Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 57 of 57
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2018-03-22 11:10
Expand
In this committee's previous discussions, we have received comments on the offensive dimension of certain powers or capabilities of the CSE. It is well known that groups that are terrorists or associated with terrorists, such as Daesh, benefit from online informal networks of sympathizers, structures and communications. This new armada or new equipment at the disposal of these terrorist groups represents an additional threat.
How should the offensive approach of the CSE be defined? How will this offensive approach respond to the new threat?
Dans les discussions antérieures de ce comité, on nous a fait des commentaires sur la dimension offensive de certains pouvoirs ou de certaines capacités du CST. On n'est pas sans savoir que des groupes terroristes ou associés aux terroristes, par exemple Daech, bénéficient de réseaux informels de sympathisants, de structures et de communications en ligne. Cette nouvelle armada ou ce nouvel équipement à la disposition de ces groupes terroristes représente une menace additionnelle.
De quelle manière doit-on définir l'approche offensive du CST? De quelle manière cette approche offensive va-t-elle répondre à la nouvelle menace qui s'installe?
Collapse
View Harjit S. Sajjan Profile
Lib. (BC)
One aspect in particular that is extremely important, since the Minister of National Defence is also responsible for our Canadian Armed Forces, is that CSE will now actually have the ability to provide the right support to the Canadian Armed Forces. They obviously provided the right intelligence, but now with Bill C-59 they can provide the right expertise. They'll be able to leverage their knowledge base and their technology and keep up to date with some of the terrorist networks and what they're trying to do, especially when it comes to keeping our soldiers safe. That includes everything, as I mentioned, from somebody detonating an IED to disrupting the network to keep it from getting to that point.
We also have to be mindful that even with the best technologies, we had to wait for a cyber-attack on us to occur before we could actually do anything about it. We need to make sure that we are proactive in having a defensive mechanism so that when we see a threat we are able to shut it down beforehand. These are the things that are very important here to making sure that we protect our infrastructure in a very proactive manner.
Un aspect en particulier qui est extrêmement important, puisque le ministre de la Défense nationale est également responsable de nos Forces armées canadiennes, c'est que le CST aura maintenant la capacité de fournir le bon soutien aux Forces armées canadiennes. De toute évidence, il a fourni le bon renseignement, mais maintenant, avec le projet de loi  C-59, il peut fournir la bonne expertise. Il pourra tirer parti de ses connaissances et de ses technologies pour se tenir au courant de certains réseaux terroristes et de ce qu'ils essaient de faire, surtout pour assurer la sécurité de nos soldats. Comme je l'ai mentionné, cela comprend tout, depuis la détonation d'un engin explosif improvisé jusqu'à la perturbation du réseau pour l'empêcher d'atteindre ce point.
Nous devons aussi garder à l'esprit que même avec les meilleures technologies, nous avons dû attendre qu'une cyberattaque nous vise avant de pouvoir faire quoi que ce soit. Nous devons nous assurer d'avoir un mécanisme de défense proactif afin de pouvoir mettre fin à une menace avant qu'elle ne se produise. Ce sont là des éléments très importants pour nous assurer de protéger nos infrastructures de façon très proactive.
Collapse
Scott Newark
View Scott Newark Profile
Scott Newark
2018-02-15 11:10
Expand
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. It's good to see you again.
I'd like to thank the committee for the invitation to appear before you with respect to this very important Bill C-59. I've had the opportunity to follow some of the proceedings and to read some of the transcripts, and it's very encouraging to see the depth and substance of the questions asked of the individual witnesses who are appearing, including with different perspectives.
I've had a long history, and I was thinking about it before I came here today. It's been almost 30 years, I guess, since I first testified before a parliamentary committee. I was a crown prosecutor from Alberta, and as I put it, I got tired of tripping over the mistakes of the parole system in my courtroom, and realized that the only way to try to change it was to change the laws. That meant coming to Ottawa, because we were dealing with federal correctional legislation. I was appearing before parliamentary committees where I exposed what had happened in a couple of cases.
The important work of the legislative branch struck me then, and it has remained with me throughout. That sometimes gets overlooked, and depending on how things are being handled at the executive branch of government, the really important and critical analysis that committees can do is quite significant. A bill like this is a very good example of that, because you can have different opinions about things on different subjects, but you have the ability to ask questions and to try to elicit information to analyze whether or not the intended results are going to be achieved by the legislation in the way that it's drafted or if other things need to be done. That is particularly true, I think, in relation to legislation like Bill C-59, which is obviously pretty complex legislation and deals with a whole lot of subjects.
In fairness, the discussion itself has raised issues that are not contained in Bill C-59. I think a very encouraging sign was the way that the government sent the bill here in advance of second reading so that you could have input and suggestions on other subjects. I have some suggestions to make on things like that. I must admit, though, that I would suggest that it probably is a better idea, simply from a procedural perspective, to confine your recommendations to the specifics of the bill, and perhaps, in an ancillary report, make suggestions on other subjects rather than adding huge new amendments to sections and opening up different issues that are not specifically contained in Bill C-59. There's so much of value in Bill C-59 that it's a good idea to move it forward.
My presentation today will touch on essentially three aspects. The first is just to take some examples of things that I think are notable and quite important in Bill C-59. I also have a couple of comments on things, and one in particular I have a problem with, but I suppose, to put it in a larger sense, they're just ones where I would suggest you may want to ask some questions and make sure you understand that what you are anticipating is the case is, in fact, the case. Then, because the minister has invited suggestions on other issues, if we have time—and probably not in the opening statement, but during questions and answers—I have some suggestions on other issues that I think might be of interest.
Let me just give you a little bit of background as well on my personal experience in this, because it impacts on the insights. As I mentioned, I was a crown prosecutor in Alberta. Ultimately, because of one of the cases I was involved in, in 1992 I became the executive officer of the Canadian Police Association. This is the rank-and-file police officers, the unions. We were involved very heavily from 1992 to 1998 in criminal justice reform, policy advocacy. It was from that, in particular, and my work as a crown prosecutor, that I got the sense of the importance of learning from front-line operational insights how you can then shape legislative or policy tools so as to achieve desired outcomes.
Also, not everything needs to be done by legislation. There are frequently instances—and I was struck by this as I was watching some of the evidence from some of the witnesses that you've had—where we don't necessarily need new laws. We need to enforce the ones we already have, and we need to make sure that the tools are in place to use them appropriately. There are some examples of that, I think, in Bill C-59 specifically.
I ended up working with the Ontario government in 1998 as an order in council appointment. That government had intended to achieve some criminal justice reforms, and they weren't getting it done, so they wanted some people with some understanding of the justice system.
After 9/11, I was appointed as the special security adviser on counterterrorism because of some work I had previously been involved in. I had significant interactions with Americans in relation to that. In the old days, it was the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, which became INSET. I had a role, essentially, in being the provincial representative in some of the discussions, and I saw the inter-agency interactions, or lack thereof, and the impact that potentially had.
Since then, I'm actually one of the guys who did the review that led to the arming of the border officers. I still do work with the union on policy stuff. I also do some stuff with security technology committees. The value of that is that you get an understanding of some of the operational insights and what is necessary to achieve the intended outcomes.
I should add, I suppose, the final thing. Last year, I accepted a position at Simon Fraser University as an adjunct professor. I know you'll be shocked to hear that. It's for a course they offer, a master's program, the Terrorism, Risk, and Security Studies program. The course I teach is balancing civil liberties and public safety and security. To go on from a point that the general made, I think the case is that these are not either-or situations. We are fully capable of doing both, and there is a balance involved in this. As a general principle, it is a very good idea, when you're looking at what is proposed in legislation, especially in legislation like this which has national security implications, to keep in mind the general principles of protecting civil rights.
There are two points about that. You'll notice that in “civil rights”, “rights” is modified by “civil”. In other words, they are rights that exist in the context of a civil society. That has ramifications in the sense, I think, of what citizens are entitled to expect of their government. I don't want government intruding on my privacy, but, at the same time, if government has the capability of accessing relevant information and acting on someone who is a threat to me and my family, I expect, under my civil right, that, in fact, government will do what it needs to do to extend that protection.
The other side of that—and I know, Monsieur Dubé asked many questions about this, as did other members of the committee—is the importance of looking at it generally, at what is proposed, to see that there is, in effect, oversight initially and, as well, appropriate review so that the balancing can take place. In my opinion, and more accurately in my experience, having the executive branch reporting to itself for authorization is something that should raise a red flag. There are provisions within the act that ultimately address that, although there are some that raise some questions about it.
In the very brief time left, let me just say that I think that among the important things in the legislation are the extensive use of preambles and definitions about the importance of privacy and what we would generally call civil rights in consideration of why we're doing things. That, I think, was a deficiency in BillC-51. I can tell you that it is critically important in today's charter world to make sure that is included so that the courts can consider whether or not what was being done by legislative authority in fact took into account the charter issues. A rule of statutory interpretation is “thou shalt consider the preamble in a statute when actually drafting it”.
With one minute left, I think probably the most important operational aspect of this bill is the proactive cyber-activity authorized to CSE. That is a reality of the world in which we live. We are totally cyber-dependent, which also means we have enormous cyber-vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity, in effect, has been an afterthought. This is a step; it is not the complete answer. I do some work in the cyber field as well, and that is something that I think is extremely important.
The one issue I would raise, in closing, which I have a concern about specifically, is in relation to the change in what I think is the evidentiary threshold in the terrorism propaganda offence. I can get into that in more detail, but my concern is, essentially, that it may be making it, for no good reason, no justifiable reason that I can see, harder to use that section, which has extreme relevance now in the changing domestic terrorism environment in which we are living.
I look forward to answering any questions and, hopefully, touching on the other subjects.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux de vous revoir.
Je voudrais remercier le Comité de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant lui en ce qui a trait au très important projet de loi  C-59. J'ai eu l'occasion de suivre certaines des procédures et de lire certaines des transcriptions, et il est très encourageant de voir la profondeur et la qualité des questions posées à chaque témoin qui comparaît, notamment ceux qui ont des points de vue différents.
J'ai une longue expérience, et j'y pensais avant de me présenter ici aujourd'hui. Je pense que la première fois que j'ai témoigné devant un comité parlementaire, c'était il y a près de 30 ans. J'étais procureur de la Couronne de l'Alberta, et, comme je l'ai expliqué, j'en ai eu assez de buter contre les erreurs du système de libération conditionnelle dans ma salle d'audience, et je me suis rendu compte que la seule façon de changer la situation consistait à modifier les lois. Cela signifiait que je devais venir à Ottawa, parce qu'il était question de lois correctionnelles fédérales. Je comparaissais devant des comités parlementaires, où j'exposais ce qui s'était passé dans deux ou trois cas.
À ce moment-là, le travail important de l'organe législatif m'a frappé, et j'ai gardé cette impression depuis. Ce travail passe parfois inaperçu, et, selon la façon dont les choses sont traitées par l'organe exécutif du gouvernement, l'analyse très importante et cruciale que les comités peuvent faire est très importante. Un projet de loi comme celui-ci en est un très bon exemple, car on peut avoir des opinions divergentes sur divers sujets, mais on a la capacité de poser des questions et de tenter d'obtenir des renseignements pour analyser si les résultats escomptés seront obtenus grâce au libellé actuel du projet de loi, ou bien si on doit faire d'autres choses. Selon moi, c'est particulièrement le cas en ce qui a trait à des projets de loi comme le projet de loi  C-59, qui est manifestement très complexe et qui porte sur beaucoup de sujets.
En toute équité, la discussion en soi a soulevé des questions qui ne figurent pas dans le projet de loi  C-59. Selon moi, le fait que le gouvernement l'a envoyé ici avant la deuxième lecture, de sorte que vous puissiez obtenir des commentaires et des suggestions sur d'autres sujets, est très encourageant. J'ai des propositions à faire sur des choses de ce genre. Je dois toutefois admettre que je soutiendrais qu'il serait probablement une meilleure idée, simplement d'un point de vue procédural, de limiter vos recommandations aux particularités du projet de loi, et peut-être présenter dans un rapport complémentaire des suggestions sur d'autres sujets, au lieu d'apporter une énorme quantité de nouveaux amendements aux dispositions et de soulever diverses questions qui ne sont pas abordées précisément dans le projet de loi  C-59. Ce projet de loi a tellement de valeur qu'il serait une bonne idée de le faire avancer.
L'exposé que je présente aujourd'hui portera essentiellement sur trois aspects. Tout d'abord, je vais simplement utiliser des exemples d'éléments qui, selon moi, sont remarquables et très importants dans le projet de loi  C-59. J'ai aussi deux ou trois commentaires à formuler sur certains aspects, dont un en particulier qui me pose problème, mais je suppose — pour m'exprimer de façon plus générale — que ce ne sont que des éléments au sujet desquels je vous proposerais de poser des questions et de vous assurer que ce que vous prévoyez qui va se produire se produit effectivement. Ensuite, comme le ministre a manifesté son souhait d'obtenir des suggestions sur d'autres questions, si nous avons le temps — et probablement pas dans la déclaration préliminaire, mais durant la période de questions —, j'ai certaines suggestions à faire sur d'autres questions qui, selon moi, pourraient être intéressantes.
Laissez-moi simplement vous présenter un peu le contexte ainsi que mon expérience personnelle à ce sujet, car ces éléments ont une incidence sur les réflexions dont je vais vous faire part. Comme je l'ai mentionné, j'ai été procureur de la Couronne en Alberta. En raison de l'une des affaires auxquelles j'ai pris part, en 1992, j'ai fini par devenir l'agent exécutif de l'Association canadienne des policiers. Il s'agit des agents de police de la base, les syndiqués. De 1992 à 1998, nous avons participé activement à la réforme de la justice pénale, à la défense des politiques. C'est en raison de cette expérience, en particulier, et de mon travail de procureur de la Couronne que j'ai ressenti l'importance d'utiliser les connaissances opérationnelles de première ligne pour apprendre comment on peut ensuite façonner les outils législatifs ou stratégiques de manière à obtenir les résultats souhaités.
En outre, il n'est pas nécessaire que tout soit fait au moyen d'un projet de loi. Il y a souvent des cas — et j'ai été frappé par ce fait au moment où je regardais certaines des déclarations faites par des témoins que vous avez accueillis — où nous n'avons pas nécessairement besoin de nouvelles lois. Nous devons faire appliquer celles dont nous disposons déjà, et nous devons nous assurer que les outils sont en place afin que l'on puisse les utiliser adéquatement. Selon moi, le projet de loi  C-59 en contient des exemples précis.
En 1998, je me suis retrouvé à travailler pour le gouvernement de l'Ontario, après avoir été nommé par décret. Ce gouvernement avait l'intention de réaliser des réformes de la justice pénale, mais il n'y arrivait pas, alors il voulait des personnes ayant une certaine compréhension du système de justice.
Après le 11 septembre, j'ai été nommé conseiller spécial en matière de sécurité et de lutte contre le terrorisme en raison de certains travaux auxquels j'avais déjà participé. J'ai eu des interactions importantes avec les Américains à ce titre. Anciennement, c'était l'Unité mixte d'enquête sur le crime organisé, qui est devenue l'EISN. Essentiellement, mon rôle consistait à être le représentant provincial dans certaines des discussions, et j'observais les interactions entre les organismes, ou l'absence de telles interactions, et les conséquences qu'elles pouvaient avoir.
Depuis, je fais partie des personnes qui ont effectué l'examen qui a mené à l'armement des agents des services frontaliers. Je travaille encore avec le syndicat relativement à des affaires de politique. Je fais également certaines choses avec les comités sur les technologies de sécurité. La valeur de ce travail tient au fait qu'on apprend à comprendre certaines des réalités opérationnelles et ce qui est nécessaire pour obtenir les résultats escomptés.
Je suppose que je devrais ajouter le dernier élément. L'an dernier, j'ai accepté un poste de professeur adjoint à l'Université Simon Fraser. Je sais que vous allez être choqués d'entendre cela. C'est pour un cours offert à cette université, un programme de maîtrise: le programme d'études du terrorisme, des risques et de la sécurité. Le cours que je donne concerne l'établissement d'un équilibre entre les libertés civiles et la sûreté et la sécurité publiques. Pour revenir sur un argument qu'a formulé le général, je pense qu'il ne s'agit pas de situations où on doit faire un choix entre deux options. Nous sommes pleinement capables de faire les deux, et cela suppose l'établissement d'un équilibre. En règle générale, il s'agit d'une très bonne idée, si on regarde ce qui est proposé dans le projet de loi, surtout dans un texte législatif comme celui-ci, qui a des conséquences sur la sécurité nationale, afin de ne pas laisser de côté les principes généraux de la protection des droits civils.
Ce principe comporte deux volets. Vous remarquerez que dans le terme « droits civils », le mot « droits » est modifié par l'adjectif « civils ». Autrement dit, ce sont des droits qui existent dans le contexte d'une société civile. Selon moi, cette signification a des ramifications du point de vue de ce que les citoyens ont le droit d'attendre de leur gouvernement. Je ne veux pas que le gouvernement fasse intrusion dans ma vie privée, mais, en même temps, si le gouvernement a la capacité d'accéder à des renseignements pertinents et de prendre des mesures à l'égard d'une personne qui pose une menace pour ma famille et moi, je m'attends, au titre de mon droit civil, à ce que le gouvernement fasse ce qu'il a à faire pour étendre cette protection.
L'autre volet de ce principe — et, je sais, M. Dubé a posé de nombreuses questions à ce sujet, tout comme d'autres membres du Comité —, c'est l'importance d'étudier ce qui est proposé d'un point de vue général, pour s'assurer qu'il y a effectivement une surveillance initiale ainsi qu'un examen approprié afin que l'équilibre puisse être établi. À mon avis et, plus précisément, d'après mon expérience, le fait que l'autorité exécutive relève d'elle-même pour l'obtention d'une autorisation, c'est quelque chose qui devrait susciter des inquiétudes. Le projet de loi contient des dispositions qui finiront par régler ce problème, quoiqu'il en contient certaines qui soulèvent des questions à ce sujet.
