Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 100
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-13 10:16 [p.18265]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise on behalf of the constituents of Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon to present three petitions.
The first petition calls for increased penalties for impaired driving.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai le plaisir de présenter trois pétitions au nom des électeurs de Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon.
La première pétition réclame des peines plus sévères à l'égard de la conduite avec facultés affaiblies.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-13 10:16 [p.18265]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the second petition is regarding cluster munitions.
Monsieur le Président, la deuxième pétition concerne les armes à sous-munitions.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-13 10:16 [p.18265]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I also have hundreds of signatories to a petition calling on this House to condemn discrimination against females occurring through sex-selective pregnancy termination.
Monsieur le Président, je souhaite également présenter une pétition signée par des centaines de personnes qui demandent à la Chambre de condamner la discrimination exercée contre les femmes lorsqu'on a recours à l'avortement sexo-sélectif.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-13 15:50 [p.18311]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to be sharing my time with the member for Northumberland—Quinte West. It is particularly apropos to be doing so. He is a former police officer who has served in remote northern communities, as many members in the Conservative caucus have. I believe there are 14 former police officers in our caucus, among them are the member for Northumberland—Quinte West, the member for Kootenay—Columbia, the member for Yukon, the Minister of International Cooperation. All of them have served this country well. They have put their lives on the line to protect ours. They certainly have the on-the-ground experience which the member for Churchill was just referring to, so I will certainly take my lead from the member for Northumberland—Quinte West and look forward to his speech.
I appreciate the opportunity to talk about this important issue. This is a piece of legislation that concerns cracking down on the illegal trafficking of contraband tobacco. Like most Canadians, unfortunately, members of my family have been touched by cancer as a result of smoking tobacco. My grandfather died at the age of 57 after having taken up smoking when he joined the air force in World War II. He smoked for 40 years and he was taken away from my family far too soon. My wife's aunt just passed away this last year. It was the same situation. For 40 years she was addicted to cigarettes. It took her from our family far sooner than we would have liked.
We need to continue our efforts to convince Canadians that smoking is a bad thing in all its forms and that contraband tobacco is particularly nefarious. Not only does it contain all the negative factors associated with smoking, but it also deprives the government, which has to look after people who become ill from smoking cigarettes, of tax revenue. I heard a colleague in the NDP mention the figure of $2 billion a year. The member for Churchill, another NDP member, also mentioned the lack of revenue being a key concern when dealing with contraband tobacco. That is where I am going to focus my speech.
Contraband tobacco is not only illegal, but it is detrimental to the health and safety of Canadians. In addition, as I said, the trafficking of contraband tobacco deprives the government of important revenue that is earned through the sale of legal tobacco products, revenue that helps fund programs aimed at stopping the use of tobacco, particularly among youth, and that funds health care for those who need it.
As I said, I am going to focus my comments today on what our government is doing to protect government revenues and the Canadian tax base. Since coming to office in 2006, our government has taken a number of steps to improve the integrity of the Canadian tax system and make it stronger and fairer for all Canadians. In an uncertain global environment, the most important contribution the government can make to help create jobs, growth and long-term prosperity is to maintain a sound fiscal position. Managing tax dollars wisely ensures sustainable public services and low taxes for Canadian families and businesses.
Our government is committed to responsible fiscal management, which includes returning to balanced budgets in the medium term. Also, we are controlling spending. It also includes continuing to enhance the integrity of the tax system to ensure that everyone pays their fair share of taxes. Such actions help keep taxes low for Canadian families and businesses, thereby improving incentives to work, save and invest right here in Canada.
In past budgets, our government adopted tough rules to close tax loopholes and prevent a select few businesses and individuals from avoiding taxes. Since 2006, including measures proposed in economic action plan 2013, the government has introduced over 75 measures to improve the integrity of the tax system. Economic action plan 2013, in fact, takes several important steps to improve the integrity of our tax system and to close tax loopholes. The measures include strengthening compliance with the law, and fighting international tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance.
In economic action plan 2013, our government announced a new stop international tax evasion program, which would enable the Canada Revenue Agency to pay individuals with knowledge of major international tax non-compliance a percentage of tax collected as a result of information they provide.
We would require certain financial intermediaries, including banks, to report their clients' international electronic fund transfers of $10,000 or more to the CRA. In addition, we propose new reporting requirements for Canadian taxpayers with foreign income or properties and have streamlined the process for obtaining information concerning unnamed persons from third parties, such as banks.
Again, this speaks to our desire to make sure that everyone is paying a fair share and not skipping out on tax bills or using aggressive tax avoidance schemes. We are doing our best as part of our effort to get back to a balanced budget in the medium term, and this is part of our plan to do that. Fighting things like contraband tobacco and the loss of revenues through contraband tobacco will help us meet that goal.
In May of this year, our government announced a $30 million investment to target international tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance.
This investment includes new resources of $15 million through economic action plan 2013 to establish the necessary systems for the CRA to receive reports from banks and other financial intermediaries on international electronic fund transfers of $10,000 or more, and an additional $15 million in reallocated CRA funds that will be used to bring in new audit and compliance resources dedicated exclusively to issues of international compliance and revenue collection that were identified as a result of measures outlined in our last budget.
To ensure that these activities move forward quickly, the government announced the creation of a dedicated team of CRA experts responsible for the implementation of the international tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance measures announced in that budget. It would ensure that the full force of the agency's international compliance and auditing resources are brought to bear on individuals or businesses seeking to hide money or assets offshore.
Again, a key part of this bill is to ensure that are we cracking down on the organized crime that uses contraband tobacco as a revenue source and deprives the Government of Canada of a revenue source as well.
I will give a bit more background on what Bill S-16 does.
First of all, the bill fulfills a platform commitment. In 2011, our government made a commitment to establish a mandatory jail time for repeat offenders. Bill S-16 would bring amendments to the Criminal Code to establish a new offence of trafficking in contraband tobacco, with mandatory jail time for second and subsequent convictions.
It is important that we send the message that if one is going to break the law, one would not get repeated slaps on the wrist and be allowed to walk away and treat the justice system as a joke. There will be real penalties. The primary target of this new offence is organized crime and those who are involved in the trafficking of contraband tobacco in large volumes.
The definition of trafficking would include sale, offer for sale, possession for the purposes of sale, transportation, distribution and delivery of contraband tobacco. The penalty for the first offence would be up to six months of imprisonment on summary conviction and up to five years of imprisonment if prosecuted on indictment.
The bill also proposes that repeat offenders convicted of this new offence on indictment would be sentenced to a mandatory minimum penalty of 90 days on a second conviction, 180 days on a third conviction and two years less a day for any subsequent convictions.
We are taking action and fulfilling our campaign promises. We are targeting organized crime and working to ensure that the revenues would be going into government coffers at all levels to promote smoking cessation programs, reach out to our youth and fund health care and other services that we have grown to rely on. An important part of maintaining those important services is passing this bill and cracking down on contraband tobacco.
I urge all members of this House to support the bill.
Monsieur le Président, j’ai le plaisir de partager mon temps avec le député de Northumberland—Quinte West. Cela est particulièrement opportun, car il a été policier et il a travaillé dans les collectivités éloignées du Nord, tout comme nombre d’autres membres du caucus conservateur. Je crois que nous comptons 14 policiers à la retraite dans notre caucus, notamment le député de Northumberland—Quinte West, le député de Kootenay—Columbia, le député de Yukon et le ministre de la Coopération internationale. Ils ont tous fait honneur à notre pays. Ils ont risqué leur vie pour protéger les nôtres. Ils possèdent certainement cette expérience concrète à laquelle la députée de Churchill vient de faire allusion, alors je vais écouter attentivement ce que le député de Northumberland—Quinte West a à nous dire.
Je suis heureux de pouvoir traiter de cette question importante. Le projet de loi s’attaque à la contrebande de tabac. Comme la plupart des Canadiens, malheureusement, j’ai des parents qui ont été victimes du cancer parce qu’ils ont consommé des produits du tabac. Mon grand-père est mort à l’âge de 57 ans. Il avait commencé à fumer lorsqu’il s’est enrôlé dans l’armée de l’air, pendant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Il a fumé pendant 40 ans et il nous a quittés trop tôt. La tante de mon épouse est elle aussi décédée, l’an dernier. C’est un cas similaire. Pendant 40 ans elle a fumé la cigarette, et elle aussi elle a quitté notre famille bien plus tôt que nous ne l’aurions voulu.
Il nous faut poursuivre nos efforts pour convaincre les Canadiens que le tabagisme est une habitude à proscrire sous toutes ses formes et que le tabac de contrebande est particulièrement nocif. Non seulement ce tabac produit tous les effets négatifs liés au tabagisme, mais en outre il prive le gouvernement d’une partie de ses recettes fiscales, alors même qu’il doit assurer des soins aux personnes atteintes de maladies attribuables à la cigarette. J’ai entendu un collègue du NPD mentionner le montant de 2 milliards de dollars par année. La députée de Churchill, qui représente elle aussi le NPD, a également indiqué que le manque à gagner constituait une préoccupation importante lorsqu’on parle de contrebande de tabac. C’est de cet aspect que je veux traiter.
Le tabac de contrebande est non seulement illégal, il est préjudiciable à la santé et à la sécurité des Canadiens. Par ailleurs, comme je l’ai dit, la contrebande de tabac prive le gouvernement des recettes importantes qui proviennent de la vente de produits légitimes du tabac, des recettes qui nous aident à financer les programmes destinés à décourager le tabagisme, en particulier chez les jeunes, et à financer les services de santé pour ceux qui en ont besoin.
Comme je l’ai dit, je vais concentrer mes commentaires aujourd’hui sur ce que le gouvernement fait pour protéger les recettes publiques et l’assiette fiscale canadienne. Depuis son arrivée au pouvoir, en 2006, le gouvernement a pris nombre de mesures pour accroître l’intégrité du régime fiscal canadien et le rendre plus robuste et plus équitable pour tous les Canadiens. Dans un contexte mondial incertain, la contribution la plus importante que le gouvernement peut faire pour stimuler l’emploi, la croissance et la prospérité à long terme consiste à maintenir une situation financière saine. La gestion sage de l’argent des contribuables garantit la viabilité des services publics et limite les impôts que les familles et les entreprises canadiennes doivent payer.
Le gouvernement s’est engagé à gérer les finances publiques de façon responsable, ce qui comprend le retour à l’équilibre budgétaire à moyen terme. En outre, nous limitons les dépenses. Cela comprend aussi le renforcement de l’intégrité du régime fiscal, pour veiller à ce que tous paient leur juste part d’impôt. De telles mesures contribuent à maintenir les impôts à un bas niveau pour les familles et les entreprises canadiennes et elles encouragent donc le travail, l’épargne et l’investissement ici même, au Canada.
Dans le cadre de budgets précédents, le gouvernement a adopté des règles strictes pour éliminer les échappatoires fiscales et empêcher qu’un petit nombre d’entreprises et de particuliers évitent de payer de l’impôt. Depuis 2006 et en comptant les mesures contenues dans le Plan d’action économique de 2013, le gouvernement a mis de l’avant plus de 75 mesures pour améliorer l’intégrité du régime fiscal. Le Plan d’action économique de 2013, de fait, prévoit plusieurs mesures importantes pour accroître l’intégrité de notre régime fiscal et éliminer les échappatoires fiscales. Je songe entre autres au renforcement de l'observation et à la lutte contre l’évasion fiscale internationale et les stratagèmes d’évitement fiscal abusif.
Dans le Plan d’action économique de 2013, le gouvernement a annoncé le nouveau programme Combattons l’évasion fiscale internationale, qui permettrait à l’Agence du revenu du Canada de verser aux personnes qui sont au courant d’importants cas d’inobservation fiscale internationale un pourcentage des impôts recouvrés grâce aux renseignements fournis.
Nous exigerons de certains intermédiaires financiers, y compris les banques, qu’ils déclarent à l’ARC les transferts internationaux par voie électronique de fonds d'une valeur de 10 000 $ ou plus. En outre, nous proposons de nouvelles exigences de déclaration pour les contribuables canadiens ayant un revenu ou des biens à l’étranger et nous avons rationalisé le processus pour obtenir auprès de tierces parties, notamment les banques, de l’information au sujet de particuliers non nommés.
Là encore, ces mesures témoignent de notre désir de veiller à ce que tous paient leur juste part et à ce que personne ne puisse se soustraire à ses obligations fiscales ni se livrer à des manœuvres d’évitement fiscal abusif. Nous ne ménageons pas nos efforts pour revenir à l’équilibre budgétaire à moyen terme, et ces mesures font partie de notre plan à cette fin. La lutte contre la contrebande de tabac, par exemple, et contre la perte de recettes attribuable à la contrebande de tabac nous aidera à atteindre ce but.
