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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Ms. Cohen, you said at the outset that testifying before us today made you very nervous. I can assure you that everyone here around the table is relatively nervous at the prospect of raising this sensitive subject before witnesses with so much experience. So I congratulate all the witnesses for being here today.
My first question is for Dr. Wieman.
Dr. Wieman, can you speak about the experience of the B.C. First Nations Health Authority in the area of MAID? Are you able to share any best practices or guidelines that the First Nations Health Authority has adopted with respect to MAID?
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you very much.
My next question is for Dr. Barbès-Morin.
Paragraph 241.2(1)(c) of the Criminal Code stipulates that to be eligible for medical assistance in dying, a person must “have a grievous and irremediable medical condition.” This means “enduring physical or psychological suffering that is intolerable to them and that cannot be relieved under conditions that they consider acceptable“, as the Code further states.
Are there treatments for some illnesses or mental health problems that the patient may consider unacceptable, but that could relieve intolerable suffering?
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
That's all the time I have.
Thank you.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
I call this meeting to order.
Welcome to meeting number 30 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages.
Pursuant to the order of reference of Monday, May 30, 2022, the committee is resuming its study of Bill C-13, An Act to amend the Official Languages Act, to enact the Use of French in Federally Regulated Private Businesses Act and to make related amendments to other Acts.
Today's meeting is in a hybrid format, pursuant to the House Order of Thursday, June 23, 2022. Members will attend in person or with the Zoom application, as we are now used to doing.
To ensure an orderly meeting, I would like to outline a few rules to follow.
Before speaking, please wait until I recognize you by name. If you're on the videoconference, please click on the microphone icon to unmute yourself. When you're not speaking, your mike should be on mute.
Interpretation is available for those of you joining us on Zoom. You have the choice at the bottom of your screen of floor, English or French audio. For those in the room, you can use your earpiece and select the desired channel.
As a reminder, all comments should be addressed through the chair.
For members in the room, if you wish to speak, please raise your hand. For members on Zoom, please use the raise hand function. The clerk and I will manage the speaking order as best we can, and we appreciate your patience and understanding in this regard.
Before we hear from our first witnesses, I would like to welcome, via Zoom, our clerk, Ms. Legault, and her assistant, Ms. Labelle.
I would now like to welcome our valiant witnesses.
Appearing in the first hour, we have the Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne, represented by Lynn Brouillette, Chief Executive Officer, and Martin Normand, Director, Strategic Research and International Relations.
We also have the Public Service Alliance of Canada, represented by Alex Silas, Regional Executive Vice-President, National Capital Region, and Rosane Doré Lefebvre, Communications Officer. They are also joining us via videoconference. Mr. Silas comes from one of the most beautiful regions in Canada, although I won't tell you what region that is.
With that said, we will begin with Mr. Normand, who will be discussing issues important to the people he represents regarding the modernization of Bill C-13.
We are listening, Mr. Normand.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Normand.
Pardon me, but I forgot to inform the witnesses that they had five minutes each for their presentations. However, you didn't exceed your five minutes, Mr. Normand.
Mr. Silas, you come from a magnificent region, and you have the floor for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Silas.
We will now begin a first round of questions, in which every intervention will be six minutes, with the vice-chair of this committee.
Mr. Godin, you have six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Godin.
Mr. Serré, you have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Silas and Mr. Serré.
The second vice-chair of our committee will ask the next questions.
Mr. Beaulieu, you have six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Silas.
We will end this final six-minute round of questions with Ms. Ashton, who is speaking to us from Manitoba.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you very much Mr. Normand.
That's it, Ms. Ashton.
We'll begin the second round of questions with Mr. Gourde.
Over to you for five minutes Mr. Gourde.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you Mr. Silas and Mr. Gourde.
Ms. Patricia Lattanzio, You have six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Lattanzio. That's all the time you have.
Mr. Beaulieu will be asking the next questions.
Mr. Beaulieu, you have two and a half minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 15 seconds left, Mr. Beaulieu.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Silas.
We have now got to the final round of questions.
Ms. Ashton, you have the floor for two and a half minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Normand and Ms. Ashton.
