisdictions in Canada. Victims report to us that they are not consistently provided information about their rights or how to exercise them, they feel overlooked in all of the processes, and they have no recourse when officials don't respect their rights.
While the bill we are discussing today is, as I said earlier, a step in the right direction, there is certainly more work that needs to be done to make sure our justice system in Canada works for everyone who comes into contact with it, and I will add especially victims. One way this can be achieved is by immediately filling the position of federal ombudsman for victims of crime, which has now been vacant for nine months. There is absolutely no excuse for this position to have remained vacant for nine months when other positions are filled immediately, including, as I mentioned earlier, the position of ombudsman for those who are in our federal prisons.
By contrast, as I was mentioning, when the offenders ombudsman position became vacant, the Liberal government filled it the very next day, as it should have been. It should be filled right away, but so should the position of the ombudsman for victims of crime.
In 2021, the Canadian Judicial Council published “Ethical Principles for Judges”. I would like to reference excerpts from this publication to add some context into the role and duty of the judiciary.
They read as follows:
An independent and impartial judiciary is the right of all and constitutes a fundamental pillar of democratic governance, the rule of law and justice in Canada....
Today, judges’ work includes case management, settlement conferences, judicial mediation, and frequent interaction with self-represented litigants. These responsibilities invite further consideration with respect to ethical guidance. In the same manner, the digital age, the phenomenon of social media, the importance of professional development for judges and the transition to post-judicial roles all raise ethical issues that were not fully considered twenty years ago. Judges are expected to be alert to the history, experience and circumstances of Canada’s Indigenous peoples, and to the diversity of cultures and communities that make up this country. In this spirit, the judiciary is now more actively involved with the wider public, both to enhance public confidence and to expand its own knowledge of the diversity of human experiences in Canada today.
As was just referenced, social context and society overall change over time, and critical institutions like the justice system must grow to reflect these changes. Much of the time, this simply requires education on emerging issues or a more updated perspective on older issues.
In order to grow, there is a crucial partnership that must be respected between the judiciary and Parliament. While the Parliament and the courts are separate entities, there is a back-and-forth conversation between the two that is essential to our democracy and our judiciary. We have recently seen examples in which that conversation, unfortunately, was desperately lacking. On Friday, May 27, of this year, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the punishment of life without parole in cases concerning mass murderers.
When confronted on the impact of the Supreme Court’s ruling, the Liberal government is determined to stick to their talking points by telling Parliament and concerned Canadians that we should not worry about mass killers actually receiving parole, because that possible outcome is extremely rare. What that actually means is that this government is comfortable putting these families through a revictimizing, retraumatizing parole process, even though, at the end of the day, it is essentially all for show because, according to the government, we just need to trust that a mass killer will not receive parole anyway.
In the Supreme Court of Canada’s ruling, the decision stated, “A life sentence without a realistic possibility of parole presupposes the offender is beyond redemption and cannot be rehabilitated. This is degrading in nature and incompatible with human dignity. It amounts to cruel and unusual punishment.”
What the court is saying here is that keeping mass killers behind bars for the number of years that a judge has already decided would adequately reflect the gravity of their crimes amounts to “cruel and unusual punishment”. Personally, I and many others feel and believe that having the victims' families endure a parole hearing every two years for the rest of their lives is the real cruel and unusual punishment, and the federal government has a duty and a responsibility to respond to the court’s decision, something that it has not done and has shown no inclination to do.
Essentially, the Supreme Court also ruled on May 13 that one can drink one’s way out of a serious crime. We have called on the government to respond to that as well, and we look forward to debate on the response that needs to be coming. Just because the Supreme Court has made these rulings does not mean that this is the end of the road. What it means is that there is a discussion and a dialogue that has to take place, and now the ball is in our court. It is for us to deal with these decisions in Parliament. The Liberals can now create legislation that responds to the Supreme Court’s decisions, and this legislation can be used to make sure that victims, survivors and their families can live in a country where they are equally protected and respected by our justice system.
Bill C-9, an act to amend the Judges Act, is a step in the right direction. I will note that there is much, much more to be done to make sure that the justice system is fair and balanced for all.
Madame la Présidente, il ne nous reste que quelques jours de séance à la Chambre avant l'ajournement et c’est donc probablement ma dernière occasion de prendre la parole avant que nous regagnions tous nos circonscriptions pour l’été. J’aimerais, par conséquent, commencer par saluer les citoyens extraordinaires de ma circonscription de Fundy Royal, que j’ai l’honneur de représenter à cette 44e législature.
Pour ce qui est de la question à l'étude, nous sommes ici aujourd’hui pour examiner le projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges. Je résumerai d’abord brièvement le projet de loi.
Le projet de loi modifierait la Loi sur les juges afin de remplacer le processus d’examen, par le Conseil canadien de la magistrature, de la conduite des juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral. Il créerait un nouveau processus d’examen des allégations d’inconduite dont la gravité ne justifierait pas la révocation d’un juge et modifierait le processus par lequel des recommandations relatives à la révocation sont adressées au ministre de la Justice. Comme les dispositions qu’il remplace, ce nouveau processus s’appliquerait aussi aux personnes autres que des juges qui sont nommées à titre inamovible en vertu d’une loi du Parlement.
Bref, le projet de loi vise à mettre à jour la Loi sur les juges afin de renforcer le processus d’examen des plaintes visant des juges. Le processus existant a été créé en 1971. Il est donc temps de le rafraîchir. Nous pouvons tous convenir qu’il est bon de renforcer la confiance dans le système judiciaire et de prendre des mesures pour mieux répondre aux plaintes éventuelles des Canadiens. Les Canadiens comptent sur le Parlement pour renforcer le système judiciaire.
À l’heure actuelle, le système judiciaire canadien est affaibli par les retards liés à la COVID et par un manque de ressources pour les victimes en particulier, j’en veux pour exemple le poste vacant d’ombudsman des victimes. Il n’y a aucune excuse aujourd’hui pour cet état de fait, alors que tellement d’histoires concernant des victimes canadiennes défraient la chronique. Il y a aussi des projets de loi comme celui que le secrétaire parlementaire vient de mentionner, le projet de loi C‑5. Les victimes avec qui nous avons parlé, que nous avons rencontrées et entendues en comité, sont préoccupées par ce projet de loi et son prédécesseur, le projet de loi C‑22. L’ombudsman des victimes avait beaucoup à dire à ce sujet.
J’aimerais beaucoup entendre l’avis d’un ombudsman des victimes, sauf que nous n’en avons pas. Quelqu’un devait être nommé en octobre, mais le poste est vacant depuis bien des mois. C’est totalement inacceptable, non seulement pour les victimes et leur famille, mais aussi pour tous les Canadiens. Je ferai remarquer que lorsque le poste d’ombudsman des délinquants sous responsabilité fédérale est devenu vacant, il a été comblé le lendemain. Nous voyons quelles sont les priorités du gouvernement.
Le projet de loi C‑9 a été présenté à l’origine au Sénat sous le nom de projet de loi S‑5, le 25 mai 2021. La version précédente du projet de loi n’a pas franchi l’étape de la deuxième lecture. Des députés d'en face ont évoqué les retards, et certains ont demandé pourquoi nous en parlons. Pourquoi ce projet de loi n’a-t-il pas été adopté? Eh bien, le premier ministre a déclenché ses élections surprises en pleine pandémie, en août 2021. Voilà ce qui est arrivé à cette version du projet de loi.
Le projet de loi a été présenté de nouveau au Sénat l’an dernier sous le nom de projet de loi S‑3, mais le gouvernement a apparemment changé d’avis et l’a retiré du Feuilleton du Sénat en décembre 2021 pour présenter ce projet de loi à la Chambre des communes sous le nom de projet de loi C‑9. C’est là qu’il a traîné pendant des mois jusqu’à aujourd’hui, à quelques jours de notre départ pour la pause estivale.
Le projet de loi modifierait le processus actuel d’examen des plaintes visant des juges en créant un processus pour les plaintes assez graves pour justifier une révocation, et un autre processus pour les manquements justifiant des sanctions autres qu’une révocation, comme du counseling, une formation continue et des réprimandes. Actuellement, si l’inconduite est de moindre gravité, le membre du Conseil canadien de la magistrature qui procède seul à l’examen initial peut négocier avec un juge une mesure appropriée.
À ce stade, il peut être utile de faire un bref historique du Conseil canadien de la magistrature et de donner de l'information sur ses activités et ses membres.
Établi par le Parlement en 1971, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature a pour mandat de « d’améliorer l’efficacité, l’uniformité et la qualité des services judiciaires rendus dans les cours supérieures du Canada ». En vertu de ce mandat, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature préside au processus de traitement des plaintes contre un juge.
Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature est composé de 41 membres et est dirigé par l’actuel juge en chef de la Cour suprême du Canada, le très honorable Richard Wagner, qui en est le président. En sont membres les juges en chef et les juges en chef associés ou adjoints des cours supérieures provinciales et fédérales du Canada. Les membres ont pour objectif d’améliorer l'uniformité dans l’administration de la justice devant les tribunaux ainsi que la qualité des services dans les cours supérieures du Canada.
Pour en revenir au projet de loi lui-même, les raisons pour lesquelles un juge pourrait être démis de ses fonctions sont énoncées. Elles comprennent l’invalidité, l’inconduite, le manquement aux devoirs de la charge de juge et « [toute] situation qu’un observateur raisonnable, équitable et bien informé jugerait incompatible avec les devoirs de la charge de juge ». Un agent de contrôle peut rejeter une plainte si elle semble frivole ou inappropriée, plutôt que de la renvoyer au comité d’examen. Une plainte qui allègue du harcèlement sexuel ou de la discrimination ne peut être rejetée. Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature publiera les critères de sélection complets.
Le ministre ou le procureur général peut lui-même demander au Conseil canadien de la magistrature de former un comité d'audience plénier pour déterminer si la révocation d’un juge d’une cour supérieure est justifiée. Dans les trois mois suivant la fin de chaque année civile, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature doit présenter un rapport sur le nombre de plaintes reçues et les mesures prises. Comme l’a déclaré le gouvernement, ce projet de loi vise à rationaliser le processus pour les plaintes plus graves pour lesquelles la révocation pourrait être une issue.
Comme je l’ai dit, ces modifications permettraient aussi de combler les lacunes actuelles du processus en imposant des sanctions obligatoires à un juge lorsqu’une plainte pour inconduite est jugée fondée, mais pas assez grave pour justifier la révocation. Là encore, ces sanctions pourraient comprendre le suivi d’une thérapie, la participation à de la formation continue et des réprimandes. Au nom de la transparence, ce projet de loi exigerait que le Conseil canadien de la magistrature précise dans son rapport public annuel le nombre de plaintes reçues et comment elles ont été réglées.
Pour clarifier, le processus du Conseil canadien de la magistrature ne s’applique qu’aux juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral, c’est à dire les juges de la Cour suprême du Canada et des cours fédérales, des cours supérieures de première instance provinciales et territoriales et des cours d’appel provinciales et territoriales. Les provinces et les territoires sont responsables de l’examen de la conduite des juges des tribunaux de première instance provinciaux et territoriaux, qui sont aussi nommés par les provinces.
Depuis sa création en 1971, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature a mené des enquêtes sur huit plaintes considérées comme suffisamment graves pour justifier la révocation d’un juge. Quatre d’entre elles ont effectivement donné lieu à des recommandations de révocation. Une neuvième enquête est en cours, mais a connu des retards en raison des restrictions sanitaires imposées par la Province de Québec, comme le couvre-feu et les limites de capacité à l'intérieur.
En vertu du nouveau processus proposé dans le projet de loi C-9, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature continuerait de présider le processus judiciaire de traitement des plaintes, qui commencerait dans un comité d’examen composé de trois personnes qui déciderait soit d’enquêter sur une plainte d’inconduite ou, si la plainte est suffisamment grave pour justifier la révocation du juge soit de la renvoyer à un comité d’audience distinct composé de cinq personnes. S'il y a lieu, un comité d’examen composé de trois personnes, à savoir un membre du Conseil canadien de la magistrature, un juge et un non-juriste, pourrait imposer des sanctions telles que des excuses publiques ou des cours de formation continue. Si cela est justifié, un comité d’audience composé de cinq personnes, soit deux membres du Conseil canadien de la magistrature, un juge, un avocat et un non-juriste, pourrait, après avoir tenu une audience publique, recommander au ministre de la Justice la révocation du juge.
Les juges qui risquent d’être démis de leurs fonctions auraient accès à un comité d’appel composé de trois membres du Conseil canadien de la magistrature et de deux juges, et enfin à la Cour suprême du Canada, si elle accepte d’entendre l’appel.
Je sais que cela semble très long et alambiqué, mais croyez le ou non, cela simplifierait en fait le processus actuel de révision judiciaire des décisions du Conseil, qui exige actuellement une révision judiciaire par deux niveaux supplémentaires de tribunaux, à savoir la Cour fédérale et la Cour d’appel fédérale, avant qu’un juge puisse demander à la Cour suprême d’entendre l’affaire.
Les amendements prévoient un mécanisme de financement pour le nouveau processus. L’impact financier du processus de révision a été soulevé par un certain nombre d’intervenants. J'encourage le gouvernement libéral à tenir compte de sa responsabilité financière envers les contribuables dans toutes ses politiques, mais ce projet de loi est un bon début.
J’aimerais prendre un moment pour souligner que nous devons remercier l’ancienne cheffe du Parti conservateur d’avoir ouvert la voie à la présentation de ce projet de loi à la Chambre des communes aujourd’hui. Rona Ambrose a présenté son projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, le projet de loi C‑337, en 2017. Ce projet de loi aurait exigé que la magistrature canadienne produise chaque année un rapport détaillant le nombre de juges ayant suivi une formation en droit des agressions sexuelles et le nombre de causes entendues par des juges n’ayant pas suivi de telle formation, ainsi qu’une description des cours suivis. Il aurait également exigé que tout avocat candidat à un poste dans la magistrature ait d’abord suivi une formation sur les affaires d’agression sexuelle. Enfin, il se serait traduit par un plus grand nombre de décisions écrites de la part des juges présidant les procès pour agression sexuelle, offrant ainsi une meilleure transparence aux Canadiens en quête de justice.
La prémisse initiale du projet de loi C‑337 était une réponse à une plainte concernant le comportement d’un juge fédéral qui avait présidé une affaire d’agression sexuelle en 2014. Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature, dont nous parlons aujourd’hui, avait lancé une enquête sur le comportement de ce juge puis, en mars 2017, il avait envoyé une lettre au ministre fédéral de la Justice recommandant la révocation de ce juge, recommandation que le ministre a acceptée.