Pour le très peu de temps qu'il nous reste, laissez-moi simplement affirmer que je pense qu'entre autres choses importantes prévues dans le projet de loi, il y a l'utilisation abondante de préambules et de définitions au sujet de l'importance de la vie privée et ce que nous appellerions généralement les droits civils, en ce que cela s'applique aux raisons pour lesquelles nous prenons des mesures. Il s'agissait selon moi d'une lacune du projet de loi C-51. Je peux vous dire qu'il est d'une importance cruciale dans le monde d'aujourd'hui, qui est régi par la Charte, que l'on veille à ce que ce soit inclus, afin que les tribunaux puissent déterminer si les mesures prises par l'autorité législative tenaient effectivement compte des questions liées à la Charte. « Le préambule d'une loi tu examineras au moment même de la rédaction » est une règle relative à l'interprétation des lois.
Il me reste une minute; je pense que l'aspect opérationnel du projet de loi qui est probablement le plus important, c'est l'autorisation de cyberactivité proactive accordée au CST. C'est une réalité du monde dans lequel nous vivons. Nous sommes totalement cyberdépendants, ce qui signifie également que nous avons d'énormes vulnérabilités à cet égard. En réalité, la cybersécurité a été une considération secondaire. Il s'agit d'une première étape; ce n'est pas la réponse complète. Je fais également un certain travail dans le domaine cybernétique, et c'est quelque chose qui, selon moi, est extrêmement important.
La question que je soulèverais pour conclure, qui me préoccupe particulièrement, est liée au changement dans ce que je pense être la norme de preuve associée à l'infraction de propagande terroriste. Je pourrai aborder ce sujet plus en détail, mais ma préoccupation tient essentiellement au fait qu'il pourrait rendre plus difficile — pour aucune bonne raison, aucune raison justifiable que je puisse imaginer — l'utilisation de cette disposition, qui est extrêmement pertinente maintenant, vu l'environnement de terrorisme intérieur dans lequel nous vivons.
J'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions et, je l'espère, d'aborder d'autres sujets.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
I don't mean to cut you off.
You alluded in your remarks to your concern about the speech crime provision in Bill C-51 being modified under Bill C-59. I was reading a piece that you wrote—it might have been for iPolitics as a matter of fact, back in the fall—where you pointed to your opposition to this.
Just for the record, under Bill C-51, it was a crime for one to “knowingly advocate or promote the commission of terrorism offences in general”. Under Bill C-59, this has been replaced with something much more common in criminal law: “counselling another person to commit a terrorism” act.
I have read your criticism, so I want to jump immediately to ask you a question about how the offence was phrased in BillC-51. Take the example of a journalist or a group of protestors who were supporting a group—now the times don't align here but I think you'll appreciate the example—of anti-apartheid activists, under the ANC and under Mandela. You know very well that, particularly in the early history of their activism against apartheid, they advocated for non-lethal attacks on public infrastructure.
Now if a journalist here in Canada were writing in favour of that kind of an approach—again, the anti-apartheid movement was one of the most important struggles of the 20th century—it's entirely conceivable, and I'm not the only one to use this example, that they could have been charged under the wording in BillC-51.
To shift now, to pivot to a counselling offence, doesn't this clarify and bring greater understanding to what is permissible and what is not permissible?
Je ne veux pas vous interrompre.
Vous avez mentionné dans votre exposé vos préoccupations concernant les modifications apportées par le projet de loi  C-59 à la disposition touchant l'infraction pour propagande terroriste contenue dans le projet de loi C-51 . J'ai lu un article que vous avez rédigé — qui a peut-être paru sur le site iPolitics l'automne dernier — dans lequel vous avez fait part de votre opposition à ces modifications.
Aux fins du compte rendu, dans le projet de loi C-51 , il est prévu qu'une personne commet un acte criminel lorsqu'elle « sciemment, par la communication de déclarations, préconise ou fomente la perpétration d’infractions de terrorisme en général ». Dans le projet de loi  C-59, ce passage a été remplacé par des termes plus communs en droit criminel: « conseiller la commission d’infractions de terrorisme ».
J'ai lu votre critique à ce sujet, donc je souhaite vous poser immédiatement une question à propos de la formulation relative à l'infraction dans le projet de loi C-51. Prenons l'exemple d'un journaliste ou d'un groupe d'opposants qui soutient un groupe — je sais que la période ne correspond pas, mais je crois que vous comprendrez l'exemple — d'activistes antiapartheid liés au Congrès national africain et à Mandela. Vous savez très bien que, en particulier au début du mouvement contre l'apartheid, on appelait à perpétrer des attaques ne causant pas la mort contre les infrastructures publiques.
Si un journaliste au Canada écrivait un article en faveur de ce type d'approche — encore une fois, le mouvement antiapartheid a mené une des plus importantes batailles du XXe siècle — on pourrait facilement concevoir, et je ne suis pas le seul à utiliser cet exemple, que ce journaliste pourrait être accusé selon la formulation des dispositions dans le projet de loi C-51.
Le fait d'apporter des modifications maintenant, d'utiliser les termes « conseiller la commission d'infractions de terrorisme », ne clarifie-t-il pas l'infraction et ne permet-il pas de mieux comprendre ce qui est permis et ce qui ne l'est pas?
Collapse
Scott Newark
View Scott Newark Profile
Scott Newark
2018-02-15 11:27
Expand
I don't think so. I don't agree—
Je ne crois pas. Je ne suis pas d'accord...
Collapse
Scott Newark
View Scott Newark Profile
Scott Newark
2018-02-15 11:29
Expand
As I say, the biggest one I have questions about is the terrorism propaganda. To circle back and answer, precisely because the proposed definition is section 22 of the Criminal Code—which is counselling another person to commit a criminal offence—the way I read the language of that, in effect that offence is already there.
I guarantee you, sir, that if that wording is used, there will be occasions when defence counsel will come to court when somebody is charged, and ask, “Who was it that he was counselling to commit the offence?” If you don't have another person involved, you aren't able to prove the offence.
That compares to the general notion, which reflects the reality of what we're dealing with now: we know that what would be included in the definition of terrorism propaganda is what is being used in radicalization, recruitment, and facilitation, including and especially in domestic circumstances. That's what we're actually facing.
To your point, though, about the larger issues, I'll go back to what I said before. I actually think there are things in Bill C-59 that help us deal with the reality of returning jihadis. The most important thing is that the government did not change the evidentiary level in section 810.011, the terrorism peace bonds. It's still “may commit”. Had that been raised up to “will commit”, that would have put a much more significant barrier on things.
The other thing that is very important in this bill is the provision that requires annual reporting on the number of peace bonds that are actually used, and also a five-year reporting on the impact of the bill itself. In my experience in government, that tends to bring about accountability. I assure you that if those provisions are included, throughout the different offices of the security branches and agencies there will be whiteboards going up with people writing on them, “Okay, I'm responsible for this. I've actually got to deliver this.” That's a good thing, because I think accountability tends to produce results.
Comme je l'ai mentionné, l'élément le plus important qui soulève chez moi des questions concerne la propagande terroriste. Pour revenir sur la question et y répondre, c'est précisément parce que la définition proposée se trouve à l'article 22 du Code criminel, soit une personne qui conseille à une autre de commettre une infraction. Si je comprends bien le libellé, dans les faits, cette infraction figure déjà dans la loi.
Je peux vous garantir que, si on conserve le libellé, dans certaines affaires, des avocats de la défense se présenteront devant le tribunal quand une personne est accusée et demanderont: « À qui cette personne conseillait-elle de commettre une infraction? » S'il n'y a pas une autre personne d'impliquée, il n'est pas possible de prouver que l'infraction a été commise.
Cela se rapporte à la notion générale, qui reflète la réalité à laquelle nous faisons face maintenant: nous savons que ce qui devrait être inclus dans la définition de propagande terroriste, ce sont les moyens utilisés pour la radicalisation, le recrutement et la facilitation, y compris, et surtout, dans des situations qui surviennent ici. C'est ce à quoi nous faisons face dans les faits.
En ce qui concerne les questions plus larges que vous avez soulevées, je vais revenir à ce que j'ai mentionné précédemment. Je crois que certains éléments du projet de loi  C-59 nous aident à composer avec la réalité du retour des djihadistes. La chose la plus importante, c'est que le gouvernement n'a pas changé la norme de preuve exigée à l'article 810.011, qui concerne l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public dans le cas de crainte d'une infraction de terrorisme. Le libellé comprend toujours « craindre la possibilité qu'une personne commette ». Si cela avait été remplacé par « craindre qu'une personne commette », cela aurait créé un obstacle beaucoup plus important.
L'autre élément qui est très important dans ce projet de loi, c'est la disposition qui exige le dépôt annuel d'un rapport indiquant le nombre d'engagements contractés et la disposition portant sur un examen des effets de la loi après cinq années d'application. D'après mon expérience au gouvernement, ce genre de disposition a tendance à favoriser la reddition de comptes. Je peux vous assurer que, si ces dispositions sont incluses, on verra apparaître des tableaux blancs dans les différents bureaux des services et des organismes de sécurité, et les gens y inscriront ce dont ils sont responsables et ce qu'ils doivent livrer. C'est une bonne chose, parce que je suis d'avis que l'obligation de rendre des comptes favorise l'atteinte de résultats.
Collapse
View Blaine Calkins Profile
CPC (AB)
View Blaine Calkins Profile
2018-02-15 11:54
Expand
Mr. Newark, just to reiterate what you said earlier about the current provisions that BillC-51 put in place where it is an offence to broadly counsel someone to propagate terrorist propaganda. This means that in a particular case somebody who is propagating terrorist propaganda could unknowingly influence somebody to commit a terrorist act without that person who is propagating the propaganda even knowing that somebody was going to commit the offence.
Let me get to my point. Bill C-59 is proposing that somebody would only be charged if they had counselled somebody, which means that somebody would have to commit the act, and we would have to trace that back to whoever counselled them, whereas the legislation as it currently exists could stop the person from propagating the terrorist activity in the first place, thereby preventing the activity from happening.
Is that a fair assessment?
Monsieur Newark, je veux seulement réitérer ce que vous avez dit plus tôt sur les dispositions actuelles prévues par le projet de loi C-51, selon lesquelles le fait de conseiller de manière générale à une personne de diffuser de la propagande terroriste constitue une infraction. Cela signifie que, dans un cas particulier, une personne qui diffuse de la propagande terroriste pourrait sans le savoir influencer une autre personne à commettre un acte terroriste, sans savoir que quelqu'un allait commettre une infraction.
Laissez-moi en venir à mon propos. Le projet de loi C-59 propose qu'une personne soit seulement accusée si elle avait conseillé une autre personne, ce qui signifie que quelqu'un aurait à commettre l'acte, et nous aurions à remonter jusqu'à quiconque le lui avait conseillé, alors que la loi telle qu'elle est rédigée actuellement permettrait d'emblée de faire en sorte que la personne arrête de faire la propagande de l'activité terroriste, empêchant ainsi l'activité de se produire.
Est-ce une évaluation qui est juste?
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
I wanted to broach the question of youth policing in context of the question of potential radicalization of young Canadians or them being vulnerable to radicalization by foreign or even domestic terrorist organizations, both right-wing and others.
Is this work that your commission has intersected with, and if so, how does that play into the question of whether this is a national security issue or something that is dealt with on more local levels within the RCMP structure?
Je voudrais aborder la question des interventions policières auprès des jeunes dans le contexte de la radicalisation potentielle de jeunes Canadiens ou de leur vulnérabilité à la radicalisation provoquée par des organisations terroristes étrangères ou même nationales, inspirées d'une idéologie de droite ou autre.
Est-ce un travail auquel votre Commission a pris part, et si c'est le cas, en quoi cela influe-t-il sur la question de savoir s'il s'agit d'un enjeu lié à la sécurité nationale ou d'un enjeu qui est abordé à un échelon local au sein de la structure de la GRC?
Collapse
Guy Bujold
View Guy Bujold Profile
Guy Bujold
2018-02-15 12:21
Expand
I'm not aware that we've actually dealt with it as a specific subject. In a world where Bill C-59 did not exist, it would be an issue that would be on our list of systemic review issues that we might want to consider looking at in the future. Therefore, in the new context where the new agency is created, they might very well, using their own powers, do a review of that subject. Yes, I think it would be in that case definitely related to national security, certainly the way you framed the question.
À ma connaissance, nous n'avons pas traité cela en particulier. Dans un monde où le projet de loi  C-59 n'existait pas, il s'agirait d'un enjeu que nous voudrions possiblement examiner de manière systématique à l'avenir. Par conséquent, dans le contexte où le nouvel office est créé, ce dernier pourrait très bien utiliser son pouvoir pour se pencher sur la question. Oui, je crois que ce serait assurément un cas lié à la sécurité nationale, de la façon dont vous avez présenté la question.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
If I could, with the last question here, I'll ask anyone who wishes to to take it. I've been reading the 2017 public report on the terrorist threat to Canada, produced by Public Safety. In that report, there are a number of references to far-right extremism and what that means for Canada from a terrorist-threat perspective. The report says that a dedicated module on extreme right-wing groups is currently under development. It's being developed by the first responder terrorism awareness program team. The report says that while far-right activity, far-right extremism, has always been a concern, this is the first time—at least that's what the report implies—that a dedicated approach in the form of a module here has been created. Does this mean that the Department of Public Safety is particularly concerned, now more than ever, about the threat of far-right extremism in Canada?
Merci beaucoup.
Si vous me le permettez, ma dernière question s'adresse à qui voudra bien y répondre. J'ai lu le Rapport public de 2017 sur la menace terroriste pour le Canada qu'a préparé Sécurité publique Canada. À quelques reprises, le rapport fait allusion à l'extrémisme de droite et explique ce que cela signifie pour le Canada au chapitre de la menace terroriste. Le rapport signale qu'un module dédié à la question des groupes d'extrême droite est en cours d’élaboration sous la direction de l’équipe du programme de sensibilisation des premiers intervenants au terrorisme. Selon le rapport, bien que les activités de l'extrême droite et l'extrémisme de droite aient toujours été une préoccupation, c'est la première fois — du moins, c'est que le rapport laisse entendre — qu'une démarche dédiée prend forme. Cela signifie-t-il que le ministère de la Sécurité publique est particulièrement inquiet — plus que jamais en fait — de la menace qu'exerce l'extrémisme de droite au Canada?
Collapse
Malcolm Brown
View Malcolm Brown Profile
Malcolm Brown
2018-02-13 12:12
Expand
Really briefly, I'm not sure I can say more than ever, but I will ask Gilles Michaud to respond to the specific question.
Très rapidement, je ne sais pas si je peux dire « plus que jamais », mais adressez-vous à Gilles Michaud; il pourra vous répondre avec plus de précision que moi.
Collapse
Gilles Michaud
View Gilles Michaud Profile
Gilles Michaud
2018-02-13 12:12
Expand
That specific module is really a law-enforcement push. We've seen the increase in activities, and we would say that an aspect of the threat that we have is that we had taken our eyes off the ball, I guess, for a number of years. Right now there's a push to really delve into it. With our police of jurisdiction, because that's mainly where those activities occur and where the responsibility lies, we're trying to get a better understanding as to the existence of that threat and the level.
En fait, ce module est un coup de collier en matière d'application des lois. Nous avons constaté une recrudescence des activités, et je crois que la situation actuelle est due en partie au fait que nous nous sommes détournés de cela pendant un certain nombre d'années. Il y a vraiment un effort particulier pour examiner ces choses de plus près. Notre service de police est celui qui a la compétence voulue pour faire cela — après tout, c'est surtout dans la sphère fédérale que ces activités se produisent et c'est à cet ordre de gouvernement que la responsabilité incombe —, c'est-à-dire essayer de mieux comprendre la nature et l'ampleur de cette menace.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
Mr. Brown, with regard to the issue of domestic violence, terrorism, extremism, radicalization—perhaps using as one anecdotal example the incident in Sainte-Foy just over a year ago—in your assessment, how important is our proactive work with Canadian young people? I have the sense that the vast majority of these cases do involve young people under 35 years of age. By my anecdotal knowledge, 60- and 70-year-olds don't self-radicalize. What do we need to do within the framework that we have? How important is this work to counter violence and radicalization, and what are its principal elements?
Merci.
Monsieur Brown, en ce qui concerne la violence familiale, le terrorisme, l'extrémisme, la radicalisation — on pourrait par exemple se servir du cas isolé qui s'est produit à Sainte-Foy il y a un peu plus d'un an —, à votre avis, dans quelle mesure le travail proactif effectué auprès des jeunes Canadiens est-il important? Je crois comprendre que la vaste majorité de ces cas sont le fait de jeunes de moins de 35 ans. Selon ma connaissance partielle du monde, les soixantenaires et les septuagénaires ne s'autoradicalisent pas. Que pouvons-nous faire à l'intérieur du cadre dont nous disposons? Dans quelle mesure le travail pour contrer la violence et la radicalisation est-il important, et quels en sont les principaux éléments?
Collapse
Malcolm Brown
View Malcolm Brown Profile
Malcolm Brown
2018-02-13 12:25
Expand
There's no question that it's a very important element. The principal element is the work that's led by the Canada centre that operates out of the department. It works with local community groups and provides funding and support for initiatives in Montreal, Calgary, Toronto, and across the country, in part because the solutions for Calgary will be different from the solutions for Montreal. That's really a key part of our response to that particularly vulnerable age group.
Il ne fait aucun doute que ce travail est très important. Le gros de ce travail est mené par le Centre canadien d'engagement communautaire et de prévention de la violence, qui évolue en marge du ministère. Le Centre travaille avec des groupes communautaires locaux. Il finance et soutient des initiatives d'un peu partout au pays — à Montréal, à Calgary, à Toronto et ailleurs —, en partant du principe que les solutions doivent être adaptées aux conditions locales. C'est vraiment l'un des éléments centraux de notre réponse à l'égard de ce groupe d'âge particulièrement vulnérable.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
Are we, as Canada, out front on this challenge, or are there experiences among, say, the Five Eyes that could be useful in constructing our own framework?