On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank the representatives of the Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne and the Public Service Alliance of Canada for having taken the time to come and testify today.
If you believe that there is other important information that would be useful to us, please don't hesitate to send it in writing. It would be given the same level of consideration as your testimony here today. If so, please send this additional information to our clerk, who will then distribute it to all members of the committee.
Thank you very much.
We will now suspend the meeting to prepare for the second hour with the next group of witnesses.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
We are now reconvening the meeting.
Unfortunately, the second hour of the meeting will be shorter than expected because of some technical problems we have been experiencing.
We will now welcome Ms. Marie-Nicole Dubois, the Vice-President of the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique, who will be joining us by videoconference.
Ms. Dubois, You're going to have five minutes for your presentation. After that, committee members will in turn be able to ask you questions to which you can reply.
You now have the floor.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you very much, Ms. Dubois.
We are beginning the first round of questions. The time available might only allow one round of questions, with six minutes for each speaker.
We'll begin with the first vice-chair of the committee, Mr. Joël Godin.
Go ahead, Mr. Godin.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you Mr  Godin.
Thank you Ms. Dubois.
It's now over to Mr. Drouin for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Drouin.
Ms. Dubois, the next questions for you will be coming from Mr. Mario Beaulieu, the second vice-chair of the committee.
Mr. Beaulieu, you have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Dubois and Mr. Beaulieu.
We'll continue with more questions, this time from Ms. Ashton, from Manitoba, who has six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Dubois.
We're going to do another round of questions with reduced speaking times. The Liberal Party and the Conservative Party will have four minutes each. The Bloc Québécois and the NDP will have two.
Mr. Généreux, you have four minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 30 seconds left, Mr. Généreux.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Généreux and Ms. Dubois.
The next questions will be asked by Mr. Angelo Iacono, who has four minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 30 minutes left, Mr. Iacono.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Very well.
Mr. Beaulieu, you have the floor for two minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Dubois and Mr. Beaulieu.
Ms. Dubois, here is a final question from Ms. Ashton, who has two minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Dubois. If there is any other information that the committee could benefit from, please feel free to put it in writing for us. It is as important as your oral testimony. If you feel this additional information is important, please forward it to our clerk, who will distribute it to all committee members.
Before adjourning, I would like to remind committee members that we meet next Tuesday. Next Thursday, the Board of Internal Economy will be using our space, so there will be no meeting of the Standing Committee on Official Languages.
Thanks again, Ms. Dubois.
I also thank all the other witnesses we heard today.
The meeting is adjourned.
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-21 17:01
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Thank you so much, Mr. Chair. I'd like to wish everybody a happy National Indigenous Peoples Day.
To anybody celebrating across Turtle Island and of course right here in unceded Wolastoqiyik territory, as my stepfather, Spasaqsit Possesom, grand chief, would say, it's a good day to be indigenous, and it's a good day for us allies to be reminded that we are all treaty people.
Of course, I would like to also mention to my fellow committee members that it's an honour to serve with all of you on this important committee.
Thank you so much to our witnesses for joining us today. I think what I'll do for my short time is start with Minister Mostyn.
You focused in on an issue that is very close to my heart, which is climate change, so I'd like to talk about the need for climate-resilient infrastructure. I'm wondering if you could give us a bit of insight into some of the conversations and planning that's happening around this, and more importantly, I think, how indigenous knowledge is informing that process.
Thank you.
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-21 17:07
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Thank you so much.
I know my time is very limited, so I will ask a question really quickly to Vice-Chief Tsannie.
You mentioned something else that's close to my heart, and that's youth engagement. It is the most important resource.
How can we best engage this fastest-growing demographic as far as emergency preparedness and stepping up to what's needed in the north is concerned?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:08
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Thank you.
I'll ask my question in English or French, so just make sure your translation button is on.
The first question is for Mr. Bonnell.
In your remarks you said that 90% of your harvest is covered by MSC sustainable certification. I have known about this certification since 2017, when we were impacted by the right whale measure in my area.