Le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis aujourd’hui vise à accélérer et à faciliter le processus de traitement des plaintes afin que des cas extrêmes comme celui que je viens de mentionner puissent être examinés de manière exhaustive et adéquate sans causer trop de perturbations sur le plan du temps, des coûts et des retards dans le traitement de plaintes moins graves, mais tout de même importantes.
Plus tôt cette année, le Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne a reçu une lettre dans laquelle l’Association du Barreau canadien donnait son appui au projet de loi C‑9 dans sa forme actuelle. Voici un extrait de cette lettre:
L’ABC a commenté l’état du processus d’examen de la conduite des juges dans son mémoire de 2014 au Conseil canadien de la magistrature (CCM). Ses 16 recommandations à ce sujet consistaient à assurer que le processus respecte les objectifs d’équilibre entre l’indépendance de la magistrature et la confiance du public dans l’administration de la justice. Le CCM et Justice Canada ont réagi en présentant leurs propres rapports, ce qui a débouché sur les modifications actuellement proposées à la Loi sur les juges (Loi) par le ministre de la Justice.
Plus loin, on peut y lire ce qui suit:
De l’avis du sous-comité de l’ABC, le projet de loi C‑9 établit un juste équilibre entre le droit à l’équité procédurale et la confiance du public dans l’intégrité du système de justice pour ce qui est de la conduite des juges, qui forment l’épine dorsale de ce système. Les modifications proposées renforcent la responsabilisation des juges, favorisent la transparence et créent des économies dans le processus de traitement des plaintes contre des membres de la magistrature.
Je voudrais m'arrêter ici, vite fait, pour dire qu'à un moment comme celui‑ci, alors que nous sommes saisis d'un tel projet de loi, il serait tout indiqué, me semble‑t‑il, d'avoir un ombudsman fédéral des victimes d'actes criminels pour entendre son point de vue sur la façon dont le processus judiciaire de traitement des plaintes fonctionne ou ne fonctionne pas actuellement et la façon dont le projet de loi pourrait ou ne pourrait pas relever ces défis ou dissiper ces préoccupations.
Dans son témoignage devant le comité de la justice le 3 juin 2021, l'ombudsman fédérale des victimes d'actes criminels a soulevé ce qui constituait, à son avis, le point « le plus important », à savoir le recours juridique ou la réparation dont disposent les victimes si leurs droits sont violés.
Elle a déclaré:
Actuellement, les victimes n'ont aucun moyen de faire respecter les droits qui leur sont conférés par la loi; elles ont uniquement le droit de déposer une plainte auprès de divers organismes. Cela signifie que les victimes s'en remettent à la bonne volonté des fonctionnaires du système de justice pénale et des services correctionnels pour que leurs droits prévus par la loi soient respectés. Cela signifie que les victimes doivent compter sur la police, les procureurs de la Couronne, les tribunaux, les commissions d'examen, les agents correctionnels et les commissions des libérations conditionnelles pour assurer, faire respecter et appliquer leurs droits.
Cependant, mon bureau continue de recevoir des plaintes qui sont semblables dans toutes les administrations du Canada. Les victimes nous disent qu'elles ne sont pas toujours informées de leurs droits ou de la façon de les exercer, qu'elles se sentent négligées dans tous les processus et qu'elles n'ont aucun recours lorsque les fonctionnaires ne respectent pas leurs droits.
Bien que le projet de loi dont nous discutons aujourd'hui soit, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, un pas dans la bonne direction, il reste certainement encore beaucoup de travail à faire pour faire en sorte que tous au Canada puissent compter sur un système de justice efficace, surtout les victimes. Une façon d'y parvenir consiste à pourvoir immédiatement le poste d'ombudsman fédéral des victimes d'actes criminels, qui est vacant depuis maintenant neuf mois. Il est inexcusable que ce poste soit resté vacant pendant neuf mois alors que d'autres postes sont pourvus immédiatement, y compris, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, le poste d'ombudsman auprès des délinquants sous responsabilité fédérale.
Comme je l'ai mentionné, à titre de comparaison, quand le poste d'ombudsman des délinquants est devenu vacant, le gouvernement libéral l'a pourvu dès le lendemain, comme il se devait de le faire. Le poste devait être pourvu sans tarder, tout comme le poste d'ombudsman des victimes d'actes criminels devrait l'être.
En 2021, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature a publié les « Principes de déontologie judiciaire ». Je tiens à citer des extraits de cette publication pour mettre en contexte le rôle et le devoir de la magistrature.
Les extraits se lisent comme suit:
Piliers fondamentaux de la gouvernance démocratique, de la primauté du droit et de la justice, l’indépendance et l’impartialité de la magistrature sont des droits reconnus à chacun [...]
De nos jours, les responsabilités des juges s’étendent à la gestion des instances ainsi qu’aux conférences de règlement et aux séances de médiation judiciaires. De plus, il arrive fréquemment que les juges doivent interagir avec des parties non représentées. Ces responsabilités appellent une nouvelle réflexion sur le soutien à apporter en matière déontologique. Parallèlement, d’autres phénomènes soulèvent des enjeux déontologiques qui n’avaient pas été pleinement considérés il y a vingt ans: l’arrivée de l’ère numérique, l’émergence des médias sociaux, l’importance du perfectionnement professionnel des juges et le passage de certains de ceux-ci à une autre carrière après leur départ de la magistrature. On attend des juges qu’ils soient sensibles et au fait de l’histoire, du vécu et de la réalité des peuples autochtones au Canada, ainsi que de la diversité des cultures et des communautés qui composent le pays. C’est dans cet esprit que la magistrature joue un rôle plus actif qu’auparavant auprès du public, aussi bien pour soutenir la confiance que le public accorde à la magistrature que pour approfondir sa connaissance de la diversité des expériences humaines au Canada.
Comme je viens de le mentionner, le contexte social et la société dans son ensemble évoluent avec le temps, et des institutions essentielles comme le système judiciaire doivent évoluer pour faire état de ces changements. La plupart du temps, cela nécessite simplement une éducation sur les questions émergentes ou une perspective actualisée sur des questions plus anciennes.
Afin de se développer, il doit exister un partenariat crucial entre le système judiciaire et le Parlement. Bien que le Parlement et les tribunaux soient des entités distinctes, le dialogue qui existe entre les deux est essentiel pour notre démocratie et notre système judiciaire. Nous avons récemment vu des exemples où ce dialogue, malheureusement, a fait cruellement défaut: le vendredi 27 mai dernier, la Cour suprême du Canada a annulé la peine d’emprisonnement à vie sans possibilité de libération conditionnelle dans les affaires de massacres.
Lorsqu’il est confronté à l’impact de la décision de la Cour suprême, le gouvernement libéral est déterminé à s’en tenir à ses points de discussion en disant au Parlement et aux Canadiens inquiets que nous n'avons pas à redouter que les auteurs de massacres bénéficient d’une libération conditionnelle, car cette possibilité est extrêmement rare. Cela signifie en fait que ce gouvernement est disposé à faire subir aux familles touchées un processus de libération conditionnelle qui les revictimise et les retraumatise, même si, en fin de compte, ce n’est que de la poudre aux yeux parce que, selon le gouvernement, nous n'avons qu'à avoir l'assurance que les massacreurs ne seront pas libérés de toute façon.
Dans son jugement, la Cour suprême du Canada a déclaré: « Une peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité sans possibilité réaliste de libération conditionnelle présuppose que le contrevenant est irrécupérable et que sa réhabilitation est impossible. Cette peine est dégradante et incompatible avec la dignité humaine. Elle constitue une peine cruelle et inusitée. »
Ce que la Cour dit ici, c’est que le fait de garder les auteurs de massacres derrière les barreaux pendant un nombre d’années qui reflète de manière adéquate, selon ce qu'un juge a déjà décidé, la gravité de leurs crimes équivaut à une « peine cruelle et inusitée ». Personnellement, comme beaucoup d’autres, je pense et je crois que la véritable peine cruelle et inusitée, c'est de faire subir aux familles des victimes une audience de libération conditionnelle tous les deux ans pour le reste de leur vie, et que le gouvernement fédéral a le devoir et la responsabilité de répondre à la décision de la Cour, ce qu’il n’a pas fait et n’a manifesté aucune intention de faire.
Essentiellement, la Cour suprême a également statué le 13 mai qu’il suffit de s’enivrer pour échapper à une condamnation pour un crime grave. Nous avons appelé le gouvernement à réagir aussi à cette décision et nous attendons avec impatience le débat qui s'ensuivra. Le fait que la Cour suprême ait rendu ces décisions ne signifie pas que c’est la fin. Ce que cela signifie, c’est qu’un débat et un dialogue doivent avoir lieu, et que c’est à nous maintenant de jouer. C’est à nous de traiter ces décisions au Parlement. Les libéraux peuvent maintenant créer une loi qui répond aux décisions de la Cour suprême, et cette loi peut servir à faire en sorte que les victimes et les survivants ainsi que leurs familles peuvent vivre dans un pays où ils sont également protégés et respectés par notre système juridique.
Le projet de loi C‑9, Loi modifiant la Loi sur les juges, est un pas dans la bonne direction. Je tiens à souligner qu’il reste encore beaucoup, beaucoup de choses à faire pour que le système juridique soit juste et équilibré pour tous.
Collapse
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2022-06-16 11:17 [p.6787]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I appreciated my colleague's review of what he sees in Bill C-9, but I want to take this opportunity to ask him more about victims' rights. I was very much honoured to work with our former ombudsman for victims' rights, Sue O'Sullivan. We worked together in this place to try to improve the victims' rights bill. It fell short then. Not only do I think we need to appoint a new ombudsman for victims' rights, but we need to look at what we can do to make our own victims' rights code more robust.
I wonder if the hon. member for Fundy Royal has studied what they did in California with what is called Marsy's Law, which includes the kind of provisions we need here in Canada to protect victims.
Madame la Présidente, j’ai bien aimé l’examen que mon collègue a fait de ce qu’il voit dans le projet de loi C‑9, mais je veux profiter de l’occasion pour l’interroger davantage sur les droits des victimes. J’ai eu l’immense honneur de travailler avec l'ancienne protectrice des droits des victimes, Sue O’Sullivan. Nous avons travaillé ensemble au Parlement pour essayer d’améliorer le projet de loi sur les droits des victimes, qui n'était alors pas à la hauteur. Non seulement je pense que nous devons nommer un nouveau protecteur des droits des victimes, mais nous devons également examiner ce que nous pouvons faire pour rendre notre propre code sur les droits des victimes plus solide.
Je me demande si le député de Fundy Royal a étudié ce qui s'est fait en Californie avec ce qu’on appelle la loi Marsy, qui comprend le genre de dispositions dont nous avons besoin ici, au Canada, pour protéger les victimes.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 11:18 [p.6787]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I agree with the hon. member wholeheartedly that we need to put more emphasis on victims. What is really troubling is that in past versions of this bill and past versions of Bill C-5, we had commentary from the office of the victims ombudsman. It is important for us to have someone who speaks for victims. It should not be up to victims only to speak for themselves.
Unfortunately, in the last nine months that voice, which is so important, has not been there to speak to this, other legislation, or Supreme Court of Canada decisions, all of which greatly impact victims and their families, and the position remains vacant. I am urgently calling, and have been for months now, on the government to fill the position of ombudsman for victims of crime.
Madame la Présidente, je suis tout à fait d’accord avec le député pour dire que nous devons mettre davantage l’accent sur les victimes. Ce qui est vraiment troublant, c’est que les versions antérieures de ce projet de loi et celles du projet de loi C‑5 prévoyaient que bureau de l’ombudsman des victimes pouvait faire des observations. Il est important pour nous que quelqu’un représente les victimes. Les victimes ne devraient pas être obligées de parler en leur propre nom.
Au cours des neuf derniers mois, malheureusement, leur voix, pourtant si importante, n’a pas été entendue au sujet de ce projet de loi, ni au sujet d’autres mesures législatives, ni au sujet des décisions de la Cour suprême, qui ont pourtant des implications considérables pour les victimes et leurs familles. Par ailleurs, le poste d’ombudsman est toujours vacant. Je demande de toute urgence au gouvernement, comme je le fais depuis des mois, de désigner un ombudsman des victimes d’actes criminels.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2022-06-16 11:19 [p.6787]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague from Fundy Royal for his speech. My question also addresses victims, because he talked a lot about victims in his speech. I want to talk about the new provisions that allow the review panel to impose certain sanctions for less serious offences—continuing education and therapy, for example—which is an improvement over the previous bill. However, there is no opportunity for the victim to participate in the choice of sanctions. The bill indicates that the judge involved has consent over certain sanctions, but there is no mention of the victims.
Could this be an improvement to the bill?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de Fundy Royal de son discours. Ma question portera aussi sur les victimes, parce qu'il en a beaucoup fait état dans son discours. Je le ramènerai aux nouvelles dispositions qui permettent au comité d'examen d'imposer certaines sanctions dans des cas d'infractions moins graves. On peut parler de formation continue et de thérapies, entre autres, ce qui est une amélioration par rapport au projet de loi précédent. Par contre, nulle part il n'y a la possibilité pour la victime de participer au choix de la sanction. On parle juste du consentement du juge en cause dans certaines sanctions, mais on ne parle jamais des victimes.
Est-ce que cela pourrait être une amélioration au projet de loi?
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 11:20 [p.6787]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I think any time we can incorporate more views of victims and the impact of offences or misconduct on the victim, we absolutely should. That was the commentary of the ombudsman for victims of crime, where she said that, too often, no one is looking out for victims and their voice is not heard during the process. We understand there are many issues that are paramount for victims right now. Ironically, I am citing someone whose position remains vacant, and that is the ombudsman for victims of crime.
I am pleased to work with my hon. colleague on strengthening this bill and others, and the role that victims play in our processes.
Madame la Présidente, je crois que chaque fois que nous pouvons tenir compte du point de vue des victimes et des répercussions des infractions ou de l’inconduite sur les victimes, nous devons absolument le faire. L’ombudsman des victimes d’actes criminels a dit que, trop souvent, personne ne s’occupe des victimes et que leur voix n’est pas entendue pendant le processus. Nous savons qu’il y a de nombreuses questions qui revêtent une importance primordiale pour les victimes à l’heure actuelle. Ironiquement, je cite quelqu’un dont le poste demeure vacant, je veux parler de l’ombudsman des victimes d’actes criminels.
Je suis ravi de travailler avec ma collègue pour étoffer ce projet de loi et d’autres mesures législatives et de renforcer le rôle que les victimes jouent dans nos processus.