Le Canada est-il à l'avant-garde quant au traitement de ce problème ou y a-t-il des expériences dont nous pourrions nous inspirer pour mettre au point notre propre cadre d'intervention? Je pense par exemple à ce qui se fait dans d'autres pays, notamment ceux de la collectivité des cinq.
Collapse
Malcolm Brown
View Malcolm Brown Profile
Malcolm Brown
2018-02-13 12:26
Expand
I would say actually we are leaders. We work closely, particularly but not only, with Five Eyes partners on understanding trends, but again in the same way that the interventions in Calgary are different from the interventions in Montreal, the interventions in Sydney, Australia, will be different from the interventions in Canada. I would say we are very well positioned relative to our colleagues, and based on conversations we've had at a recent G7 meeting in the fall, it was very clear that Canada is playing a leadership role.
Je dirais en fait que nous sommes les meneurs. Nous travaillons de près avec nos partenaires de la collectivité des cinq — surtout avec eux, mais pas seulement avec eux — afin de comprendre les tendances, mais comme pour l'exemple de tout à l'heure à propos des villes, les interventions qui s'appliquent ailleurs ne conviennent pas nécessairement pour le Canada. Je dirais que nous sommes en très bonne posture par rapport à nos collègues. J'ajouterais même que, selon les échanges que nous avons eus lors de la réunion du G7 de l'automne dernier, il est très clair que le Canada est un leader dans ce domaine.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
My final question is for Mr. Breithaupt. On the assumption that we're dealing primarily with young people when we talk about domestic terror threats or radicalization and extremist threats, do you have any thoughts on the current framework of the bill that speaks particularly to the Youth Criminal Justice Act provisions, clauses 159 to 167?
Are there any ideas, any thoughts with regard to improving those provisions, or are you satisfied this will adequately protect Canadian youth?
Merci beaucoup.
Ma dernière question s'adresse à M. Breithaupt. En présumant que les menaces terroristes, la radicalisation et les menaces extrémistes constatées au Canada sont principalement associées aux adolescents, avez-vous des observations à formuler au sujet des dispositions mises de l'avant dans le projet de loi quant à la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents, c'est-à-dire les articles 159 à 167?
Avez-vous des choses à proposer pour améliorer ces dispositions, ou êtes-vous d'avis qu'elles seront en mesure de protéger adéquatement nos adolescents?
Collapse
Douglas Breithaupt
View Douglas Breithaupt Profile
Douglas Breithaupt
2018-02-13 12:27
Expand
Thank you for the question.
I will just talk a little bit about the proposed amendments. The Youth Criminal Justice Act recognizes that young persons have special guarantees of rights and freedoms, and it contains a number of significant legal safeguards to ensure they are treated fairly and their rights are fully protected. Part 8 of the bill is aimed at ensuring that all youth who are involved in the criminal justice system due to terrorism-related conduct are afforded enhanced procedural and other protections that the Youth Criminal Justice Act provides. It ensures, for example, that youth protections apply in relation to recognizance orders and clarifies that youth justice courts have exclusive jurisdiction to impose these orders on youth.
For example, if a young person were to come before a youth justice court on an application for a terrorism peace bond and is not represented by a lawyer, the amendments here would require the court to advise the young person of his or her right to retain and instruct counsel, refer the young person to any available legal aid program, and if the young person is unable to obtain counsel through the program, direct that young person to be represented by counsel provided by the state upon request of the young person.
There is more discussion internationally about the effects of terrorism on the juvenile justice system, and these proposals for amendments to the Youth Criminal Justice Act are to enhance protections of youth in proceedings where recognizance with conditions in terrorism peace bonds apply, but it also provides for access to youth records for the purposes of administering the Canadian passport order, subject to the privacy protections of the act.
Je vous remercie de cette question.
Je traiterai brièvement des amendements proposés. La Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents admet que les jeunes bénéficient de garanties particulières au chapitre des droits et libertés, et contient un certain nombre de mesures de protection juridiques importantes pour faire en sorte qu'ils soient traités équitablement et que leurs droits soient protégés. La Partie 8 du projet de loi vise à garantir que tous les jeunes qui ont des démêlés avec le système de justice pénale en raison d'un comportement lié au terrorisme aient droit à des mesures de protection renforcées sur le plan de la procédure et à d'autres égards en vertu de la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents. Par exemple, le projet de loi stipule que les mesures de protection des jeunes s'appliquent aux engagements et précise que les tribunaux pour adolescents ont le pouvoir exclusif d'imposer des engagements aux jeunes.
Par exemple, si un jeune non représenté par un avocat comparaissait devant un tribunal pour adolescents concernant une demande d'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public lié au terrorisme, les amendements exigeraient que ce tribunal l'informe de son droit de mandater un avocat, le dirige vers un programme d'aide juridique disponible et, si le jeune ne peut obtenir les services d'un avocat par l'entremise de ce programme, fasse en sorte qu'il soit représenté par un avocat de l'État s'il en fait la demande.
À l'échelle internationale, on discute aussi des effets du terrorisme sur le système de justice pour mineurs, et les amendements qu'on propose d'apporter à la Loi sur le système de justice pour adolescents visent à renforcer la protection des jeunes au cours des procédures quand il faut tenir compte des conditions d'un engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public lié au terrorisme. Ils prévoient toutefois aussi l'accès aux dossiers des adolescents en application du Décret sur les passeports canadiens, le tout devant faire l'objet de mesures de protection de la vie privée de la loi.
Collapse
Michael Mostyn
View Michael Mostyn Profile
Michael Mostyn
2018-02-08 12:13
Expand
Thank you. I will be sharing my time with Mr. Matas.
We thank the committee for inviting us to appear. I will provide some introductory remarks. My colleague David Matas, our senior legal counsel, will elaborate on some of our key points on the proposed legislation.
B'nai Brith Canada is this country's oldest national Jewish organization, founded in 1875, with a long history of defending the human rights of Canadian Jewry and others across the country. We advocate for the interests of the grassroots Jewish community in Canada and for their rights such as freedom of conscience and religion.
B'nai Brith Canada testified before this committee in 2015 and, most recently, in February 2017, on what was then BillC-51. Our testimony today will develop the same points we had previously expressed, and we will focus on specific areas that touch on our work, particularly part 7.
Our latest audit of anti-Semitic incidents in Canada contains a key truth: Jews are consistently targeted by hate and bias-related crimes in Canada at a rate higher than that of any other identifiable group. Statistics Canada recently released its report on 2016 police-reported hate crimes, and once again Jews were targeted more than any other group in the country. But police-reported hate crimes are only the tip of the iceberg. We require better tools—data and analysis—to gain greater insights into all hate crimes and to do a better job of countering them.
Bill C-59 includes proposals to change the Criminal Code aimed at improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the terrorist entity listing regime. We endorse those proposals providing for a staggered ministerial review of listed entities and granting the minister the authority to amend the names, including aliases, of listed entities.
In the past, B'nai Brith has been supportive of measures to empower security officials to criminalize advocacy and promotion of terrorism, and seize terrorist propaganda. We supported these measures to deny those intent on inspiring, radicalizing, or recruiting Canadians to commit acts of terror and who exploit the legal leeway to be clever but dangerous with their words. Bill C-59 seeks to change the law's articulation of this offence from “advocates or promotes” to “counselling” the commission of a terrorism offence. This is a weakening of the law that we believe is unhelpful. We have noted the assurances provided by the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, but we are still uncertain that such a change, which in our view weakens the law, is needed.
The change of advocacy and promotion to “counselling” also impacts on the definition of “terrorism propaganda”. Bill C-59 would remove the advocacy and promotion of terrorism offences in general from the definition. This is also a weakening of the law.
We accept that the right to freedom of expression is an important consideration, but the right of potential victims to be free from terrorism and the threat of terrorism must be a greater priority.
The importance of a clear articulation of the penalties for advocacy and promotion of terrorism should include the glorification of terrorism, something that should be of concern to all of us.
These are specific points I wanted to raise. There are others that, while not specifically part of the proposed amendments to Bill C-59, are intimately associated and are of interest and concern to B'nai Brith Canada. There are further points here. I'd like to highlight some.
The continuing manifestation of anti-Semitism, hate crimes, and hate speech in Canada affects not only the Jewish community. B'nai Brith Canada sees these worrying trends as national security issues. Organizations such as ours working with law enforcement agencies at the federal, provincial, and municipal levels must address these issues collaboratively.
The government's framework to counter youth radicalization is also extremely important. We endorse the work of the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence. We look forward to a stronger dialogue with them.
How can we collaborate in the more effective monitoring of groups engaged in hate speech or incitement directed at children, including those using coded messages that are nonetheless threatening, even where these might fall short of actual crimes? This is very much the focus in countering radicalization at an early stage, where civil society can have better dialogue with law enforcement.
How can we ensure that government agencies shun questionable organizations and groups, particularly those that receive government grants and nonetheless are operating in ways inimical to the fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadian society? We would welcome a channel of dialogue for this purpose.
Lastly, how can we better engage in dialogue with the Canada Revenue Agency to ensure diligent follow-up to complaints regarding organizations engaged in or supporting those expressing hate speech at odds with their charitable status?
There are other points, as I mentioned, in our paper. I'm sure we can answer those in questions.
I'd like to cede the floor to my colleague David Matas.
Merci. Je partagerai mon temps de parole avec Me Matas.
Nous remercions le Comité de nous avoir invités à comparaître. Je ferai quelques remarques liminaires. Mon collègue David Matas, notre conseiller juridique principal, expliquera davantage certains de nos principaux arguments quant à ce projet de loi.
Fondée en 1875, B’nai Brith Canada est la plus ancienne organisation nationale juive du pays. Nous défendons depuis longtemps les droits de la personne des Juifs canadiens et des autres citoyens à travers le pays. Nous défendons les intérêts de la communauté juive du Canada ainsi que ses droits, comme la liberté de conscience et de religion.
B’nai Brith Canada a témoigné devant ce comité en 2015 et, plus récemment, en février 2017, au sujet de ce qui était alors le projet de loi C-51. Notre témoignage d’aujourd’hui reprendra les mêmes arguments que nous avons déjà soulevés et nous nous concentrerons sur des domaines précis qui touchent au travail que nous faisons, en particulier la partie 7.
Notre dernier rapport sur les incidents d’antisémitisme au Canada fait état d’une vérité essentielle: les juifs sont constamment la cible de crimes motivés par la haine et les préjugés au Canada à un taux plus élevé que tout autre groupe identifiable. Statistique Canada a récemment publié son rapport sur les crimes haineux déclarés par la police en 2016; une fois de plus, les juifs ont été le groupe le plus ciblé au pays. Mais les crimes haineux déclarés par la police ne sont que la pointe de l’iceberg. Nous avons besoin de meilleurs outils — des données et des analyses — pour mieux comprendre tous les crimes haineux et mieux les contrer.
Le projet de loi  C-59 propose de modifier le Code criminel afin d’améliorer l’efficience et l’efficacité du régime de listes d’entités terroristes. Nous appuyons ces mesures, qui prévoient un examen ministériel échelonné des entités inscrites et confèrent au ministre le pouvoir de modifier les noms, y compris les pseudonymes, de ces entités.
Par le passé, B’nai Brith a appuyé les mesures visant à habiliter les responsables de la sécurité à criminaliser la préconisation et la fomentation du terrorisme et à saisir la propagande terroriste. Nous avons appuyé ces mesures pour empêcher ceux qui veulent inspirer, radicaliser ou recruter des Canadiens pour commettre des actes de terrorisme et qui exploitent la latitude juridique qui leur permet de propager des paroles astucieuses, mais dangereuses. Le projet de loi  C-59 vise à modifier la définition juridique de cette infraction, en remplaçant « préconiser ou fomenter » par « conseiller » la commission d’infractions de terrorisme. Il s’agit d’un affaiblissement de la loi qui, à notre avis, est inutile. Nous avons pris note des assurances que le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile a données, mais nous ne savons toujours pas si un tel changement, qui, à notre avis, affaiblit la loi, est nécessaire.
Remplacer « préconiser ou fomenter » par « conseiller » aura également un impact sur la définition de « propagande terroriste ». Le projet de loi  C-59 supprimerait de cette définition la préconisation et la fomentation des infractions terroristes en général. Cela affaiblirait aussi la loi.
Nous admettons que le droit à la liberté d’expression est important, mais le droit des victimes potentielles d’être à l’abri du terrorisme et de la menace terroriste doit avoir une plus grande priorité.
Il est important de bien définir les sanctions en matière de préconisation et de fomentation du terrorisme et de veiller à ce qu’elles portent aussi sur la glorification du terrorisme, laquelle devrait nous préoccuper tous.
Voilà les éléments précis dont je voulais vous parler. Il y en a d’autres qui, même s’ils ne font pas partie des modifications proposées au projet de loi  C-59, sont intimement liés et qui intéressent et préoccupent B’nai Brith Canada. Il existe d’autres éléments et j’aimerais en souligner quelques-uns.
L’omniprésence de l’antisémitisme, des crimes haineux et du discours haineux au Canada ne touche pas seulement la communauté juive. B’nai Brith Canada est d’avis que ces tendances inquiétantes sont des questions de sécurité nationale. Des organismes comme le nôtre qui travaillent avec les forces de l’ordre à l’échelle fédérale, provinciale et municipale doivent régler ces problèmes conjointement.
La politique du gouvernement visant à contrer la radicalisation des jeunes est également extrêmement importante. Nous appuyons le travail du Centre canadien d’action communautaire et de prévention de la violence. Nous nous réjouissons à la perspective d’un dialogue plus soutenu avec eux.
Comment pouvons-nous collaborer pour mieux surveiller les groupes qui se livrent à des discours haineux ou qui incitent la haine chez les enfants, y compris ceux qui utilisent des messages codés et néanmoins menaçants, même lorsqu’il ne s’agit pas d’actes criminels? C’est là l’objectif principal de la lutte contre la radicalisation à un stade précoce, où la société civile peut mieux dialoguer avec les forces de l’ordre.
Comment pouvons-nous faire en sorte que les agences gouvernementales évitent les organismes et les groupes douteux, en particulier ceux qui reçoivent des subventions gouvernementales et qui, malgré tout, agissent d’une manière contraire aux droits et libertés fondamentaux de la société canadienne? Nous serions heureux de participer à un dialogue à cet égard.
Pour terminer, comment pouvons-nous mieux dialoguer avec l’Agence du revenu du Canada afin d’assurer un suivi diligent des plaintes concernant les organismes qui s’adonnent à des propos haineux ou qui appuient ceux qui expriment des propos contraires à leur statut d’organisme de bienfaisance?
Comme je l’ai mentionné, nous soulignons d’autres éléments dans notre mémoire. Je suis certain que nous pourrons en discuter lors de la période des questions.
J’aimerais céder la parole à mon collègue David Matas.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have a final question for you.
In a Toronto Star piece written shortly after your retirement, you were asked if Canadians needed to readjust their thinking about what makes a terrorist. You replied by saying that most young recruits are those who:
feel that the Muslim world is under attack and that somehow Canada is contributing to that.
With that in mind, would you suggest that the nature of radicalization is not religious in nature and that those who are going abroad and taking up arms are inspired by a political message, in the same way that young recruits were inspired by the Spanish Civil War or something along those lines?
J'ai une dernière question pour vous.
Dans un article du Toronto Star paru peu après que vous ayez pris votre retraite, à la question à savoir si les Canadiens avaient besoin de rajuster leur interprétation de ce qui fait un terroriste, vous avez répondu en disant que la plupart des recrues sont des jeunes qui
sentent que le monde musulman est attaqué et que, en quelque sorte, le Canada contribue à cela.
À ce sujet, êtes-vous d'avis que la radicalisation n'est pas de nature religieuse et que ceux qui vont à l'étranger pour prendre les armes sont motivés par un message politique, tout comme les jeunes recrues étaient motivées lors de la guerre civile en Espagne, ou quelque chose de ce genre?
Collapse
Richard Fadden
View Richard Fadden Profile
Richard Fadden
2018-02-06 11:22
Expand
Broadly speaking, I would, although we have to acknowledge that it's often done under the cover of religion. A lot of people use the tenets of Islam to justify what they want to do. I fundamentally believe that a large chunk of the Muslim world believes that they're under attack by the west.
I had some research done once to find out the last time a non-Muslim country was attacked by the west. Do you what country it was? Grenada. Every other significant military effort undertaken by the west—read: often the United States—has been against a Muslim or a quasi-Muslim country. You can understand why I argue that they do feel under attack. If you add that basic sort of gut-level reaction to everything that's on the Internet, in the cyberworld, and whatnot, they do feel threatened.
That said, religion is often used as a cover.
Oui, de façon très générale, quoique nous devrions reconnaître que cela est souvent fait sous le couvert de la religion. Bien des gens invoquent les préceptes de l'islam pour justifier leurs actes. Je suis convaincu qu'une grande proportion du monde musulman est convaincue qu'il est attaqué par l'Ouest.
J'ai fait faire une recherche à un moment donné pour savoir quelle est la dernière fois que l'Ouest a attaqué un pays non musulman. Savez-vous quel était ce pays? La Grenade. Toute autre action militaire d'importance entreprise par l'Ouest — souvent les États-Unis — a été dirigée contre un pays musulman ou quasi musulman. Vous pouvez comprendre pourquoi je pense qu'ils se sentent attaqués. Si on ajoute cette sorte de réaction viscérale à tout ce qui paraît sur Internet, dans le cyberespace, il n'est pas étonnant qu'ils se sentent menacés.
Ceci dit, la religion est souvent utilisée comme prétexte.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much for that.
If it's fair to say that terrorism and extremism remain a prominent threat, is it also fair to say—you spoke about the imploding caliphate and returning fighters—that recruitment, either by right-wing extremist groups or by international terrorist groups like al Shabaab and the remainders of ISIS, remain a threat; in other words, fresh recruitment of Canadian youth who are particularly vulnerable to radicalization, to recruitment, and to becoming incorporated in these organizations?