En mai, le gouvernement a annoncé un investissement de 30 millions de dollars pour cibler l’évasion fiscale internationale et l’évitement fiscal abusif.
Cet investissement comprend de nouvelles ressources, soit 15 millions de dollars par l’intermédiaire du Plan d’action économique de 2013 pour mettre en place les nouveaux systèmes nécessaires qui permettront à l’ARC de recevoir les rapports des institutions financières et des autres institutions sur les transferts de fonds électroniques internationaux de 10 000 $ ou plus, et une somme supplémentaire de 15 millions de dollars en fonds réaffectés de l’ARC qui serviront à amener de nouvelles ressources pour la vérification et l’observation qui seront entièrement consacrées au règlement des questions en matière d’observation et au recouvrement des recettes à l’échelle internationale, qui auront été déterminées grâce aux mesures annoncées dans notre dernier budget.
Pour faire en sorte que ces activités avancent rapidement, le gouvernement a annoncé la création d’une équipe spécialisée composée d’experts de l’ARC et chargée de mettre en œuvre les mesures contre l’évasion fiscale internationale et l’évitement fiscal international qui ont été annoncées dans le budget. Elle veillera à ce que l’agence utilise au maximum ses ressources d’observation et de vérification à l’échelle internationale pour lutter contre les particuliers ou les entreprises qui tentent de cacher de l’argent ou des actifs à l’étranger.
Là encore, un aspect clé du projet de loi consiste à nous attaquer au crime organisé pour qui la contrebande de tabac est une source de revenus et qui, ce faisant, prive le gouvernement du Canada de ses recettes.
Je veux expliquer un peu mieux l’effet du projet de loi S-16.
Tout d’abord, le projet de loi remplit un engagement qui figurait dans notre programme électoral. En 2011, le gouvernement s’est engagé à instituer des peines d’emprisonnement obligatoire pour les récidivistes. Le projet de loi S-16 modifie le Code criminel pour créer une nouvelle infraction, la contrebande de tabac, assortie d’une peine d’emprisonnement obligatoire pour une deuxième condamnation et toute condamnation subséquente.
Il est important de bien faire comprendre que quiconque enfreint la loi et récidive par surcroît ne s’expose plus à de simples réprimandes, après quoi il peut rentrer chez lui et tourner en dérision le système de justice. Il y aura de véritables sanctions. Cette nouvelle infraction cible principalement le crime organisé et ceux qui font la contrebande d’importantes quantités de produits du tabac.
La définition de contrebande comprendra le fait de vendre, d’offrir en vente, de transporter, de livrer, de distribuer ou d’avoir en sa possession pour la vente des produits du tabac illicites. La peine pour une première infraction pourrait aller jusqu’à six mois d’emprisonnement sur déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire et jusqu’à cinq ans d’emprisonnement sur déclaration de culpabilité par mise en accusation.
Le projet de loi propose en outre d’imposer aux récidivistes reconnus coupables de cette nouvelle infraction par mise en accusation une peine minimale obligatoire de 90 jours pour une deuxième condamnation, de 180 jours pour une troisième condamnation et de deux ans moins un jour pour toute condamnation subséquente.
Nous prenons des mesures et nous tenons les promesses que nous avons faites pendant la campagne électorale. Nous ciblons le crime organisé et nous nous efforçons de veiller à ce que les recettes aillent dans les coffres de l’État à tous les niveaux pour encourager les programmes de lutte contre le tabagisme, rejoindre les jeunes et financer les soins de santé et les autres services sur lesquels nous comptons. Pour maintenir ces importants services, il nous faut adopter ce projet de loi et faire échec à la contrebande de tabac.
Je presse tous les députés d’appuyer le projet de loi.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-13 16:00 [p.18312]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, obviously we work not only with our partners at all levels of government but also with the RCMP and our international partners as well to tackle this important issue.
If the member refers to the speech of the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety, she will see that the parliamentary secretary gave a comprehensive analysis of the work we have done with the cross-border group and U.S. authorities to ensure that we are able to respond when there is suspicion of smuggling of goods or suspicion that contraband tobacco may be crossing an international border.
Certainly that is something we are aware of and something we are working on proactively. I hope we can count on the hon. member's support when we bring forward measures to tackle that sort of activity.
Monsieur le Président, il est évident que nous collaborons non seulement avec nos partenaires de tous les ordres de gouvernement, mais aussi avec la GRC et nos partenaires internationaux pour nous attaquer à cet important problème.
Si la députée veut bien se reporter au discours prononcé par la secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Sécurité publique, elle constatera que la secrétaire parlementaire a présenté une analyse complète du travail que nous avons fait avec le groupe transfrontalier et les autorités américaines pour être en mesure de réagir si nous soupçonnons que des marchandises ou du tabac sont passés en contrebande à une frontière internationale.
C’est certainement une chose dont nous sommes conscients et à l’égard de laquelle nous agissons d’une manière proactive. J’espère que nous pourrons compter sur l’appui de la députée lorsque nous présenterons des mesures destinées à réprimer ce genre d’activité.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-13 16:02 [p.18312]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, our spending to promote government initiatives is much lower than the last year of Liberal government. We have also increased our spending on health transfers. It will be up to $40 billion by the end of this decade. Members can contrast that with the Liberal Party record of cutting $25 billion in health and social transfers.
Young Canadians know the dangers of smoking, but we need to reach out to them where they live. The way we could do that is at the local, provincial and local school board levels. Those are the levels that are going to reach out with an individual plan that will work best for those communities. To have a one-size-fits-all approach from Ottawa is not the best way to do it.
We have given an unprecedented level of resources to the provinces to deal with education and health care. They are in the best position to direct those dollars.
Monsieur le Président, nous avons beaucoup moins dépensé pour promouvoir les initiatives du gouvernement que ne l’avait fait le gouvernement libéral dans sa dernière année. Nous avons également augmenté l’argent consacré au transfert relatif à la santé, qui atteindra 40 milliards de dollars d’ici la fin de la décennie. Les députés peuvent faire la comparaison avec le Parti libéral, qui avait réduit de 25 milliards de dollars les transferts relatifs à la santé et aux programmes sociaux.
Les jeunes Canadiens connaissent les dangers du tabac, mais nous devons les atteindre là où ils vivent. La façon de le faire consiste à agir aux niveaux local et provincial ainsi qu’auprès des conseils scolaires locaux. Une approche universelle conçue à Ottawa ne serait pas très avantageuse à cet égard.
Nous avons mis à la disposition des provinces des ressources d’un niveau sans précédent pour financer l’éducation et les soins de santé. Elles sont les mieux placées pour répartir les montants en cause.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-13 16:04 [p.18313]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, when we were talking about young people, both of the individuals I referred to started smoking early in their teens, and it led to tragically shortened lives. One of the things that we know affects youth smoking rates is the cost of cigarettes and whether they are available at a cheap rate.
The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety pointed out that one-third of the cigarette butts found at Ontario high schools are contraband. The reason is that young people generally cannot afford to pay for regulated tobacco products, so they look to a cheaper product.
Contraband tobacco is actually targeting our young people. It makes it easier for them to get into this highly addictive and deadly habit. We need to stop the supply of contraband tobacco, which will reduce youth smoking going forward.
Monsieur le Président, les deux personnes dont j'ai parlé ont commencé à fumer au début de leur adolescence, et leur vie en a été tragiquement écourtée. Nous savons que le taux de tabagisme chez les jeunes varie notamment en fonction du prix des cigarettes et de leur disponibilité à prix modique.
La secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Sécurité publique a souligné que le tiers des mégots de cigarettes trouvés près des écoles secondaires de l'Ontario proviennent de cigarettes de contrebande. Cela s'explique par le fait qu'en général, les jeunes n'ont pas les moyens d'acheter des produits du tabac réglementés et se tournent donc vers un produit moins cher.
En fait, le tabac de contrebande cible nos jeunes. Il facilite l'acquisition d'une habitude qui engendre une forte dépendance, une habitude mortelle. Nous devons enrayer l'offre de tabac de contrebande, ce qui permettra de réduire le taux de tabagisme chez les jeunes, à l'avenir.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-10 14:15 [p.17970]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, while our Conservative government celebrated a milestone of over one million net new jobs created since July 2009, the NDP deputy leader was in New York at Left Forum 2013, a conference committed to addressing the destructive nature of capitalism's inherent drive to growth.
Left Forum included seminars entitled: anti-capitalist strategies and imaginaries, taking socialism seriously, and discussions on Israel's deadly economy and the Palestinian right to return. Attendees were also treated to a series of anti-development seminars including one entitled, the necessity of direct action to prevent expansion of oil and gas infrastructure.
Despite the NDP leader's efforts to distance himself from the word “socialism”, his deputy leader has once again reminded Canadians of the NDP's anti-capitalist, anti-Israel and anti-development roots. While the NDP members pontificate on anti-capitalist strategies to kill jobs, Canadians can rest assured that every time our Conservative government travels abroad, it is to promote jobs, growth and long-term prosperity.
Monsieur le Président, tandis que le gouvernement conservateur célébrait le million d'emplois créés, net, depuis juillet 2009, la chef adjointe du NPD était à New York au Left Forum 2013, un congrès visant à contrer la nature destructrice de la quête de croissance inhérente au capitalisme.
Le Left Forum comprenait des séminaires intitulés: visions et stratégies anticapitalistes; prendre le socialisme au sérieux; et dialogues sur l'économie meurtrière d'Israël et le droit de retour des Palestiniens. Les participants ont également eu droit à une série de séminaires anti-développement, dont un qui s'intitulait l'impératif d'intervenir directement pour empêcher l'expansion de l'infrastructure pétrolière et gazière.
Malgré les efforts du chef du NPD pour se distancier du mot « socialisme », sa chef adjointe vient de rappeler une fois de plus aux Canadiens les racines anticapitalistes, anti-Israël et anti-développement du NPD. Alors que les néo-démocrates pontifient à l'égard de leurs stratégies anticapitalistes visant à détruire des emplois, les Canadiens peuvent avoir l'assurance que chaque fois que le gouvernement conservateur va à l'étranger, c'est pour favoriser l'emploi, la croissance et la prospérité à long terme.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-06 16:30 [p.17840]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is always entertaining when that member rises to his feet and speaks about just about anything but the bill in front of us. He did that again today.
The member talked about lip service. He asked us to do the math. We have some math here. Between 2006 and 2014, approximately $3 billion will be invested to support first nations communities in managing their water and waste water infrastructure. In 2011-12 alone, there were 402 major and minor first nations water and waste water infrastructure projects, with 286 more planned for this fiscal year.
The hon. member talked a lot, but not about Bill S-8. He talked about the lack of funding, when there has actually been $3 billion. He talked about a lack of projects, when there have been 600, approaching 700 projects.
Perhaps the member could reconcile the facts with the rhetoric in his speech.
Monsieur le Président, il est toujours divertissant de voir ce député se lever et parler d'à peu près tout sauf du projet de loi à l'étude. Il l'a fait encore une fois aujourd'hui.
Le député a parlé des beaux discours. Il nous demande de faire le calcul. Nous avons quelques calculs à présenter. Entre 2006 et 2014, environ 3 milliards de dollars auront été investis pour appuyer les collectivités des Premières Nations dans la gestion de leurs réseaux d'aqueduc et d'égout. En 2011-2012 seulement, le gouvernement a soutenu 402 petits et grands projets d'infrastructure ayant trait aux réseaux d'aqueduc et d'égout des Premières Nations, et 286 autres ont été prévus pour l'exercice en cours.
Le député a beaucoup parlé, mais il en a dit bien peu sur le projet de loi S-8. Il a parlé du manque de financement, alors qu'il s'élève à 3 milliards de dollars. Il dit que les projets manquent, alors qu'il y en a eu 600, presque 700.
Peut-être que le député devrait tenter de réconcilier ses propos avec les faits.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-06 16:40 [p.17842]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is indeed a pleasure to participate in this debate today. I want to say at the outset that I will be splitting my time with the hon. member for Edmonton Centre.
Just this morning we saw the results of the good work of the Conservative government when it comes to working with first nations people. We were in the aboriginal affairs committee discussing the Yale First Nation Final Agreement, which involved Chief Robert Hope of the Yale First Nation, the Government of Canada and the Government of B.C. I am hopeful that will move ahead quickly. We saw how it can work when we work together. Certainly, I want to congratulate the Yale First Nation in my riding of Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon for all its hard work over 20 years at the table and finally getting the resolution they have been seeking with their treaty.
I am here today to talk about Bill S-8, the safe drinking water for first nations act. I believe this is an act that fully deserves the support of all colleagues in the House. The proposed legislation would address the serious problem of chronic unsafe drinking water in many first nations through an innovative and collaborative process, which is the key. The proposed process would have first nations work alongside government officials to design and implement regulatory regimes.