Collapse
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2022-06-16 11:20 [p.6787]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I want to profoundly thank the hon. member for Fundy Royal for placing victims at the heart of his intervention. I listened very carefully to the speech that the parliamentary secretary to the Liberal Minister of Justice gave, and I do not believe the word “victim” was ever mentioned. My colleague here on the Conservative side, of course, made victims the linchpin of his comments.
I would ask him to expand on the practical impact that this legislation, if it is improved at committee, could have on the plight of future victims.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie sincèrement le député de Fundy Royal d’avoir placé les victimes au cœur de son discours. J’ai écouté très attentivement l’allocution du secrétaire parlementaire du ministre libéral de la Justice et je ne crois pas l’avoir entendu prononcer le mot « victime » une seule fois, contrairement à mon collègue conservateur qui a pris soin de mettre les victimes au centre de ses commentaires.
Je lui demanderais de nous en dire davantage sur les répercussions concrètes que ce projet de loi, à condition qu’il soit amélioré à l’étape de l’étude au comité, pourrait avoir sur le sort des futures victimes.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 11:21 [p.6787]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his steadfast support for victims.
It is always concerning to me. I currently sit on the justice committee and when we discuss a bill, for example Bill C-5, which we voted on this week, often the word “victim” does not come up in the conversation whatsoever. It is often said that justice delayed is justice denied, so one avenue of improvement with this bill is streamlining the process for offences that do not warrant removal from the bench so that we would have an outcome and have an impact on the judge who is the subject of the complaint sooner rather than later, as is currently the case with a too protracted process.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de son appui indéfectible aux victimes.
Cela m’inquiète toujours. Je siège actuellement au comité de la justice et quand nous discutons d’un projet de loi, par exemple du projet de loi C‑5 sur lequel nous nous sommes prononcés cette semaine, le mot « victime » n’est jamais prononcé dans les discussions. On dit souvent que justice différée est justice refusée. Par conséquent, un moyen d’améliorer ce projet de loi consisterait à simplifier le processus pour les infractions qui ne justifient pas la destitution d’un magistrat, de sorte que cela donnerait un résultat et aurait un impact sur le juge qui fait l’objet de la plainte plus rapidement, contrairement à ce qui est actuellement le cas lorsqu’un processus est trop long.
Collapse
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2022-06-16 11:22 [p.6787]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I have already agreed with my colleague from Fundy Royal that we need to deal more expeditiously with the vacancy for the ombudsman for victims' rights. However, in looking at this legislation, one must remember that of course judges in this country do not solely judge criminal cases. Obviously, the areas of law that end up before a judiciary are everything from contract law, environmental law and crimes that involve actual violence to property law, intellectual property rights and trade law. We could go on forever. These disputes go into many different areas of the life of a country.
Therefore, I would ask the member how he feels about these improvements and modernization of the Canadian Judicial Council.
Madame la Présidente, j’ai déjà convenu avec mon collègue de Fundy Royal que nous devons nous occuper plus rapidement de la vacance du poste d’ombudsman des droits des victimes. Cependant, en examinant ce projet de loi, nous devons bien sûr nous rappeler que les juges de ce pays ne font pas qu’entendre des affaires criminelles. Il va sans dire que les questions de droit qui aboutissent devant les tribunaux vont du droit des contrats au droit de l’environnement, en passant par le droit criminel avec les crimes violents, le droit des biens, le droit de la propriété intellectuelle et le droit commercial. Nous pourrions continuer indéfiniment. Les différends entendus touchent de nombreux aspects de la vie d’un pays.
Je demande donc au député ce qu’il pense de ces améliorations et de la modernisation du Conseil canadien de la magistrature.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 11:23 [p.6788]
Expand
Madam Speaker, my hon. colleague is quite right. There are many different judges and many different types of law in the cases that they are presiding over. However, the fact is that there needs to be a robust complaints process in place. Misconduct could take place both inside and outside of the courtroom and is not necessarily confined, as the member mentioned, to criminal cases.
We look to this bill as an improvement on the existing process, particularly for offences that do not warrant removal but warrant some type of sanction that could include training or otherwise. As I mentioned, justice delayed is justice denied, so we look at having a streamlined process as an improvement, but by no means is this the end of the conversation. As has come up many times now in questions and answers, victims have to play a more prominent role, both in this and throughout our criminal justice system.
Madame la Présidente, ma collègue a tout à fait raison. On dénombre beaucoup de juges qui président à l’audition de nombreuses affaires relevant de types de droit différents. Il demeure qu’il y a lieu de mettre en place un solide processus de traitement des plaintes. L’inconduite peut se produire tant à l’intérieur qu’à l’extérieur de la salle d’audience et elle ne se limite pas nécessairement, comme la députée l’a mentionné, à des affaires criminelles.
Nous considérons ce projet de loi comme une amélioration par rapport au processus actuel, surtout pour les infractions qui ne justifient pas le renvoi, mais qui justifient un type de sanction pouvant prendre la forme d’une formation obligatoire ou autre. Comme je l’ai dit, justice différée est justice refusée. Nous estimons donc qu’un processus simplifié constitue une amélioration, mais les choses ne s’arrêtent pas là. Comme on l'a dit à maintes reprises dans les questions et les réponses, les victimes doivent jouer un rôle plus important, tant dans ce domaine que dans l’ensemble de notre système de justice pénale.
Collapse
View Kerry-Lynne Findlay Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for bringing this forward. As a former Canadian Bar Association president and long-time lawyer before I came to this place, I know that one of the things we always fought for and spoke up for was independence of the judiciary. That is something that is integral to confidence in our justice system. However, in today's world, when all judgments that are made public are scrutinized by the public and sometimes hard to explain, it seems to me that a process for looking at the conduct of judges that would not necessarily meet the threshold of Judicial Council review makes some sense.
I am interested in my colleague's thoughts on how this bill interacts with our common support for independence of the judiciary.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de cette précision. En tant qu’ancienne présidente de l’Association du Barreau canadien et avocate de longue date avant mon entrée à la Chambre, je peux dire que nous nous sommes toujours battus pour l’indépendance de la magistrature, une indépendance que nous avons toujours défendue. Celle-ci fait partie intégrante de la confiance envers notre système de justice. Cependant, à l’heure où tous les jugements rendus publics sont désormais passés à la loupe par le public, même si certains sont difficiles à expliquer, il me semble plutôt logique qu’un processus d’examen de la conduite des juges puisse ne pas nécessairement répondre au critère de l’examen par le conseil de la magistrature.
J’aimerais savoir dans quelle mesure, selon mon collègue, ce projet de loi rejoint notre appui commun à l'égard de l’indépendance de la magistrature.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 11:25 [p.6788]
Expand
Madam Speaker, it was a pleasure to serve with my hon. colleague for some time on the justice committee. She brings a wealth of experience in this and other areas.
It is important. This legislation came in back in the 1970s. There are always improvements that can be made to the process, particularly when dealing with situations that do not warrant removal. As my hon. colleague has rightly said, the independence of the judiciary is so important. It underpins the process. Without an independent judiciary, we do not have proper rule of law in our country. Therefore, we respect that judicial independence, but we also know that there have to be robust provisions in place when there are actual cases of misconduct, rare as they may be.
This bill would streamline that process, particularly dealing with situations that do not warrant removal from the bench. Obviously, removal from the bench, for a judge, is the ultimate sanction. As I mentioned in my speech, it has been applied very rarely, but there are other instances where there needs to be a sanction for misconduct, and this bill would streamline that process. It is why we are supporting the bill, but we are also open to making amendments that would improve it and improve the role of victims in the process.
Madame la Présidente, j’ai eu le plaisir de siéger avec ma collègue au comité de la justice pendant un certain temps. Elle possède une vaste expérience dans ce domaine et dans d’autres.
C’est important. Cette loi est entrée en vigueur dans les années 1970. Il y a toujours des améliorations à apporter au processus, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit de situations qui ne justifient pas la révocation. Comme ma collègue l’a dit à juste titre, l’indépendance de la magistrature est primordiale. Elle est à la base du processus. La primauté du droit ne peut exister dans notre pays sans une magistrature indépendante. Par conséquent, nous respectons l’indépendance de la magistrature, mais nous savons aussi qu’il doit y avoir des dispositions rigoureuses en place lorsqu’il y a des cas d’inconduite, aussi rares soient-ils.
Le projet de loi simplifierait ce processus, en particulier dans les situations qui ne justifient pas la révocation du juge. De toute évidence, la révocation d’un juge est la sanction ultime. Comme je l’ai mentionné dans mon discours, ce n'est arrivé que très rarement, mais il y a d’autres cas où il faut prévoir une sanction pour inconduite, et ce projet de loi simplifierait ce processus. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous appuyons le projet de loi, mais nous sommes aussi ouverts à apporter des amendements qui l’amélioreraient et qui amélioreraient le sort des victimes dans le processus.
Collapse
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2022-06-16 11:27 [p.6788]
Expand
Madam Speaker, with your permission and permission from my colleagues, I would like to share my time with my colleague, the member for Saint-Jean.
Madame la Présidente, je voudrais d'abord solliciter votre permission et celle de mes collègues pour partager mon temps de parole avec ma collègue la députée de Saint-Jean.
Collapse
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2022-06-16 11:27 [p.6788]
Expand
Madam Speaker, for years, people have been calling for reforms of the process for reviewing allegations of judicial misconduct, whether the review results in a removal or not. This is not the first time that such a bill has been introduced in the House. The Judicial Council itself has called for this. If we can pass this legislation, it will benefit all stakeholders in the judicial system and all Quebeckers and Canadians. The judicial system is the backbone of any society that wants to live, thrive and evolve in peace. Without a judicial system, it would be total anarchy, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth.
No one wants to abolish the courts. Everyone wants to be able to have faith that the courts will resolve our disputes. Ideally, it would resolve all of them, and for that to happen, we must appoint judges with spotless records in terms of credibility and professionalism. The first step is to ensure that the appointment process is effective and non-partisan. I will come back to this.
We must also ensure that once a judge is appointed, they are consistently subject to ethical conduct rules that are acceptable to everyone involved. Finally, we must ensure that, in cases of misconduct, there is a reliable and effective process for reviewing and, where appropriate, fairly sanctioning the conduct of the party at fault.
We have to admit that the review process in place is among the best in the world. We are not starting from scratch, and that is a good thing. Having myself participated in discussions with bar associations in other jurisdictions in Europe and elsewhere, I can say that what we have here in Quebec and Canada is the envy of many other democratic societies.
That being said, recent examples have shown that we need to think about a new and improved process that would prevent abuses. Having a process that takes years before all reviews and appeals have been exhausted, while the principal continues to receive a salary and benefits—often including a generous pension fund—and these costs are assumed by the public, certainly does not help boost confidence in the judicial system.
Of course, it is just as important that judges who are the subject of a complaint can express their point of view, defend themselves and exercise their rights just like any other citizen. The process needs to be fair and should not unduly favour the person who is guilty of misconduct and seeks to abuse the system. In this respect, Bill C-9 meets our expectations and should receive our support, as well as that of all Canadians. I am happy about this and even hopeful that we will now tackle the other key process, judicial appointments.
It would be nice to see the government finally set partisan politics aside when appointing new judges.
Does the “Liberalist” the government is so fond of still have a place in the selection process? We have talked about this many times in the House. We will have to talk more.
Could the final selection from the short list be done by a committee made up of a representative from each of the recognized parties? Could representatives of the public or professional bodies also take part? That is certainly something to think about.
In my opinion, we are ready for this review process. The Bloc Québécois has been calling for it for a long time, and we will continue to do so. Bill C-9 may set the stage for us to seriously consider it. Will the Minister of Justice be bold enough to propose it? I hope so. If he does, I can assure him right now of our full co-operation.
Until then, let us hope that the reform of the complaints review process proposed in Bill C-9 can build public trust in our judicial system.
I said “our judicial system” because we must never forget that the judicial system belongs to the people and must be accountable to the people. We are merely the ones responsible for ensuring the system is effective.
I will not rehash here the process that led to the relatively recent resignation of a Superior Court justice for whom the review process, given the many appeals and challenges against him, apparently had no hope of ending before he was assured the monetary benefits of his office. However, we must recognize that we cannot allow this heinous impression of non-accountability and dishonesty persist, whether it is well-founded or not. We need to assume our responsibilities and make sure that the public never doubts the credibility, goodwill and effectiveness of our courts.
Madame la Présidente, enfin, la réforme du processus d'examen des accusations d'inconduite des juges — que cet examen conduise ou non à la révocation — est demandée depuis déjà plusieurs années. Ce n'est d'ailleurs pas la première fois qu'un tel projet de loi est déposé devant la Chambre des communes. Le Conseil de la magistrature lui-même le demande. Si on peut maintenant en terminer avec cet exercice législatif, c'est l'ensemble des acteurs du système judiciaire et toute la population qui y trouvera son compte. Le système judiciaire est le pilier de toute société aspirant à vivre, à s'épanouir et à évoluer en paix. Sans système de justice, c'est l'anarchie, œil pour œil, dent pour dent.
Personne ne souhaite l'abolition des tribunaux. Au contraire, tout le monde veut pouvoir s'y fier pour régler les différends qui nous occupent. Idéalement, régler tous nos différends. Pour y arriver, il est essentiel d'y désigner des juges dont la crédibilité et le professionnalisme sont sans tâche. La première étape pour y arriver est bien sûr de s'assurer d'avoir un processus de nomination efficace et non partisan. J'y reviendrai.
Il faut aussi s'assurer qu'en tout temps, après sa nomination, chaque juge est assujetti à des règles de conduite éthiques qui suscitent l'adhésion de l'ensemble des justiciables. Enfin, il faut s'assurer que, en cas d'inconduite, un processus fiable et efficace permet d'examiner et, le cas échéant, de sanctionner équitablement la conduite du fautif.
Il faut quand même admettre que le processus d'examen en place figure parmi les plus enviables au monde. Nous ne partons pas de zéro et il s'en faut. Pour avoir moi-même participé à des échanges avec des barreaux d'autres juridictions en Europe et ailleurs, je peux dire que ce qui se passe ici au Québec et au Canada fait l'envie de nombreuses autres sociétés dites démocratiques.
Cela dit, des exemples récents nous amènent à nous questionner et à réfléchir à un nouveau processus amélioré qui permettrait d'éviter les dérapages. Qu'il faille étirer un processus pendant des années avant d'avoir épuisé les recours en révision et en appel, quand le principal intéressé continue de toucher sa rémunération et ses avantages sociaux, dont souvent un généreux fonds de pension, et que ces frais sont assumés par l'ensemble de la populatio, n'est sûrement de nature à maintenir la confiance dans le système judiciaire.