Merci beaucoup.
Il est évident que le terrorisme et l'extrémisme nous menacent gravement. Peut-on aussi affirmer, puisque vous avez mentionné l'implosion du califat et le retour des combattants de la liberté, que le recrutement qu'effectuent les groupes extrémistes de droite et les groupes terroristes internationaux comme al Shabaab ainsi que les derniers combattants de l'État islamique nous menacent encore? Autrement dit, risquons-nous encore de faire face à la radicalisation et au recrutement de jeunes Canadiens vulnérables dans ces groupes?
Collapse
Paul Martin
View Paul Martin Profile
Paul Martin
2018-02-01 11:10
Expand
I would agree with that statement. The fact is that individuals who are interested and motivated to recruit people and incite people to violence and to take action are using the cyber-world, and they have used it quite effectively. That is probably, next to the returning foreign fighters, one of the biggest concerns that we have as a committee. We do try to address that issue as well.
Je suis d'accord avec cette affirmation. En fait, les individus qui cherchent à recruter des gens pour les inciter à la violence le font dans le cyberespace de manière très efficace. Nous avons là, avec le retour des combattants de la liberté, l'une des plus graves préoccupations de notre comité. Nous nous efforçons d'aborder ce problème aussi.
Collapse
Laurence Rankin
View Laurence Rankin Profile
Laurence Rankin
2018-02-01 11:11
Expand
With the assistance of the federal government, at a municipal and provincial level, countering radicalization to violence is a key priority for the Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General's office in British Columbia, by way of example. We're creating a hub approach to this issue because we've determined that we have to address it before it goes from young people becoming radicalized to their actually acting upon those beliefs. The hub approach is a venue for various community service providers to work together, really with the aim to redirect individuals who may be on the path to radicalization.
En Colombie-Britannique, par exemple, le ministère de la Santé publique et le bureau du Solliciteur général luttent fortement contre la radicalisation au niveau municipal et provincial, avec l'aide du gouvernement fédéral. Nous créons un centre pour éliminer ce problème avant que les jeunes radicalisés passent à l'action. Ce centre permet à différents fournisseurs de services communautaires de collaborer afin de réorienter les jeunes déjà engagés sur la voie de la radicalisation.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much. That's extremely helpful.
I wanted to ask you a follow-on question. You've in a way pre-empted what I was going to ask about. From your experience as serving police officers, in addition to serving on the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, what are central levers at our disposal to mitigate the risk of being radicalized? I say radicalized with respect to the propensity to be subject to a right-wing extremist group, as we saw with the individual who committed the massacre in Sainte-Foy just over a year ago. There's no evidence that he belonged to a group, but there is certainly self-radicalization, one could say, and also Islamic terrorist groups. What do we know so far that would facilitate the work of preventing young Canadians from ever falling into this trap?
Merci beaucoup. Ces renseignements nous aident énormément.
J'ai une question de suivi à vous poser. En fait, vous y avez déjà presque répondu. De par votre expérience dans les services de police, outre votre service à l'Association canadienne des chefs de police, sauriez-vous de quelles ressources centrales nous disposons pour atténuer le risque de voir la radicalisation se répandre? Je parle de radicalisation vers un groupe d'extrémistes de droite, comme l'individu qui a commis le massacre de Sainte-Foy il y a un peu plus d'un an. Rien n'indique qu'il faisait partie d'un groupe, mais nous pouvons presque dire qu'il s'est radicalisé lui-même contre les groupes terroristes islamiques. Quelles connaissances possédons-nous pour empêcher les jeunes Canadiens de tomber dans ce piège?
Collapse
Paul Martin
View Paul Martin Profile
Paul Martin
2018-02-01 11:12
Expand
We've taken a multi-faceted approach within our police service. It's about educating our police officers on recognizing the signs of radicalization. Probably the more effective means is community engagement, making sure that our police services, especially the municipal and those closer to the ground.... I know the federal agency, as Laurence has pointed out, ultimately has authority for national security investigations, but it's the police of jurisdiction that's going to see this. Our activities are about engaging the communities for a number of different reasons, not the least of which is to make sure they trust us and feel there is legitimacy with the police services so that they can confide in us if they see that members of their community are being radicalized to violence.
The other piece is putting out education to these young individuals who may be getting a message from one side to say that there is some glory or something that's good for them to go to this act of violence, to say that in fact, it's quite the opposite.
Nos services de police ont adopté une approche polyvalente. Nous enseignons aux agents à reconnaître les signes de la radicalisation. Le moyen le plus efficace est probablement l'engagement communautaire de nos services de police, surtout à l'échelle municipale, sur le terrain... Je sais que l'organisme fédéral, comme l'a souligné Laurence, mène des enquêtes sur la sécurité nationale, mais les services de police locaux sont plus aptes à observer ces signes. Nous mobilisons les collectivités pour différentes raisons. Nous visons avant tout à ce que les gens fassent confiance aux services de police et aillent leur dire s'ils voient des résidents de leur quartier se radicaliser.
Nous nous efforçons aussi d'éduquer les jeunes qui se font dire qu'un acte de violence les couvrira de gloire ou autre. Nous leur démontrons qu'en réalité, c'est tout à fait le contraire.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
If I can follow up, I only have a minute left with a more specific question along the same lines.
Is there a pattern, a profile—not to say a stereotype, but a propensity—that's identified so far that raises the risk of being radicalized or being recruited, in terms of socio-economic status; in terms of racial, religious, or cultural background; in terms of networks that one does or doesn't belong to? Is there anything yet that we can use as a sort of marker for the way forward?
Si vous me permettez, il me reste seulement une minute, alors je vais vous demander quelques précisions à ce sujet.
Voyez-vous un profil, pour ne pas dire un stéréotype, une tendance incitant ces jeunes à se radicaliser ou à se faire recruter? Peut-être un profil socioéconomique, racial, religieux ou culturel? Peut-être aussi des réseaux auxquels ils se joignent? Avons-nous déjà cerné un facteur qui nous montrerait dans quelle direction nous diriger?
Collapse
Paul Martin
View Paul Martin Profile
Paul Martin
2018-02-01 11:14
Expand
Laurence can step in and correct anything I may say on this, but we've had this discussion at the committee level, and there's no specific profile of what a person who gets radicalized looks like.
Generally speaking, there are things where they are vulnerable, they perhaps feel disaffected, they don't trust people, and they're on their own—they're loners. That's probably the closest thing you're going to get to a profile, but as far as a specific socio-economic status or age, no.
Laurence me corrigera si je me trompe, mais nous en avons discuté au comité, et nous avons conclu que les personnes qui se radicalisent n'ont pas de caractéristiques communes.
En termes très généraux, ces individus sont vulnérables par le fait qu'ils se sentent marginalisés, qu'ils ne font confiance à personne, qu'ils n'ont aucun soutien et qu'ils sont solitaires. Je pense que nous avons là un profil très vague, mais du point de vue du statut socioéconomique et de l'âge, nous n'avons rien du tout.
Collapse
View Pam Damoff Profile
Lib. (ON)
We are talking about terrorists. We've already brought up 9/11, ISIS, al Qaeda, that side of it, and certainly you were talking about the far right. We've seen it in Sainte-Foy, in Las Vegas in the United States, and we tend to not focus on that. I'm just wondering if you could comment on the challenges you're facing. When the minister was here, he said these types of acts are by lone wolves and they're very difficult for law enforcement or Public Safety to deal with, these lone wolves who've been radicalized, but we are seeing quite a few of these radicalizations to the far right and we don't talk about them quite as much.
Could either of you speak to that?
Nous parlons des terroristes. Nous avons évoqué le 11 septembre, l'État islamique et Al-Qaïda; c'est là une dimension du problème. Vous avez aussi mentionné l'extrême droite. Nous l'avons vue à Sainte-Foy et à Las Vegas aux États-Unis. Nous avons tendance à négliger cela. Pourriez-vous nous parler des défis que vous rencontrez? Quand nous avons parlé au ministre, il a indiqué que ce genre d'acte était perpétré par des « loups solitaires » radicalisés et que les forces de l'ordre et la Sécurité publique avaient bien du mal à y faire face. Nous voyons un certain nombre d'exemples d'une telle radicalisation dans l'extrême droite, mais nous n'en parlons pas beaucoup.
L'un de vous deux peut-il aborder cette question?
Collapse
Paul Martin
View Paul Martin Profile
Paul Martin
2018-02-01 11:33
Expand
I'm fortunate to live in a jurisdiction where one of our professors at the university is a subject matter expert on right-wing extremism, so I have a little bit of knowledge from her. The one thing about right-wing extremism is it cannot be underestimated here or elsewhere.
The biggest difference, to my understanding, between right-wing extremism and what we're seeing from Islamic extremism is really how organized they are. So when you talk about them being lone wolves, there's perhaps a little bit more to that, but they're not quite as organized nationally and internationally perhaps as others. That's really the biggest difference, as I understand it, but it cannot be underestimated and it is still a threat within this country and elsewhere.
J'ai la chance de vivre dans une circonscription où se trouve une professeure d'université dont la spécialité est l'extrémisme de droite. Grâce à elle, j'ai quelques connaissances sur le sujet. On ne saurait sous-estimer l'extrémisme de droite, au Canada ou ailleurs dans le monde.
Selon ce que j'en comprends, la principale différence entre l'extrémisme de droite et l'extrémisme islamique tient au degré d'organisation des groupes. Lorsque vous parlez des « loups solitaires », il se peut qu'ils ne soient pas tout à fait seuls, mais ils ne sont sans doute pas aussi bien organisés que d'autres groupes à l'échelle nationale ou internationale. Voilà la principale différence, à ma connaissance. Il n'en demeure pas moins que cette menace est toujours présente au pays et ailleurs dans le monde; elle ne doit pas être sous-estimée.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
I think it would be helpful.
Mr. Boisvert, if we can take advantage of your position, you'll have a lot to say about this. Canadian youth are vulnerable not only because they are youth, but also because they are preyed upon by terrorist organizations such as Abu Sayyaf, Al Shabaab, and ISIS.
Could we have your perspective on the protection of Canadian youth with respect to terrorist organizations that prey upon them, as related to the provisions in the bill?
Je pense que ce serait utile.
Monsieur Boisvert, si vous nous permettez de tirer parti du poste que vous occupez, je sais que vous aurez de nombreuses observations à formuler à ce sujet. Les jeunes Canadiens sont vulnérables non seulement en raison de leur âge, mais aussi parce qu'ils sont les proies d'organisations terroristes comme le Groupe d'Abu Sayyaf, Al-Chabaab et l'État islamique.
Pourrions-nous connaître votre point de vue quant à la protection des jeunes contre les organisations terroristes qui s'attaquent à eux, en vertu des dispositions du projet de loi?
Collapse
Raymond Boisvert
View Raymond Boisvert Profile
Raymond Boisvert
2018-01-30 13:03
Expand
I'll speak more perhaps at a higher level and from a practitioner's perspective.
I don't blame the Internet for radicalization, but it certainly is an important pathway and part of an ecosystem that leads somebody to falling prey to negative messaging.
I'd also like to underline, as it has been recently underlined once again in the United States in a more recent study, that the biggest threat of radicalization is actually the extreme right and not Islamic extremism. I think that's a very important piece.
Radicalization or extremism is extremism is extremism. It's the idea that we're now increasingly living in a world in which we're able to purvey hatred, and we can entice people and we can motivate them. The challenge for the security agency is that a person will come to their attention sometimes quite often through the issue of data exploitation and quite often through the issue of people posting online. Aaron Driver, the case in Ontario just about a year and a half ago, is a great example of that.
That's still an important toolset. The question is how to know when somebody goes from becoming radicalized—becoming incensed and thinking about it, maybe making some comments about mobilizing towards operational planning—to knowing when they really intend to do it. That's the big dilemma for the intelligence agencies and the law enforcement groups such as the RCMP that work together on those cases.
Je parlerai peut-être davantage à un niveau supérieur, ainsi qu'en ma qualité d'expert.
Je ne reproche pas à Internet de favoriser la radicalisation, mais c'est certainement une importante voie d'accès et une partie de l'écosystème qui permet à une personne de devenir la proie de messages négatifs.
Comme cela a été souligné de nouveau dernièrement aux États-Unis, dans le cadre d'une étude menée plus récemment, j'aimerais aussi faire ressortir le fait que la principale menace de radicalisation est l'extrême droite, et non l'extrémisme islamique. Je pense que c'est un point très important.
La radicalisation ou l'extrémisme sont du pareil au même. Ils véhiculent l'idée que nous vivons de plus en plus fréquemment dans un monde où nous sommes en mesure de propager la haine, de séduire les gens et de les motiver. La difficulté pour un organisme de sécurité, c'est que la personne sera souvent portée à son attention pour des raisons d'exploitation des données et d'affichage en ligne. Le cas d'Aaron Driver, qui est survenu en Ontario il y a près d'un an et demi de cela, en est un excellent exemple.
Internet est tout de même un important outil. Il reste à savoir comment on détermine le moment où quelqu'un passe de la radicalisation — le passage de la réflexion à l'indignation, puis à la formulation de commentaires relatifs à la mobilisation en vue d'une planification opérationnelle — à l'intention d'agir. Voilà le dilemme auquel font face les services de renseignement et les groupes d'application de la loi, comme la GRC, qui travaillent ensemble à la résolution de ces cas.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
You'll be the perfect person to answer this. What are your views on a Canadian youth who has been inside a terrorist organization and comes back onto our shores?
Vous êtes la personne la mieux placée pour répondre à cette question. Que pensez-vous d'un jeune Canadien qui a fait partie d'une organisation terroriste et qui revient au pays?
Collapse
Raymond Boisvert
View Raymond Boisvert Profile
Raymond Boisvert
2018-01-30 13:05
Expand
I think it's going to be a difficult and expensive process, because for one thing, it's difficult to understand. Once somebody has been exposed to extreme levels of violence, once they have been highly radicalized and have been schooled in warfare, you'd hope that they would have just had enough, that they've seen it and know they've made a terrible mistake. I think probably the majority are exactly in that kind of mindset, but how do you know?
If my responsibility is to keep Canadians safe, if I'm responsible for our counterterrorism program, we would say, “Well, we have to run this to ground to make sure that.... Let's go out and speak to that person as frequently as we can to get a better sense of what's behind their motives and whether they've turned the corner or whatever.” The expensive part is that you still have to afford some level, I think, of coverage in the early portions of that process, but you can't cover everybody. The number of persons who are of concern greatly outstripped the capability of the security establishment back in 2012, and I hate to even think of what it is today.
Je crois que le processus sera difficile et coûteux parce que, premièrement, ce conditionnement est difficile à comprendre. Une fois qu'une personne a été exposée à des degrés de violence extrême, qu'elle a été fortement radicalisée et formée à faire la guerre, on oserait espérer qu'elle en a eu assez, qu'elle en a vu assez et qu'elle a conscience d'avoir commis une terrible erreur. Je pense que la plupart de ces personnes sont exactement dans cet état d'esprit, mais comment le savoir?
Si je suis responsable d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens ou de mettre en œuvre notre programme de contre-terrorisme, je dirais, « Eh bien, nous devons aller jusqu'au bout pour nous assurer que... rencontrons cette personne et parlons-lui aussi souvent que nous le pouvons afin d'avoir une meilleure idée de ce qui sous-tend ses motivations et de savoir si elle a tourné la page ». Ce qui est coûteux, c'est le fait que vous devez tout de même, je crois, assurer un certain niveau de surveillance au tout début du processus, mais que vous ne pouvez pas surveiller tout le monde. En 2012, le nombre de personnes préoccupantes dépassait de loin la capacité des services de sécurité, et je ne veux même pas penser aux chiffres d'aujourd'hui.
Collapse
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
That answers my question, thank you. As I do not have a lot of time, I would like to continue with my questions to you.
When you testified about Bill C-51, you mentioned that members of the community want to help with deradicalization, but they are afraid of being accused of being extremists.
Do you think that Bill  C-59 solves that problem?
Cela répond à ma question, merci. Comme je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps de parole, j'aimerais continuer à vous poser des questions.
Lorsque vous avez témoigné à propos du projet de loi C-51, vous avez mentionné que des membres de la communauté voulaient participer à la déradicalisation, mais qu'ils avaient peur d'être accusés d'extrémisme.
Pensez-vous que le projet de loi  C-59 règle ce problème?
Collapse
Ihsaan Gardee
View Ihsaan Gardee Profile
Ihsaan Gardee
2017-12-12 9:20
Expand
In terms of our testimony on BillC-51, obviously there is a concern regarding the stigma that is associated with being identified as somebody who has been connected in any way to violent extremism or the ideology that supports and underpins it. There is a concern that exists there in terms of that stigma being applied to not just the individual but more broadly to the community at large when looking at national security and ensuring our shared security.
To be clear, Canadian Muslims are as concerned about violent extremism and the ideologies that underpin it, and we are equally concerned about all forms of violent extremism.
Pour ce qui est de notre témoignage sur le projet de loi C-51, il y a bien sûr une préoccupation qui tient à la stigmatisation associée au fait d'être considéré comme quelqu'un qui est lié d'une façon ou d'une autre à l'extrémisme violent ou à une idéologie qui le soutient ou le sous-tend. Certains craignent que la stigmatisation touche non seulement des particuliers, mais, de façon plus générale, l'ensemble d'une communauté, lorsqu'il est question de préserver la sécurité nationale et d'assurer notre sécurité commune.
Soyons clairs: les musulmans canadiens sont aussi préoccupés par l'extrémisme violent et les idéologies sous-jacentes et nous sommes tout autant préoccupés par toutes les formes d'extrémisme violent.
Collapse
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2017-12-12 10:31
Expand
Great, thank you.
Mr. Fogel, we were talking about the rise in hate crimes and anti-Semitism in particular, which top some of these sad lists and rankings. When we look at the issue of radicalization, which while not necessarily part of the bill in a substantive way is a related issue in terms of how we tackle some of these issues, it was part of the debate on BillC-51 as well.