What will be the impact on your industry, on your business and on the market, if we lose some of those certifications?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:09
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On top of that, as you're probably aware, there is the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The U.S. is monitoring closely what we're doing with our fisheries. We're talking a lot about seals lately. We all understand we need to do something about the seal population. It has some effects on our other species. If we do it wrong with seals, if we just go there and harvest seals, can this also have an impact on our crab and lobster market, for example, in the U.S.? As you know, that is where we export almost everything.
What are your thoughts on that? What is your take on that?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:11
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Just quickly, I'm pretty sure you're aware of the right whale measure. You see the map of the gulf almost shut down. Do you think those measures can be revised a bit, so that we can still retain MSC certification and, at the same time, ensure the Marine Mammal Protection Act is met in the U.S.?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:12
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I wanted to go to Mr. Prevost, but you have me there. You're saying the MSC certification is very important. As you know, it's been suspended. I think it's still suspended. The price has never been so high.
To put it in perspective, you tell fishers it's very important, but at the same time, they're having wonderful prices. They're saying, “Maybe the MSC certification doesn't matter that much, at the end of the day.”
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:13
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Mr. Prevost, when I have a little time, I'll get back to you.
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:52
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Thank you, Mr. Kelloway.
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Prevost, my dad was also a fisherman all his life. I went out fishing with him a lot. He's retired now, but I still enjoy it, every time I have a chance to go with my cousin, who now owns the boat.
I want to go back to what Mr. Arnold was saying. You said that 694 million pounds is the estimate for bait needed in Atlantic Canada, including Quebec. Do you know what percentage of that amount—just an estimate—comes only from herring and mackerel from our waters? Do you know what I mean?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:53
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You mean that 300 million pounds of this bait comes from our area waters. Is that right?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:53
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You said the recordings are not accurate. Can you elaborate on that, please?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:54
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They're recording when the fishermen arrive at the wharf and what is reported.
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:54
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Your company is called Bait Masters and you're telling us something about the bait we import. This is a little troubling for me to hear. You said there's no risk assessment or management whatsoever for validating imported bait—let's say from Japan or Norway.
Doesn't the CFIA take care of this and make sure that, if we import bait—let's say herring or mackerel from Japan—it knows whether its a good fit for our water, with no disease?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:55
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Were you aware of some fishermen...? We heard a couple of times, on this committee, about Asian carp and the possibility of using it for bait. Are you aware of that?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:56
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Is your company trained to develop some other kind of bait? I know the MFU, for example, is trying to develop synthetic bait—if I can say that—within its organization. Are you also trying to develop that?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-21 12:57
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I think we should.
I'm glad you said, at the beginning, that fishermen don't want to try something else, because they have more confidence in.... If you'd given my father something other than herring or mackerel, he would not have put it in his trap.
Do you think we will get there? Will we find a solution for synthetic bait that will work for—
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Good afternoon, everyone.
I call this meeting to order.
Welcome to meeting number 28 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages.
Today's meeting is in a hybrid format. Members will attend in person or with the Zoom application.
In light of the recommendations from health authorities regarding the pandemic, all those attending the meeting in person should follow the directives of the Board of Internal Economy. I thank the members in advance for their co‑operation.
Should any technical challenges arise, please advise me. Note that we may need to suspend for a few minutes, as we need to ensure that all members are able to participate fully.
Pursuant to the order of reference of Monday, May 30, 2022, the committee is resuming its study of Bill C‑13, An Act to amend the Official Languages Act, to enact the Use of French in Federally Regulated Private Businesses Act and to make related amendments to other Acts.
I would now like to welcome the first witnesses.
Today we have Linda Cardinal, Associate Vice-Rector of Research at the Université de l’Ontario français, and Stéphanie Chouinard, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Royal Military College of Canada and Queen's University.
Welcome, ladies.
The meeting will be somewhat shortened as a result of the voting. You nevertheless have five minutes for your opening statements. Then we will begin the first round of questions.
Before speaking, please wait until I recognize you by name. If you are participating in the meeting by video conference, please click on the microphone icon to unmute your mike. When speaking, please speak slowly and clearly. When you are not speaking, your mike should be on mute to prevent echoing in the room.