Bien sûr, il est tout aussi important que les juges faisant l'objet d'une plainte puissent faire valoir leur point de vue, se défendre, faire valoir leurs droits, comme tout autre citoyen. Le processus doit quand même être équitable et ne pas favoriser indûment celui ou celle qui est coupable d'inconduite et cherche à en abuser. En ce sens, le projet de loi C‑9 répond à nos attentes et devrait susciter notre adhésion comme celui de toute la population. Je ne peux que m'en réjouir et, oui, espérer qu'on s'attaque maintenant à l'autre processus tout aussi essentiel, celui des nominations.
N'est-il pas en effet souhaitable que le gouvernement s'écarte enfin de la partisanerie politique au moment où il désigne les nouveaux magistrats?
La « libéraliste » si chère à ce gouvernement a-t-elle encore sa place dans le processus de sélection? On en a fréquemment parlé à la Chambre. Il va falloir y revenir.
La sélection finale à partir de ce qu'il est convenu d'appeler la courte liste, ou short list dans la langue choyée et communément parlée dans ce Parlement, ne pourrait-elle pas être faite par un comité formé d'un représentant de chacun des partis reconnus? Des représentants de la population ou des ordres professionnels pourraient-ils aussi y participer? Il y a certainement matière à réflexion.
Nous sommes mûrs, à mon avis, pour ce nouvel exercice de révision. Le Bloc québécois le réclame depuis déjà belle lurette et nous continuerons de le demander. Le projet de loi C‑9 met possiblement la table pour nous inviter à y réfléchir sérieusement. Le ministre de la Justice aura-t-il le courage nécessaire pour le proposer? J'aime croire que oui. Le cas échéant, je l'assure d'ores et déjà de notre totale collaboration.
D'ici là, souhaitons que la réforme du processus d'examen des plaintes que nous propose le projet de loi C‑9 renforce la confiance du public dans son système judiciaire.
Je dis bien « son système judiciaire », car il ne faut jamais oublier que le système judiciaire appartient effectivement au peuple et que c'est à ce dernier qu'il doit rendre des comptes. Nous ne sommes que les garants de l'efficacité de ce système.
Je n'ai pas l'intention de refaire ici le processus qui a mené à la démission relativement récente d'un juge de la Cour supérieure dont le processus d'examen n'avait, semble-t-il, à la lumière des nombreux appels et contestations dont il fut l'objet, aucun espoir de conclusion avant que ne lui soient assurés les avantages pécuniaires que lui garantissait sa fonction. Cependant, force est d'admettre que nous ne pouvons pas laisser planer cette espèce de détestable impression, bien fondée ou non, de non-responsabilité et de malhonnêteté. Nous devons assumer nos responsabilités et nous assurer que la population ne doute jamais de la crédibilité, de la bienveillance et de l'efficacité de ses tribunaux.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2022-06-16 11:33 [p.6789]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague from Rivière-du-Nord for his speech.
I would like to comment on the second part of his speech on the appointment process. As we discuss Bill C-9 today, what our colleagues have often pointed out is both the importance of maintaining the separation between the judiciary, the executive and the legislative powers and the importance of having a system the public can trust. It seems to me that these two principles are especially pertinent to the appointment of judges.
Does my colleague not think that this is the cornerstone of the more than necessary review of the appointment process?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de Rivière-du-Nord de son discours.
J'aimerais revenir sur la deuxième partie de son discours sur le processus de nomination. Quand on parle du projet de loi C‑9 aujourd'hui, ce que nous entendons beaucoup de la part de nos collègues, c'est l'importance de maintenir la séparation des pouvoirs entre le judiciaire, l'exécutif et le législatif, d'une part, et l'importance, d'autre part, d'avoir un système dans lequel la population peut avoir confiance. Il me semble que ces deux principes s'appliquent encore plus à la nomination des juges.
Mon collègue ne croit-il pas que c'est justement la pierre d'assise de la plus que nécessaire révision du processus de nomination?
Collapse
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2022-06-16 11:34 [p.6789]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for her question. I totally agree with her.
Indeed, it takes both. We need effective rules of conduct that inspire confidence, a process for reviewing these rules that is just as effective, and an appointment process. All of this must be completely independent of the executive and legislative branches.
In fact, our work is limited to implementing the process, the selection committees and the review panels. That is our job, but once that is done, the system must remain entirely non-partisan. Political partisanship must never influence the appointment of a judge or the sanctions for a judge’s misconduct.
In addition, the review process is also important in ensuring that no unfounded complaints prevent a judge from sitting. This process is essential, and must be absolutely non-partisan.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de sa question. Je suis totalement d'accord avec elle.
Effectivement, il faut faire les deux. Cela prend des règles de conduite efficaces dans lesquelles on a confiance, un processus de révision de ces règles tout aussi efficace, mais aussi un processus de nomination. C'est l'ensemble de cela qui doit être complètement indépendant des pouvoirs exécutif et législatif.
En fait, notre travail se limite à mettre sur pied ces processus, les comités de sélection et les comités d'examen. C'est notre travail, mais une fois que c'est fait, cela doit demeurer complètement non partisan. Il ne faut jamais que la partisanerie politique influence la nomination d'un juge, pas plus que la sanction d'une inconduite de sa part.
Par ailleurs, le processus d'examen est important aussi pour s'assurer qu'il n'y a pas de plainte non fondée qui empêche un juge de siéger. Ce processus est essentiel et doit être absolument non partisan.
Collapse
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
2022-06-16 11:35 [p.6789]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I congratulate my colleague on his excellent speech. I hope he agrees that we need to pass this bill so that we can spend more time resolving other problems in our judicial system, particularly systemic racism and the appointment of judges.
What does he think are the biggest problems in our judicial system?
Madame la Présidente, je félicite mon collègue pour son excellent discours. J'espère qu'il convient que nous devons adopter ce projet de loi afin que nous puissions passer plus de temps à régler d'autres problèmes liés à notre système judiciaire, notamment en ce qui concerne le racisme systémique et la nomination des juges.
Selon lui, quels sont les problèmes les plus importants dans notre système judiciaire?
Collapse
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2022-06-16 11:36 [p.6789]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for her question. Before answering, I would like to congratulate her for making the effort to ask the question in French. I know that it was not easy, and I want her to know that I am very thankful for the effort. It is a mark of respect, and I sincerely thank her.
I was so focused on her language efforts that I forgot her question. Ha, ha!
I do agree that we need to vote in favour of Bill C-9. The appointment process must also be impartial, and it needs a review. That is our job, and we owe it to voters and the entire population to make sure our justice system is non-partisan, effective, professional and reliable.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de sa question. Avant d'y répondre, je vais me permettre d'abord de la féliciter pour l'exercice qu'elle fait de poser sa question en français. Je sais que ce n'est pas facile et je veux qu'elle sache que c'est un effort dont je lui suis hautement reconnaissant. C'est une belle marque de respect et je l'en remercie sincèrement.
J'étais tellement concentré sur l'exercice de langue que j'en ai oublié la question de ma collègue. Ha, ha!
Effectivement, il faut voter en faveur du projet de loi C‑9. Le processus de nomination doit lui aussi être impartial et révisé. C'est notre travail et nous devons aux électeurs et à l'ensemble de la population de nous assurer d'un système de justice non partisan, efficace, professionnel et fiable.
Collapse
View Tracy Gray Profile
CPC (BC)
View Tracy Gray Profile
2022-06-16 11:37 [p.6789]
Expand
Madam Speaker, the seat for the office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime has been vacant since last October. Does the member have any thoughts on that?
When we consider legislation such as this, and on the overall topic, it is really important that we consider victims. Could the member comment on that?
Madame la Présidente, le poste du Bureau de l’ombudsman fédéral des victimes d’actes criminels est vacant depuis octobre dernier. Le député a-t-il quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?
Au cours de l'examen d'un projet de loi comme celui-ci, et sur le sujet en général, il est vraiment important que nous tenions compte des victimes. Le député pourrait-il nous dire ce qu’il en pense?
Collapse
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2022-06-16 11:37 [p.6789]
Expand
Madam Speaker, thanks to my colleague, I remember the previous question now. I would say that the biggest challenge is non-partisanship.
Anyway, to answer the question from my colleague from Kelowna—Lake Country, I would say that we do need to appoint an ombudsman. An ombudsman is the guardian and representative of the people. He or she monitors the work of various organizations. It is therefore important. The position is vacant and should be filled. I hope it will be filled soon.
Once again, I must say that, fortunately or unfortunately, I am an eternal optimist, and I always tend to trust people. Sometimes I am disappointed, but until then, I will place my trust in the current government. I will, however, say that it needs to hurry up, because this is urgent. We need to appoint an ombudsman, review the appointment process and respond to what the public is asking for so that we can finally say “mission accomplished”.
Madame la Présidente, la mémoire m'est revenue grâce à l'aide de mon collègue, et, pour répondre à la question précédente, je dirais que le plus grand défi est la non-partisanerie.
Cela dit, pour répondre à la question de ma collègue de Kelowna—Lake Country, je dirai que la nomination d'un ombudsman est effectivement une chose importante. C'est le gardien et le représentant du peuple. Il est appelé à faire la surveillance de l'exercice des différents organismes. C'est donc effectivement important. Le poste est vacant et doit être pourvu. J'espère que ce sera fait rapidement.
Je dirai encore une fois que je suis malheureusement ou heureusement un éternel optimiste et que je suis porté à toujours faire confiance. Je suis parfois déçu, mais je vais tout de même encore faire confiance, jusque là, au gouvernement actuel. Je lui dis cependant de se grouiller, parce que cela presse. Il faut désigner l'ombudsman, réviser le processus de nomination et répondre à tout ce que la population demande pour qu'on puisse enfin dire « mission accomplie ».
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2022-06-16 11:39 [p.6790]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to stand this morning to discuss Bill C-9.
While I was reading the bill, I had a bit of déjà vu. I remember driving on the 417 in the spring while listening to the speeches in the House on Bill S-5, which was sponsored by Senator Dalphond, for whom I have tremendous respect. I still call him “Your Honour”.
I know that Bill S‑5 died on the Order Paper because of the election. The fact that I was supposed to discuss Bill C‑9 in the spring but did not get a chance to shows that we may be a bit behind on the legislative agenda. That is the only criticism I will offer today. As for the rest, I am highly satisfied at least with the spirit of the bill we are studying, as is the Canadian Judicial Council, which strongly supports it.
We are talking about it today. One of the pillars or cornerstones of the bill is the importance of the separation of powers between the legislative, judicial and executive branches. This has been the case since 1971, when the Canadian Judicial Council was created and made responsible for reviewing complaints. This is maintained in Bill C-9.
To ensure the separation of powers, the ability to remove judges is also maintained, as originally provided for in section 99(1) of the Constitution Act, 1867, which states that “the judges of the superior courts shall hold office during good behaviour, but shall be removable by the Governor General on address of the Senate and House of Commons”.
If we relied specifically on this principle, it might appear as though the legislative branch and the executive branch, meaning us here in Parliament, had power over the removal of judges. However, since 1971, the complaint review process has been the responsibility of the Canadian Judicial Council, which must issue recommendations to the Minister of Justice in order for the removal to take place. This complaint review process has been around for over 50 years.
With respect to what has been done since 1971, the improvements in Bill C‑9 meet certain needs. In this case, better is not the enemy of good. We tend to think that if something is working reasonably well, we should not necessarily seek perfection. I think that this used to apply in this case.
There are three essential issues that the bill resolves. The first is that the current process is extremely long. Given the numerous opportunities to file for appeals and judicial reviews during the process, it can take a very long time to review a complaint. My colleagues mentioned that. Unfortunately, we saw proof of this with a Superior Court judge whose name I will not mention, but whose review process lasted from 2012 to 2021. If I remember correctly, the decision was handed down in 2021.
As my colleague from Rivière-du-Nord mentioned, the problem is that, during that whole time, the judge continues to receive their salary and benefits and contribute to their pension. That in itself can be an incentive to come up with endless stalling tactics and draw the process out in order to keep the financial benefits.
This bill makes certain changes. In particular, it modifies the process to include the creation of an appeal panel, the final body before the Supreme Court to which a judge who is at fault can apply. This eliminates the need to go through the Superior Court and the Court of Appeal to reach the Supreme Court, assuming it even agrees to hear the appeal. The bill streamlines the process.
As my colleagues mentioned, under the current version of the act, judges still receive their salary and benefits. Clause 126(1) of the new act remedies that situation. It states, and I quote:
For the purposes of calculating an annuity under Part I, if a full hearing panel decides that the removal from office of a judge who is the subject of a complaint is justified, the day after the day on which the judge is given notice of the full hearing panel’s decision is the day to be used to determine the number of years the judge has been in judicial office and the salary annexed to the office held by the judge at the time of his or her resignation, removal or attaining the age of retirement unless (a) the decision is set aside by a decision of the Supreme Court of Canada, or by the decision of an appeal panel if the appeal panel’s decision is final; (b) the Minister’s response under subsection 140(1) provides that no action is to be taken to remove the judge from office; or (c) the matter of removal of the judge from office is put to one or both Houses of Parliament and is rejected by either of them.
As a result, a judge who is found to be at fault will not receive a salary during that period.
Another problem with the previous version of the bill was that there were no half-measures for lesser offences, so to speak. It was all black or white. The panel's only options were to issue a recommendation for removal or to not issue one. The only middle ground involved negotiating some sort of disciplinary action with the judge on a case-by-case basis. However, judges were quite free to say that they did not want any part in that process because it was not mandatory.
This bill remedies that situation. As soon as a complaint, which can be based on written submissions to the panel, has been examined, the panel can impose redress measures in cases where the reason for the complaint does not constitute grounds for removal.
The review panel can order the judge, for example, to take professional development courses or require him to apologize. In some cases, this can help more effectively remedy a situation when the judge is open to having certain sanctions apply. This may be sufficient, in certain cases, to avoid continuing with a full complaint process and public hearing, which could be long and expensive.
One of the options in the new bill is for the council to issue a private or public expression of concern. There is a certain transparency in the process. The council can issue a private or public warning, a private or public reprimand or order the judge to apologize. As I mentioned in my question to the member for Fundy Royal, the only thing that is a little unusual is one of the measures in clause 102, as follows:
(g) with the consent of the judge, take any other action that the panel considers appropriate in the circumstances.
Perhaps there are questions that should be asked when the bill is referred to a committee for study after second reading, if it gets to that stage, which should not be a problem. For example, why is the judge's consent required? Why do the victims have no say in choosing the sanction to be applied for an offence that is less serious than one that might lead to removal from office?