Given that radicalization is not just one group, it's obviously many hate groups, and many of these groups are sadly targeting your community and others, I want to get your thoughts on the direction in which the government is going with its counter-radicalization efforts and just hear more generally your thoughts on that issue.
C'est très bien, merci.
Monsieur Fogel, nous avons mentionné l'augmentation du nombre de crimes haineux et de crimes antisémites en particulier, qui figurent en haut de certains de ces tristes classements. En ce qui concerne la radicalisation, même si elle n'est pas abordée comme telle dans le projet de loi, il s'agit d'une question connexe à l'égard de la manière dont nous nous attaquons à certains de ces problèmes, et elle a aussi été abordée dans le cadre des débats sur le projet de loi C-51.
Vu que la radicalisation touche non pas un seul groupe, mais plutôt de nombreux groupes haineux, et que, malheureusement, bon nombre de ces groupes prennent pour cible votre communauté, entre autres, je souhaite entendre vos commentaires concernant l'orientation du gouvernement en matière de lutte à la radicalisation et à propos de ce sujet en général.
Collapse
Shimon Fogel
View Shimon Fogel Profile
Shimon Fogel
2017-12-12 10:32
Expand
Counter-radicalization is a very tough nut to crack, because by definition you're targeting groups that are almost inherently suspicious of and resistant to efforts of outreach by any agents or elements of government. Just the very issue of building up a level of trust is something that impedes the process of proactive counter- or anti-radicalization processes.
It is in some way related to this legislation, in that, as I mentioned earlier, the distinction of how you categorize the counselling or the promotion of hatred and radicalization is an important element there, because it would be a mistake for us to think of one-on-one dynamics, that there's somebody fomenting radicalization and that individual has a specific target. Very often it's a wide net that is cast out, and the individual seeks to reel in whoever is caught in the net, so we have to be sensitive to that point.
I'm still of the view that the most effective effort is proactively putting in place the tone and environment within specific communities that will allow them to take ownership of the process of creating space between those who would aim to radicalize elements or segments of the community and those who are offering a meaningful alternative.
La lutte à la radicalisation est très difficile à réaliser, parce que, par définition, vous ciblez des groupes qui, presque par nature, sont méfiants et résistent aux efforts de sensibilisation déployés par n'importe quel représentant ou organisme du gouvernement. Le simple problème que pose l'établissement d'un lien de confiance entrave le processus de lutte proactive contre la radicalisation.
D'une certaine façon, cet enjeu est lié au projet de loi, dans le sens où, comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, un des éléments importants tient à la façon dont on classe le fait de conseiller ou de fomenter la haine et la radicalisation, parce que ce serait une erreur de croire que ces comportements sont le fait d'un seul individu, qu'une personne seule fomente la radicalisation et que cette personne a une cible précise. Bien souvent, il s'agit d'une personne qui tend un grand filet et cherche à attirer quiconque se prend dans les mailles, donc nous devons garder ce point à l'esprit.
Je suis toujours d'avis que le moyen le plus efficace consiste à créer de façon proactive un climat et un environnement dans des communautés particulières qui permettront aux membres de prendre en main le processus visant à distinguer les personnes qui cherchent à radicaliser des membres ou des sous-groupes dans la communauté des personnes qui offrent une autre voie très intéressante.
Collapse
Alex Neve
View Alex Neve Profile
Alex Neve
2017-12-05 8:56
Expand
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Good morning, committee members. Amnesty International certainly welcomes this opportunity to appear before you in the course of your review of Bill C-59. I'd like you to know at the outset that I'm here on behalf of both the English and francophone branch of Amnesty International Canada, and thus on behalf of our 400,000 supporters across the country.
Amnesty International has a long history of frequent appearances before parliamentary committees dealing with national security matters, be that studies of proposed legislation or reviews of existing legislation. That's not because we're national security experts. Our expertise, of course, lies in human rights. Our interest in Bill C-59, therefore, comes directly from our mandate to press governments to uphold their international human rights obligations. Documenting and responding to human rights violations arising in a national security context and pressing governments to amend national security laws, policies, and practices to conform to international human rights obligations have long featured prominently in Amnesty International's research and campaigning around the world, long predating September 11.
National security is often blatantly used as an excuse for human rights violations, clearly intended simply to punish and persecute political opponents or members of religious and ethnic minorities. National security operations have frequently proceeded with total disregard for obvious human rights consequences, leading to such serious human rights violations as torture, disappearances, and unlawful detention. Without adequate safeguards and restrictions, overly broad national security activities harm individuals and communities who pose no security threat at all. In all of these instances, the impact is frequently felt in a disproportionate and discriminatory manner by particular religious, ethnic, and racial communities, adding yet another human rights concern.
These concerns are by no means limited to other parts of the world. Over the past 15 years, Amnesty International has taken up numerous cases involving national security-related human rights violations related to the actions of Canadian law enforcement and national security agencies. These concerns have been so serious as to be the subject of two separate judicial inquiries, numerous Supreme Court and Federal Court rulings, and several significant apologies and financial settlements totalling well over $50 million to a number of Canadian citizens and other individuals whose rights were gravely violated because of the actions of Canadian agencies. I think of Maher Arar, Benamar Benatta, Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad El Maati, Muayyed Nureddin, and Omar Khadr. This is why we bring our human rights analysis to legislation such as Bill C-59—to ensure that provisions provide the greatest possible safeguards against human rights violations of this nature.
In commenting on the bill, I will touch briefly on five areas: first, the need for a stronger human rights anchor in the bill; second, the bill's national security review provisions; third, positive changes in Bill C-59; fourth, concerns that remain; and fifth, issues of concern that have not been addressed in the bill.
The first area is the need for a national security approach anchored in a commitment to human rights. In the review that preceded Bill C-59, we urged the government to use the opportunity of the present reform to adopt a clear human rights basis for Canada's national security framework. That is an approach that is not only of benefit, evidently, for human rights, but truly lays the ground for more inclusive, durable, and sustainable security as well. Currently, other than the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, none of Canada's national security legislation specifically refers to or incorporates Canada's binding international human rights obligations.
We recommended that those laws be amended to include provisions requiring legislation to be interpreted and applied in a manner that complies with international human rights norms. That was not taken up in Bill C-59 except for one very limited reference to the convention against torture. This is important in that it sends a strong message of the centrality of human rights in Canada's approach to national security. It is also of real benefit when it comes to upholding human rights in national security-related court proceedings.
Our first recommendation, therefore, remains to amend Bill C-59 to include a provision requiring all national security-related laws to be interpreted in conformity with Canada's international human rights obligations.
Second, we strongly welcome and support the provisions in part 1 of Bill C-59 creating the national security and intelligence review agency. Amnesty International has been calling for the creation of a comprehensive and integrated review agency of this nature since the time of our submissions to the Arar inquiry in 2005. This has been one of the longest-standing and most serious gaps in Canada's national security architecture. We do have three associated recommendations.
First, in keeping with the earlier recommendation I just made, the mandate of the review agency should be amended to ensure that the activities of security and intelligence agencies will be reviewed specifically to ensure conformity to Canada's international human rights obligations.
Second, the review agency must have personnel and resources commensurate with what will be a significant workload. We endorse the recommendation made by Professor Kent Roach that the provision allowing for a chair and additional commissioners numbering between three and six is inadequate, and would suggest that the number of additional commissioners be raised to between five and eight.
Third, we continue to be concerned about the review specifically of the Canada Border Services Agency. Unlike many of the agencies that will be reviewed by the new agency, the CBSA does not have its own stand-alone independent review body. The new review agency will have the power to review CBSA's national security and intelligence-related activities, but there still is no other independent agency reviewing the entirety of CBSA's activities, despite the growing number of cases where the need for such review is urgently evident, including deaths in immigration custody. This imbalance will inevitably pose awkwardness for the review agency's review of CBSA, and it underscores how crucial it is for the government to move rapidly to institute full, independent review of CBSA.
We'd like to highlight improvements. First, our concerns about the overly broad criminal offence in BillC-51 of advocating or promoting the commission of terrorism offences in general have been addressed by the proposed revisions to section 83.221 of the Criminal Code, which would instead criminalize the act of counselling another person to commit a terrorism offence, which was already a criminal offence essentially.
Second, the threat reduction powers in BillC-51, which anticipated action by CSIS that could have violated a range of human rights guaranteed under the Charter of Rights and under international law have been significantly improved. However, we think it needs to go further, and there needs to be specific prohibition of the fact that CSIS will not involve threat reduction of any kind that will violate the charter or violate international human rights obligations. We also welcome the changes made to preventive detention, but have some recommendations as to how that can be improved.
We remain concerned about the Secure Air Travel Act provisions, which we do not think address the many serious challenges that people face with the application of the no-fly list. Much more fundamental reforms are needed, including a commitment to establishing a robust redress system that will eliminate false positives, and significant enhancements to listing and appeal provisions to meet standards of fairness.
Because I know my time is limited, let me end with some provisions that remain unaddressed in the legislation.
One of the most explicit contraventions of international human rights in Canadian national security law, going back over 20 decades now, is the provision in immigration legislation allowing individuals in undefined exceptional circumstances to be deported to a country where they would face a serious risk of torture. It's a direct violation of the UN convention against torture. UN human rights bodies have repeatedly called for this to be addressed. Bill C-59 passed on the opportunity to do so. We would recommend that be taken up.
Finally, Bill C-59 also fails to make needed reforms to the approach taken to national security in immigration proceedings. There were very serious concerns about BillC-51's deepening unfairness of the immigration security certificate process, for instance, withholding certain categories of evidence from special advocates.
There needs to be a significant rethinking and reconsideration of immigration security certificate proceedings, rolling back those changes that were made in BillC-51, and addressing still the other areas of concern with respect to the fairness of that process.
Thank you.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.
Bonjour membres du Comité. Amnistie internationale est bien sûr heureuse d'avoir l'occasion de comparaître devant vous dans le cadre de votre étude du projet de loi  C-59. Je tiens à vous dire dès le départ que je représente ici le volet tant anglophone que francophone d'Amnistie internationale Canada et, par conséquent, je représente nos 400 000 sympathisants à l'échelle du pays.
Amnistie internationale comparaît fréquemment et depuis longtemps devant des comités parlementaires qui se penchent sur des questions liées à la sécurité nationale, que ce soit dans le cadre d'étude de projets de loi ou d'examen de lois en vigueur. Et ce n'est pas parce que nous sommes des experts de la sécurité nationale. Notre expertise, bien sûr, concerne les droits de la personne. Par conséquent, ce qui nous intéresse dans le projet de loi  C-59, est lié directement à notre mandat, qui consiste à exiger des gouvernements qu'ils respectent leurs obligations internationales en matière de droits de la personne. Depuis longtemps, dans le cadre de ses recherches et de ses campagnes à l'échelle internationale, Amnistie internationale documente les violations des droits de la personne dans le contexte de la sécurité nationale, et réagit, et exige des gouvernements qu'ils modifient leurs lois, leurs politiques et leurs pratiques en matière de sécurité nationale pour respecter les obligations internationales en matière de droits de la personne. C'est le cas depuis bien avant le 11 septembre.
On utilise souvent la sécurité nationale pour excuser des violations des droits de la personne, alors qu'il est clair que l'objectif est simplement de punir et de persécuter des opposants politiques ou des membres de minorités religieuses ou ethniques. Les activités liées à la sécurité nationale ont souvent été réalisées dans le mépris total des conséquences en matière de droits de la personne, ce qui peut mener à de graves violations des droits de la personne comme la torture, des enlèvements et la détention illicite. Sans mesures de protection et restrictions adéquates, des activités trop générales liées à la sécurité nationale sont préjudiciables pour des particuliers et des collectivités qui ne constituent absolument pas une menace à la sécurité. Dans tous ces cas, l'impact est souvent ressenti de façon disproportionnée et discriminatoire par des communautés religieuses, ethniques et raciales précises, créant ainsi une autre préoccupation liée aux droits de la personne.
De telles préoccupations sont loin de se limiter à d'autres régions du globe. Au cours des 15 dernières années, Amnistie internationale s'est occupée de nombreux cas de violation des droits de la personne ayant trait à la sécurité nationale liés aux actions des organismes canadiens d'application de la loi et responsables de la sécurité nationale. Ces préoccupations ont été si graves qu'elles ont fait l'objet de deux enquêtes judiciaires, de nombreuses décisions de la Cour suprême et de la Cour fédérale, de plusieurs excuses importantes et de règlements financiers d'une valeur totale de bien plus de 50 millions de dollars à l'intention d'un certain nombre de citoyens canadiens et d'autres personnes dont les droits ont été gravement violés en raison des actions d'organismes canadiens. Je pense ici à Maher Arar, Benamar Benatta, Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad El Maati, Muayyed Nureddin et Omar Khadr. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous soumettons des projets de loi comme le projet de loi  C-59 à notre analyse liée aux droits de la personne, pour nous assurer que les dispositions proposées offrent la meilleure protection possible contre les violations des droits de la personne de cette nature.
Pour ce qui est de mes commentaires sur le projet de loi, je vais aborder rapidement cinq domaines: premièrement, le besoin d'ancrer plus solidement les droits de la personne dans le projet de loi; deuxièmement, les dispositions sur les examens liés à la sécurité nationale; troisièmement, des changements positifs dans le projet de loi  C-59; quatrièmement, les préoccupations qui restent; et cinquièmement, les enjeux préoccupants qui n'ont pas été réglés dans le projet de loi.
Le premier domaine concerne le besoin d'asseoir l'approche en matière de sécurité nationale sur un engagement au chapitre des droits de la personne. Dans l'examen qui a précédé le projet de loi  C-59, nous avons prié le gouvernement de profiter de la réforme actuelle pour appuyer le cadre de sécurité nationale du Canada sur un fondement clair concernant les droits de la personne. Il s'agit d'une approche qui non seulement est bénéfique, évidemment, pour ce qui est des droits de la personne, mais qui jette vraiment les bases d'une sécurité plus inclusive, durable et fiable. Actuellement, à part la Loi sur l'immigration et la protection des réfugiés, aucune des lois canadiennes liées à la sécurité nationale ne mentionne précisément les obligations internationales du Canada en matière des droits de la personne ni ne les intègre.
Nous recommandons que ces lois soient modifiées pour inclure des dispositions exigeant qu'on interprète et applique la loi d'une façon qui respecte les normes internationales en matière de droits de la personne. C'est quelque chose qu'on n'a pas cru bon de faire dans le cadre du projet de loi  C-59, à part une référence très limitée à la Convention contre la torture. C'est pourtant important, puisque cela lance un message fort quant au caractère central des droits de la personne dans l'approche canadienne en matière de sécurité nationale. C'est aussi très bénéfique lorsque vient le temps de faire respecter les droits de la personne dans le cadre des procédures judiciaires liées à la sécurité nationale.
Notre première recommandation, par conséquent, reste de modifier le projet de loi  C-59 pour inclure une disposition exigeant que toutes les lois liées à la sécurité nationale soient interprétées conformément aux obligations internationales du Canada en matière de droits de la personne.
Deuxièmement, nous accueillons et soutenons fortement les dispositions de la partie 1 du projet de loi  C-59 qui crée l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Amnistie internationale demande la création d'un organisme responsable de réaliser des examens exhaustifs et intégrés de cette nature depuis la présentation de nos observations durant l'enquête sur l'affaire Arar en 2005. Il s'agit d'une des plus anciennes et plus graves lacunes du cadre de sécurité nationale du Canada. Nous avons formulé trois recommandations connexes.
Premièrement, conformément à la recommandation précédente que je viens de formuler, le mandat de l'organisme d'examen doit être modifié pour que l'on puisse s'assurer que les activités des organismes responsables de la sécurité et du renseignement seront examinées précisément pour en garantir la conformité avec les obligations internationales du Canada en matière de droits de la personne.
Deuxièmement, l'organisme d'examen doit miser sur un personnel et des ressources suffisants pour s'acquitter de ce qui constituera une charge de travail importante. Nous appuyons la recommandation formulée par le professeur Kent Roach selon laquelle la disposition prévoyant un président et des commissaires supplémentaires — entre trois et six — est inadéquate, et nous suggérons que le nombre de commissaires supplémentaires soit augmenté et passe à de cinq à huit.
Troisièmement, nous continuons d'être préoccupés par la surveillance dont fera l'objet précisément l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Contrairement à de nombreux organismes qui feront l'objet d'examens réalisés par le nouvel Office, l'ASFC ne possède pas son propre organisme d'examen indépendant. Le nouvel organisme de surveillance aura le pouvoir d'examiner les activités de l'ASFC liées à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement, mais il n'y a toujours pas d'autres organismes indépendants chargés d'examiner l'ensemble des activités de l'ASFC, malgré le nombre croissant de cas où le besoin de réaliser de tels examens est frappant, y compris des décès durant une détention liée à l'immigration. Il est inévitable que ce déséquilibre crée un malaise dans le cadre de l'examen de l'ASFC réalisé par l'Office de surveillance, ce qui souligne à quel point il est crucial que le gouvernement agisse rapidement pour assurer un examen complet et indépendant de l'ASFC.
Nous tenons à souligner les améliorations. Premièrement, nos préoccupations liées à l'infraction criminelle trop générale énoncée dans le projet de loi C-51, soit le fait de préconiser ou fomenter la perpétration d'infractions de terrorisme en général ont été dissipées par les révisions proposées à l'article 83.221 du Code criminel, qui criminalisera plutôt le fait de conseiller à une autre personne de commettre un acte terroriste, ce qui, essentiellement, est déjà une infraction criminelle.
Deuxièmement, les pouvoirs de réduction de la menace du projet de loi C-51, qui anticipait des actions du SCRS pouvant constituer une violation d'un large éventail de droits de la personne garantis en vertu de la Charte des droits et par le droit international, ont été grandement améliorés. Cependant, nous croyons qu'il faut aller plus loin, et il doit y avoir une interdiction précise selon laquelle le SCRS ne participera à aucune activité de réduction des menaces qui constituerait un manquement à l'égard des obligations au titre de la Charte ou des obligations internationales en matière de droits de la personne. Nous accueillons aussi favorablement les changements apportés à la détention préventive, mais nous tenons à formuler certaines recommandations sur la façon d'améliorer la situation.