A starting point for this work would be the regulations that currently apply to communities adjacent to first nations, which is good common sense. More precisely, this means reviewing provincial or territorial regulations and adapting them to recognize the particular circumstances of first nations communities. We certainly recognize that an Ottawa-based, one-size-fits-all solution is not the solution that first nations need.
Members of this House need to recognize that currently no legally enforceable drinking water and waste water regulations exist for first nations on reserve. This is simply unacceptable. Regulations provide the framework for safe drinking water and waste water systems. They are essential because they map out clear lines of responsibility for each of the many steps required to safeguard water quality, such as source protection, regular quality testing and close adherence to established standards and protocols for water treatment and distribution. This is why regulations are essential for first nations communities. We must safeguard the drinking water for first nations members.
In essence, Bill S-8 is enabling legislation, as the member for Peace River, the chairman of the aboriginal affairs committee, stated earlier. It would authorize regulatory regimes developed through the collaborative process that I have just described. The proposed legislation does not dictate what the regimes must contain.
Unfortunately, some critics have chosen to misinterpret this approach and portray the bill instead as an effort by the Government of Canada to offload some of its liabilities. A closer look at the issue, however, reveals that this is simply not the case.
The truth is that collaboratively developed regulations would clarify the roles and responsibilities of all parties, including chiefs, band councils, water operators, and federal departments and agencies. The Government of Canada has no plan to offload or download its responsibilities to first nations, or to provinces and municipalities for that matter. Bill S-8 aims to engage as many stakeholders as possible in the design and implementation of regulatory regimes that protect the safety of drinking water.
Collaboration has been a defining characteristic of our government's efforts to resolve the issue of first nations access to safe drinking water since the very beginning. Seven years ago, the Government of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations agreed upon a joint plan of action. For instance, both partners appointed members to the expert panel that reviewed regulatory options. Although the panel did not recommend a particular option, it did lay out the benefits and limitation of various options. The panel's final report repeatedly emphasized the need for ongoing collaboration.
Here is an excerpt from that report:
The federal government and First Nations partners should take steps to pare away bureaucracy, collaborate with provinces on tri-partite harmonization, and both simplify and update procurement procedures. Over time, First Nations should take on an increasing share of the activities directly related to planning, procuring and gaining approval for plants.
Bill S-8 proposes to follow the expert panel's advice by authorizing regulations developed with the direct input of first nations and designed to meet the particular needs and circumstances of their communities. The government's approach with Bill S-8 effectively rejects other options that have been considered in the past, such as imposing a single federal regime or merely incorporating provincial and territorial regulations without adaptation. These one-size-fits-all approaches are attractive because they should make it easier and faster to establish regulations and assign responsibilities, but these approaches could never reconcile the significant differences that exist among first nations communities. The truth is that we believe the best solution is to design and implement regulations by working directly with first nations and other stakeholders. This is a bottom-up rather than top-down exercise.
To get a sense of what the process might look like, I draw the attention of the House to an effort led by the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat. Known as the APC, this advocacy and policy group comprises representatives from more than 30 first nations located in the Atlantic provinces. For the last few years, the APC has been studying regulatory options for drinking water.
Representatives of the APC described this work to the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development on May 23. Mr. John Paul, APC's executive director, said the organization appreciates that drinking water is ultimately a health and safety issue. Here is an excerpt of his testimony. He said:
We need to own whatever regulations come out of this, and we need to believe that they're workable and to figure out exactly what we need to do on the human resources side, the governance, and all of those different things.
In an effort to take ownership of regulations, the APC contracted one of Canada's most qualified experts in drinking water, Dr. Graham Gagnon, director of the Centre for Water Resources Studies at Dalhousie University. With Dr. Gagnon's help, the APC has developed a list of the technical benchmarks that could provide the basis for a regulatory regime. Perhaps more significantly, however, the APC and Dr. Gagnon have been working on a new approach to regulating the safety of first nations drinking water. The approach would involve a regional first nation water authority. The authority would be similar to those that other communities in Canada use to help govern public utilities and post-secondary education institutions.
Here is how Dr. Gagnon described the proposed authority to the standing committee:
Implementation of a first nations regional water authority would enable coordinated decision-making, maximize efficiencies of resource allocation, and establish a professionally based organization that would be in the best position to oversee activities related to drinking water and waste water disposal. This would, on a day-to-day basis, transfer liability away from chiefs and councils, and pass it to a technical group.
That is very important. He said this would, on a day-to-day basis, transfer liability away from chiefs and councils and pass it to a technical group. As the quote indicates, the creation of a first nations-owned authority could be a valuable part of the solution, at least for Atlantic first nations. APC continues to investigate this option.
It is impossible to say if all first nations would pursue such an approach, but the mechanism proposed in Bill S-8 would provide first nations with the opportunity to propose and develop solutions that best meet their needs and best protect their communities. As the APC's example indicated, liability would not be downloaded or offloaded to first nations but, rather, options would be developed to address the role and responsibilities of the various stakeholders by region. This collaborative approach is precisely why we should endorse the legislation before us.
Our government fully supports Mr. Paul and the APC as they develop their regulations, and we hope the opposition will realize how important this is and support Bill S-8. The bill would help us move forward and work with first nations to develop regulations that serve them well and help provide safe drinking water for first nations right across the country.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de participer au débat d'aujourd'hui. Je tiens à dire d'entrée de jeu que je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député d'Edmonton-Centre.
Ce matin même, nous avons vu le fruit des efforts du gouvernement conservateur lorsqu'il est question de travailler avec les Premières Nations. Au Comité des affaires autochtones, nous avons eu une discussion sur l'Accord définitif concernant la Première Nation de Yale, à laquelle participaient le chef Robert Hope, de la Première Nation de Yale, ainsi que des représentants du gouvernement du Canada et du gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique. J'espère que les choses progresseront rapidement. Nous avons vu comment cela fonctionne quand nous travaillons ensemble. Je tiens à féliciter la Première Nation de Yale, située dans ma circonscription, Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon, de son travail acharné au cours des 20 dernières années à la table de négociation qui lui a valu enfin la résolution souhaitée dans le cadre du traité.
Je suis ici aujourd'hui pour parler du projet de loi S-8, la Loi sur la salubrité de l'eau potable des Premières Nations. Je crois que cette loi mérite pleinement l'appui de tous mes collègues de la Chambre. Le projet de loi réglerait le grave problème de l'insalubrité chronique de l'eau dans de nombreuses collectivités des Premières Nations grâce à un processus d'innovation et de collaboration essentiel. Dans le cadre de ce processus, les Premières Nations travailleraient de concert avec les représentants du gouvernement à l'élaboration et à la mise en oeuvre de régimes réglementaires.
Comme point de départ, il serait logique de se servir de la réglementation qui s'applique actuellement aux collectivités adjacentes à celles des Premières Nations. Cela suppose plus précisément d'examiner la réglementation provinciale ou territoriale et de l'adapter afin de tenir compte des situations propres aux collectivités des Premières Nations. Nous savons très bien qu'une solution universelle émanant d'Ottawa n'est pas la clé pour les Premières Nations.
Les députés doivent reconnaître qu'actuellement, il n'existe aucune réglementation exécutoire en matière d'alimentation en eau potable et de traitement des eaux usées dans les réserves des Premières Nations. C'est tout simplement inacceptable. La réglementation fournit un cadre pour les réseaux d'égouts et d'alimentation en eau potable. Elle est essentielle parce qu'elle définit clairement les responsabilités associées à chacune des nombreuses étapes à exécuter pour préserver la qualité de l'eau, comme la protection des sources d'eau, les analyses de qualité périodiques et le respect rigoureux des normes et des protocoles établis pour le traitement et la distribution de l'eau. Voilà pourquoi les règlements sont essentiels pour les collectivités des Premières Nations. Nous devons préserver l'eau potable pour les membres des Premières Nations.
Essentiellement, le projet de loi S-8 est une loi habilitante, comme l'a indiqué plus tôt le député de Peace River et président du Comité des affaires autochtones. Il autoriserait la mise en place de régimes réglementaires au moyen du processus de collaboration que je viens de décrire. Le projet de loi ne dicte pas le contenu des régimes.
Malheureusement, certains détracteurs ont mal compris cette façon de procéder et prétendent que, en présentant ce projet de loi, le gouvernement du Canada cherche à se décharger de certaines obligations. Lorsqu'on y regarde de plus près, on constate que ce n'est tout simplement pas le cas.
En fait, en étant élaborés conjointement, les règlements pourront préciser le rôle et les responsabilités de chacun, notamment des chefs, des conseils de bande, des opérateurs des installations de traitement de l'eau ainsi que des ministères et organismes fédéraux. Le gouvernement du Canada n'a pas l'intention de se décharger de ses responsabilités et de les imputer aux Premières Nations ni, d'ailleurs, aux provinces et aux municipalités. Le projet de loi S-8 vise à faire participer le plus grand nombre possible d'intervenants dans la conception et la mise en oeuvre de régimes de réglementation préservant la salubrité de l'eau potable.
Depuis le début, les efforts que déploie le gouvernement pour régler le problème de l'alimentation des Premières Nations en eau potable se caractérisent par la collaboration. Il y a sept ans, le gouvernement du Canada et l'Assemblée des Premières Nations ont convenu d'un plan d'action commun. Les partenaires ont notamment nommé les membres du groupe d'experts qui a examiné les diverses avenues réglementaires. Ce groupe d'experts n'a pas recommandé de solution en particulier, mais il a fait ressortir les avantages et les inconvénients de quelques-unes des possibilités envisagées. Le rapport final du groupe d'experts insiste particulièrement sur le fait que la collaboration constante des partis est nécessaire.
Voici un extrait du rapport:
Le gouvernement fédéral et ses partenaires des Premières nations devraient : prendre des mesures pour réduire la bureaucratie; collaborer avec les provinces pour une harmonisation tripartite; simplifier et mettre à jour les processus d’approvisionnement. Graduellement, les Premières nations prendraient en charge une part de plus en plus grande des activités directement liées à la planification, à l’approvisionnement et à l’obtention d’une approbation pour les usines.
Le projet de loi S-8 donnerait suite à la recommandation du groupe d'experts et permettrait l'élaboration de règlements en collaboration avec les Premières Nations; ces règlements seraient conçus pour répondre à des besoins précis de leurs communautés. Le gouvernement n'a pas retenu, pour le projet de loi S-8, certaines options qui avaient été envisagées; notamment l'imposition d'un régime fédéral unique ou la simple incorporation, sans adaptation, des règlements des provinces et des territoires. Ces approches à formule unique sont attrayantes parce qu'elles devraient faciliter et accélérer la prise de règlement et l'attribution des responsabilités, mais elles ne permettaient aucunement de tenir compte des différences importances qui existent entre les communautés autochtones. En fait, nous croyons que la collaboration avec les Premières Nations et les autres intéressés pour la conception et la mise en oeuvre des règlements est la meilleure solution. Il faut partir de la base et non l'inverse.
Pour avoir une idée du processus, je tiens à faire connaître à la Chambre les travaux de l'organisme Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat. Connu sous l'acronyme APC, ce groupe de pression et d'orientation stratégique est composé de représentants de plus de 30 Premières Nations des provinces de l'Atlantique. Cet organisme étudie depuis quelques années diverses options de réglementation visant l'eau potable.
Les représentants de l'APC ont décrit les travaux qu'ils mènent au Comité permanent des affaires autochtones et du développement du Grand Nord le 23 mai. Le directeur général l'APC, M. John Paul, a dit que l'organisme a reconnu que l'eau potable est, en définitive, une question de santé et de sécurité. Voici un extrait de son témoignage:
Nous devons appuyer tout règlement qui en découle, et nous devons être convaincus qu'il va fonctionner et déterminer exactement les mesures à prendre au chapitre des ressources humaines, de la gouvernance et de toutes les autres choses.
Afin de prendre activement part à l'élaboration des règlements, l'APC a retenu les services de l'un des plus grands experts en eau potable du Canada, M. Graham Gagnon, du Centre d'étude sur les ressources hydriques de l'Université Dalhousie. Avec l'aide de M. Gagnon, l'APC a établi une liste de normes techniques qui pourraient constituer le fondement d'un régime réglementaire. Mais il y a peut-être plus important encore: l'APC et M. Gagnon collaborent pour concevoir une nouvelle approche réglementaire à l'égard de la salubrité de l'eau potable des Premières Nations. Cette approche ferait appel à un organisme régional autochtone de gestion de l'eau. Cet organisme serait semblable à ceux qui, ailleurs au Canada, participent à la gestion des services publics et des établissements d'éducation postsecondaire.