Another thing the bill deals with is how onerous the process is. Previously, the Canadian Judicial Council itself had to make a recommendation to the minister to have a judge removed. The way it was set up, there was one panel that reviewed the case and another panel that, if it received the complaint, had to pass it on to the Canadian Judicial Council itself. The whole thing involved about 17 chief justices or associate chief justices from courts that were not already part of the process. It diverted energy from solving other problems in the courts, and the process did not necessarily help ensure procedural fairness for judges. This bill fixes that. The review panel itself will now be able to make a recommendation to the minister to relieve a judge of her or his duties. This kind of short-circuits a process that was not necessary and did not guarantee procedural fairness.
All these factors significantly improve the process. However, as my colleague from Rivière-du-Nord explained, this is not the only way to improve people's perception that the justice system is impartial and create a clear separation between the legislative, executive and judicial branches.
I think we also need to look at updating the judicial appointment process. The Bloc Québécois has called for this numerous times by suggesting things like creating a special all-party committee tasked with recommending a new selection process. I have not lost hope. Like my colleague, I believe that human nature is fundamentally good and is capable of doing good things, although I too am sometimes disappointed. Still, I am always willing to work with anyone who is equally willing, and I encourage the government to introduce a bill to review the appointment process.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un plaisir de prendre la parole ce matin au sujet du projet de loi C‑9.
En révisant le projet de loi, je me suis rendu compte que ce n'était pas la première fois que je m'y attardais. Je me rappelle être en voiture sur la 417, au printemps, et écouter le discours à la Chambre sur le projet de loi S‑5 du sénateur Dalphond, pour qui j'ai un très grand respect et que je me plais encore à appeler « M. le juge ».
Je réalise que le projet de loi S‑5 est mort au Feuilleton en raison du déclenchement des élections. Si je devais prendre la parole sur le projet de loi C‑9 au printemps et que je ne l'ai pas fait, cela montre qu'il y a peut-être eu un peu de retard dans le calendrier législatif. C'est la seule critique que je me permettrai de faire aujourd'hui. Pour le reste, je suis particulièrement satisfaite tout au moins de l'esprit du projet de loi que nous étudions, comme l'est d'ailleurs le Conseil canadien de la magistrature, qui soutient abondamment l'exercice.
Nous en parlons aujourd'hui: un des piliers, une des pierres d'assise du projet de loi, c'est l'importance d'avoir une séparation des pouvoirs entre le législatif, le judiciaire et l'exécutif. C’était déjà le cas depuis 1971, avec la création du Conseil canadien de la magistrature, qui était responsable de l'examen des plaintes. Cela est maintenu dans le projet de loi C‑9.
Pour assurer cette séparation des pouvoirs, on maintient aussi l'amovibilité des juges, comme le prévoit la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867, au paragraphe 99(1): « [...] les juges des cours supérieures resteront en fonction durant bonne conduite, mais ils pourront être révoqués par le gouverneur général sur une adresse du Sénat et de la Chambre des Communes. »
Si on partait de ce principe précisément, cela pourrait donner l'impression qu'il y a une possibilité que le législatif et l'exécutif, c'est-à-dire ce qu'on fait au Parlement, aient un pouvoir sur la révocation des juges. Or justement, depuis 1971, le processus d'examen des plaintes passe par le Conseil canadien de la magistrature, qui doit émettre une recommandation au ministre de la Justice afin que le processus de révocation puisse suivre son cours. Cela fait une bonne cinquantaine d'années que le processus d'étude des plaintes existe.
Par rapport à ce qui se fait depuis 1971, on répond tout de même à certains besoins avec les améliorations qu'on peut voir dans le projet de loi C‑9. Dans ce cas de figure ci, on est en présence d'une situation où le mieux n'est pas l'ennemi du bien. On a parfois tendance à dire que si une chose fonctionne suffisamment bien, il ne faut pas nécessairement chercher la perfection. Ici, je pense que cela s'appliquait.
Il y a trois éléments essentiels que le projet de loi vient régler. Le premier de ces éléments est que le processus actuel est extrêmement long. Quand on regarde les nombreuses possibilités d'appels, de contrôles et de révisions judiciaires qui peuvent avoir lieu en cour de processus, on constate que l'évaluation d'une plainte peut durer extrêmement longtemps. Mes collègues en ont fait état. On en a eu malheureusement la preuve par l'exemple dans le cas d'un juge de la Cour supérieure que je ne nommerai pas, mais dont le processus d'étude a trainé de 2012 à 2021. De mémoire, 2021 est l'année où la décision a été rendue.
Comme le mentionnait mon collègue de Rivière-du-Nord, le problème est que, pendant tout ce temps-là, le juge continue à toucher rémunération et avantages sociaux et il continue à cotiser à son fonds de retraite. Cela peut être en soi un incitatif à multiplier certaines mesures dilatoires, à faire étirer le processus et à le trainer en longueur pour maintenir ces avantages financiers.
Avec le projet de loi actuel, on apporte certaines modifications. Il y a notamment — à même le processus — la création d'un comité d'appel, la dernière instance avant la Cour suprême à laquelle un juge fautif peut s'adresser. On évite donc de passer par la Cour supérieure, la Cour d'appel et, par la suite, la Cour suprême, si elle accepte évidemment d'entendre l'appel. On donne un régime minceur au processus.
Sous l'actuelle version de la loi, comme mes collègues en ont parlé, les juges reçoivent encore leur traitement et leurs avantages. Avec le paragraphe 126(1) de la nouvelle loi, on remédie à cette situation:
Aux fins du calcul d'une pension dans le cadre de la partie I, si le comité d'audience plénier conclut que la révocation du juge en cause est justifiée, la date correspondant au jour suivant celui où la décision lui est notifiée est celle qui est utilisée pour déterminer son ancienneté et son dernier traitement, sauf dans l'un ou l'autre des cas des suivants: a) la décision est annulée par une décision de la Cour suprême du Canada [...]; b) […] le ministre indique qu'aucune action ne sera prise en vue de la révocation du juge; c) la question de la révocation du juge est présentée à l'une ou l'autre des chambres du Parlement, ou aux deux, et l'une ou l'autre la rejette.
Donc, il n'y aura pas de traitement pendant cette période pour un juge qui est reconnu fautif.
Une autre lacune de la version précédente du projet de loi, c'est qu'il n'y avait pas de demi-mesure, par exemple, pour des infractions de niveau moindre, pour ainsi dire. C'était tout blanc ou tout noir. Le comité n'avait que la possibilité d'émettre une recommandation de révocation ou de ne pas en émettre. Entre les deux, tout ce qui pouvait être fait, c'était de négocier à la pièce, avec le juge, des mesures disciplinaires quelconques. Or le juge avait toute la latitude pour dire qu'il ne voulait rien savoir parce que ce n'était pas une mesure coercitive.
On est venu, avec le processus actuel, remédier à la situation. À partir du moment où on a examiné la plainte, qui peut être fondée sur des éléments écrits qui ont été présentés au comité, le comité peut imposer des mesures de réparation s'il décide de ne pas pousser plus loin le processus parce qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un motif qui devrait ouvrir la porte à une révocation.
Le comité d'examen peut ordonner au juge, par exemple, de suivre des cours de perfectionnement professionnel ou l'obliger à présenter des excuses, et cela peut aider, dans certains cas, à remédier de façon plus efficace à une situation si on considère que le juge est ouvert à ce que certaines sanctions soient appliquées. C'est peut-être suffisant, dans certains cas, pour éviter de pousser plus loin un processus de plainte en bonne et due forme et une audience publique qui peut être longue et coûteuse.
Parmi les possibilités prévues par le nouveau projet de loi, il y a celle, pour le conseil, d'exprimer des préoccupations publiquement ou confidentiellement. Il y a une certaine transparence dans le processus. Par ailleurs, il peut donner un avertissement public ou confidentiel, prononcer une réprimande publique ou confidentielle ou ordonner au juge de s'excuser. Comme je le mentionnais dans ma question au député de Fundy Royal, la seule chose qui est un peu particulière, c'est une des mesures prévues à l'article 102:
g) avec le consentement du juge en cause, prendre toute autre mesure qu’il estime indiquée dans les circonstances.
Ce seront peut-être des questions à poser lorsque le dossier sera renvoyé au comité pour étude après la deuxième lecture du projet de loi, s'il passe cette étape, ce qui ne devrait pas être un problème. Par exemple, pourquoi le consentement du juge est-il requis? Pourquoi les victimes ne sont-elles pas impliquées dans le choix de la sanction qui peut être imposée en cas d'infraction de nature un peu moins grande que celle qui ouvre la porte à une révocation?
Une autre chose que le projet de loi vient régler, c'est le fait que le processus est particulièrement lourd. À l'époque, avec la constitution du Conseil canadien de la magistrature, c'est le Conseil lui-même qui devait faire la recommandation au ministre pour la révocation d'un juge. Cela faisait en sorte qu'il y avait un premier comité qui étudiait le dossier, puis un autre comité qui, ensuite, s'il recevait la plainte, devait la passer au Conseil canadien de la magistrature lui-même. Cela mobilisait environ 17 juges en chef ou juges en chef adjoints des tribunaux qui n'étaient pas déjà dans le processus. C'était de l'énergie qu'on ne pouvait pas consacrer à régler des problèmes courants dans les tribunaux, et ce n'était pas un exercice qui aidait nécessairement à assurer une équité procédurale aux juges. Donc, on vient régler cela. C'est le comité d'examen lui-même qui peut maintenant faire la recommandation au ministre de démettre un juge de ses fonctions. Donc, on vient un peu court-circuiter un processus qui n'était pas nécessaire et qui ne garantissait aucune équité procédurale.
Avec tout cela, on vient quand même améliorer beaucoup le processus. Cependant, comme mon collègue de Rivière-du-Nord en a fait état, ce n'est pas la seule solution qui permettrait d'assurer une meilleure impression d'impartialité de la part du système de justice et une meilleure séparation entre le législatif et l'exécutif et le judiciaire.
Je pense qu'il est pertinent de considérer également la révision du processus de nomination des juges, ce que le Bloc québécois a appelé à faire à plusieurs reprises, en proposant, par exemple, la création d'un comité spécial transpartisan qui serait chargé de recommander un nouveau processus de sélection. Donc, je me permets d'espérer. Tout comme mon collègue, je crois en la bonté de la nature humaine et en sa capacité à faire de bonnes choses, avant de finalement, parfois, être déçue moi aussi. Je tends encore la perche à bon entendeur. J'invite le gouvernement à déposer un projet de loi qui permettra de revoir le processus de nomination.
Collapse
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
View Richard Cannings Profile
2022-06-16 11:48 [p.6791]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for her great speech.
I think we all agree on this bill. It is a good bill, and it is important.
In the spirit of co-operation, I would like to ask my colleague how she would improve this bill.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de son bon discours.
Je crois que nous sommes tous d'accord sur ce projet de loi. C'est un bon projet de loi et il est important.
Dans un esprit de collaboration, j'aimerais demander à ma collègue comment elle améliorerait ce projet de loi.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2022-06-16 11:49 [p.6791]
Expand
Madam Speaker, as the previous speaker did, I too want to thank my colleague for his question, which he asked in French. We really do appreciate it and see it as a sign of respect. We know that it is not always easy.
I have already mentioned one possible way to impose sanctions for offences that do not necessarily call for the judge to be removed from office. I talked about including victims more in the process. This could be deliberated by the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. Unfortunately, I am not a member of that committee, so of course someone else will have to suggest ways to improve the legislation, but that could be a good starting point.
With regard to the fees involved in representing the judge, the committee work could also include ensuring that there is no financial incentive to carry on and drag out the proceedings.
Madame la Présidente, tout comme mon prédécesseur l'a fait, je remercie mon collègue de sa question posée en français. Nous l'apprécions énormément et nous le voyons comme un signe de respect. Nous savons que ce n'est pas toujours évident.
J'ai déjà souligné quelque chose qui pourrait être fait relativement aux sanctions pour les infractions qui n'ouvrent pas la porte à une révocation. Il s'agirait d'inclure davantage dans le processus les victimes de certaines sanctions. Cela pourrait faire l'objet de discussions au Comité permanent de la justice et des droits de la personne, auquel je ne siège malheureusement pas. Je comprends donc que ce sera un autre que moi qui pourra suggérer des améliorations, mais cela pourrait déjà en faire partie.
En ce qui concerne les honoraires pour représenter le juge, un travail pourrait également être fait pour s'assurer qu'il n'y a pas d'incitatifs financiers à poursuivre et à faire traîner les procédures en longueur.
Collapse
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for her fine speech.
I would like to ask her a question about the federal ombudsman for victims of crime. This position has been vacant for nine months, yet the ombudsman for federal offenders position was filled one day later. Could my colleague tell me about this government's priorities when it comes to victims?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de son beau discours.
J'aimerais lui poser une question concernant l'ombudsman fédéral des victimes d'actes criminels. On sait que son poste est vacant depuis neuf mois, alors que le poste de l'ombudsman des délinquants a été pourvu un jour plus tard. Ma collègue pourrait-elle me parler des priorités de ce gouvernement face aux victimes?
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2022-06-16 11:50 [p.6791]
Expand
Madam Speaker, whether the role of an ombudsman is to protect victims or offenders, there is always a certain obligation to appoint someone quickly. When a position remains vacant for a long time, there will be a backlog of cases. Unfortunately, that has become this government's specialty. I am thinking in particular about the immigration file, which I carried for two years.
I also think there should be more transparency with respect to certain appointments. For example, take the defence file, which is one of my files. We think the ombudsman should be accountable to the House, not the minister. That might have avoided some conflicts in the past, as in the Jonathan Vance case.
Madame la Présidente, que le rôle d'un ombudsman soit de protéger les victimes ou les délinquants, il y a toujours une certaine obligation de nommer le titulaire rapidement. Un poste qui reste vacant pendant longtemps implique une accumulation des dossiers, ce qui est malheureusement devenu une spécialité maison du gouvernement. Je pense notamment au dossier de l'immigration, que j'ai porté pendant deux ans.
Je pense aussi qu'on devrait faire preuve de plus de transparence dans le cas de certaines nominations. Je pense ici au dossier de la défense, que je porte, dans lequel nous aimerions que l'ombudsman rende des comptes à la Chambre et non au ministre. Cela aurait peut-être évité certains conflits par le passé, comme pour le dossier de Jonathan Vance.
Collapse
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2022-06-16 11:51 [p.6791]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I too will ask my colleague a question in French.