Nous restons préoccupés par les dispositions de la Loi sur la sûreté des déplacements aériens qui, selon nous, ne permet pas de composer avec les nombreux défis auxquels les gens sont confrontés en raison de l'application des listes d'interdiction de vol. Des réformes beaucoup plus fondamentales sont nécessaires, y compris un engagement à l'égard de la création d'un système de dédommagement solide pour éliminer les faux positifs et une importante amélioration de l'établissement des listes et des dispositions d'appel pour respecter les normes en matière d'équité.
Puisque je sais que mon temps est compté, permettez-moi de terminer en soulignant certaines dispositions qui ne sont toujours pas abordées dans le projet de loi.
L'une des contraventions les plus flagrantes des conventions internationales en matière de droits de la personne dans la loi canadienne sur la sécurité nationale — c'est une situation qui remonte à plus de 20 ans, maintenant, c'est la disposition qui dans la loi sur l'immigration, permet à des personnes, dans des circonstances exceptionnelles non définies, d'être expulsées vers un pays où elles courent de sérieux risques de torture. Il s'agit d'une violation directe de la Convention des Nations unies contre la torture. Les organismes des Nations unies responsables des droits de la personne ont demandé à répétition que ce problème soit réglé. Le projet de loi  C-59 a raté une occasion de le faire. Nous recommandons qu'on règle ce problème.
Enfin, le projet de loi  C-59 ne réforme pas comme il faudrait l'approche prise en matière de sécurité nationale dans le cadre des procédures de l'immigration. Il y avait de graves préoccupations liées au fait que le projet de loi C-51 accentue le caractère inéquitable du processus lié au certificat de sécurité pour l'immigration, par exemple, en cachant certaines catégories de preuves aux avocats spéciaux.
Il faut vraiment revoir et réévaluer les procédures d'immigration liées aux certificats de sécurité, pour annuler les changements qui ont été apportés dans le projet de loi C-51 et composer avec d'autres préoccupations liées au caractère équitable de ce processus.
Merci.
Collapse
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
I will, Mr. Chairman. Thank you very much to the members of the committee for their work as they are about to begin clause-by-clause study of Bill C-59, the national security act.
I am pleased today to be accompanied by a range of distinguished officials in the field of public safety and national security. David Vigneault, as you know, is the director of CSIS. Greta Bossenmaier, to my right, is the chief of the Communications Security Establishment, and the CSE is involved in Bill C-59 in a very major way.
To my left is Vincent Rigby, associate deputy minister at Public Safety. I think this is his first committee hearing in his new role as associate deputy minister. Kevin Brosseau is deputy commissioner of the RCMP, and Doug Breithaupt is from the Department of Justice.
Everything that our government does in terms of national security has two inseparable objectives: to protect Canadians and to defend our rights and freedoms. To do so, we have already taken a number of major steps, such as the new parliamentary committee established by Bill C-22 and the new ministerial direction on avoiding complicity in mistreatment. That said, Bill  C-59 is certainly central to our efforts.
As I said last week in the House, this bill has three core themes: enhancing accountability and transparency, correcting certain problematic elements in the former BillC-51, and ensuring that our national security and intelligence agencies can keep pace with the evolving nature of security threats.
Bill C-59 is the product of the most inclusive and extensive consultations Canada has ever undertaken on the subject of national security. We received more than 75,000 submissions from a variety of stakeholders and experts as well as the general public, and of course this committee also made a very significant contribution, which I hope members will see reflected in the content of Bill C-59.
All of that input guided our work and led to the legislation that's before us today, and we're only getting started. When it comes to matters as fundamental as our safety and our rights, the process must be as open and thorough as it can possibly be. That is why we chose to have this committee study the bill not after second reading but before second reading. As you know, once a bill has passed second reading in the House, its scope is locked in. With our reversal of the usual order, you will have the chance to analyze Bill C-59 in detail at an earlier stage in the process, which is beginning now, and to propose amendments that might otherwise be deemed to be beyond the scope of the legislation.
We have, however, already had several hours of debate, and I'd like to use the remainder of my time to address some of the points that were raised during that debate. To begin with, there were concerns raised about CSIS's threat reduction powers. I know there are some who would like to see these authorities eliminated entirely and others who think they should be limitless. We have taken the approach, for those measures that require a judicial warrant, of enumerating what they are in a specific list.
CSIS needs clear authorities, and Canadians need CSIS to have clear authorities without ambiguity so that they can do their job of keeping us safe. This legislation provides that clarity. Greater clarity benefits CSIS officers, because it enables them to go about their difficult work with the full confidence that they are operating within the parameters of the law and the Constitution.
Importantly, this bill will ensure that any measure CSIS takes is consistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. BillC-51 implied the contrary, but CSIS has been very clear that they have not used that particular option in Bill C-51, and Bill C-59 will end any ambiguity.
Mr. Paul-Hus, during his remarks in the debate in the House, discussed the changes we're proposing to the definition of “terrorist propaganda” and the criminal offence of promoting terrorism. Now, there can be absolutely no doubt of our conviction—I think this crosses all party lines—that spreading the odious ideologies of terrorist organizations is behaviour that cannot be tolerated. We know that terrorist groups use the Internet and social media to reach and radicalize people and to further their vile and murderous ends. We must do everything we can to stop that.
The problem with the way the law is written at the moment, as per BillC-51 is that it is so broad and so vague that it is virtually unuseable, and it hasn't been used. Bill C-59 proposes terminology that is clear and familiar in Canadian law. It would prohibit counselling another person to commit a terrorism offence. This does not require that a particular person be counselled to commit a particular offence. Simply encouraging others to engage in non-specific acts of terrorism will qualify and will trigger that section of the Criminal Code.
Because the law will be more clearly drafted, it will be easier to enforce. Perhaps we will actually see a prosecution under this new provision. There has been no prosecution of this particular offence as currently drafted.
There were also questions raised during debate about whether the new accountability mechanisms will constitute too many hoops for security and intelligence agencies to jump through as they go about their work. The answer, in my view, is clearly, no. When the bill was introduced, two of the country's leading national security experts, Craig Forcese and Kent Roach, said the bill represents “solid gains—measured both from a rule of law and civil liberties perspective—and come at no credible cost to security.”
Accountability mechanisms for Canadian security and intelligence agencies have been insufficient for quite some time. BillC-22 took one major step to remedy that weakness by creating the new National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. Bill C-59 will now add the new comprehensive national security and intelligence review agency, which some people, for shorthand, refer to as a super-SIRC, as well as the position of intelligence commissioner, which is another innovation in Bill C-59.
These steps have been broadly applauded. Some of the scrutiny that we are providing for in the new law will be after the fact, and where there is oversight in real time we've included provisions to deal with exigent circumstances when expedience and speed are necessary.
It is important to underscore that accountability is, of course, about ensuring that the rights and freedoms of Canadians are protected, but it is also about ensuring that our agencies are operating as effectively as they possibly can to keep Canadians safe. Both of these vital goals must be achieved simultaneously—safety and rights together, not one or the other.
Debate also included issues raised by the New Democratic Party about what is currently known as SCISA, the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act. There was a suggestion made that the act should be repealed entirely, but, with respect, that would jeopardize the security of Canadians. If one government agency or department has genuine information about a security threat, they have to be able to disclose it to the appropriate partner agencies within government in order to deal with that threat, and you may recall that this has been the subject of a number of judicial enquiries in the history of our country over the last number of years.
That disclosure must be governed by clear rules, which is why Bill C-59 establishes the following three requirements. First, the information being disclosed must contribute to the recipient organization's national security responsibilities. Second, the disclosure must not affect any person's privacy more than is reasonably necessary. Third, a statement must be provided to the recipient attesting to the information's accuracy. Furthermore, we make it clear that no new information collection powers are being created or implied, and records must be kept of what information is actually being shared.
Mr. Chair, I see you're giving me a rude gesture, which could be misinterpreted in another context.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
Hon. Ralph Goodale: There are a couple of points more, but I suspect they'll be raised during the course of the discussion. I'm happy to try to answer questions with the full support of the officials who are with me this morning.
Thank you.
Je vais le faire, monsieur le président. Je remercie sincèrement les membres du Comité de leur travail, au moment où ils s'apprêtent à entreprendre l'étude article par article du projet de loi  C-59, loi concernant la sécurité nationale.
J'ai le plaisir aujourd'hui d'être accompagné par un groupe de distingués collaborateurs qui travaillent dans le domaine de la sécurité publique et nationale. David Vigneault, comme vous le savez, est directeur du SCRS. Greta Bossenmaier, à ma droite, est chef du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, le CST, qui est très concerné par le projet de loi  C-59.
À ma gauche, Vincent Rigby est sous-ministre délégué à Sécurité publique. Je pense qu'il en est à sa première audience du Comité dans ses nouvelles fonctions. Kevin Brosseau est sous-commissaire à la GRC, et Doug Breithaupt travaille au ministère de la Justice.
Dans tout ce que fait notre gouvernement en matière de sécurité nationale, il y a deux objectifs inséparables: protéger les Canadiens et défendre les droits et libertés. Pour ce faire, nous avons déjà pris plusieurs mesures importantes, comme le nouveau comité de parlementaires établi par le projet de loi C-22 et la nouvelle directive ministérielle visant à éviter la complicité dans les cas de mauvais traitements. Cela dit, le projet de loi  C-59 est certainement un élément central de nos efforts.
Comme je l'ai mentionné la semaine dernière à la Chambre, le projet de loi porte sur trois thèmes principaux: accroître la responsabilité et la transparence, corriger les lacunes de l'ancien projet de loi C-51, et veiller à ce que les agences canadiennes chargées de la sécurité nationale et du renseignement soient en mesure de s'adapter à l'évolution des menaces.
Le projet de loi  C-59 est le fruit des consultations les plus exhaustives qui aient été menées au Canada sur la sécurité nationale. Nous avons reçu plus de 75 000 mémoires provenant d'un grand éventail d'experts et d'intervenants ainsi que de la population. Les membres du Comité y ont aussi apporté une contribution très importante, comme ils pourront le constater, je l'espère, à son contenu.
Toute cette information a guidé nos travaux et mené au projet de loi qui est devant nous aujourd'hui, et ce n'est qu'un début. Quand il est question de sujets aussi fondamentaux que notre sécurité et nos droits, le processus doit être aussi ouvert et complet que possible. C'est pourquoi nous avons choisi de demander au Comité d'examiner ce projet de loi non pas après, mais avant la deuxième lecture. Comme vous le savez, une fois que le projet de loi a passé l'étape de la deuxième lecture en Chambre, sa portée ne peut être modifiée. En procédant comme nous le faisons, vous aurez la chance d'examiner le projet de loi  C-59 en détail plus tôt dans le processus, soit à partir de maintenant, et de proposer des amendements qui auraient pu autrement être considérés comme dépassant sa portée.
Nous avons déjà eu plusieurs heures de débat, et j'aimerais profiter du temps qu'il me reste pour vous parler de certains points qui ont été soulevés à cette occasion. Tout d'abord, il y avait des inquiétudes au sujet des pouvoirs de réduction de la menace du SCRS. Certains voudraient qu'on les élimine totalement, alors que d'autres voudraient qu'ils soient illimités. Pour les mesures qui nécessitent un mandat judiciaire, nous avons donc décidé de les énumérer dans une liste précise.
Le SCRS doit avoir, et les Canadiens ont besoin que le SCRS ait, des pouvoirs clairement définis, sans ambiguïté, afin qu'il puisse faire son travail qui est d'assurer notre sécurité. Le projet de loi apporte cette clarté. En ayant des pouvoirs très clairs, les agents du SCRS peuvent accomplir le travail difficile qui est le leur en sachant qu'ils le font en respectant pleinement la loi et la Constitution.
Qui plus est, le projet de loi fera en sorte que les mesures prises par le SCRS respectent la Charte des droits et libertés. Le projet de loi C-51 supposait le contraire, et même si le SCRS a très clairement indiqué qu'il n'a jamais utilisé cette option, le projet de loi  C-59 éliminera toute ambiguïté à ce sujet.
Lors de son intervention pendant le débat en Chambre,M. Paul-Hus a parlé des changements que nous proposons d'apporter à la définition de « propagande terroriste » et à l'infraction criminelle de fomenter la commission d'une infraction de terrorisme. Il ne peut maintenant y avoir absolument aucun doute sur notre conviction — et je pense que tous les partis sont d'accord — que répandre les idéologies odieuses des organisations terroristes est un comportement qui ne peut être toléré. Nous savons que les groupes terroristes utilisent Internet et les réseaux sociaux pour joindre et radicaliser des gens et arriver à leurs fins ignobles et sanguinaires. Nous devons faire tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour les en empêcher.
Le problème à l'heure actuelle est que la définition du projet de loi C-51 étant très vaste et très vague, elle est pratiquement inapplicable, et la disposition n'a pas été utilisée. Le projet de loi  C-59 propose donc une terminologie claire et courante en droit canadien. Il interdirait de conseiller à une personne la commission d’infractions de terrorisme. Cela ne nécessite pas qu'une personne en particulier soit incitée à commettre une infraction particulière. Le simple fait d'encourager les autres à poser des gestes terroristes non spécifiques se qualifiera et enclenchera cette disposition du Code criminel.
La loi étant plus claire, il sera plus facile de l'appliquer. Des poursuites seront peut-être intentées en vertu de cette nouvelle disposition pour cette infraction, ce qui n'a pas été le cas jusqu'à maintenant.
On a aussi demandé pendant le débat à la Chambre si les nouveaux mécanismes de reddition de comptes n'obligeront pas les agences de sécurité et de renseignement à faire trop de pirouettes pendant leur travail. La réponse, à mon avis, est certainement non. Lorsque nous avons présenté le projet de loi, deux de nos meilleurs experts en sécurité nationale au pays, Craig Forcese et Kent Roach, ont mentionné que le projet de loi constituait des avancées solides — tant du point de vue de la règle de droit que des libertés civiles — et sans coût apparent pour la sécurité.
Les mécanismes de reddition de comptes des agences canadiennes de sécurité et de renseignement sont déficients depuis un bout de temps déjà. Le projet de loi C-22 a fait un grand pas pour corriger cette lacune en créant le Comité de parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. Le projet de loi  C-59 créera quant à lui l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, que certains appellent, pour faire court, super CSARS, de même que le poste de commissaire au renseignement, une autre innovation du projet de loi  C-59.
Ces mesures ont été très bien accueillies. Certaines activités de surveillance prévues dans le projet de loi auront lieu a posteriori, et quand les activités de surveillance auront lieu en temps réel, nous avons inclus des dispositions pour couvrir les situations d'urgence où il faut intervenir sans attendre.
Il est important de mentionner que la reddition de comptes vise, bien sûr, à s'assurer que les droits et les libertés des Canadiens sont protégés, mais aussi à s'assurer que nos organismes fonctionnent le mieux possible pour protéger les Canadiens. La sécurité et les droits sont deux objectifs essentiels qui doivent être atteints simultanément, et non pas l'un sans l'autre.
Lors du débat, le Nouveau Parti démocratique a soulevé des questions au sujet de ce qu'on appelle communément la LCISC, la Loi sur la communication d'information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada. On a suggéré de l'abroger totalement, mais, respectueusement, nous mettrions ainsi la sécurité des Canadiens en danger. Si un organisme ou ministère gouvernemental possède des renseignements dignes de foi concernant une menace à la sécurité, il doit être en mesure de les divulguer aux organismes partenaires concernés au sein du gouvernement pour s'occuper de cette menace, et vous vous souviendrez sans doute que cela a donné lieu à quelques enquêtes judiciaires dans l'histoire de notre pays au cours des dernières années.
La divulgation doit être régie par des règles claires, et c'est pourquoi le projet de loi  C-59 prévoit les trois exigences suivantes: premièrement, l'information divulguée doit cadrer avec les responsabilités en matière de sécurité nationale de l'organisme destinataire. Deuxièmement, la divulgation ne doit pas se répercuter sur la vie privée d'une personne plus que raisonnablement nécessaire. Troisièmement, l'organisme destinataire doit recevoir une confirmation que les renseignements sont exacts. De plus, nous indiquons clairement qu'aucun nouveau pouvoir en matière de collecte de renseignements n'est créé ou sous-entendu, et qu'un dossier doit être conservé sur tout renseignement communiqué à un autre organisme.
Monsieur le président, je vois que vous me faites un geste inélégant, qui pourrait être mal interprété dans un autre contexte.
Des députés: Oh, oh!
L'hon. Ralph Goodale: J'ai quelques autres points, mais je présume qu'ils seront soulevés pendant la discussion. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions avec l'appui des gens qui m'accompagnent aujourd'hui.
Merci.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I'd like to welcome Minister Goodale to the committee with his team and extend my congratulations to Mr. Rigby and welcome him in his new role.
I'd like to also echo Mr. Motz's appreciation for bringing this bill to us before second reading.
Minister Goodale, my question falls squarely into the overarching framework that we need both good security and to protect our charter rights. It's about Canadian youth and their vulnerability to terrorism. In particular, we have terrorist networks around the world like Abu Sayyaf, in the Philippines; al Shabaab in Somalia; ISIS in Syria, and the Levant; and future terrorist networks, potentially or likely, that will prey on youth in various countries. These are children, really, according to my reading, who range between the ages of 14 and 19 or who are into their early twenties.
Clause 159 of the bill brings the Youth Criminal Justice Act into connection with Bill C-59, applies it to Bill C-59, including the principle that detention is not a substitute for social measures and also that preventative detention, as provided for in section 83.3 of the Criminal Code, falls into that same framework. It's not a substitute.