Voici comment M. Gagnon a décrit au comité permanent l'organisme régional envisagé:
La création d'un organisme régional chargé de l'eau des Premières Nations permettrait une prise de décisions coordonnées, l'affectation des ressources de la façon la plus efficace possible et l'établissement d'un organisme professionnel qui serait le mieux placé pour superviser les activités liées au traitement de l'eau potable et des eaux usées. Au quotidien, cela permettrait le transfert de la responsabilité des chefs et des conseils vers un groupe technique.
M. Gagnon a dit que, au quotidien, cela permettrait le transfert de la responsabilité des chefs et des conseils vers un groupe technique. C'est très important. Comme le passage cité l'indique, la création d'un organisme des Premières Nations pourrait faire partie intégrante de la solution, du moins pour les Premières Nations de la région atlantique. L'APC continue d'examiner cette possibilité.
On ne peut pas dire si les Premières Nations adopteront toutes cette approche, mais le mécanisme prévu dans le projet de loi S-8 leur donnerait la possibilité de proposer et d'élaborer les solutions qui répondent le mieux à leurs besoins et protègent le mieux leurs communautés. Comme le montre l'exemple de l'APC, la responsabilité ne serait pas carrément rejetée sur les Premières Nations, mais des formules seraient élaborées pour définir les rôles et les responsabilités des divers intervenants par région. Cette approche axée sur la collaboration est précisément la raison pour laquelle nous devrions appuyer le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis.
Le gouvernement appuie entièrement l'élaboration de règlements par M. Paul et l'APC. Nous espérons que l'opposition comprendra à quel point c'est important et appuiera le projet de loi S-8, qui nous permettra de faire des progrès et de travailler avec les Premières Nations à l'établissement de règlements qui répondront à leurs besoins et permettront d'offrir de l'eau potable de qualité aux collectivités autoctones partout au pays.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-06 16:51 [p.17843]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as chance would have it—and I am not sure if the hon. member heard that speech—I did give a riveting speech on incorporation by reference of regulations just last week. I know she was there for that.
We are working closely with first nations to develop these regulations. Certainly, we have been at the table with significant funding to ensure we are providing that infrastructure for first nations, as I mentioned earlier in the debate. Between 2006 and 2014, we will have provided $3 billion in infrastructure upgrades. Since just 2007, nearly 700 projects have been undertaken to provide that critical infrastructure for first nations who do not have it.
We are going to work with the first nations. Again, the government has committed $330.8 million over two years through economic action plan 2012 to help sustain progress made to build and renovate water infrastructure on reserve.
We continue to be there, both with a collaborative approach with first nations and with financial resources to ensure we are providing first nations with the infrastructure they need.
Monsieur le Président, je ne sais pas si la députée a eu la chance d'entendre ce discours, mais il se trouve que j'ai prononcé pas plus tard que la semaine dernière un discours percutant sur l'incorporation des règlements par renvoi. Je sais que la députée était présente à cette occasion.
Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les Premières Nations pour élaborer ces règlements. Chose certaine, nous sommes arrivés à la table avec un budget important pour nous assurer de fournir l'infrastructure voulue aux Premières nations, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt dans le débat. Entre 2006 et 2014, nous aurons fourni 3 milliards de dollars pour l'amélioration des infrastructures. Depuis 2007, près de 700 projets ont été entrepris pour fournir cette infrastructure cruciale aux Premières nations qui n'en ont pas.
Nous allons travailler avec les Premières nations. Je répète que le gouvernement a engagé 330,8 millions de dollars sur deux ans dans le cadre du plan d'action économique de 2012 pour aider à soutenir les progrès réalisés pour bâtir et rénover les installations de traitement de l'eau dans les réserves.
Nous continuons d'être présents, à la fois en proposant notre collaboration aux Premières nations et en fournissant des ressources financières pour fournir aux Premières nations l'infrastructure dont elles ont besoin.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-06 16:54 [p.17844]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, let me just say that I will certainly put the record of this government on delivering results for grassroots first nations people up against the record of 13 years of inaction of the previous Liberal government.
We have worked together. I mentioned that at the beginning of my speech. We worked together today and debated a treaty in committee, working together with three levels of government to deliver results. There is certainly no broken trust there.
We have also been involved in an extensive engagement with first nations on this issue since we formed government. In the summer of 2006, the expert panel held public hearings across Canada. It heard from 110 presenters. In March 2009, there was a series of engagement sessions with more than 700 participants, of which 544 were first nations. In the winter of 2009-10, we met with first nations chiefs to discuss implementation and engagement during the earlier sessions. From October 2010 until October 2011, we held without prejudice discussions with first nations organizations to address their concerns.
This is a collaborative approach. We are going to continue to work with first nations. We know that working with them will deliver results for first nations communities.
Monsieur le Président, permettez-moi de dire que je n'hésiterai pas à comparer les résultats obtenus par le gouvernement conservateur pour la population autochtone aux 13 années d'inaction de l'ancien gouvernement libéral.
Nous avons collaboré. Je l'ai mentionné au début de mon discours. Nous avons travaillé ensemble, discuté d'un traité en comité, travaillé avec trois ordres de gouvernement pour obtenir des résultats. La confiance est loin d'être rompue.
Depuis notre arrivée au pouvoir, nous avons également abondamment consulté les Premières Nations sur cette question. Le groupe d'experts a tenu des audiences publiques au Canada durant l'été 2006. Il a entendu 110 présentations. En mars 2009, il y a eu une série de séances de discussion auxquelles plus de 700 personnes ont participé, dont 544 Autochtones. Pendant l'hiver 2009-2010, nous avons rencontré les chefs des Premières Nations pour discuter du déroulement et de la participation aux précédentes séances de discussion. D'octobre 2010 à octobre 2011, nous avons mené, sous toutes réserves, des discussions avec les Premières Nations pour répondre à leurs préoccupations.
Voilà une approche axée sur la collaboration. Nous continuerons de travailler avec les Premières Nations. Nous savons qu'ainsi, nous obtiendrons des résultats pour leurs collectivités.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-03 20:28 [p.17572]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am sure all Conservative members appreciated that trip down memory lane where we got to learn about the Liberal government.
For 13 long years Canadians had a Liberal government. Then the Liberals went from a majority on that side of the House, down to a minority official opposition, down to the window seats at the end because they lost the trust of Canadians.
The member talked about health care. One of the things the Liberals did was cut $25 billion in health care transfers to the provinces. They downloaded those tax cuts onto the provinces.
Perhaps the member could explain for Canadians how they were so wonderful for the health care system when Canadians rejected that government, rejected its cuts to the program and indeed looked forward to our agenda at the end of this decade where we had $40 billion in health care transfers, the greatest amount ever transferred to the provinces for health care.
Monsieur le Président, je suis certain que tous les conservateurs ont aimé qu'on leur rafraîchisse la mémoire et qu'on leur parle du gouvernement libéral.
Les libéraux ont été au pouvoir pendant 13 longues années. De gouvernement majoritaire, ils sont passés à l'opposition officielle, puis ils se sont approchés des fenêtres tout au bout de la Chambre parce qu'ils ont perdu la confiance des Canadiens.
Le député a parlé de l'assurance-maladie. Or, les libéraux ont justement réduit de 25 milliards de dollars les transferts en santé aux provinces. Ils ont transféré ces réductions d'impôt aux provinces.
Le député pourrait-il expliquer aux Canadiens ce que les libéraux ont fait de si extraordinaire au régime d'assurance-maladie pour que les Canadiens rejettent leur gouvernement, pour qu'ils s'insurgent contre les compressions à ce programme et pour qu'ils attendent avec impatience, à la fin de la décennie, notre plan prévoyant des transferts en santé s'élevant à 40 milliards de dollars, le plus grand montant jamais transféré aux provinces pour les soins de santé.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-03 20:48 [p.17575]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is indeed a pleasure to rise today on Bill C-60, economic action plan 2013 act, no.1.
As we know, Canada's economic action plan is working. Just this past Friday, Statistics Canada announced that the Canadian economy grew by 2.5% in the first quarter of 2013. This represents the strongest quarterly growth in nearly two years. Additionally, Statistics Canada positively revised its economic growth in the fourth quarter of 2012 up from 0.6% to 0.9%. This is the seventh straight quarter of positive growth in Canada, which is another sign that our economy is on the right track. Additionally, of the over 900,000-plus net new jobs created in Canada since the depth of the global recession, over 90% are full-time, and nearly 75% are in the private sector, which represents the best job-growth record in the entire G7.
Bill C-60 includes a number of measures that were in the economic action plan. They include reforms to the temporary foreign worker program that would ensure that Canadians are always given the first crack at available jobs. It would introduce a new temporary first-time donor super credit for first-time claimants of the charitable donations tax credit. We have reaffirmed our government's plan to proceed with the sale of Ridley Terminals in British Columbia. We would formally establish the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development to better align Canada's foreign diplomacy, trade and development efforts. We would improve benefits for Canadian veterans through changes to the war veterans allowance, which would result in over 3,100 veterans being eligible for this allowance for the first time. In addition, an estimated 5,350 veterans and survivors would benefit from the change. We would support high-quality value-added jobs in important sectors of the Canadian economy, such as manufacturing, by providing tax relief for new investments in manufacturing equipment. We would provide better support for job-creating infrastructure in municipalities across Canada by indexing the gas tax fund and would keep taxes low for hard-working Canadian families and job-creating businesses.
I want to expand on a few items I just mentioned as well as some additional items in Bill C-60.
The adoption expense tax credit is a great measure included in Bill C-60. It would better recognize the costs associated with the adoption process.
I am the father of an eight-year-old son, and it is a privilege for my wife and I to raise him. There are many others in this country who have chosen to expand their families through adoption. I think of my own family and friends who have done that. I think of the member for Essex, who has been a national leader on the importance of adoption and the recognition of the expenses families incur when they choose to make that addition. No value can be placed on what a new child brings to each family, but we want to make sure that we recognize the costs earlier in the process. This would be a great measure that would apply to adoptions finalized after 2012.
The first-time donor super credit is something we would bring in to encourage young Canadians, primarily, and those who have not given before to a non-profit organization, to do so.
I think of some of the great local charities in my riding of Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon, such as the Meadow Rose Society, which provides care for single moms in low-income families who do not have the necessities, such as formula and diapers, to provide for their young babies. Some of us may take these for granted, but they represent a significant cost. The Meadow Rose Society is there to help those moms in Chilliwack. This is an example of an organization that people who have not given before may want to use that first-time super credit for. They would get a little extra bang for their buck when they made that donation.
Another opportunity in Chilliwack is the Ruth and Naomi Foundation, which helps the homeless and the at-risk homeless in Chilliwack by providing them with a place to sleep and a warm meal. It is supported by local churches and organizations across the spectrum in Chilliwack. It is another great charity that would benefit from this super credit.
I wanted talk about something else near and dear to the people of Chilliwack. A number of veterans have chosen to make their homes in my community, in large part because CFB Chilliwack was a place people used to come through for their basic training. Unfortunately, CFB Chilliwack was closed during the decade of darkness in the 90s under the Liberal government. However, a number of veterans have returned at the end of their military careers to make Chilliwack home. That is why I was pleased to see that Bill C-60 would include tax relief for Canadian Armed Forces members and police officers deployed on international missions. It would streamline the process for approving tax relief for those members who are deployed on international moderate-risk missions.
There are a number of veterans in my own family. Both my grandfathers served, one in the air force and one in the navy. I have a cousin who returned last year from a tour in Afghanistan, so this is an issue that hits close to home for me. That is why I was pleased that we would be improving veterans' benefits for low-income veterans of both the Second World War and the Korean War as well as their survivors.
We would provide assistance to additional veterans and their survivors. Under the current program, a veteran's total calculated income includes a disability pension provided by Veterans Affairs Canada. That pension is automatically deducted from the amount of benefits available to veterans and survivors under the war veterans allowance. Under the proposed amendments, to better assist those veterans who have served their country, the government would no longer take the disability pension into account when determining eligibility and calculating benefits under the war veterans allowance program.
Improving services for veterans is part of the pattern of our government. In the main budget, we doubled the amount available to the Last Post Fund. We have streamlined the veterans independence program to provide benefits directly to recipients of that program. Also, we have recently invested and promoted the helmets to hard hats program. That is just one more measure we have included in this recent budget.
I was at Hope Secondary School in Hope, B. C. this weekend and spoke to the graduating class there. It is a diverse community. There were a number of first nations graduates at Hope Secondary School. That is why I was pleased to see in the bill that we would provide $5 million to Indspire for post-secondary scholarships and bursaries for first nations and Inuit students. That is something that would be welcome news to the over 30 first nations in my riding and the over 10,000 individuals in my riding who are first nations.