I understand that my colleague agrees with me about reviewing the appointment process. We have said it before: The “Liberalist” is appalling. I am not the one who came up with the name, by the way—it was the government. When even the government refers to this list of conditions by that name, we can imagine what impact this can have on the public. This really needs to be addressed quickly.
I would like to know what my colleague thinks about the example from Quebec, the Bastarache commission, during which former justice Bastarache reviewed the appointment process and proposed conditions that are better than those in place at the federal level.
Madame la Présidente, je vais moi aussi poser une question à ma collègue en français.
Je comprends que ma collègue est d'accord avec moi sur la question de la révision du processus de nomination. Nous l'avons déjà dit: la « libéraliste » est une aberration. Ce n'est d'ailleurs pas moi qui ai inventé ce nom, mais le gouvernement. Si même le gouvernement appelle ainsi cette liste de conditions, on peut imaginer l'effet que cela peut avoir dans la population. Il faut vraiment s'y attaquer rapidement.
J'aimerais savoir ce que pense ma collègue de l'exemple du Québec, où s'est tenue la commission Bastarache, durant laquelle l'ex-juge Bastarache s'est penché sur le processus de nomination et a proposé des conditions qui sont meilleures que celles qui sont en vigueur au fédéral.
Collapse
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
2022-06-16 11:52 [p.6791]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I will not miss any opportunity to say that Quebec is forward-thinking and is doing great things that we should emulate more often.
We need to have a much more transparent, non-partisan and depoliticized process. I will say it again, because this is key to having confidence in the justice system: The legislative, the executive, and the judicial branches must be kept separate, which is not the case with the “Liberalist”. This example is painfully obvious.
Since most of the judges who sit in Quebec are federally appointed superior court judges, efforts to ensure a non-partisan appointment process will have a particular impact on the routine workings of the courts.
Madame la Présidente, je ne manquerai pas une occasion de dire que le Québec est avant-gardiste et fait de belles choses dont on devrait plus souvent s'inspirer.
Effectivement, on devrait avoir un processus beaucoup plus transparent, non partisan et dépolitisé. Je le répète, car c'est la pierre d'assise de la confiance dans le système judiciaire: le législatif, l'exécutif et le judiciaire doivent être bien séparés, ce qui n'est pas le cas avec la « libéraliste ». Cet exemple crève les yeux.
Étant donné que la plupart des juges qui siègent au Québec sont des juges des cours supérieures nommés par le gouvernement fédéral, le fait d'assurer un processus de nomination non partisan aura une incidence particulière sur le quotidien dans les tribunaux.
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2022-06-16 11:53 [p.6792]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I will turn to the substance of Bill C-9 in a moment, but first I want to talk about how we got here, a process that for me illustrates disarray on the government's side in this 44th Parliament. Some days it still seems almost as if the Liberals really did not expect to have to govern after the last election.
Certainly, the bill was essentially ready to go well before the pandemic hit. For unknown reasons, the government decided to have it introduced in the Senate on May 25, 2020, as Bill S-5, and it died there when the unnecessary 2021 election was called. Then it was reintroduced by the government leader in the Senate as Bill S-3 on December 1, 2021. After a dispute over whether the bill could actually be introduced in the Senate as it would require a royal recommendation to allow expenditures by the Judicial Council under the bill, the bill was withdrawn from the Senate on December 15, 2021, and reintroduced as a government bill, Bill C-9, in the House on December 16, 2021, if members can follow that bouncing ball.
Despite the disarray on the government side, the bill still seemed to be a priority for the Liberal government as it was included in the December 2021 mandate letter for the Minister of Justice. There, the Prime Minister directed that the Minister of Justice, “Secure support for the swift passage of reforms to the judicial conduct process in the Judges Act to ensure the process is fair, effective and efficient so as to foster greater confidence in the judicial system.”
That's fair enough, and no doubt there is important work for us to do on improving the process by which complaints against federal judges are handled. However, here we come to the question of priorities of the Liberals and their effectiveness when it comes to addressing, in a timely manner, the pressing crises in our justice system and, of course, the question of the persistent obstructionism of the Conservatives, as the official opposition, in this sitting of Parliament.
While I remain disappointed that the government chose to ensure the defeat of private member's Bill C-216 from the member for Courtenay—Alberni, which would have decriminalized personal possession of small amounts of drugs, we have made some progress on the opioid crisis. Pushed into action by the impending vote on the private member's bill, the Liberals, after months of delay, finally granted an interim exemption to the provisions of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act for British Columbia, in effect decriminalizing personal possession for small amounts of drugs for the next three years.
That's a good thing, yes, but it only raises the question of why wait another six months. This delay seems likely to ensure that 2022 will eclipse the appalling record set in 2021 in British Columbia for the greatest number of overdose deaths in B.C. Also, why only British Columbia? The epidemic of deaths from toxic drug supply continues unabated across the country and in all corners of the country, both urban and rural. Passing Bill C-216 would have allowed us to begin to apply the tools we know that work right now: decriminalizing the personal possession of small amounts of drugs and guaranteeing a safe supply of drugs for those suffering from addictions. Bill C-216 would have brought a permanent change to the law to guarantee that addiction is dealt with as a health matter and not a criminal matter.
The crisis that demands urgent action is, of course, systemic racism in our criminal justice system. The most prominent evidence of the reality of this crisis is the over-incarceration of indigenous and Black Canadians in this country. All members by now are familiar with the shocking facts that indigenous people are more than six times as likely as other Canadians to end up incarcerated and that Black Canadians are more than twice as likely. Most shocking I think to all of us is the fact that indigenous women make up 50% of women incarcerated in federal institutions when they are less than 5% of the population.
Of course, injustice does not end with incarceration, as there is the legacy of the resulting criminal record. Not only have indigenous and racialized Canadians been disproportionately targeted for investigation, prosecution, fining or imprisonment, the most marginalized among us then end up stuck with criminal records. These are criminal records that make getting a job almost impossible, criminal records that often restrict access to affordable housing or even ordinary rental housing because of criminal record checks, criminal records that make volunteering with kids and seniors impossible, criminal records that restrict travel and criminal records that even make it difficult to get a bank loan or a mortgage.
The good news is that we have taken some steps to address the systemic racism in our court system with the passage of Bill C-5 yesterday. As soon as the Senate acts, we will see the elimination of 20 mandatory minimum penalties, most importantly those in the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, which fell very heavily on indigenous and racialized Canadians and have been a major contributor to over-incarceration.
Again, we would have liked to see bolder action here with the expansion of the existing Gladue principles to give judges discretion to waive all remaining mandatory minimums when it would be unjust to impose them on indigenous or racialized Canadians due to their circumstances. Unfortunately, this was not in the bill. One may ask why I am going on so long about this. It is judges' discretion that will make a big difference, so people have to have confidence in the judiciary.
Despite the public image that we never co-operate in Parliament, we had good co-operation in the justice committee. That co-operation allowed the passage of my amendment to Bill C-5, which will see the elimination of criminal records for personal possession of drugs within two years through a process called sequestration. What this means in practice is that these records will no longer show up in criminal record checks.
Today, we are moving on to debate Bill C-9 and finally, some members may say, I am coming to the substance of this bill. This is a bill to reform the process for handling complaints against federal judges. As I said, it is important in our system to maintain public confidence in those judges. Is this a crisis? Clearly it is not. Is it as urgent as decriminalizing drugs or removing systemic racism in our justice system? Clearly it is not. Is this as important? I would argue that in fact it is, because trust in the integrity of our justice system is integral to the fate of our democracy, especially in these trying times. We have to have faith in the integrity of the justice system and that means in the judges themselves, so we have to do better when it comes to holding the judiciary accountable, but we have to do so in ways that respect their fundamental independence and protect the system against government and political interference.
Bill C-9 suggests ways in which we can do this and, as I mentioned at the outset, measures have been ready to go on this for a very long time. Can we do better on holding judges accountable? Yes, we can, but it took well over two years for the government to get this bill before the House today and many of the ideas in it were first proposed in Canadian Bar Association reports as early as 2014. Some appeared in private members' bills tabled in the House as early as 2017, so it is past time to get to work on this bill.
Let me distinguish just for a moment what we are actually talking about. We are not talking about mistakes in law that occur from time to time in the federal courts. There is a clear remedy for these kinds of mistakes, and it is the appeal process. Instead, we are talking about the failure of federally appointed judges to meet the high standards that have been set for them and that we naturally should demand of them. That is either when it comes to personal conduct or to maintaining impartiality on the bench.
I should say from the outset that the Canadian record is remarkably good when it comes to cases of serious misconduct warranting removal from the bench. In the history of Canada, the Canadian Judicial Council has recommended removal for only five federally appointed judges. Four of those resigned before Parliament could deal with their cases, and the fifth before Parliament could act on the case. Whether these judges resigned before being removed solely to protect their pensions, which has been alleged, or simply to avoid the stigma of being the first federal judge ever removed by Parliament, I leave for others to judge.
Leaving the process in the hands of judges themselves is probably necessary, as this is both a key and crucial feature of our current system. It is the one that guarantees governments cannot influence the decisions of judges by threatening to remove them from office. Complaints about federally appointed judges are handled by the Canadian Judicial Council, which is made up of the 41 chief justices and associate chief justices of federally appointed courts.
The Canadian Judicial Council is chaired by the chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, who appoints a committee to examine complaints. If a complaint is initially found to have merit, a three-judge panel examines the complaint and either decides to dismiss it, to recommend no further action because the misconduct does not warrant removal from the bench, or to hold a public inquiry. Again, this is relatively rare, with only 14 inquiries held over the past 40 years.
If there was an inquiry, the committee would then forward its findings to the full Judicial Council, along with a recommendation on the possible removal. If removal is recommended, the judge has the right to appeal to an appeals panel and, if needed, further appeal beyond that. The Supreme Court of Canada can choose to hear the appeal directly, but the current process is that the case would be heard at the Federal Court and the Federal Court of Appeal before the Supreme Court of Canada could hear the case. This seems unnecessarily complicated and provoking of unnecessary delay. Bill C-9 would address the problem, but while the current system does work in the most serious cases of judicial behaviour, the process is long and drawn out.
Bill C-9 would also address the major gap in the current process, which is that it has proved largely ineffective in dealing with cases of misbehaviour that would not be serious enough to warrant removal from the bench. This is the fact: There is only one possible remedy in the current process, which is removal from the bench. Serious misbehaviour, though rare, is not hard to spot as it always involves law-breaking by the judge concerned or outright corruption.
Less serious complaints about misbehaviour are almost always about the question of impartiality. What would an example be of this less serious misbehaviour? A case in Saskatchewan in 2021 is a case in point. Five complaints were received about a judge who appeared in pictures with a group indirectly connected to a case on which, though he had finished hearings, he had not yet delivered judgment.
The judge in this case agreed this was a serious error on his part and that it could reflect negatively on perceptions about his impartiality in the case before him. The complaints did not proceed, as almost no one thought the judge should be removed and he had promised it would never happen again. Under the current provisions, no action could have been taken, if the judge had disputed the allegations, other than to recommend his removal from the bench for appearing in a photograph.
Bill C-9 would allow for additional remedial options other than the current sole option of recommending removal. The bill proposes the referral of complaints to a three-judge review panel, which might find removal to be warranted, and then the review panel could refer the complaint to a larger five-judge hearing panel. At the review stage, however, the review panel could still dismiss the complaint or impose remedies other than removal.
What would Canadians get out of these changes? Most importantly, they would get confidence in the judiciary that would be better maintained by having a process that was both more timely and could deal more effectively with less serious complaints. This should help prevent the judicial system from falling into disrepute and help preserve the very important trust in the impartiality of the judiciary.
Bill C-9 might actually save some taxpayer money on cases involving allegations of misconduct by federal judges, as the current process can stretch out for years. Cases involving serious misconduct now often take up to four years to resolve. Bill C-9 would expedite that process by removing the two levels of court appeals that I mentioned.
At the same time, there also may be an increase in costs for dealing with less serious allegations as there would be more options available that are currently dismissed early in the process. The benefit here is that less serious cases would no longer simply be dismissed, and instead sanctions for remedies would be possible.
In the end, and after hearing debate today, I believe Bill C-9 should prove to be relatively uncontentious. The Canadian Bar Association was part of the consultations that were held by the judicial council when Senate Bill S-5 was being drafted in the previous Parliament. There was a broader consultation that dealt with measures to clarify expectations on what constitutes “good behaviour” for federal judges that are largely set in regulations. Bill C-9 simply reforms the process for dealing with judges who fail to meet those standards.
Bill C-9 would also require more transparency with regard to how complaints are handled. The Canadian Judicial Council is responsible for administering this process, and Bill C-9 would require the council to include the number of complaints it received and how they were resolved in its annual public report.
In conclusion, New Democrats support modernizing the process for complaints against federally appointed judges, and we support adding alternative remedial options behind the current sole option of removal from the bench. The bill would allow for varied sanctions such as counselling, continuing education and other reprimands. New Democrats are supportive of streamlining and updating the process to handle complaints against federally appointed judges. This process has not been updated for 50 years. It is time for a modern complaint system for a modernized judiciary, and one that will help increase public confidence in federal judges.
The bill provides an opportunity for parties to work together to get an important reform in place, as it is yet another example of things that did not get done earlier because of the unnecessary 2021 election. We should get this done so that we can then turn our attention back to tackling the serious issues in our justice system that remain, and to confronting the opioid crisis that is better dealt with as a health matter than a judicial matter. I hope to see Bill C-9 advance quickly through the House and in the other place.
Madame la Présidente, je parlerai de la teneur du projet de loi C‑9 dans un instant, mais j’aimerais d’abord expliquer comment nous en sommes arrivés ici, un processus qui illustre bien selon moi l’état de désarroi dans lequel se trouve le gouvernement en cette 44e législature. Certains jours, j’ai parfois l’impression que les libéraux ne s’attendaient pas vraiment à gouverner après les dernières élections.
Le projet de loi était essentiellement prêt à être adopté bien avant la pandémie. Pour des raisons inconnues, le gouvernement a décidé de le présenter au Sénat le 25 mai 2020. Il s'agissait du projet de loi S-5, et il est mort au Feuilleton lorsque les élections inutiles de 2021 ont été déclenchées. Puis, le leader du gouvernement au Sénat l’a présenté de nouveau sous la forme du projet de loi S-3 le 1er décembre 2021. Après un différend sur la question de savoir si le projet de loi pourrait être présenté au Sénat, car il nécessiterait une recommandation royale pour permettre au Conseil de la magistrature d’engager des dépenses en vertu du projet de loi, ce dernier a été retiré du Sénat le 15 décembre 2021 et présenté de nouveau comme projet de loi d’initiative ministérielle, le C‑9, à la Chambre le 16 décembre 2021, si les députés ont bien réussi à me suivre.