I wonder if you could comment on your vision of how the bill relates to young offenders, vulnerable youth, essentially the pre-commission of any terrorist offences or recruitment by networks, and then also your broader vision about how we can do better in terms of preventing terrorism in the first place by making sure these networks do not prey on Canadian youth and children.
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je souhaite la bienvenue au Comité au ministre Goodale et à son équipe. J'offre mes félicitations à M. Rigby et je lui souhaite la bienvenue dans ses nouvelles fonctions.
À l'instar de M. Motz, j'aimerais vous remercier de nous avoir saisis du projet de loi avant la deuxième lecture.
Monsieur Goodale, ma question a directement trait à l'idée générale que nous avons besoin d'avoir une bonne sécurité et de protéger nos droits garantis par la Charte. Cela concerne les jeunes Canadiens et leur vulnérabilité face au terrorisme. En particulier, nous avons des réseaux terroristes dans le monde, notamment Abu Sayyaf, aux Philippines, Al-Shabaab, en Somalie, le groupe État islamique, en Syrie et au Levant, et de futurs réseaux terroristes qui risquent de chercher à s'en prendre aux jeunes dans divers pays. Selon ce que j'ai lu, cela vise vraiment des jeunes de 14 à 19 ans ou qui sont dans la jeune vingtaine.
L'article 159 du projet de loi  C-59 a trait à la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents et à son application; cela inclut notamment le principe selon lequel la détention ne remplace pas les mesures sociales et que cela vaut également pour la détention préventive, comme le prévoit l'article 83.3 du Code criminel. Ce n'est pas un substitut.
J'aimerais vous entendre au sujet de votre vision sur la manière dont le projet de loi concerne les jeunes délinquants et les jeunes vulnérables en ce qui a trait essentiellement à ce qui se passe avant la commission d'une infraction de terrorisme ou leur recrutement par des réseaux. Ensuite, j'aimerais avoir votre vision globale sur ce que nous pouvons faire mieux pour empêcher le terrorisme à la source en nous assurant que ces réseaux ne cherchent pas à s'en prendre aux jeunes et aux enfants.
Collapse
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
It's a very serious issue, Mr. Spengemann. You really have touched on the two elements we're working on. Through the collection of new provisions that are here in Bill C-59 we will give CSIS and the RCMP and our other agencies the ability and the tools to be as well informed as humanly possible about these activities and to be able to function with clarity within the law and within the Constitution to do what they need to do to counter those threats. Specifically where offences arise in relation to young people, the Youth Criminal Justice Act applies, so that is the process by which young offenders will be managed under this law.
The other side of it is prevention, and all of the countries in the G20, and probably many others around the world, are turning their attention more and more to this question. It has been discussed among the Five Eyes allies. It's been discussed among the G7 countries as well as the G20.
How can we find the ways and share our expertise internationally with all countries that share this concern? How can we find the ways to identify vulnerable people early enough to have a decent opportunity to intervene effectively in that downward spiral of terrorist influence to get them out of that pattern?
Obviously intervention and counter-radicalization techniques will not work in every circumstance. That's why we need a broad range of tools to deal with terrorist threats, but where prevention is possible, we need to develop the expertise to actually do it. That is the reason we created the new Canada centre for community engagement and prevention of violence, so we would have a national office that could coordinate the activities that are going along at the local and municipal and academic levels across the country, put some more resources behind those, and make sure we are sharing the very best ideas and information so that if we can prevent a tragedy, we actually have the tools to do it.
Il s'agit là d'un problème très grave, monsieur Spengemann. Vous abordez réellement deux éléments auxquels nous travaillons. Grâce à l'éventail de nouvelles dispositions que comprend le projet de loi  C-59, nous donnerons au Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, à la GRC et aux autres organismes la capacité et les outils nécessaires pour être aussi bien informés qu'il est humainement possible de l'être au sujet de ces activités et pour pouvoir agir dans le respect de la loi et de la Constitution afin de faire ce qu'ils doivent faire pour contrer ces menaces. Lorsque les infractions mettent en jeu des jeunes, la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents s'applique; le processus sera donc régi par cette loi lorsque de jeunes contrevenants sont concernés.
L'autre facette est celle de la prévention, une question vers laquelle tous les pays membres du G20, et probablement de nombreux autres pays du monde, portent leur attention. Les alliés de la collectivité des cinq, ainsi que les pays membres du G7 et du G20 ont d'ailleurs discuté du sujet.
Comment pouvons-nous trouver des moyens de mettre en commun l'expertise de tous les pays concernés? Comment trouver des moyens de détecter les jeunes vulnérables suffisamment tôt pour avoir une occasion décente d'intervenir efficacement afin de mettre fin à la spirale de l'influence terroriste et de les sortir du cycle?
De toute évidence, les techniques d'intervention et de lutte à la radicalisation ne fonctionneront pas à tout coup. Voilà pourquoi nous devons disposer d'un large éventail d'outils pour lutter contre les menaces terroristes; quand la prévention s'avère possible, toutefois, nous devons renforcer l'expertise pour intervenir à cet égard. C'est pour cette raison que nous avons mis sur pied le nouveau Centre canadien d'engagement communautaire et de prévention de la violence, un bureau national qui coordonnera les activités mises en oeuvre à l'échelle locale, municipale et universitaire au pays, leur accordera davantage de ressources et assurera l'échange des idées et des renseignements les meilleurs pour que si nous pouvons prévenir une tragédie, nous disposions des outils pour y parvenir.
Collapse
View Sven Spengemann Profile
Lib. (ON)
Minister, thank you.
Very briefly, would it be fair to say that disrupting recruitment efforts of international or domestic terrorist organizations is as significant as disrupting terrorist finance is?
Merci, monsieur le ministre.
Très brièvement, serait-il juste de dire qu'il est aussi important de contrecarrer les efforts de recrutement des organisations terroristes à l'échelle internationale et nationale que de nuire à leurs finances?
Collapse
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
Yes. It's all important. It's hard to put them in a hierarchical order. It's all important activity, and we're doing our best to have a coordinated, full effort with everybody on board.
Oui, c'est important, bien qu'il soit difficile de classer les activités en ordre hiérarchique. Toutes les activités sont importantes, et nous faisons de notre mieux pour déployer un effort global coordonné avec toutes les parties prenantes.
Collapse
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
I have one last question. Part of the deradicalization centre's job, or what they say is one of their methods, is to read poetry to the returning ISIL fighters. Because we have people from other allied countries listening in, can you specifically give us the title of a poem that might help deradicalize returning ISIL fighters?
J'ai une dernière question. La tâche du centre de déradicalisation consiste entre autres, selon les intervenants, à lire de la poésie aux combattants de Daech qui reviennent au pays. Comme des personnes de pays alliés nous écoutent, pouvez-vous nous donner le titre précis d'un poème qui pourrait contribuer à déradicaliser ces combattants?
Collapse
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
Okay. The approval is required for the second part.
For Mr. Rigby, what is the justification for Bill C-59 changing the definition of “terrorist propaganda” in the Criminal Code? It raises the evidentiary standard beyond what is the factual reality of current practices in radicalization, recruitment, and facilitation, and actually duplicates what is already the crime of counselling a criminal offence in section 22 of the Criminal Code.
In light of this, will the government consider removing the proposed amendment in Bill C-59 relating to terrorist propaganda?
D'accord. L'approbation est nécessaire pour les cyberopérations actives.
Je vais m'adresser à M. Rigby. Pour quelle raison a-t-on modifié dans le projet de loi  C-59 la définition de « propagande terroriste » qui figure dans le Code criminel? Cela augmente le niveau de preuve requis au-delà des pratiques actuelles que sont la radicalisation, le recrutement et la facilitation, en plus de recouper le crime que constitue déjà le fait de conseiller à une autre personne de commettre une infraction à l'article 22 du Code criminel.
À la lumière de ces faits, est-ce que le gouvernement décidera de retirer la modification proposée dans le projet de loi  C-59 concernant la propagande terroriste?
Collapse
Vincent Rigby
View Vincent Rigby Profile
Vincent Rigby
2017-11-30 10:23
Expand
I'll defer to my colleague from Justice on this issue, although the minister addressed a bit of your question with respect to the definition and use of the word “counselling” in greater precision. Perhaps my colleague can provide a more fulsome answer.
Je m'en remettrai à mon collègue du ministère de la Justice, bien que le ministre ait répondu en partie à votre question concernant la clarification de la définition et l'utilisation du terme « conseiller ». J'espère que mon collègue pourra vous fournir une réponse plus complète.
Collapse
Douglas Breithaupt
View Douglas Breithaupt Profile
Douglas Breithaupt
2017-11-30 10:23
Expand
Indeed there is a link to the counselling offence that's proposed in Bill C-59. The “terrorist propaganda” definition is proposed to be amended to mean “any writing, sign, visible representation or audio recording that counsels the commission of a terrorism offence”. It's very closely linked to the new counselling offence.
There were concerns with the current wording of the terrorist propaganda definition, which is “advocates or promotes the commission of terrorism offences in general”, suggesting that this wasn't so easy to apply. That has been deleted, fulfilling a commitment the government made to narrow overly broad definitions, including “terrorist propaganda”.
Il y a effectivement un lien avec l'infraction de conseiller qui est proposée dans le projet de loi  C-59. La définition de « propagande terroriste » serait modifiée de façon à désigner tout « écrit, signe, représentation visible ou enregistrement sonore qui conseille la commission d'une infraction de terrorisme ». En fait, il y a un lien très rapproché avec la nouvelle infraction qui consiste à conseiller.
Il existait certaines préoccupations quant au libellé actuel de la définition de la propagande terroriste, soit « préconise ou fomente la perpétration d'infractions de terrorisme en général », ce qui porte à croire que cette définition n'était pas aisément applicable. La définition a donc été supprimée, suite à l'engagement du gouvernement qui souhaitait clarifier les définitions trop vagues, dont celle de « propagande terroriste ».
Collapse
View Cheryl Gallant Profile
CPC (ON)
That means that if somebody receives a message or sees something on social media and simply shares it with another person for, quite possibly, the purpose of information, the sender will not be prosecuted for simply sending or receiving this kind of information.
Cela veut dire que si quelqu'un reçoit un message ou voit quelque chose dans les médias sociaux et ne fait que l'envoyer par la suite à une autre personne à des fins d'information, admettons, la personne qui a fait suivre l'information ne fera pas l'objet de poursuites pour avoir tout simplement envoyé ou reçu l'information.
Collapse
Douglas Breithaupt
View Douglas Breithaupt Profile
Douglas Breithaupt
2017-11-30 10:24
Expand
It's important to realize that the counselling offence, as proposed in Bill C-59, is an offence that would be subject to prosecution. The “terrorist propaganda” definition applies to a system within the Criminal Code.
Former BillC-51 created two new warrants in the Criminal Code, one allowing for the seizure and forfeiture of terrorist propaganda in a tangible form, according to the definition, and the other allowing a peace officer to come before a judge to seek a warrant for the deletion of terrorist propaganda from a website that's available to the public through a Canadian Internet service provider. The terrorist propaganda definition applies to these warrants, as well as under the Customs Act, because it allows terrorist propaganda or prohibited goods under the Customs Act.
Rappelons-nous que l'infraction qui consiste à conseiller, telle que proposée dans le projet de loi  C-59, est une infraction qui ferait l'objet de poursuites. La définition de « propagande terroriste » s'inscrit dans la structure prévue par le Code criminel.
L'ancien projet de loi C-51 a ajouté deux dispositions au Code criminel, l'une prévoyant un mandat de saisie et de confiscation d'articles de propagande terroriste, conformément à la définition, et l'autre permettant à un agent de la paix de demander une ordonnance à un juge pour supprimer la propagande terroriste affichée sur un site Web accessible au public par l'entremise d'un fournisseur canadien de service Internet. La définition de la propagande terroriste s'applique à ce mandat et à cette ordonnance, ainsi qu'à la Loi sur les douanes, puisqu'elle vise la propagande terroriste ou les marchandises interdites.
Collapse
View Dave MacKenzie Profile
CPC (ON)
View Dave MacKenzie Profile
2017-11-30 10:31
Expand
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you to the panel for being here.
I'm pleased that we're updating the existing BillC-51, and I think there are some updates in here. I'm sure we all agree that in three or five years from now we'll be looking for more updates.
One of the things that has always been of interest to me and I think to Canadians is that, if we can disrupt and prevent things, it's always better to do that than it is to deal with the fallout afterwards. I wonder if Bill C-59 has changed the scope of the non-warrant disruption activities that could be designed to reduce threats and if so, how and why?
Does Bill C-59 require a CSIS officer to obtain a warrant to go to speak to a suspected person's parents about their child's radicalization or terrorist intent? I recognize that, when you go to a judge to get a warrant, there's a lot of work, a lot of time involved, and sometimes time is of essence. Would this then enter into that whole process?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je remercie les témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui.
Je suis content de voir que nous actualisons les dispositions du projet de loi C-51. Il y a effectivement quelques mises à jour. Je suis sûr que d'ici trois ou cinq ans, il y en aura encore plus.
Moi-même, ainsi que les Canadiens, sommes d'avis que s'il est possible d'intervenir et d'empêcher certains phénomènes, c'est toujours souhaitable, plutôt que de devoir payer les pots cassés après coup. Je me demande si le projet de loi  C-59 a changé le volume des activités d'intervention sans mandat qui pourraient être conçues pour réduire la menace et, dans l'affirmative, comment et pourquoi?
Le projet de loi  C-59 oblige-t-il un agent du SCRS à obtenir un mandat afin de parler aux parents du jeune soupçonné de radicalisation ou d'intentions terroristes? Je comprends que demander un mandat à un juge entraîne beaucoup de travail et prend du temps, et parfois le temps, il n'y en a pas. Ce genre de facteurs entrent-ils en ligne de compte?
Collapse
David Vigneault
View David Vigneault Profile
David Vigneault
2017-11-30 10:32
Expand
Specifically in terms of the non-warranted threat reduction measures, the new bill does not impose any new measures. The service has used threat reduction measures about 30 or so times.
In your specific example, if we were aware of an individual who wanted to travel abroad for the purpose of joining a terrorist organization, we would not need a warrant to intervene with a parent or with people in close proximity to this individual to inform them of what we know in order for them maybe to have an influence on that. Bill C-59 does not make any changes to that provision.
As I've said, we've used this measure about 30 or so times.
Le nouveau projet de loi ne prévoit aucune nouvelle mesure de réduction de la menace pouvant être prise sans mandat. Notre service a eu recours à des mesures de réduction de la menace environ 30 fois.
Dans votre exemple précis, c'est-à-dire si nous avions connaissance d'une personne qui voulait aller à l'étranger afin de se joindre à une organisation terroriste, nous n'aurions pas à obtenir de mandat afin d'intervenir auprès d'un parent ou des proches de la personne pour les informer et leur demander d'exercer une influence. Le projet de loi  C-59 ne modifie aucunement la disposition pertinente.
Je le répète, nous avons utilisé cette mesure environ 30 fois.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you again to the officials for being here today.
Mr. Rigby, I want to ask you about a preventative approach. We heard the minister take a question on that, but I'd like to understand the department's perspective further, the public policy rationale, if you could go into that.
Mr. Spengemann talked about the importance of a preventative approach. Indeed a preventative approach could be more important than dealing with the financing of terrorism. Could you get into that?
Merci à vous, monsieur le président, et merci aux divers fonctionnaires d'être venus aujourd'hui.
Monsieur Rigby, j'aimerais en savoir plus sur l'approche préventive. Le ministre a répondu à une question à ce sujet, mais j'aimerais mieux comprendre la perspective du ministère, le raisonnement derrière la politique publique, si vous le voulez bien.
M. Spengemann a parlé de l'importance d'une approche préventive. Il se peut qu'une approche préventive soit encore plus importante pour ce qui est du financement du terrorisme. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus?
Collapse
Vincent Rigby
View Vincent Rigby Profile
Vincent Rigby
2017-11-30 10:37
Expand
I think, as the minister said, there is a range of options and a range of tools that can be used. There are responsive actions, and he laid out what some of those were, and then there's a preventative side, which I think is just as important at the end of the day, and I think the minister made that quite clear.
He made a specific reference to the Canada centre for community engagement and the prevention of violence. We're very excited about this new tool. It was just created back in June, but it affords us an opportunity for the centre to reach out at the grassroots level, at the community level, to work with Canadians, to work with Canadian groups to do research on counter-radicalization, to reach out to youth, to try to nip radicalization in the bud, and to really try to have a holistic approach to preventing radicalization before it starts.
It is already up and running as I've indicated. In addition to actually launching programming and launching grants and contributions, it's also been consulting with Canadians over the course of the fall with a view to actually providing a strategy for countering radicalization to violence, which the government would like to present at some point.
It will be a very comprehensive approach, and I think it will be an important tool in what is already a pretty wide-ranging tool box.
Comme le ministre l'a indiqué, nous avons toute une gamme de mesures et d'outils que nous pouvons mettre en oeuvre. Il y a des mesures réactives, et il en a décrit, et ensuite il y a les mesures préventives, qui, au final, sont tout aussi importantes, à mon avis, et le ministre l'a bien dit d'ailleurs.
Il a parlé tout particulièrement du Centre canadien d'engagement communautaire et de prévention de la violence. Ce nouvel outil s'annonce très prometteur. Il a vu le jour en juin dernier, et il nous donnera la possibilité de communiquer avec les gens à l'échelle locale et communautaire, à travailler avec les Canadiens, à collaborer avec les groupes canadiens afin d'effectuer de la recherche sur les mesures de lutte contre la radicalisation, de communiquer avec les jeunes, d'éradiquer la radicalisation, et d'avoir une approche holistique afin de tuer la radicalisation dans l'oeuf.
Le centre a déjà ouvert ses portes, comme je l'ai dit. Ses employés, en plus de leurs activités de programmation et responsabilités liées aux subventions et aux contributions, consultent les Canadiens cet automne afin de concevoir une stratégie pour lutter contre la radicalisation violente, une stratégie que le gouvernement aimerait présenter à un moment donné.