I was speaking with Chief Robert Hope of the Yale First Nation at that graduation. He had two members from his first nation graduating there. I could see the pride he had on seeing those folks walk across the stage to get their diplomas.
Our economic action plan is working. We have had record numbers of jobs since the depths of the recession. We have cut taxes over 150 times, resulting in savings of over $3,000 for the average Canadian family of four. We continue to have the best banking sector in the world. We continue to lead the industrial world in economic growth.
Our economic action plan is working, and that is why I would ask all members of the House to support Bill C-60 so that we can continue to promote an economic plan that is working for Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un plaisir de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi C-60, Loi no 1 sur le Plan d'action économique de 2013.
Comme nous le savons, le Plan d'action économique du Canada fonctionne. Vendredi dernier, Statistique Canada a annoncé que l'économie canadienne avait connu une croissance de 2,5 % au cours du premier trimestre de 2013, ce qui représente la plus forte croissance trimestrielle en près de deux ans. En outre, Statistique Canada a revu à la hausse la croissance économique du pays au quatrième trimestre de 2012, la faisant passer de 0,6 % à 0,9 %. C'est le septième trimestre d'affilée où le Canada connaît une croissance positive, ce qui est un autre signe que notre économie est sur la bonne voie. En outre, plus de 900 000 emplois ont été créés, net, au Canada depuis le creux de la récession mondiale, dont plus de 90 % sont à plein temps et près de 75 % sont dans le secteur privé, ce qui représente le meilleur bilan de tout le G7 au chapitre de la croissance de l'emploi.
Le projet de loi C-60 comprend un certain nombre de mesures prévues dans le Plan d'action économique. Parmi ces mesures, pensons à la réforme du Programme des travailleurs étrangers temporaires, qui fera en sorte que les Canadiens seront les premiers à accéder aux emplois disponibles. Il instaurera un super crédit d'impôt temporaire pour un premier don de bienfaisance, auquel auront droit les particuliers qui demandent pour la première fois le crédit d'impôt pour dons de bienfaisance. Nous avons réaffirmé notre engagement à procéder à la vente de Ridley Terminals en Colombie-Britannique. Nous allons établir officiellement le ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement afin de mieux harmoniser les efforts du Canada en matière de diplomatie étrangère, de commerce et de développement. Nous allons améliorer les prestations aux anciens combattants en modifiant la Loi sur les allocations aux anciens combattants, ce qui aura pour résultat de rendre admissibles pour la première fois plus de 3 100 anciens combattants. En outre, plus de 5 350 anciens combattants et survivants bénéficieront de ces changements. Nous appuierons des emplois de qualité à valeur ajoutée dans des secteurs importants de l'économie canadienne, comme le secteur manufacturier, en offrant des allégements fiscaux pour de nouveaux investissements dans l'équipement de fabrication. Nous fournirons un appui accru pour les projets d'infrastructure porteurs d'emplois dans les municipalités d'un bout à l'autre du pays, en indexant le fonds de la taxe sur l'essence, en plus de maintenir les impôts peu élevés pour les familles canadiennes et les entreprises qui créent des emplois.
Je voudrais en dire plus sur certains points que je viens de mentionner, en plus d'autres éléments du projet de loi C-60.
Le crédit d'impôt pour frais d'adoption est une autre formidable mesure prévue dans le projet de loi C-60. Elle vise à mieux tenir compte des coûts associés au processus d'adoption.
Je suis père d'un garçon de huit ans; c'est un privilège pour moi et ma femme de l'élever. Nombreux sont ceux dans ce pays qui ont choisi d'élargir leur famille au moyen de l'adoption. Je pense à ma propre famille et aux amis qui l'ont fait. Je pense au député d'Essex, véritable chef de file national sur la question de l'adoption et sur la question de la reconnaissance des dépenses que les familles engagent lorsqu'elles choisissent de s'engager dans cette voie. Il est impossible de fixer un prix sur ce qu'un enfant apporte à chaque famille; nous voulons toutefois reconnaître les coûts entraînés au début du processus. Il s'agit d'une excellente mesure qui s'appliquerait aux processus d'adoption finalisés après 2012.
Le super crédit d'impôt pour un premier don de bienfaisance vise surtout à encourager les jeunes Canadiens, et ceux qui ne l'ont jamais fait auparavant, à faire un don à un organisme sans but lucratif.
Je pense à certaines des excellentes oeuvres de charité de ma circonscription, Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon, comme la Meadow Rose Society, qui s'occupe de mères seules à faible revenu qui n'ont même pas le strict nécessaire, comme des préparations lactées et des couches, pour leur nourrisson. Certains d'entre nous tiennent peut-être ces choses pour acquises, mais elles coûtent cher. La Meadow Rose Society est là pour aider ces mamans de Chilliwack. C'est un exemple d'organisme auquel les gens qui n'ont jamais fait de dons pourraient donner pour utiliser ce super crédit pour premier don. Ils en auraient ainsi un peu plus pour leur argent.
Une autre possibilité à Chilliwack est la Ruth and Naomi Foundation, qui aide les itinérants et les itinérants à risque à Chilliwack en leur offrant un lieu où dormir et un repas chaud. Elle est soutenue par les églises locales et divers organismes à Chilliwack. Voilà une autre excellente oeuvre de charité qui bénéficierait du super crédit.
Je voulais parler d'une autre chose qui est chère aux gens de Chilliwak. Plusieurs anciens combattants ont élu domicile dans ma collectivité, en grande partie parce que, à une époque, les gens venaient suivre leur entraînement de base à la base des Forces canadiennes Chilliwack. Malheureusement, la base a fermé dans les années 1990, durant la décennie de grande noirceur, sous le gouvernement libéral. Toutefois, certains anciens combattants reviennent pour s'y installer à la fin de leur carrière militaire. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai été heureux de voir que le projet de loi C-60 prévoyait un allégement fiscal pour les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et les policiers envoyés en mission à l'étranger. Cette mesure simplifierait le processus d'approbation des allégements fiscaux pour les militaires qui sont envoyés en mission à risque modéré à l'étranger.
Il y a plusieurs anciens combattants dans ma famille. Mes deux grands-pères ont servi, un dans l'aviation et l'autre dans la marine. J'ai un cousin qui est rentré d'Afghanistan l'année dernière. C'est donc une question à laquelle je suis très sensible. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai été heureux d'apprendre que nous allions accroître les prestations pour les anciens combattants à faible revenu qui ont servi durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale ou la guerre de Corée et pour leurs survivants.
Nous fournirions de l'aide à un plus grand nombre d'anciens combattants ou à leurs survivants. Dans le programme actuel, le revenu total d'un ancien combattant est calculé en incluant la prestation d'invalidité versée par le ministère des Anciens Combattants. L'argent est automatiquement soustrait de l'allocation versée aux anciens combattants ou à leurs survivants. La modification proposée vise à fournir une aide accrue aux anciens combattants, qui ont servi leur pays, et aurait pour effet de ne plus tenir compte de le prestation d'invalidité pour déterminer l'admissibilité à l'allocation versée aux anciens combattants ni pour en calculer le montant.
L'amélioration des services fournis aux anciens combattants est conforme aux autres mesures appliquées par le gouvernement. Dans le budget principal, nous doublons la somme accordée au Fonds du Souvenir. Nous avons rationalisé le fonctionnement du Programme pour l'autonomie des anciens combattants pour fournir les prestations directement aux bénéficiaires de ce programme. De plus, nous avons récemment investi dans le programme Du régiment aux bâtiments et nous en faisons la promotion. Ce n'est qu'une mesure parmi d'autres du dernier budget.
J'ai pris la parole en fin de semaine dernière devant les finissants de l'école secondaire de Hope, en Colombie-Britannique. C'est un groupe d'élèves diversifié. On y trouve bon nombre de finissants des Premières Nations. C'est pourquoi je me réjouis que le projet de loi prévoie 5 millions de dollars pour Indspire, afin d'offrir des bourses d'études postsecondaires aux étudiants des Premières Nations et aux étudiants inuits. Cet argent devrait être bien accueilli par les 10 000 personnes qui font partie des 30 Premières Nations de ma circonscription.
J'ai parlé au chef Robert Hope, de la Première Nation de Yale, après la cérémonie de fin des études secondaires. Deux membres de sa Première Nation étaient parmi les finissants. J'ai été témoin de la fierté qu'il ressentait en voyant ces élèves monter sur scène pour recevoir leur diplôme.
Notre Plan d'action économique donne de bons résultats. Nous constatons une création record d'emplois depuis le creux de la récession. Nous avons réduit le fardeau fiscal plus de 150 fois, ce qui permet à la famille canadienne moyenne de 4 personnes d'économiser 3 000 $. Nous continuons de jouir du meilleur secteur bancaire au monde. Nous continuons d'être en tête du peloton des pays industrialisés pour ce qui est de la croissance économique.
Notre Plan d'action économique est efficace, et c'est pourquoi j'invite tous les députés à appuyer le projet de loi C-60. Nous pourrons ainsi continuer de favoriser la mise en oeuvre d'une stratégie économique bénéfique pour l'ensemble des Canadiens.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-03 20:58 [p.17577]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is the youngest member in this House, and I am youngest member from British Columbia. This tariff regime we are talking about has not been changed since 1974, and that is four years before I was born and probably 14 years before the hon. member was born.
I think it is time we recognized that those economies the tariffs were designed to help, economies like China and India, have grown up a lot since 1974, as have we. For developing nations, this was a form of foreign aid.
We no longer need to provide those extra breaks to those countries. They are standing quite well on their own two feet. We should be looking to advantage Canadian manufacturers, Canadian businesses, and that is exactly what we would be doing with Bill C-60.
Monsieur le Président, le député est le plus jeune de la Chambre et je suis le plus jeune député de la Colombie-Britannique. Le régime tarifaire dont nous parlons n'a pas été modifié depuis 1974. C'était 4 ans avant ma naissance, et probablement 14 ans avant la sienne.
À mon avis, il est temps de reconnaître que les économies auxquelles les tarifs devaient venir en aide, comme celles de la Chine et de l'Inde, ont, comme nous, bien grandi depuis 1974. Pour des pays en développement, c'était une forme d'aide étrangère.
Nous n'avons plus besoin d'accorder des allégements supplémentaires à ces pays. Ils se débrouillent très bien. Nous devrions plutôt chercher à aider les entreprises et les fabricants canadiens. C'est précisément ce que le projet de loi C-60 permettra de faire.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-03 21:01 [p.17577]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, indeed, I am proud of the steps we have taken for our veterans. It was the right decision to take, and we have committed the almost $800 million that that court case will cost Canadian taxpayers. That is something that has been implemented, and we are proud to bring it forward in this budget.
The question I have for the hon. member is whether he is proud of his government that sent our troops to Afghanistan with green uniforms, into a desert theatre. Is he proud of sending them there with Iltis jeeps? Is he proud of sending them there without the equipment they needed to do the job?
We stand up for our men and women in uniform while they are serving and after they leave the forces, and members can bet I am proud of that.
Monsieur le Président, je suis effectivement fier des mesures que nous mettons en place pour les anciens combattants. C'était une bonne décision. Nous nous sommes engagés à investir la somme que cette affaire judiciaire coûtera aux contribuables canadiens, soit près de 800 millions de dollars. Nous avons fait le nécessaire, et nous sommes fiers de présenter ces mesures dans le budget.
Pour ma part, voici ce que j'aimerais demander au député. Est-il fier que son gouvernement ait envoyé les militaires canadiens en Afghanistan avec des uniformes verts, alors qu'ils allaient dans un milieu désertique? Est-il fier de leur avoir fourni des jeeps Iltis? Est-il fier de les avoir envoyés là-bas sans leur fournir le matériel dont ils avaient besoin pour faire leur travail?
Nous défendons les intérêts des militaires canadiens pendant leur carrière militaire et après. J'en suis très fier; les députés peuvent en être certains.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-06-03 22:11 [p.17587]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the hon. member and I are both from British Columbia. He was lecturing the finance minister earlier about NDP governments. He will remember the nineties when Premier Mike Harcourt resigned in disgrace in British Columbia. Premier Glen Clark resigned in disgrace in British Columbia. In fact, in the election that just occurred in British Columbia, British Columbians were so alarmed at the prospect of another lost decade of another NDP government that Adrian Dix's 22-point lead in the polls evaporated because of the anti-development, anti-jobs, high tax rhetoric that we hear parroted by the member right now.
Why does he think that a message that was so soundly rejected by British Columbians will suddenly now be embraced by Canadians?