Malgré le désarroi du gouvernement libéral, ce projet de loi semble être demeuré une priorité pour celui-ci, puisqu’il a été inclus dans la lettre de mandat de décembre 2021 du ministre de la Justice. Dans cette lettre, le premier ministre demandait au ministre de la Justice d’« obtenir le soutien nécessaire afin d’assurer l’adoption rapide des réformes du processus disciplinaire de la magistrature dans la Loi sur les juges pour veiller à ce que le processus soit équitable, efficace et efficient et suscite une plus grande confiance à l’égard du système judiciaire ».
Je suis bien d’accord, et il ne fait aucun doute que nous avons un travail important à faire pour améliorer le processus de traitement des plaintes contre les juges fédéraux. Cependant, nous en arrivons à la question des priorités des libéraux et de leur efficacité pour ce qui est de régler rapidement les crises urgentes au sein du système de justice. Nous en arrivons aussi, bien sûr, au problème de l’obstruction persistante des conservateurs, dans leur rôle d’opposition officielle en cette session parlementaire.
Bien que je sois déçu que le gouvernement ait choisi de rejeter le projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire C‑216 du député de Courtenay—Alberni, qui aurait décriminalisé la possession de petites quantités de drogues à des fins personnelles, nous avons réalisé certains progrès dans la lutte contre la crise des opioïdes. Poussés à agir par le vote imminent sur ce projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, les libéraux, après des mois de retard, ont finalement accordé une exemption provisoire aux dispositions de la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances pour la Colombie‑Britannique. Ils ont décriminalisé la possession de petites quantités de drogues à des fins personnelles pour les trois prochaines années.
C’est une bonne chose, mais on se demande pourquoi il faut attendre encore six mois. Ce retard risque de nous faire surpasser, en 2022, le triste record de décès par surdose en Colombie‑Britannique établi en 2021. En outre, pourquoi s'arrêter à la Colombie‑Britannique? L’épidémie de décès attribuables à l’approvisionnement en drogues toxiques fait des ravages dans toutes les régions du pays, tant urbaines que rurales. L’adoption du projet de loi C‑216 nous aurait permis d’appliquer les outils que nous savons efficaces à l’heure actuelle, soit la décriminalisation de la possession de petites quantités de drogues à des fins personnelles et la garantie d’un approvisionnement sécuritaire de drogues pour les personnes qui souffrent de toxicomanie. Le projet de loi C‑216 aurait apporté une modification permanente à la loi pour garantir que la toxicomanie soit traitée comme un problème de santé plutôt que comme un crime.
La crise urgente à régler est, bien sûr, celle du racisme systémique dans le système de justice pénale du pays. L’incarcération disproportionnée des Canadiens autochtones et noirs en est la preuve la plus accablante. Tous les députés sont maintenant conscients du fait choquant que les Autochtones sont au-delà de six fois plus susceptibles que les autres Canadiens de se retrouver en prison, et les Canadiens noirs, de leur côté, le sont deux fois plus. Le plus troublant, je crois pour nous tous, est le fait que dans les établissements fédéraux, 50 % des femmes incarcérées sont autochtones, alors que celles-ci représentent moins de 5 % de la population.
Bien sûr, l’injustice ne se limite pas à l’incarcération, car il y a aussi les séquelles du casier judiciaire qui en résulte. Non seulement les Canadiens autochtones et racialisés sont ciblés de manière disproportionnée dans le cadre d’enquêtes, de poursuites, d’amendes ou de peines d’emprisonnement, mais les habitants les plus marginalisés du pays se retrouvent aussi avec des casiers judiciaires. Ces casiers judiciaires rendent presque impossible pour eux de se trouver un emploi, limitent fréquemment leurs chances d’accéder à un logement abordable, voire d’accéder à un logement locatif ordinaire — en raison de la vérification des antécédents judiciaires —, les empêchent de faire du bénévolat auprès d’enfants ou de personnes âgées, restreignent leurs possibilités de voyage et rendent même difficile pour eux d’obtenir un prêt bancaire ou une hypothèque.
La bonne nouvelle est qu’avec l’adoption du projet de loi C‑5, hier, nous avons pris des mesures pour lutter contre le racisme systémique dans le système judiciaire canadien. Dès que le Sénat l’aura aussi adopté, 20 peines minimales obligatoires, notamment celles en vertu de la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances, qui frappaient très durement les Canadiens autochtones et racialisés et qui ont grandement contribué à leur taux d’incarcération excessif, seront éliminées.
Encore une fois, nous aurions aimé voir des mesures plus audacieuses, comme l’élargissement des principes énoncés dans Gladue pour donner aux juges la latitude de ne pas imposer les autres peines minimales obligatoires non plus lorsqu’elles seraient injustes pour les Canadiens autochtones ou racialisés en raison de leur situation. Malheureusement, cela n’a pas été inclus dans le projet de loi. D’aucuns pourraient se demander pourquoi je m’attarde tant sur ce sujet. C’est parce que c’est le pouvoir discrétionnaire des juges qui fera une grande différence pour permettre aux gens d’avoir confiance dans le système judiciaire.
Malgré l’image que certains pourraient avoir selon laquelle les députés ne collaborent jamais au Parlement, les membres du comité de la justice ont bien travaillé ensemble. Cet esprit de collaboration a rendu possible l’adoption de mon amendement au projet de loi C‑5, qui prévoit l’élimination d’ici deux ans des casiers judiciaires pour possession de drogues à des fins personnelles grâce à un processus de retrait automatisé. Concrètement, cela signifie que ces casiers n’apparaîtront plus lors des vérifications des antécédents judiciaires.
Aujourd’hui, nous passons au débat sur le projet de loi C‑9. Enfin, diront certains députés, j’en viens à la teneur de ce projet de loi. C’est un projet de loi visant à réformer le processus de traitement des plaintes contre les juges fédéraux. Comme je l’ai dit, il est important dans notre système de maintenir la confiance du public envers ces juges. S’agit-il d’une crise? Manifestement non. Est-ce aussi urgent que de décriminaliser les drogues ou d’éliminer le racisme systémique dans notre système judiciaire? Manifestement non. Est-ce aussi important? Je dirais qu’en fait, ce l’est, car la confiance dans l’intégrité de notre système judiciaire fait partie intégrante du destin de notre démocratie, surtout en ces temps difficiles. Nous devons avoir confiance dans l’intégrité du système judiciaire, et cela signifie dans les juges eux-mêmes. Nous devons donc faire mieux pour ce qui est de la responsabilisation des juges, mais nous devons le faire de manière à respecter leur indépendance fondamentale et à protéger le système contre l’ingérence gouvernementale et politique.
Le projet de loi C‑9 propose des moyens d’y parvenir et, comme je l’ai mentionné au début, des mesures sont prêtes depuis très longtemps à cet égard. Pouvons-nous faire mieux en ce qui a trait à la responsabilisation des juges? Oui, nous le pouvons, mais il a fallu bien plus de deux ans au gouvernement pour que ce projet de loi soit présenté à la Chambre aujourd’hui, et bon nombre des idées qu’il contient ont été proposées pour la première fois dans des rapports de l’Association du Barreau canadien dès 2014. Certaines sont apparues dans des projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire déposés à la Chambre dès 2017; il est donc plus que temps de se mettre au travail sur ce projet de loi.
Je veux faire une brève distinction concernant ce dont nous parlons réellement. Nous ne parlons pas des erreurs de droit qui se produisent de temps à autre dans les tribunaux fédéraux. Il existe un recours clair pour ce genre d’erreurs, et c’est le processus d’appel. Nous parlons plutôt de l’incapacité des juges de nomination fédérale à respecter les normes élevées qui ont été fixées pour eux et que nous devrions naturellement exiger d’eux, et ce, qu’il s’agisse de leur conduite personnelle ou du maintien de leur impartialité sur le banc.
Je dois dire d’emblée que le bilan canadien est remarquablement bon en ce qui concerne les cas d’inconduite grave justifiant la révocation d’un juge. Dans l’histoire du Canada, le Conseil canadien de la magistrature n’a recommandé la révocation que de cinq juges de nomination fédérale. Quatre d’entre eux ont démissionné avant que le Parlement ne puisse traiter leur cas, et le cinquième avant que le Parlement ne puisse prendre des mesures. Je laisse à d’autres le soin de juger si ces juges ont démissionné avant d’être révoqués dans le seul but de protéger leur pension, ce qui a été allégué, ou simplement pour éviter la stigmatisation associée au fait d’être le premier juge fédéral ayant fait l'objet d'une révocation par le Parlement.
Laisser le processus entre les mains des juges eux-mêmes est probablement nécessaire, car il s’agit d’une caractéristique à la fois clé et cruciale de notre système actuel. C’est celle qui garantit que les gouvernements ne peuvent influencer les décisions des juges en menaçant de les démettre de leurs fonctions. Les plaintes concernant les juges de nomination fédérale sont traitées par le Conseil canadien de la magistrature, qui est composé des 41 juges en chef et juges en chef adjoints des cours de nomination fédérale.
Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature est présidé par le juge en chef de la Cour suprême du Canada, qui constitue un comité chargé d’examiner les plaintes. Si une plainte est jugée fondée initialement, un comité de trois juges l’examine et décide soit de la rejeter, soit de ne pas recommander d’autres mesures parce que l’inconduite ne justifie pas la révocation du juge, soit encore de tenir une enquête publique. Là encore, cette dernière possibilité est relativement rare, puisque seules 14 enquêtes ont été menées au cours des 40 dernières années.
S’il y a enquête, le comité transmet ses conclusions à l’ensemble du Conseil de la magistrature, ainsi qu’une recommandation sur la révocation éventuelle. Si la révocation est recommandée, le juge a le droit d’interjeter appel auprès d’un comité d’appel et, au besoin, d'en interjeter d'autres. La Cour suprême du Canada peut choisir d’instruire l’appel directement, mais la procédure actuelle prévoit que la Cour fédérale et la Cour d’appel fédérale instruisent l’appel avant que la Cour suprême du Canada n'en soit saisie. Cela semble inutilement compliqué et entraîne des retards indus. Le projet de loi C‑9 réglerait le problème, car si le système actuel fonctionne dans les cas de comportement judiciaire les plus graves, le processus est long et fastidieux.
Le projet de loi C‑9 remédierait également à la principale lacune du processus actuel, à savoir qu’il s’est révélé largement inefficace pour traiter les cas de mauvaise conduite qui ne seraient pas assez graves pour justifier la révocation. C'est un fait: il n’y a qu’un seul remède possible dans le processus actuel, c'est-à-dire la révocation. Les fautes graves, bien que rares, ne sont pas difficiles à repérer, car elles comportent toujours une violation de la loi par le juge concerné ou la corruption pure et simple.
Les plaintes moins graves pour mauvaise conduite portent presque toujours sur la question de l’impartialité. Quel serait un exemple de cette mauvaise conduite moins grave? Une affaire survenue en Saskatchewan en 2021 en est un bon exemple. Cinq plaintes ont été reçues au sujet d’un juge qui est apparu sur des photos avec un groupe indirectement lié à une affaire dans laquelle, bien qu’il ait terminé les audiences, il n’avait pas encore rendu son jugement.
Le juge en question a reconnu qu’il s’agissait d’une erreur grave de sa part et que cela pouvait avoir une incidence négative sur la perception de son impartialité dans l’affaire dont il était saisi. Les plaintes n’ont pas été retenues, car presque personne ne pensait que le juge devait être révoqué, et il avait promis que cela ne se reproduirait plus. En vertu des dispositions actuelles, aucune mesure n’aurait pu être prise si le juge avait contesté les allégations, si ce n’est de recommander sa révocation pour avoir figuré dans une photographie.
Le projet de loi C‑9 prévoit des mesures correctives supplémentaires autres que la seule option actuelle, qui est la révocation. Le projet de loi propose le renvoi des plaintes à un comité de révision composé de trois juges, qui pourrait conclure que la révocation est justifiée. Le comité de révision pourrait ensuite renvoyer la plainte à un comité d’audience plus important composé de cinq juges. À l’étape de la révision, toutefois, le comité de révision pourrait toujours rejeter la plainte ou imposer des mesures de redressement autres que la révocation.
Que retireraient les Canadiens de ces changements? Avant tout, ils gagneraient une plus grande confiance dans la magistrature qui serait en meilleure posture grâce à un processus à la fois plus rapide et mieux en mesure de traiter efficacement les plaintes moins graves. Cela devrait contribuer à empêcher le système judiciaire de tomber dans le discrédit et à préserver la confiance très importante dans l’impartialité de la magistrature.
Le projet de loi C‑9 pourrait en fait permettre d’économiser l’argent des contribuables dans les cas d’allégations d’inconduite de la part de juges fédéraux, car le processus actuel peut s’étendre sur des années. Il faut souvent jusqu’à quatre ans pour résoudre les cas d’inconduite grave. Le projet de loi C‑9 accélérerait ce processus en supprimant les deux niveaux d’appel des tribunaux que j’ai mentionnés.
En même temps, il pourrait y avoir une augmentation des coûts pour traiter les allégations moins graves, car il y aurait plus d’options disponibles qui sont actuellement rejetées au début du processus. L’avantage ici est que les cas moins graves ne seraient plus simplement rejetés, et qu’il serait possible d’obtenir des sanctions comme forme de réparation.
En fin de compte, et après avoir entendu le débat aujourd’hui, je crois que le projet de loi C‑9 devrait s’avérer relativement peu controversé. L’Association du Barreau canadien a participé aux consultations menées par le conseil judiciaire lors de la rédaction du projet de loi S‑5 du Sénat au cours de la législature précédente. Il y a eu une consultation plus large qui portait sur des mesures visant à clarifier les attentes quant à ce qui constitue une « bonne conduite » pour les juges fédéraux, qui sont en grande partie établies dans les règlements. Le projet de loi C‑9 réforme simplement le processus de traitement des juges qui ne respectent pas ces normes.
Le projet de loi C‑9 exigerait également plus de transparence en ce qui concerne la façon dont les plaintes sont traitées. Le Conseil canadien de la magistrature est responsable de l’administration de ce processus, et le projet de loi C‑9 exigerait que le conseil inclue le nombre de plaintes reçues et la façon dont elles ont été résolues dans son rapport public annuel.