As previously mentioned, you will be allowed a maximum of five minutes.
We will begin with Linda Cardinal.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
I apologize for interrupting, Ms. Cardinal, but please conclude your presentation.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you very much, Ms. Cardinal.
Ms. Chouinard, you have the floor for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Cardinal and Ms. Chouinard.
We will now begin the first round of questions. This time, each party will have six minutes, during which you may explain your positions at greater length.
I give the floor to Mr. Lehoux for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 20 seconds left, Mr. Lehoux.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
That will be all for the moment, Mr. Lehoux.
Arielle Kayabaga will ask the next questions.
You have the floor for six minutes, Ms. Kayabaga.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Cardinal.
Thank you, Ms. Kayabaga.
The second vice-chair of the committee, Mario Beaulieu, will be the next speaker.
Mr. Beaulieu, you have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 20 seconds in which to answer.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Chouinard.
Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu.
I now give the floor to Ms. Ashton from Manitoba for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Ashton.
Thank you very much, Ms. Chouinard and Ms. Cardinal. This isn't the first time we've had you here, and you've shared your knowledge with us with passion, as you do every time.
As I said at the outset, our meeting will be shortened as result of voting in the House of Comments. Should you have any information that you were unable to give us and that you consider relevant, please send it to the clerk, who will then forward it to us.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You've raised a good point.
I should have mentioned that we'll be unable to continue today's meeting beyond 5:30 p.m. owing to technical reasons. It's impossible. That's why we've shortened the time allowed for each group of witnesses, and it's now approximately 40 minutes rather than an hour.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Yes, unfortunately, that's what I'm saying.
Thanks once again to the witnesses.
We're going to suspend the meeting to make way for the next presenters.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
We are resuming the meeting.
I'd now like to welcome the witnesses we'll be hearing over the next hour.
We'll begin with two representatives from the Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario: the President, Mr. Carol Jolin, and the Executive Director, Mr. Peter Hominuk. We also have Mr. Martin Théberge, the President of the Société nationale de l'Acadie. All these witnesses are appearing in person, while Ms. Véronique Mallet, the Executive Director of the Société nationale de l'Acadie, will be attending virtually.
As usual, each organization will have of up to five minutes for its opening address. After that, the witnesses can give us their information by answering questions from the committee members.
To begin, I'll give the floor to the President of the Association de la francophonie de l'Ontario, for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Jolin. You've kept to your speaking time by taking only 4 minutes and 40 seconds.
I'll go now to Mr. Théberge, from the Société nationale de l'Acadie, the SNA, who has the floor for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Théberge.
Great. You spoke for 4 minutes and 59 seconds.
We will now move on to the first round of questions. Each political party will have six minutes to ask questions.
Mr. Lehoux, you have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Right. Sorry, I had relied on the document in front of me.
I had almost forgotten you, Mr. Gourde. You have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 20 seconds left, Mr. Gourde.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
I'm sorry for being so strict, but I want everyone to have at least six minutes of speaking time.
Mr. Drouin, you have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Jolin.
Mr. Beaulieu now has the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Jolin.
The final six minutes of speaking time go to the New Democratic Party.
Ms. Ashton, you have the floor.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Jolin.
Thank you, Ms. Ashton.
To the witnesses we received today from the AFO and the—
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
They are indeed important witnesses.
Nevertheless, I'll repeat what I pointed out to members of the first group of witnesses, which is that if you can think of other information that would be essential in making your suggestions clear to us, don't hesitate to send them to our clerk, who will get them to all the committee members.
Thank you again for being here. It's not your first visit to the Standing Committee on Official Languages, but it's always very pleasant to welcome you so that we can hear what you have to tell us.
The meeting is adjourned.
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-14 15:58
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to our witnesses today for joining us, especially Mr. Pedersen, because of the long trek to get here.
You mentioned some of the burnout that occurs with volunteers. There's already such a small pool to draw from. Are there any mitigation efforts or supports that exist, or that you would like to see exist, to help support volunteers for search and rescue?
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-14 16:00
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Thank you very much.
You also mentioned a lot of long-term and short-term goals as far as ameliorating the situation. You mentioned preventative education. I think you're the first witness to bring that forward.