Monsieur le Président, comme moi, le député vient de la Colombie-Britannique. Il a fait la leçon au ministre des Finances à propos des gouvernements néo-démocrates. Il se souviendra que, dans les années 1990, les anciens premiers ministres de la Colombie-Britannique, Mike Harcourt et Glen Clark, ont démissionné dans la honte. Par ailleurs, lors des élections qui viennent d'avoir lieu en Colombie-Britannique, les Britanno-Colombiens ont tellement eu peur à l'idée de perdre une autre décennie sous un gouvernement néo-démocrate que l'avance de 22 points que les sondages accordaient à Adrian Dix s'est évaporée à cause du discours répété en ce moment par le député, qui est contre le développement et les emplois, et en faveur des impôts élevés.
Pourquoi croit-il qu'un message rejeté de façon aussi catégorique par les Britanno-Colombiens sera soudainement approuvé par les Canadiens?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-05-23 19:25 [p.16927]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the official opposition House leader, who I think has proved that a member of Parliament should be able to rise and give a 20-minute speech on anything at any time. He certainly did that well. I know his constituents and mine are seized with this issue and are glad that we are debating it here today. I am thankful that there is some time before the nightly playoff hockey will start so people can watch both this debate and that, later on.
I am pleased to speak about the incorporation by reference in regulations act, Bill S-12. The bill deals with the regulatory drafting technique. Essentially, it is about when federal regulators can or cannot use the technique of incorporation by reference. Bill S-12 has been studied by the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs and has been reported without amendment to the House for consideration.
The technique of incorporation by reference is currently used in a wide range of federal regulations. Indeed, it is difficult to think of a regulated area in which incorporation by reference is not used to some degree. Bill S-12 is about securing the government's access to a drafting technique that has already become essential to the way government regulates. It is also about leading the way internationally in the modernization of regulations. More particularly, Bill S-12 responds to concerns expressed by the Joint Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations about when incorporation by reference can be used. Incorporation by reference has already become an essential tool that is widely relied upon to achieve the objectives of the government.
The Senate committee considering the bill has heard that it is also an effective way to achieve many of the current goals of the cabinet directive on regulatory management. For example, regulations that use this technique are effective in facilitating intergovernmental co-operation and harmonization, a key objective of the regulatory co-operation council established by the Prime Minister and President Obama. By incorporating the legislation of other jurisdictions with which harmonization is desired or by incorporating standards developed internationally, regulations can minimize duplication, an important objective of the red tape reduction commission, which issued its report earlier this year. The result of Bill S-12 would be that regulators have the option of using this drafting technique in regulations aimed at achieving these objectives.
Incorporation by reference is also an important tool for the government to help Canada comply with its international obligations. Referencing material that is internationally accepted rather than attempting to reproduce the same rules in the regulations also reduces technical differences that create barriers to trade, something that Canada is required to do under the World Trade Organization's technical barriers to trade agreement.
Incorporation by reference is also an effective way to take advantage of the use of the expertise of standards-writing bodies in Canada. Canada has a national standards system that is recognized all over the world. Incorporation of standards, whether developed in Canada or internationally, allows for the best science and the most accepted approach in areas that affect people on a day-to-day basis to be used in regulations. Indeed, reliance on this expertise is essential to ensuring access to technical knowledge across the country and around the world.
Testimony by witnesses from the Standards Council of Canada before the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs made it clear how extensively Canada already relies on international and national standards. Ensuring that regulators continue to have the ability to use ambulatory incorporation by reference in their regulations means that Canadians can be assured that they are protected by the most up-to-date technology. Incorporation by reference allows for the expertise of the Canadian national standards system and the international standards system to form a meaningful part of the regulatory tool box.
Another important aspect of Bill S-12 is that it allows for the incorporation by reference of rates and indices such as the consumer price index or the Bank of Canada rates, important elements in many regulations. For these reasons and more, ambulatory incorporation by reference is an important instrument available to regulators when they are designing their regulatory initiatives.
However, Bill S-12 also strikes an important balance in respect of what may be incorporated by reference by limiting the types of documents that can be incorporated by the regulation-maker. Also, only the versions of such a document as it exists on a particular day can be incorporated when the document is produced by the regulation-maker only. This is an important safeguard against circumvention of the regulatory process.
Parliament's ability to control the delegation of regulation-making powers continues, as does the oversight of the Standing Joint Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations. We expect the standing joint committee will continue its work in respect of the scrutiny of regulations at the time they were first made, as well as in the future. We expect that the standing joint committee will indeed play an important role in ensuring the use of this technique continues to be exercised in the way that Parliament has authorized.
One of the most important aspects of this bill relates to accessibility. The Minister of Justice recognized this in his opening remarks to the Senate standing committee during its consideration of this bill. Bill S-12 would not only recognize the need to provide a solid legal basis for the use of this regulatory drafting technique, but it would also expressly impose in legislation an obligation on all regulators to ensure that the documents they incorporate are accessible.
While this has always been something that the common law required, this bill clearly enshrines this obligation in legislation. There is no doubt that accessibility should be part of this bill. It is essential that documents that are incorporated by reference be accessible to those who are required to comply with them. This is an important and significant step forward in this legislation. The general approach to accessibility found in Bill S-12 will provide flexibility to regulatory bodies to take whatever steps might be necessary to make sure that the diverse types of material from various sources are in fact accessible.
In general, material that is incorporated by reference is already accessible. As a result, in some cases no further action on the part of the regulation-making authority will be necessary. For example, provincial legislation is already generally accessible. Federal regulations that incorporate provincial legislation will undoubtedly allow the regulator to meet the requirement to ensure that the material is accessible.
Sometimes accessing the document through the standard organization itself will be appropriate. It will be clear that the proposed legislation will ensure the regulated community will have access to the incorporated material with a reasonable effort on their part. It is also important to note that standards organizations, such as the Canadian Standards Association, understand the need to provide access to incorporated standards.
By recognizing the changing landscape of the Internet, this bill creates a meaningful obligation on regulators to ensure accessibility while still allowing for innovation, flexibility and creativity. Bill S-12 is intended to solidify the government's access to a regulatory drafting technique that is essential to modern and responsive regulation. It also recognizes the corresponding obligation that regulators must meet when using this tool.
This bill strikes an important balance that reflects the reality of modern regulation while ensuring the appropriate protections are enshrined in law. No person can suffer a penalty or sanction if the relevant material was not accessible to them.
This proposal will provide express legislative authority for the use of this technique in the future and confirm the validity of existing regulations incorporating documents in a manner that is consistent with that authority.
We have many years of successful experience with the use of ambulatory and static incorporation by reference in legislation at the federal level. This knowledge will be useful in providing guidance in the future. There is also every indication that the use of this technique will be essential to implementing regulatory modernization initiatives here in Canada, in conjunction with our regulatory partners in the United States and around the world.
To conclude, enactment of this legislation is the logical and necessary next step to securing access in a responsible manner to incorporation by reference in regulation. I encourage members to support this legislative proposal and recognize the important step forward that it contains.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à remercier le leader parlementaire de l'opposition officielle; je crois qu'il a démontré qu'un député devrait être capable de donner un discours de 20 minutes en tout temps, et sur n'importe quel sujet. C'est certainement réussi dans son cas. Je sais que ses électeurs et les miens s'intéressent à cette question, et qu'ils sont contents que nous en débattions aujourd'hui. Je suis heureux qu'il reste du temps avant que commencent les matchs éliminatoires de hockey diffusés chaque soir. Ainsi, les gens pourront regarder ce débat avant les matchs.
Je suis heureux de parler du projet de loi S-12, Loi sur l’incorporation par renvoi dans les règlements. Le projet de loi porte sur la technique employée pour rédiger la réglementation. Il s'agit essentiellement de déterminer quand les organismes de réglementation fédéraux peuvent ou ne peuvent pas employer la technique d'incorporation par renvoi. Le projet de loi S-12 a été étudié par le Comité sénatorial permanent des affaires juridiques et constitutionnelles, qui en a fait rapport sans proposition d'amendement, et il est maintenant soumis à l'étude de la Chambre.
La technique de l'incorporation par renvoi est actuellement utilisée dans un vaste éventail de règlements fédéraux. En effet, peu nombreux sont les domaines réglementés où elle n'apparaît pas. Avec ce projet de loi, le gouvernement veut s'assurer qu'il peut avoir recours à cette technique rédactionnelle, qui est devenue essentielle dans la façon dont il réglemente. Il veut également être un chef de file sur le plan international pour ce qui est de la modernisation de la réglementation. Plus précisément, le projet de loi S-12 donne suite aux préoccupations que le Comité mixte permanent d'examen de la réglementation a exprimées sur l'utilisation de cette technique. L'incorporation par renvoi est déjà devenue un outil essentiel largement utilisé pour atteindre les objectifs du gouvernement.
On a dit au comité sénatorial qui a étudié le projet de loi que l'incorporation par renvoi était une façon efficace d'atteindre un grand nombre des objectifs actuels de la Directive du Cabinet sur la gestion de la réglementation. Par exemple, les règlements qui utilisent cette technique favorisent la coopération et l'harmonisation intergouvernementale, un objectif clé du Conseil de coopération en matière de réglementation, établi par notre premier ministre et le président Obama. L'incorporation par renvoi de textes législatifs d'autres administrations aux fins d'harmonisation, ou de normes élaborées à l'échelle internationale, permet de réduire les chevauchements, un important objectif de la Commission sur la réduction de la paperasse, qui a déposé son rapport plus tôt cette année. Le projet de loi S-12 aurait pour effet de donner aux autorités de réglementation la possibilité de recourir à cette technique de rédaction dans les règlements, ce qui les aiderait à atteindre ces objectifs.
L'incorporation par renvoi est aussi un important outil à la disposition du gouvernement afin de permettre au Canada de s'acquitter de ses obligations internationales. L'incorporation de documents internationalement acceptés, plutôt que leur reproduction dans les règlements, permet aussi de réduire les différences techniques qui nuisent au commerce, qui est par ailleurs une obligation du Canada aux termes de l'Accord sur les obstacles techniques au commerce, adopté dans le cadre de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce.
L'incorporation par renvoi est également un moyen efficace de bénéficier du savoir-faire des organismes de normalisation canadiens. Le Canada a un Système national de normes qui est reconnu mondialement. L'incorporation dans la réglementation de normes, élaborées au Canada ou à l'échelle internationale, permet de tenir compte des meilleures données scientifiques et de l'approche la plus acceptée dans les domaines touchant la vie courante. En fait, il est primordial qu'on puisse se fier à cette expertise technique afin de pouvoir avoir accès aux connaissances techniques au Canada et à l'étranger.
Les témoignages des représentants du Conseil canadien des normes devant le Comité sénatorial permanent des affaires juridiques et constitutionnelles ont clairement fait ressortir le fait que les normes nationales et internationales sont très largement utilisées au Canada. En s'assurant que les autorités réglementaires peuvent continuer d'utiliser l'incorporation par renvoi pour réaliser leurs objectifs réglementaires, on contribue ainsi à protéger les Canadiens par l'accès aux technologies les plus récentes. L'incorporation par renvoi permet d'intégrer à la réglementation l'expertise qu'offrent le Système national de normes du Canada et les normes internationales. Cette technique fait partie des choix qui s'offrent aux autorités réglementaires en matière de réglementation.
Un autre aspect important du projet de loi S-12 est le fait qu'il permettra l'incorporation par renvoi de taux et d'indices, comme l'indice des prix à la consommation ou les taux fixés par la Banque du Canada, qui sont des éléments importants de nombreux règlements. Pour toutes ces raisons et bien d'autres encore, l'incorporation par renvoi à caractère dynamique constitue un instrument important dont peuvent se servir les organismes de réglementation lorsqu'ils désignent leurs initiatives réglementaires.
Cependant, le projet de loi S-12 établit également un juste équilibre quant à ce qui peut être incorporé par renvoi en limitant le type de documents pouvant faire l'objet d'un renvoi. De plus, seules les versions d'un document qui existent une journée donnée peuvent être incorporées, et seulement quand le document est produit par l'autorité réglementaire. Il s'agit d'un élément important qui évitera que certains cherchent à contourner le processus réglementaire.
La capacité du Parlement de contrôler la délégation du pouvoir de réglementation est maintenue, de même que la supervision du Comité mixte permanent de l'examen de la réglementation. Nous nous attendons à ce que le comité mixte permanent poursuive son travail en faisant l'examen des règlements au moment où ils sont rédigés, de même que plus tard. En fait, nous comptons sur le comité mixte permanent pour s'assurer que cette technique continue d'être utilisée de la manière autorisée par le Parlement.
L'un des aspects les plus importants du projet de loi concerne l'accessibilité. Le ministre de la Justice l'a reconnu dans son allocution au comité permanent du Sénat qui étudiait ce projet de loi. Non seulement le projet de loi S-12 reconnaîtrait le besoin de fournir un fondement juridique solide pour justifier le recours à cette technique de rédaction des règlements, mais il imposerait aussi expressément dans la loi l'obligation pour tous les organismes de réglementation de s'assurer que les documents incorporés sont accessibles.