Je crois qu'il s'agira d'une approche très complète, et ce sera un outil important qui s'ajoutera à notre panoplie déjà bien garnie.
Collapse
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
I have a quote here from Phil Gurski, security expert and former CSIS officer, who says, “the previous government had an abysmal record when it came to countering violent extremism and early detection.”
To what extent have we learned from the cases of other states? Denmark, for example, has long put into place a preventative policy. There are around a dozen or so suspected former fighters who returned to Denmark who have been put into programming of the nature that we want to see here in Canada. To what extent have we learned from cases like Denmark and other situations?
Merci.
Je vais citer Phil Gurski, expert en matière de sécurité et ancien agent du SCRS, qui a dit: « pour ce qui est de contrer l'extrémisme violent ou d'en détecter rapidement les manifestations, le gouvernement précédent a fait un travail pitoyable. »
Dans quelle mesure en avons-nous appris d'autres pays? Le Danemark, par exemple, a depuis longtemps une politique en matière de prévention. Une douzaine d'anciens djihadistes ou de personnes soupçonnées de l'être sont rentrés au Danemark et ont suivi un programme comme nous voudrions en avoir ici au Canada. Dans quelle mesure en avons-nous appris du Danemark et d'autres pays?
Collapse
Vincent Rigby
View Vincent Rigby Profile
Vincent Rigby
2017-11-30 10:39
Expand
We're in very close consultation with our allies and with others around the world as the minister mentioned, whether it's in the G7, in the G20, or working with other national security ministers within a Five Eyes context.
The minister was recently in Italy as part of a G7 meeting of national security ministers. One of the topics that they focused on was extremist travellers and countering radicalization to violence. Definitely, we're looking at lessons learned, exchanging best practices, and really across the spectrum, whether it's being preventative or responsive, learning how we can work together and how we can strengthen those tools.
Nous consultons de près nos alliés et d'autres pays, comme le ministre l'a indiqué, que ce soit les pays du G7, du G20 ou les ministres chargés de la sécurité nationale du Groupe des cinq.
Le ministre s'est rendu en Italie récemment pour assister à une rencontre des ministres chargés de la sécurité nationale du G7. Ils ont parlé notamment des extrémistes qui vont à l'étranger et des moyens de lutter contre la radicalisation violente. C'est sûr que nous tentons de tirer des leçons, d'en apprendre sur les pratiques exemplaires, et ce, sur toute la ligne, qu'il s'agisse de mesures préventives ou réactives, nous voulons en apprendre sur la façon de collaborer et la façon de renforcer nos outils.
Collapse
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, good morning.
I'm sure you would all like to join me this morning in expressing our deep concern with respect to the two very serious incidents that occurred this past weekend, one in Edmonton and the other in Las Vegas. These circumstances are horrendous in our free and open and democratic society. It's at times like these that we all pull together to support each other and to applaud our first responders on both sides of the border, who have done extraordinary work. We extend our thoughts and prayers to the victims and the families and the loved ones, and we hope for the speedy and full recovery of those who have been injured. We make the emphatic point that events like this will not divide us, nor will they intimidate us. Police investigations are obviously ongoing; they're at a very early stage. A lot more information will be forthcoming in due course, but we I'm sure stand in solidarity with one another within our country and across the border when these kinds of sorry events occur.
Mr. Chairman, with respect to this meeting and this topic, this is my first opportunity to be before the committee since the return of Parliament, so welcome to you as the new chair. I notice some other new faces on all sides of the table, and some old-timers too. To all of you, welcome, and thank you for the invitation to be here today. I look forward to a very good relationship with the committee.
We begin, of course, with BillC-21. I'm joined today by Martin Bolduc, who is vice-president of the Canada Border Services Agency; Sébastien Aubertin-Giguère, who is director general of the traveller program directorate within CBSA; and Andrew Lawrence, who is the acting executive director of the traveller program directorate.
The bill that we're here to discuss will at long last enable Canada to keep track of not only who enters our country but also who leaves it. If that sounds pretty fundamental, actually it is. But there has been a gap in our border system for a great many years that we are now proposing to close with BillC-21. I would point out that many other countries, including all of our Five Eyes allies, already collect this information that is commonly known as “exit” data. Canada, with Bill C-21, will catch up to those other countries and fill the gap.
The information that we're talking about is simply the basic identification information that is found on page 2 of everyone's passport, along with the time and the place of departure. It's the same simple identification information that all travellers willingly hand over when they cross the border. When you cross into the United States, you show your passport and the border officers take note of the information on page 2. It's that information that we're talking about here: name, date, place of birth, nationality, gender, and the issuing authority of the travel document.
The way this information will be collected is really quite straightforward, and travellers should notice no difference at all in the process. For people leaving Canada by air, the air carrier will collect that information, as it already does from passenger manifests, and it will give it to the Canada Border Services Agency before departure. For people crossing by land into the United States, American officials collecting this information, as they already do in the form of entry data, will then send it back to CBSA where it will serve as exit data. This will work in the same way in reverse for travellers crossing into Canada from the United States. The experience from the point of the view of the traveller will be absolutely unchanged.
With this information in hand, Canadian officials will be better able to deal with cross-border crime, including child abductions and human trafficking. It will strengthen our ability to prevent radicalized individuals from travelling to join terrorist groups overseas. It will help ensure the integrity of benefit programs where residency requirements are part of the eligibility criteria. It will also ensure that immigration officials have complete and accurate information when they do their jobs. They won't waste a lot of time dealing with people who have already left the country.
Finally, the legislation also addresses a concern raised in the Auditor General's report in the fall of 2015 about the need for stronger measures to combat the unlawful export of controlled or dangerous goods. BillC-21 will amend the Customs Act to prohibit smuggling controlled goods out of Canada. Currently, and this may be a surprise to some people, only smuggling “into” Canada is prohibited. The new legislation will give border officers the authorities regarding outbound goods similar to the ones they already have for inbound goods.
Mr. Chair, I followed closely the second reading debate in the House about BillC-21. There were not a lot of specific issues raised, but there was one mentioned by Mr. Dubé that I would like to respond to. It had to do with this issue of the sharing of information with the United States. I was concerned that there seemed to be a view that any exchange of information with the U.S. was inherently a bad thing.
I think we should keep in mind that the process of Canadian and U.S. authorities working together and exchanging information, pursuant to laws and agreements and subject to oversight, is essential for our mutual security. For example, when Canadian authorities were able to take action in Strathroy, Ontario, last summer to prevent a planned terrorist attack, that was due to an exchange of information with the United States. Because of that, the RCMP and local police authorities were able to prevent a much larger tragedy. Working in concert with our American partners, and exchanging information with them according to the rules, is very important to our national interests. It supports having the longest, most open, successful international boundary in the history of the world.
The key questions are these: what kind of information is to be shared, with what safeguards, and for what purposes? BillC-21 provides very clear answers. What kind of information? As I said, it's the basic identification data, on page 2 of our passports, that we all offer up whenever we cross a border. It's worth pointing out that if Canada is sharing this information with the United States, that is only because the person in question has just come into Canada from the United States, to whom they necessarily gave the same information upon entry. It's not new or expanded information beyond the fact that they have left. That's the sum and substance of the data that is involved.
What safeguards are in place? To begin with, the government has engaged proactively throughout this whole process with the Privacy Commissioner. That engagement continues. You can find the privacy impact assessments of the current and previous phases of entry/exit implementation on the CBSA website. A new assessment will be updated once the new legislation is actually in effect.
In addition, exchange of information both within Canada and with the U.S. will be subject to formal agreements that will include information management safeguards, privacy protection clauses, and mechanisms to address any potential problems.
All of this will be happening in the context of the most robust national security accountability structure that Canada has ever had. We've already passed BillC-22, which creates the new National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. Add to that Bill C-59, introduced in the spring, which will create a new national security and intelligence review agency. And as you know, we have proactively, in the last number of days, released new ministerial directives about information sharing that have been broadly applauded as significant advancements.
Finally, what purpose does the exchange of information serve? As I've outlined, it will help Canadian authorities do everything from combatting cross-border crime to preventing terrorist travel to improving the management of social benefits and immigration programs. But to give you a concrete example, if it's discovered one evening that a child is missing, police can do a check of the exit records to see if the child left the country earlier that day, where, at what time, and in whose company. That is obviously immensely helpful to investigators working collaboratively on both sides of the border in their efforts to recover the child and catch the kidnapper. For that reason alone, I hope the committee will see fit to report this bill back to the House with all deliberate speed.
I thank you for your attention, Mr. Chair, and look forward to questions.
Monsieur le président, madame et messieurs les membres du Comité, bonjour.
Je suis persuadé que vous voudrez tous vous joindre à moi ce matin pour exprimer les vives inquiétudes que soulèvent en nous les deux tragédies survenues en fin de semaine à Edmonton et à Las Vegas. Il est regrettable que des événements aussi horribles puissent se passer dans une société libre, ouverte et démocratique comme la nôtre. C'est dans des circonstances semblables que nous devons nous montrer solidaires en soulignant le travail extraordinaire accompli par les premiers intervenants de part et d'autre de la frontière. Nos pensées et nos prières accompagnent les victimes, leur famille et leurs proches. Nous espérons que les blessés pourront se rétablir totalement le plus rapidement possible. Nous ne saurions trop insister sur le fait que des gestes de la sorte ne réussiront pas à nous diviser ni à nous intimider. Les enquêtes policières débutent à peine. Nous finirons sans doute par en apprendre davantage, mais je demeure convaincu que nous saurons nous montrer solidaires, aussi bien entre Canadiens qu'avec nos voisins américains, comme nous le faisons toujours dans des circonstances aussi épouvantables.
Monsieur le président, avant d'aborder le sujet du jour, je tiens à profiter de ma première comparution devant votre comité depuis notre retour au Parlement pour vous souhaiter la bienvenue dans vos nouvelles fonctions. Je remarque aussi quelques nouveaux visages de part et d'autre de la table, et quelques anciens également. Je vous souhaite tous la bienvenue en vous remerciant de l'invitation que vous m'avez faite aujourd'hui. Je suis convaincu que nous saurons bien travailler tous ensemble.
Nous allons donc d'abord nous intéresser au projet de loi C-21. Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de trois représentants de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Il s'agit de Martin Bolduc, vice-président; Sébastien Aubertin-Giguère, directeur général, Direction de programme des voyageurs; et Andrew Lawrence, directeur exécutif par intérim, Direction de programme des voyageurs.
Grâce au projet de loi dont nous allons discuter aujourd'hui, le Canada pourra enfin, comme il le souhaitait depuis longtemps, consigner des données non seulement sur les personnes qui entrent au pays, mais aussi sur celles qui en sortent. Si vous vous dîtes que c'est quelque chose d'assez fondamental, vous avez tout à fait raison. Notre système frontalier a pourtant dû composer avec cette lacune pendant toutes ces années. Nous nous proposons maintenant d'apporter les correctifs nécessaires au moyen du projet de loi C-21. Je dois souligner que bien d'autres pays, y compris tous ceux du Groupe des cinq, recueillent déjà ces données de sortie, comme on les appelle. Le Canada souhaite rattraper son retard à ce chapitre grâce au projet de loi C-21. 
Nous parlons ici simplement des renseignements personnels de base que l'on trouve à la page 2 de n'importe quel passeport, en plus du moment et de l'endroit du départ. Ce sont les mêmes données d'identification que les voyageurs communiquent déjà volontairement lorsqu'ils traversent la frontière. Lorsque vous vous rendez aux États-Unis, vous montrez votre passeport à l'agent frontalier qui consigne les renseignements figurant à la page 2. Ce sont les informations dont il est question ici: le nom, la date et le lieu de naissance, la nationalité, le sexe et l'autorité émettrice du document de voyage.
Ces renseignements seront recueillis dans le cours normal des choses, si bien que les voyageurs ne percevront aucun changement dans le processus. Pour ceux qui quittent le Canada par avion, c'est la compagnie aérienne qui consignera ces données comme elle le fait déjà pour ensuite transmettre la liste des passagers à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada avant le départ. Pour ceux qui se rendent aux États-Unis par voie terrestre, les agents américains qui recueillent déjà ces renseignements à titre de données d'entrée les transmettront à l'ASFC qui s'en servira comme données de sortie. La réciproque sera également vraie pour les gens qui entrent au Canada à partir des États-Unis. Il n'y aura aucun changement perceptible pour le voyageur.
Grâce à ces données, les agents canadiens seront mieux à même de lutter contre les crimes transfrontaliers comme les enlèvements d'enfants et le trafic de personnes. Nous serons ainsi mieux aptes à empêcher des individus radicalisés de se rendre à l'étranger pour se joindre à des groupes terroristes. L'intégrité des programmes de prestations reposant sur des critères liés à la résidence sera quant à elle mieux protégée. Les agents de l'immigration pourront en outre accomplir leur travail en s'appuyant sur des renseignements complets et exacts. Ils cesseront de perdre des heures à travailler sur les dossiers de personnes qui ont déjà quitté le Canada.
Le projet de loi permettra enfin de répondre à une préoccupation soulevée par le vérificateur général dans son rapport de l'automne 2015 où il recommandait des mesures plus rigoureuses de lutte contre l'exportation illégale de marchandises contrôlées ou dangereuses. Le projet de loi C-21 va apporter des modifications à la Loi sur les douanes en vue d'interdire la contrebande de marchandises contrôlées qui sortent du Canada. À l'heure actuelle, et cela en surprendra peut-être certains, seule la contrebande vers le Canada est interdite. Grâce aux nouvelles mesures législatives, les agents frontaliers disposeront à l'égard des marchandises quittant le pays des mêmes pouvoirs dont ils bénéficient déjà pour les marchandises qui entrent au Canada.
Monsieur le président, j'ai suivi avec grand intérêt le débat en deuxième lecture sur le projet de loi C-21 à la Chambre. Peu de préoccupations précises ont été soulevées à cette occasion, mais j'aimerais tout de même réagir à une observation de M. Dubé au sujet des échanges d'information avec les États-Unis. Je trouve toujours inquiétant de constater que certains semblent avoir l'impression que tout échange d'information avec les Américains est une mauvaise chose en soi.
Nous devons garder à l'esprit qu'il est essentiel pour la sécurité des deux pays que les autorités canadiennes et américaines puissent collaborer et mettre en commun leurs données, conformément aux lois et aux accords en vigueur, et sous réserve d'une surveillance appropriée. C'est ainsi grâce à l'échange d'information avec les États-Unis que les autorités canadiennes ont pu intervenir l'été dernier à Strathroy en Ontario pour contrer une attaque terroriste qui avait été planifiée. Sans ces informations, la GRC et les forces policières locales n'auraient pas pu empêcher qu'une tragédie beaucoup plus grave ne survienne. Il en va de notre intérêt national que nous puissions travailler de concert avec nos homologues américains en échangeant de l'information avec eux dans les limites des règles applicables. C'est dans ce contexte qu'il nous est possible de gérer la frontière internationale la plus longue, la plus ouverte et la mieux gardée de l'histoire de la planète.
Il y a certaines questions importantes qu'il convient de se poser. Quel genre de renseignements doivent être échangés? Quelles précautions doivent être prises? À quelles fins doit-on mettre en commun ces données? Le projet de loi C-21 répond très clairement à ces questions. Quel genre d'information? Comme je l'indiquais, il s'agit des données personnelles de base figurant à la page 2 de notre passeport que nous communiquons tous déjà lorsque nous traversons une frontière. Il faut souligner que si le Canada communique ces renseignements aux autorités américaines, c'est uniquement parce que la personne visée vient d'entrer au Canada en provenance des États-Unis, lesquels ont déjà nécessairement reçu la même information de leur côté. Il n'est pas question de données nouvelles ou plus détaillées. On veut seulement savoir qui a quitté le pays et rien d'autre.
Quelles précautions sont prises? Précisons dès le départ que le gouvernement s'est assuré de communiquer avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée tout au long du processus. C'est encore le cas aujourd'hui. Vous pouvez trouver sur le site Web de l'Agence des services frontaliers l'évaluation des facteurs relatifs à la vie privée pour la phase actuelle et les phases antérieures de mise en oeuvre de l'Initiative sur les entrées et les sorties. Cette évaluation sera mise à jour une fois la nouvelle loi en vigueur.
De plus, les échanges d'information à l'intérieur du Canada et avec les États-Unis seront assujettis à des ententes officielles qui prévoiront des balises pour la gestion de l'information, des dispositions pour la protection des renseignements personnels et des mécanismes de recours en cas de problèmes.
Toutes ces mesures seront prises dans le contexte de la structure de reddition de comptes la plus efficace que le Canada ait connue en matière de sécurité nationale. Nous avons déjà adopté le projet de loi C-22 qui a permis la création du nouveau Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. Il faut ajouter à cela le projet de loi  C-59 présenté ce printemps qui vise la mise sur pied d'un nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Comme vous le savez, nous avons aussi agi proactivement au cours des derniers jours en communiquant de nouvelles directives ministérielles en matière d'échange de renseignements, un pas en avant qui a été fort bien accueilli.
Enfin, à quoi doit servir l'échange d'information? Comme je l'ai indiqué, il s'agit d'aider les autorités canadiennes à mieux remplir leur mandat, qu'il soit question de lutter contre la criminalité transfrontalière, d'empêcher un terroriste de voyager ou d'assurer une meilleure gestion des prestations sociales et des programmes d'immigration. Pour vous donner un exemple concret, pensons à la disparition d'un enfant. La police pourra vérifier les dossiers de sortie pour voir si l'enfant a quitté le pays plus tôt dans la journée, à quel endroit, à quelle heure et avec qui. C'est bien évidemment un outil précieux pour les enquêteurs des deux côtés de la frontière qui conjuguent leurs efforts pour retrouver l'enfant et appréhender la personne qui l'a enlevé. Cette raison devrait suffire à elle seule pour inciter le Comité à faire le nécessaire pour faire rapport de ce projet de loi à la Chambre dans les plus brefs délais.
Je vous remercie de votre attention et je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 57 of 57

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data