I'd like you to touch more on that. Could you expand on what kind of education programs would be the most beneficial to deploy to try to be more preventative?
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-14 16:01
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Thank you.
What role would provincial and territorial governments have in some of these initiatives for some of those long-term and short-term goals?
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-14 16:02
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Thank you.
I'd like to ask a question of Ms. Cardinal.
We've had some witnesses testify about the evacuation process. I'd like to know what that looks like from your side.
Can you walk us through the process of when the Red Cross is engaged to help support a community? Are there timelines and communication mechanisms? Are distances considered, as far as how far you're taking community members away to an evacuation place?
I'd just like some clarity around some of the processes once you're engaged.
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-14 16:05
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Thank you.
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-10 14:23
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Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to our witnesses today. I would like to begin by acknowledging that I am speaking to you all from the unceded and unsurrendered Wolastoqiyik territory here in Fredericton, New Brunswick. It's also Purple Shirts for Clean Water day here in New Brunswick.
I'd like to start with you, Mr. Lackenbauer. We've been going to you a lot. I appreciated your testimony today.
You mentioned the importance of discerning lessons after a disaster. I'm wondering if you could speak to some of the key lessons that have been learned over the last five years—or maybe even two years, because it's been such a tumultuous time. I'm wondering if you could highlight those.
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View Jenica Atwin Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2022-06-10 14:26
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Excellent. Thank you so much.
I'm ashamed to say that I didn't know a lot about the Canadian Rangers, so I think this is such an important opportunity for us as parliamentarians but also for Canadians. Maybe just to flip that question to the other side, can you celebrate some of the successes of the Canadian Rangers program? What can we learn from this in terms of ensuring that it's a sustainable program that is supported with the resources it needs?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 12:08
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I thank the witnesses for joining us.
I will first turn to Mr. Lanteigne and Ms. Roussel. I have so many questions to ask, but I have only 10 minutes.
Mr. Lanteigne and Ms. Roussel, we often have an opportunity to talk. I want to discuss shrimp with you today. As you know, this year is difficult, just like recent years have been.
Mr. Lanteigne, I will start with you. I will put a question to you that I have put to a number of witnesses since the beginning of this study. It concerns figures the department provided this year concerning the quantity of shrimp redfish eat. This year, redfish supposedly ate 221,000 tonnes of shrimp in the gulf, while shrimp biomass is approximately 54,000 tonnes.
What is your interpretation of those numbers, Mr. Lanteigne?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 12:10
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Some of your fishers are participating in the exploratory fishery for redfish, and I think they catch their quota every time they go out.
If it's 221,000 tonnes this year, we can probably expect that to rise to nearly 300,000 tonnes next year, assuming there's a 30% increase. What should we do, Mr. Lanteigne? Taking steps to protect shrimp stocks is well and good, but if redfish keep eating the shrimp, we won't have a healthy biomass.
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 12:11
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Yes, but other steps could be taken.
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 12:11
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Very good.
I noticed that, yesterday or the day before, Quebec fishers decided to stay in port because of the price the Quebec agricultural marketing board was paying.
Did your fishers in the region make a decision? Are they going to go out anyways, or will they think twice about incurring expenses—which, as you know, can be enormous—and run the risk of not being able to at least break even?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 12:12
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I'm jumping around a bit here. I have so many questions.
Can you tell us quickly why you disagreed with the precautionary approach that was taken this year and the resulting quota decisions?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 12:13
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I would say your comments probably reflect what we are all thinking. We know we have to protect the resources and keep them healthy for future generations.
Do you ever feel that the department makes quota or fishery management decisions without really taking into account the repercussions they could have on communities? Would you say that the way things are currently done does not adequately take into account the repercussions on communities?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 12:14
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I saw that—
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 13:01
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Just for the record, Mr. Small was saying earlier that DFO listens too much to NGOs, like Oceana, for example.
Oceana called for a shutdown of the capelin fishery this year, and DFO didn't listen to the advice, so we went on with what was still a capelin fishery. I just wanted to put that on the record. Of course, as I said at the beginning, I think we also have to take into account the impact that it's going to have on communities when we shut down a fishery.