Même si cela a toujours été exigé par la common law, ce projet de loi inscrit clairement cette obligation dans la loi. Il n'y a aucun doute que l'accessibilité doit faire partie intégrante de ce projet de loi. Il est essentiel que les documents qui sont incorporés par renvoi soient accessibles à ceux qui sont tenus de s'y conformer. C'est un progrès considérable réalisé par ce projet de loi. L'approche générale en matière d'accessibilité dans le projet de loi S-12 donnera aux organismes de réglementation une certaine latitude leur permettant de prendre toute mesure nécessaire pour s'assurer que les divers documents sont bel et bien accessibles, peu importe leur source.
En général, les documents qui sont incorporés par renvoi sont déjà accessibles. En conséquence, dans certains cas, l'autorité réglementaire n'aura pas de mesures additionnelles à prendre. Par exemple, les lois provinciales sont déjà du domaine public. Les règlements fédéraux incorporant des textes de loi provinciaux permettront indéniablement à l'autorité réglementaire de se conformer à l'exigence de s'assurer que la documentation est accessible.
Parfois, il suffira d'avoir accès au document par l'entremise de l'organisme de normalisation. Il sera clair que la loi proposée fera en sorte que le groupe visé par le règlement aura accès au document incorporé en fournissant un effort raisonnable. Il est également important de signaler que les organisations de normalisation, par exemple l'Association canadienne de normalisation, comprennent le besoin de donner accès aux normes incorporées aux règlements.
Compte tenu de la constante évolution d'Internet, le projet de loi impose aux autorités réglementaires l'obligation réelle de veiller à l'accessibilité, tout en laissant place à l'innovation, à la souplesse et à la créativité. Le projet de loi S-12 vise à renforcer l'accès, par le gouvernement, à une technique de rédaction qui est essentielle pour que la réglementation soit moderne et pour qu'elle puisse être adaptée aux circonstances. Il reconnaît également les obligations connexes que les organismes de réglementation doivent assumer lorsqu'ils utilisent cet outil.
Le projet de loi établit un équilibre important, qui tient compte de la réalité de la réglementation moderne, tout en veillant à ce que les mécanismes de protection appropriés soient inscrits dans la loi. Personne ne pourra se voir infliger une peine ou une sanction s'il lui était impossible d'avoir accès aux documents pertinents.
Le projet de loi établira en toutes lettres le cadre juridique de l'utilisation de cette technique et confirmera la validité des règlements où des documents sont actuellement incorporés par renvoi, si tant est que ce cadre soit respecté.
Depuis de nombreuses années, nous utilisons avec succès l'incorporation par renvoi dynamique et l'incorporation par renvoi statique dans les lois fédérales. Ces connaissances seront utiles pour indiquer la voie à suivre à l'avenir. Tout indique que l'utilisation de cette technique sera essentielle à la mise en oeuvre d'initiatives de modernisation de la réglementation au Canada, en collaboration avec nos partenaires, soit les organismes de réglementation aux États-Unis et ailleurs dans le monde.
En terminant, je dirais que l'adoption de cette mesure législative est la prochaine étape logique et nécessaire pour assurer l'accès, de manière responsable, à l'incorporation par renvoi dans les règlements. J'encourage les députés à appuyer ce projet de loi et à reconnaître le grand pas en avant qu'il nous permettra de réaliser.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-05-23 19:36 [p.16928]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I think I can answer that by saying yes and no.
I do not believe that the term “accessible” in this particular bill refers to accessibility in the traditional common-sense definition of being accessible to someone with a disability. That being said, the government, by using incorporation by reference, is still required to meet all of the obligations it is required to meet normally. Therefore, if there is a requirement, if it is commonplace for the government to produce references on a website that is readable by someone with a visual impairment, then that requirement will carry over to this. However, as far as I know, the accessibility in this legislation refers more to the ability of someone to access it generally and not specifically as it relates to a person with a disability.
Monsieur le Président, je crois pouvoir répondre en disant oui et non.
Je ne crois pas que, dans ce projet de loi en particulier, le terme « accessible » renvoie à l'accessibilité dans le sens courant traditionnel d'accessibilité aux personnes handicapées. Cela dit, lorsque le gouvernement incorporera par renvoi un document à un règlement, il sera toujours tenu de respecter l'ensemble des obligations qu'il est normalement tenu de respecter. Ainsi, s'il y a obligation, s'il est pratique courante pour le gouvernement de produire des références sur un site Web qui soient lisibles par un malvoyant, alors cette obligation s'appliquera également dans ce cas-ci. Toutefois, à ce que je sache, l'accessibilité dont il est question dans le projet de loi renvoie plutôt à la capacité d'une personne d'accéder à celui-ci de manière générale et ne vise pas précisément les personnes handicapées.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-05-23 19:38 [p.16928]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, incorporation by reference does not allow the government to avoid its language obligations. Canada's Constitution requires that acts of Parliament and regulations made under them must be enacted and published in both official languages. It also recognizes that it is constitutionally acceptable to incorporate by reference a document that is not available in an official language if there is a bona fide, legitimate reason to do so.
Documents generated by the government would always be incorporated in both official languages. Therefore, this legislation would not change anything in that regard, and obviously there would be every effort made by the government to have the documents or the reference material available in both official languages. However, in the case where that is not possible, and there is a legitimate reason for it not being possible, this would allow those documents to be referenced as well.
Monsieur le Président, l’incorporation par renvoi ne permet pas au gouvernement de se soustraire à ses obligations linguistiques. La Constitution du Canada exige que les lois du Parlement et les règlements connexes soient promulgués et publiés dans les deux langues officielles. Elle reconnaît aussi qu’il est acceptable, sur le plan constitutionnel, d’incorporer par renvoi un document qui n’est pas disponible dans une des langues officielles s’il existe une raison légitime de le faire.
Les documents produits par le gouvernement seraient toujours incorporés dans les deux langues officielles. Le projet de loi ne modifie rien à cet égard, et évidemment le gouvernement ne négligera aucun effort pour que les documents ou textes incorporés par renvoi soient disponibles dans les deux langues officielles. Toutefois, dans les cas où, pour des raisons légitimes, la chose s’avère impossible, le projet de loi autorise aussi l’incorporation de ces documents par renvoi.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-05-23 19:40 [p.16929]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I certainly appreciate that, and I could not hope to fill the shoes of the hon. member for Okanagan—Coquihalla when he left the scrutiny of regulations committee. I am just trying to pick up the slack where he left it.
I did want to comment on the hon. opposition House leader's comment that there was no fight to get on the scrutiny of regulations committee. I think the member for Hamilton Mountain, the co-chair of that committee from the New Democratic Party, would take great offence at that. She does a great job as well.
Returning to the member's question, using incorporation by reference in regulation would facilitate harmonization and intergovernmental co-operation. It would reduce barriers to trade. It would allow the government to access leading edge technical expertise from national and international standards writing organizations.
The hon. opposition House leader mentioned a case of an updated health regulation in a bill that he brought forward when he was first elected. If that regulation had been incorporated by reference and been updated, it would have automatically updated the legislation and the regulations so there would not have been a need to go through a legislative change at that point. If there had been a medical advance or there was a new warning system for a certain chemical, that would have automatically become law through this sort of process. That is my understanding. There are definite benefits to the health and safety of Canadians and also to the productivity and commercialization prospects for companies across this country.
Monsieur le Président, c’est très juste, et je n’ai pas la prétention de pouvoir remplacer le député d’Okanagan—Coquihalla au Comité d’examen de la réglementation. J’essaie simplement d’assurer sa relève.
Je voulais répondre au commentaire du leader de l’opposition à la Chambre, selon qui on ne se bouscule pas au portillon du Comité d’examen de la réglementation. Je pense que la députée d'Hamilton Mountain, qui est coprésidente de ce comité pour le Nouveau Parti démocratique, en serait certainement offusquée. Elle aussi, elle fait du bon travail.
Pour en revenir à la question du député, le recours à l’incorporation par renvoi dans la réglementation faciliterait l’harmonisation et la coopération intergouvernementale. Il réduirait les obstacles au commerce. Il permettrait au gouvernement de se prévaloir du savoir-faire technique de pointe des organisations de normalisation nationales et internationales.
Le leader de l’opposition à la Chambre a cité un règlement sur la santé qui a été mis à jour grâce à un projet de loi qu’il a présenté peu après son élection. Si ce règlement avait été incorporé par renvoi et mis à jour, il aurait automatiquement été mis à jour aussi dans la loi et dans la réglementation, et la modification législative aurait été inutile. Un progrès médical ou l’adoption d’un système de mise en garde pour un produit chimique donné seraient automatiquement consacrés dans la loi grâce à un tel processus. C’est ce que je crois comprendre. Cette mesure offre des avantages certains en ce qui a trait à la santé et à la sécurité des Canadiens ainsi qu’à la productivité et aux perspectives commerciales des entreprises de tout le pays.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-05-23 19:43 [p.16929]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is going to be the Standing Joint Committee on Scrutiny of Regulations that will continue to monitor when these changes come forward. It is important to know as well, as he mentioned, the ambulatory versus the static or the static versus dynamic. There are certain statutes or laws where certainly having an ambulatory reference would not be appropriate. That is clearly laid out here.
The Standing Joint Committee on Scrutiny of Regulations will continue to monitor these sorts of situations with able staff and members of Parliament. It is a unique committee that operates on consensus with the opposition. The member can take great comfort in the fact that his colleagues, along with the government side, will continue to ensure Canadians are protected through regulations, and we would use the incorporation by reference found in Bill S-12 for the benefit of all Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, le Comité mixte permanent d'examen de la réglementation continuera de suivre les changements au fur et à mesure qu'ils seront faits. Il est important de savoir aussi, comme il l'a mentionné, la différence entre un renvoi dynamique et un renvoi statique. Pour certaines lois, un renvoi dynamique ne serait certainement pas indiqué. Cela a été clairement expliqué ici.
Le Comité mixte permanent d'examen de la réglementation continuera de suivre ce genre de situations avec l'aide d'employés compétents et de députés. C'est un comité unique qui fonctionne de manière consensuelle avec l'opposition. Le député peut être rassuré par le fait que ses collègues, en collaboration avec les députés ministériels, continueront de veiller à ce que les règlements protègent les Canadiens et nous utiliserions l'incorporation par renvoi tel que prévu dans le projet de loi S-12 dans l'intérêt des Canadiens.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-05-02 12:12 [p.16196]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for Edmonton—Leduc for his great speech. I was a little disappointed that he did not get to give a 20-minute speech, because if he had, I know he would have talked about the excellent improvements for veterans that have been made in this budget implementation act.
I know that the hon. member is a strong supporter of veterans in his area. I am hoping he can expand on what this budget and this implementation act would do to improve services, not only in terms of the pension but also in terms of the burial funding that was previously cut. I am hoping that he can expand on that.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député d'Edmonton—Leduc de son excellent discours. J'ai été un peu déçu qu'il n'ait pu faire un discours de 20 minutes, car s'il en avait eu l'occasion, je sais qu'il aurait parlé des améliorations remarquables que ce projet de loi d'exécution du budget prévoit pour les anciens combattants.
Je sais que le député est un ardent défenseur des anciens combattants de sa région. J'aimerais qu'il nous dise de quelle façon ce budget et ce projet de loi d'exécution améliorent les services — non seulement les pensions, mais également le fonds pour les funérailles qui avait été aboli. Je l'invite à nous en dire davantage à ce sujet.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-04-30 11:30 [p.16074]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I listened carefully to the member's speech, and he once again invoked the spectre of Somalia to justify his opposition to this bill. He blamed the chain of command and others for trying to bury that episode, when in fact it was his own government that prematurely shut down the Somalia inquiry and then, as a follow-up, disbanded the Canadian Airborne Regiment. That was a shameful overreaction that irreparably damaged an elite capability of the Canadian Forces. He did not mention that.
He also failed to mention the comments of the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal when questioned by my hon. colleague from Edmonton Centre when this matter was before committee in the last Parliament. The Provost Marshal said:
I think if I were just to take the legislation as written, without the safeguards that are present, I would have a lot more concern, but due to the transparency clauses that exist—the interference complaint process under part IV of the NDA—those types of safeguards certainly make it more robust. It allows me to make sure that there is an avenue of approach, should there be a conflict.
My question for the hon. member is this: why will he not take the word of the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal, who says that this legislation would have the appropriate safeguards to ensure there would be no undue interference in his investigations?