En conclusion, les néo-démocrates appuient la modernisation du processus de traitement des plaintes contre les juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral, et nous appuyons l’ajout de solutions de rechange à la seule option actuelle de révocation. Le projet de loi permettrait des sanctions variées comme des séances de thérapie, de la formation continue et d’autres formes de réprimandes. Les néo-démocrates appuient la rationalisation et la mise à jour du processus de traitement des plaintes contre les juges nommés par le gouvernement fédéral. Ce processus n’a pas été mis à jour depuis 50 ans. Il est temps de mettre en place un système de plaintes moderne pour un système judiciaire actualisé, qui contribuera à accroître la confiance du public dans les juges fédéraux.
Le projet de loi donne l’occasion aux parties de travailler ensemble pour mettre en place une réforme importante, car c’est un autre exemple de choses qui n’ont pas été faites plus tôt en raison de l’élection inutile de 2021. Nous devrions faire en sorte que cela soit fait afin de pouvoir porter notre attention sur les problèmes graves qui subsistent dans notre système judiciaire et sur la crise des opioïdes, qu'il vaudrait mieux voir comme une question de santé que comme une question judiciaire. J’espère que le projet de loi C‑9 progressera rapidement à la Chambre et à l’autre endroit.
Collapse
View Matthew Green Profile
NDP (ON)
View Matthew Green Profile
2022-06-16 12:08 [p.6794]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the hon. member did a great job of outlining some of the gaps in justice reform. I know that he spoke at length about this bill, but I want to give him the opportunity, given his vast experience as a critic in justice, to talk about ways in which the government needs to move, going forward, to help close some of those gaps in some very serious needs for justice reform.
Monsieur le Président, le député a parfaitement exposé quelques-unes des lacunes de la réforme du système judiciaire. Je sais qu’il a longuement parlé du projet de loi, mais je tiens à lui donner l’occasion, étant donné son immense expérience de porte-parole en matière de justice, de parler de ce que le gouvernement doit faire pour aider à combler ces lacunes et pour répondre au besoin criant de réformer le système judiciaire.
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2022-06-16 12:08 [p.6794]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I know the member for Hamilton Centre's dedication to ensuring that we reform the justice system to try to remove the systemic racism that exists.
As I said in my speech, Bill C-9 is important in that the public, from diverse backgrounds, has to have confidence in this system. The other things that we have talked about here, which are getting the opioid crisis out of the justice system and directly tackling the systemic racism that results in the over-incarceration of indigenous and racialized Canadians, are in crisis. We need to move further and we need to move faster in addressing those matters in our justice system than we have been able to do in this Parliament. We are making progress, but not enough and not fast enough.
Monsieur le Président, je sais combien le député de Hamilton-Centre est déterminé à ce que nous réformions le système de justice pour essayer d’éliminer le racisme systémique.
Comme je l’ai dit dans mon intervention, le projet de loi C‑9 est important, car les citoyens de différents horizons doivent avoir confiance dans le système judiciaire. Les autres aspects dont nous avons parlé, soit la déjudiciarisation de la crise des opioïdes et la lutte contre le racisme systémique qui entraîne l'incarcération excessive des Canadiens autochtones et racialisés, sont également très problématiques. Nous devons agir plus rapidement que nous l'avons fait au cours de cette législature pour régler ces problèmes inhérents au système de justice. Nous progressons, mais pas assez et pas assez vite.
Collapse
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2022-06-16 12:09 [p.6794]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I listened to my hon. colleague's speech. He is a member of the justice committee, so there are occasional times that we agree on things at the justice committee. This is one of those times. There is agreement on this bill and that we need to update the process for judicial complaints after it being relatively unchanged for the past half-century.
One of the things that has come up in debate that I would like his comments on is this. During the last version of this bill, we were able to get input from the ombudsman for victims of crime. He will know that position has remained vacant since October of last year. In my view, it should have been filled immediately. There is an important role that the ombudsman plays when we are dealing with legislation as well as other situations that arise.
I wonder this. Could my hon. colleague comment on this vacancy, and whether he feels it is urgent that it be filled?
Monsieur le Président, j’ai écouté l’intervention du député. Il est membre du comité de la justice. Il arrive que nous nous y entendions sur certaines choses dans ce comité. C’est le cas en l’occurrence. Nous nous entendons sur ce projet de loi et sur la nécessité de mettre à jour le processus d'examen des plaintes contre des juges, qui est demeuré relativement inchangé depuis 50 ans.
J’aimerais savoir ce que le député pense d'un point qui a été mentionné dans le débat. Durant l’examen de la dernière version de ce projet de loi, nous avons entendu les observations de l’ombudsman des victimes d’actes criminels. Il sait que ce poste est vacant depuis octobre dernier. Selon moi, il devrait être pourvu immédiatement. L’ombudsman joue un rôle important lors de l'examen des projets de loi et dans d’autres situations.
Voici ma question. Le député peut-il parler de cette vacance et dire s’il estime qu’il est urgent de la pourvoir?
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2022-06-16 12:10 [p.6795]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I will state, as the member for Fundy Royal did, that although sometimes we disagree, we have worked very effectively together at the justice committee for some time. I expect that we will continue to do so.
He is well aware that both he and I have raised with the minister, on numerous occasions, the issue of the vacancy in the office of the ombudsman for federal victims of crime. I do think it is urgent that this spot be filled. It is a very important role in amplifying the voices of victims, and a very important role in letting us know in Parliament what the true state of affairs is when it comes to victims and our justice system. The previous federal ombudsman for victims of crime provided very useful testimony at committee many times, and I think we could have used that kind of testimony on some of the issues we are dealing with this time.
I would certainly agree with the member that this vacancy needs to be filled as soon as possible.
Monsieur le Président, comme l'a souligné le député de Fundy Royal, malgré certaines divergences de vues, nous travaillons très efficacement ensemble au comité de la justice depuis un bon bout de temps. Je suis certain que cette collaboration se poursuivra.
Le député sait très bien que nous avons tous deux, à de nombreuses occasions, soulevé auprès du ministre la question de la vacance du poste d’ombudsman fédéral des victimes d’actes criminels. J’estime qu’il est urgent de nommer quelqu’un. Il s’agit d’un rôle très important, puisqu'il permet de bien faire entendre la voix des victimes et d’informer les parlementaires de l’état des lieux en ce qui concerne les victimes et le système de justice. L’ancienne ombudsman fédérale des victimes d’actes criminels a présenté de nombreuses fois au comité des témoignages très utiles, et je pense que ce type de témoignages nous auraient aidés à traiter de la question dont nous sommes saisis.
Je suis tout à fait d’accord avec le député pour dire que quelqu’un doit être nommé à ce poste dès que possible.
Collapse
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
BQ (QC)
View Sébastien Lemire Profile
2022-06-16 12:11 [p.6795]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, one thing that Bill C‑9 will do is provide for a review panel made up of three people. This panel will be able to conduct the inquiry itself or refer it to a larger five-person panel.
Is the member satisfied by this panel? Does he think that it will be able to adequately address any complaints that are made against judges?
Does he have any other mechanisms to suggest?
Monsieur le Président, une des choses qu'apporte le projet de loi C‑9 est de proposer un comité qui aura à faire l'examen et qui sera notamment composé de trois personnes. Ce comité pourra soit enquêter lui-même, soit renvoyer le dossier à un autre comité un peu plus large, formé de cinq personnes.
Le député est-il satisfait de la mise en place de ce comité? Pense-t-il que cela pourra régler les dossiers de manière suffisante quand des plaintes seront déposées contre les juges?
A-t-il un autre mécanisme à proposer?
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2022-06-16 12:12 [p.6795]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I think the proof is in the pudding. I think this is a good proposal. It will allow the judicial council, as I said, to deal with less serious cases of misconduct that obviously do not warrant removal from the bench, but right now we see those complaints dismissed out of hand. I do not think that serves the public well, and I do not think it serves judges well. By having a new review committee to take a look at these less serious complaints, complaints that do not necessarily involve law-breaking or corruption, we can get some other sanctions applied to help influence judges to maintain the high standards that are expected of them.
Monsieur le Président, il me semble que les faits parlent d’eux-mêmes. Je pense qu’il s’agit d’une bonne proposition. Elle permettra au Conseil canadien de la magistrature, comme je l’ai dit, de traiter les cas moins graves d’inconduite qui ne justifient pas la révocation d’un juge, mais dont les plaintes qui y sont rattachées sont rejetées du revers de la main à l’heure actuelle. Je ne pense pas que cette façon de faire soit dans l'intérêt du public ni des juges. En demandant à un nouveau comité d’examen de traiter les plaintes moins graves, c'est-à-dire les plaintes qui ne portent pas nécessairement sur des infractions ou sur des affaires de corruption, nous pourrions faire infliger d’autres sanctions qui inciteraient les juges à travailler selon les normes élevées, conformément à ce que le public s'attend d'eux.
Collapse
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
NDP (BC)
View Taylor Bachrach Profile
2022-06-16 12:13 [p.6795]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I also want to recognize my colleague for his work on the justice committee, particularly the recent amendments that would see the sequestration of records for those charged and convicted of simple possession. It is going to make a difference for thousands of Canadians.
My question is around this bill and the process moving forward. I have been listening to the debate, and there seems to be remarkable consensus that this a much-needed change and that we should move forward in a timely way. In the past, when we have had that kind of agreement and when bills before us have a history in the House of debate and deliberation, there have been ways for us to move them forward in an expeditious manner.
I would like my colleague's thoughts on what a path forward might look like for this bill that would see it passed into law as quickly as possible.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens, moi aussi, à saluer le travail du député au comité de la justice, notamment en ce qui concerne les récents amendements relatifs à la saisie des dossiers des personnes accusées et reconnues coupables de possession simple. Ces amendements changeront tout pour des milliers de Canadiens.
Ma question porte sur le projet de loi et le processus qui suivra. J’écoute le débat et je constate un consensus remarquable sur la nécessité d'apporter des changements et d'agir rapidement. Dans le passé, quand nous arrivions à ce genre de consensus sur un projet de loi dont nous avions déjà débattu à la Chambre, nous avons trouvé le moyen de les adopter rapidement.
D’après le député, comment pouvons-nous nous y prendre pour que ce projet de loi soit adopté aussi rapidement que possible?
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2022-06-16 12:14 [p.6795]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley for his kind words on my role on the committee.
I just want to say, before I answer the question specifically, that the removal of criminal records for personal possession potentially affects 250,000 Canadians, so this would have a big impact. If we are worried about public safety, we need to make sure that those who have come in conflict with the law have every opportunity to reintegrate themselves into society, to support their families and to get things back on track. Bill C-5 would help do that.
With respect to Bill C-9, I have been frustrated, I would say, for almost five years now because we have not simply gotten this done. I think there is agreement, and like the member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley, I would recommend to House leaders that we find a way to move this bill forward very quickly.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de Skeena-Bulkley Valley de ses bons mots sur mon travail au comité.
Je tiens à dire, avant de répondre à la question, que l’élimination des casiers judiciaires pour possession pour usage personnel concerne 250 000 Canadiens. L’incidence sera donc importante. Si nous nous inquiétons au sujet de la sécurité publique, nous devons veiller à ce que les personnes qui ont eu des démêlés avec la justice aient l’occasion de réintégrer la société, de subvenir aux besoins de leur famille et de redresser la barre. Le projet de loi C‑5 serait un pas dans la bonne direction.
En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C‑9, voilà près de cinq ans que je ronge mon frein parce que le dossier n'est toujours pas réglé. Il me semble qu’il y a un consensus et, comme le député de Skeena-Bulkley Valley, je recommande aux leaders parlementaires de trouver un moyen d’adopter ce projet de loi très rapidement.
Collapse
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2022-06-16 12:15 [p.6795]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am very grateful to my hon. colleague and neighbour, the hon. member for Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, for giving us the full background and history on how long it has taken for this bill to come before us. I also agree with him that there are urgent priorities in other areas of criminal justice.
There is one area of judicial conduct that I would love to know his opinion on, and it is a growing concern. Retired Supreme Court of Canada judges and other judges from high levels carry with them an enormous amount of clout. If they say something it must be true. After all, they are former Supreme Court of Canada judges.
I am sure my hon. friend will recall that two former Supreme Court judges were hired by SNC-Lavalin and were used to undermine the opinions and work of the very hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould when she was our attorney general and minister of justice. There has been some discussion, including from Wayne MacKay, a professor emeritus at Dalhousie law school, which I was privileged to attend, that we should consider ensuring that when judges retire they remain constrained by the same ethical rules of conduct that applied when they were practising judges. I wonder if he has any views on that.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très reconnaissante à mon collègue et voisin, le député d’Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke, de nous avoir donné le contexte et l’historique complets du projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis. Je suis également d’accord avec lui pour dire qu’il y a des priorités urgentes dans d’autres domaines de la justice pénale.
Il y a un aspect de la conduite des juges sur lequel j’aimerais bien connaître son opinion, et c’est une préoccupation croissante. Les juges retraités de la Cour suprême du Canada et d’autres juges de haut niveau ont un poids énorme. S’ils disent quelque chose, ce doit être vrai. Après tout, ce sont d’anciens juges de la Cour suprême du Canada.
Je suis sûre que mon honorable ami se souviendra que deux anciens juges de la Cour suprême ont été engagés par SNC-Lavalin et ont été utilisés pour discréditer les avis et le travail de la très honorable Jody Wilson-Raybould lorsqu’elle était procureure générale et ministre de la Justice. Selon des discussions auxquelles j'ai eu le privilège d'assister, des personnes comme Wayne MacKay, professeur émérite à la Faculté de droit de Dalhousie, ont dit qu'il faudrait considérer la possibilité d'assujettir les juges retraités aux mêmes règles de conduite déontologiques que celles qui s’appliquent aux juges en fonction. Je me demande si le député a une opinion à ce sujet.
Collapse
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2022-06-16 12:16 [p.6795]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I share the hon. member's concerns about activities undertaken by former members of the judiciary, but we have a thorny problem there in that when former judges resume their private lives, it is hard to imagine how we can impose standards upon them that are different from what we expect of others. I think it is a matter worthy of investigation and worthy of consultation broadly in society and in the legal and judicial community to find a solution to this problem.
Monsieur le Président, je partage les préoccupations de la députée concernant les activités des anciens membres de la magistrature, mais nous avons là un problème épineux dans la mesure où, lorsque d’anciens juges reprennent leur vie privée, il est difficile d’imaginer comment nous pouvons leur imposer d’autres normes que celles que tout le monde devrait suivre. Je pense que c’est une question qui mérite d’être étudiée et de faire l’objet d’une vaste consultation au sein de la société et de la communauté juridique et judiciaire pour trouver une solution à ce problème.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 212 | Page: 1 of 4

1
2
3
4
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data