My question will be for Mr. Mallet now, speaking of fisheries borders.
Thank you for being here, Mr. Mallet. We are fortunate to have the opportunity to speak regularly about issues facing the fisheries in our regions. The closure of the spring herring fishery and the mackerel fishery is going to affect fishers in our regions who rely solely on those fisheries. As Mr. Morrissey said earlier, fisheries have been shut down in the past, the cod fishery in Newfoundland and Labrador, for example.
I think the department should set up a relief program for fishers affected by the closure of the spring herring and mackerel fisheries. What do you think?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 13:05
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Before we talk about bait, I have two things to say.
When the department officials were here, when we began this study, I asked them whether they had any scientists on the water monitoring the situation immediately following the closure of the mackerel fishery. They said yes. I think that answer is open to interpretation.
Did you see department scientists out on the water conducting scientific surveys as soon as the fishery closed, when the herring were there, as you said earlier?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 13:06
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I know your organization does a lot of research on artificial bait, among other things. The practice of catching a resource just to use it as bait raises questions in people's minds. There is, however, a species that could be used as bait, Asian carp, but there is significant resistance to the idea. The committee has talked about that a lot, and so have you. Can you tell us about the barriers you run into when it comes to the use of Asian carp as bait? If not Asian carp, why not redfish, as Mr. Lanteigne suggested earlier, given how plentiful it is in the Gulf?
Describe for us, if you would, the barriers you face when you try to get the necessary approvals for using Asian carp as bait in our waters?
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View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2022-06-09 13:07
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I'd like a written answer, please.
Thank you.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
I call this meeting to order.
Welcome to meeting number 26 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages.
Today's meeting is in a hybrid format, and members are attending in person or via the Zoom application.
Given the ongoing pandemic situation and in light of the recommendations from health authorities to remain healthy and safe, all those attending the meeting in person should follow the directives of the Board of Internal Economy.
Should any technical challenges arise, please advise me. Please note that we may need to suspend for a few minutes, as we need to ensure that all members are able to participate fully.
Pursuant to the order of reference of Monday, May 30, 2022, the committee is resuming its study of Bill C‑13, An Act to amend the Official Languages Act, to enact the Use of French in Federally Regulated Private Businesses Act and to make related amendments to other Acts.
On behalf of the entire committee, I would now like to welcome today's witnesses, who represent the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada, or FCFA: Liane Roy, president, and Alain Dupuis, director.
Ms. Roy, this is your first in‑person appearance before the Standing Committee on Official Languages. Welcome to Parliament Hill.
As you know, we will allow you five minutes for your presentation. Then each of the members of the political parties that form this excellent committee will have a chance to ask you questions.
Ms. Roy, you have the floor for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Roy.
To begin the first round of questions, I give the floor to the first vice-chair of the committee.
Mr. Godin, you have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Godin.
Ms. Kayabaga, you have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 20 seconds left.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have time to answer the question, Ms. Roy.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you.
The next speaker will be the second vice-chair of the committee, Mario Beaulieu.
You have the floor for six minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. I know that six minutes goes by quickly. Everyone has good questions, and the answers are interesting.
The next speaker will be Niki Ashton, who is joining us live from Manitoba, in the west.
You have the floor for six minutes, Ms. Ashton.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Roy.
You'll be able to continue your remarks later. I allowed you a little more time because your speech was really interesting.
We will now begin the second round.
Mr. Lehoux, you have the floor for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 30 seconds left, Mr. Lehoux.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Please answer briefly.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Roy and Mr. Lehoux.
Mr. Drouin, you have the floor for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Please be brief, Ms. Roy.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Ms. Roy.
Mr. Beaulieu, you have the floor for two and a half minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Please be brief, Mr. Beaulieu.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Dupuis. I apologize for interrupting. Two and a half minutes go by quickly.
Ms. Ashton, you have the floor for two and a half minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 30 seconds left.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Thank you, Mr. Dupuis.
Mr. Gourde, you have the floor for five minutes.
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View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
You have 15 seconds left, Mr. Gourde.
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