Monsieur le Président, j'ai écouté attentivement le discours du député, qui a une fois de plus invoqué le spectre de la Somalie pour justifier son opposition au projet de loi. Il a jeté le blâme sur la chaîne de commandement et sur d'autres qu'il accuse d'avoir essayé d'étouffer cette affaire, alors qu'en fait, c'est son propre gouvernement qui a mis fin prématurément à l'enquête sur la Somalie pour ensuite démanteler le Régiment aéroporté canadien. Cette réaction exagérée a causé des dommages irréparables en privant les Forces canadiennes d'une ressource d'élite. Le député a omis cela.
Il a aussi omis ce qu'a dit le grand prévôt des Forces canadiennes lorsque mon collègue d'Edmonton-Centre lui a posé des questions à ce sujet devant le comité. Je cite le grand prévôt:
Je pense que si nous prenions simplement le projet de loi tel qu'il est rédigé, sans les mesures de protection qui sont présentes, j'aurais beaucoup plus d'inquiétude, mais à cause des dispositions qui existent sur la transparence — le processus de plainte pour ingérence en vertu de la partie IV de la LDN —, ces mesures de protection rendent la chose beaucoup plus solide. Cela me permet de m'assurer qu'il y a une approche, s'il devait y avoir un conflit.
Voici ma question au député. Pourquoi ne se fie-t-il pas à la parole du grand prévôt des Forces canadiennes, qui dit que ce projet de loi comprendrait des mesures de protection qui empêcheraient toute ingérence indue dans ses enquêtes?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-04-30 11:59 [p.16077]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord for his speech and for the NDP's belated but welcome support for the bill here as well as at committee. I am a member of the national defence committee, and we were certainly grateful to get the NDP's support for our amendments on criminal records for summary trial offences. That was a positive.
I would say that the member's speech was so comprehensive and set out the NDP position so well that I would hope that NDP members would now let the speech of the member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord stand so that we may move on to a vote on this issue. As the member for Edmonton Centre mentioned, there have been 100 speeches on this issue, and we know that they do have an interest in this. Perhaps I could ask the member how much more he believes needs to be put on the table after his excellent and comprehensive speech.
Perhaps the member could also talk about the Liberal Party's new-found interest in this file and the fact that while the Liberals could not be bothered to stay until the end of the committee proceedings on this bill, they have now decided to ramp up their efforts. Maybe he could talk a bit about that, and bout why they did not address the issue during their 13 years in government. Maybe they just needed a little more time.
If the member could address both of those issues, that would be great.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à remercier le député de Chicoutimi—Le Fjord de son allocution. Je tiens en outre à remercier le NPD d'avoir décidé d'appuyer — quoique tardivement — le projet de loi, ici comme au comité. Je fais partie du Comité de la défense nationale, et nous sommes très reconnaissants au NPD d'avoir appuyé les modifications que nous proposons aux dispositions sur les casiers judiciaires imposés à la suite de procès sommaires. C'est très positif.
Selon moi, le discours du député de Chicoutimi—Le Fjord était si complet et résumait si bien la position du NPD que j'aurais envie de demander aux néo-démocrates d'en rester là et de passer immédiatement au vote. Comme le disait le député d'Edmonton-Centre, nous avons déjà entendu une centaine d'interventions, alors nous savons qu'il s'agit d'une question à laquelle s'intéresse le NPD. J'aimerais bien que le député nous dise, selon lui, ce qu'on pourrait bien avoir à ajouter après son excellente — et très complète — allocution.
Le député pourrait peut-être en profiter pour nous dire ce qu'il pense de l'intérêt que le Parti libéral semble soudain porter à ce dossier et du fait que, alors que ses membres n'ont même pas daigné assister jusqu'à la fin aux travaux du comité sur le projet de loi, il se décide enfin à bouger. J'aimerais qu'il nous dise ce qu'il en pense, de ça et du fait que, durant les 13 ans qu'ils ont passé au pouvoir, les libéraux n'ont rien fait pour régler la question. Peut-être qu'ils auraient eu besoin d'encore un peu de temps.
Si le député pouvait répondre à ces deux questions, ce serait génial.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-04-30 12:31 [p.16081]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the hon. members for Windsor West and Beaches—East York for their half-hearted support of the bill, but support nonetheless. We will take it, at this point.
One of the things the member referenced in his speech was the summary trials. Supreme Court of Canada former chief justice Brian Dickson, who examined the summary trial system, stated:
The requirement for military efficiency and discipline entails the need for summary procedures. This suggests that investigation of offences and their disposition should be done quickly and at the unit level.
Former chief justice Lamer also said:
Canada has developed a very sound and fair military justice framework in which Canadians can have trust and confidence.
There certainly have been in-depth examinations of the summary trial process and it has been found to be fair, and found to be constitutional as well.
The member mentioned the undue hardship on a member with post-service consequences of summary trials. However, the reason the members are supporting the bill at third reading is that 95% of convictions at summary trial stage would no longer appear on a criminal record. Would the member not agree that this would be a step in the right direction, and that is the reason they are supporting the bill?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie les députés de Windsor-Ouest et de Beaches—East York de leur appui pour ce projet de loi. C'est peut-être un appui tiède, mais c'est quand même un appui, et nous l'accepterons à ce stade.
Le député a parlé des procès sommaires dans son intervention. L'ancien juge en chef de la Cour suprême du Canada, Brian  Dickson, a examiné le système de procès sommaires, et a affirmé ce qui suit.
Pour obéir aux impératifs de l’efficacité militaire et de la discipline, il faut recourir aux procédures sommaires. Cela laisse supposer que les enquêtes sur des infractions et leur règlement devraient être exécutés rapidement et au niveau de l’unité.
L'ancien juge en chef Lamer a également dit ceci.
Le Canada s’est doté d’un système très solide et équitable de justice militaire dans lequel les Canadiens peuvent avoir confiance.
Il y a certainement eu des examens approfondis de la procédure sommaire, et il a été jugé qu'elle était équitable et constitutionnelle.
Le député a mentionné que les procès sommaires pouvaient causer un préjudice injustifié aux militaires quand ils retournent à la vie civile. Toutefois, les députés appuient le projet de loi à l'étape de la troisième lecture parce que 95 % des condamnations prononcées dans le cadre d'un procès sommaire n'apparaîtront plus dans un casier judiciaire. Le député ne croit-il pas que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction, et n'est-ce pas pour cette raison que ses collègues et lui appuient le projet de loi?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-04-30 13:33 [p.16089]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I listened with amusement to the hon. member's speech.
I did want to ask him why the members of the Liberal Party of Canada did nothing about this during its 13 years in power. How many more years would they have needed in government to bring forward significant reform to Canada's military justice system? Are they just blowing hot air once again here in the chamber?
I know the hon. member was not a member of the government, but he could look behind him to the hon. member for Scarborough—Guildwood and perhaps ask him.
Monsieur le Président, c'était amusant d'écouter le discours du député.
Je voudrais lui demander pourquoi les libéraux n'ont rien fait durant leurs 13 années au pouvoir. Combien d'autres années au pouvoir leur aurait-il fallu pour réformer en profondeur le système de justice militaire du Canada? Se contentent-ils, une fois de plus, de brasser de l'air à la Chambre?
Je sais que le député ne siégeait pas à la Chambre à l'époque, mais il pourrait se tourner vers le député de Scarborough—Guildwood, assis derrière lui, et lui demander.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-04-25 14:06 [p.15910]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I recently met with a number of families in Chilliwack who are concerned by a large marijuana grow operation that has sprung up in their neighbourhood. Shockingly, this massive grow op is considered a legal grow under the medical marijuana access program regulation set up by a previous Liberal government.
Medical marijuana grow ops have grown out of control in my riding of Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon. Families are concerned that their children, their safety and their standard of living are all put at risk when a grow op is located in their community.
Organized crime has infiltrated the program and there is no ability for city officials or firefighters to even know where these so-called legal grows are located.
Fortunately, our government is making significant changes to the program and will make it illegal to grow medical marijuana in neighbourhoods by March 2014.
Unfortunately, the NDP and Liberals have opposed our efforts to get rid of these grow ops. It is time for them to get onboard with our government, keep families safe and get marijuana grow ops out of our neighbourhoods.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai rencontré récemment plusieurs familles à Chilliwack qui s'inquiètent du fait qu'une grande installation de culture de la marijuana a vu le jour dans leur quartier. Étonnamment, cette importante installation est considérée comme légale en vertu du Programme d'accès à la marijuana à des fins médicales établi par le précédent gouvernement libéral.
Les installations de culture de la marijuana à des fins médicales se multiplient à un rythme effréné dans la circonscription de Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon. Les familles craignent que leurs enfants, leur sécurité et leur qualité de vie soient en danger lorsqu'une installation de culture de marijuana s'installe dans leur localité.
Le crime organisé a infiltré le programme, et il est impossible pour les autorités municipales et les pompiers de savoir où sont situées ces installations de culture soi-disant légales.
Heureusement, notre gouvernement est en train d'apporter d'importants changements au programme et rendra illégale la culture, dans les quartiers résidentiels, de marijuana à des fins médicales d'ici mars 2014.
Malheureusement, le NPD et le Parti libéral s'opposent aux efforts que nous déployons en vue d'abolir ces installations de culture. Il est temps qu'ils collaborent avec le gouvernement, afin de que les familles soit en sécurité et que l'on élimine la culture de marijuana dans nos quartiers.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-04-24 15:18 [p.15843]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise and present two different petitions from the people of Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon.
The first calls on the House to condemn atrocities against Falun Gong practitioners.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai le plaisir de présenter deux pétitions provenant de Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon.
La première demande à la Chambre de dénoncer les atrocités commises envers les adeptes du Falun Gong.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-04-24 15:19 [p.15843]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the second petition calls on the House to condemn discrimination against females occurring through sex-selective pregnancy termination.
La seconde, monsieur le Président, exhorte la Chambre à condamner la discrimination exercée contre les femmes lorsqu'on a recours à l'avortement sexo-sélectif.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-03-25 15:02 [p.15154]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, no government has done more to create opportunities for aboriginal Canadians to participate in our economy. This includes expanding the first nations land management regime, which is just one way we are empowering first nations with the tools they need to take greater control over their lands, resources and economic futures. This regime has a proven track record. Jobs, investments and greater self-sufficiency are attained by those first nations who participate.
Can the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development please update the House on today's announcement?
Monsieur le Président, aucun gouvernement dans l'histoire du pays n'en a fait autant que le gouvernement actuel pour inciter les Canadiens autochtones à participer à notre économie. Nous avons notamment étendu le régime de gestion des terres des Premières Nations, ce qui n'est qu'une des mesures que nous prenons pour fournir aux Autochtones les outils dont ils ont besoin pour assumer un contrôle accru sur leurs terres, leurs ressources et leur avenir économique. Ce régime a fait ses preuves. En effet, les Premières Nations qui y participent peuvent bénéficier d'avantages, comme des emplois, des investissements et une plus grande autonomie.
Le ministre des Affaires autochtones et du développement du Nord canadien aurait-il l'obligeance d'informer la Chambre au sujet de l'annonce faite aujourd'hui?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-03-04 13:59 [p.14546]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to highlight the wonderful work of the Chilliwack Hospice Society and its outgoing executive director, Geri McGrath.
Established in 1986, Chilliwack Hospice delivers a number of programs that help meet the physical, social, emotional and spiritual needs of individuals and families during the dying and grieving process.
Like most non-profits, the work of this organization depends on the efforts of dedicated volunteers. In the case of Chilliwack Hospice, they number over 200.
Under Geri's leadership, the hospice has seen a major growth in programs and services. In 2008, it provided palliative care to 30 patients, and by 2012 the number had grown to 568.
Sadly for Chilliwack, Geri has accepted a position with the Vancouver Hospice Society and will be spearheading their efforts to open their new hospice beds. Our loss is Vancouver's gain.
I would like to thank Geri McGrath, her staff and the dedicated volunteers at Chilliwack Hospice for the compassionate care they provide to my constituents in their time of greatest need.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole à la Chambre aujourd'hui pour souligner le travail remarquable que fait la Chilliwack Hospice Society et sa directrice administrative sortante, Geri McGrath.
Fondé en 1986, le Chilliwack Hospice offre des programmes pour répondre aux besoins physiques, sociaux, émotifs et spirituels des personnes en fin de vie et des familles en deuil.
Comme pour la plupart des organismes sans but lucratif, le travail de cet établissement dépend des efforts de bénévoles dévoués. Le Chilliwack Hospice en compte plus de 200.
Sous la direction de Geri, l'éventail de programmes et de services offerts par cet établissement de soins palliatifs s'est considérablement élargi. En 2008, il a prodigué des soins palliatifs à 30 patients et en 2012, à 568 patients.
Malheureusement pour Chilliwack, Geri a accepté un poste à la Vancouver Hospice Society où elle supervisera l'ouverture de son nouvel établissement. Ce qui est une perte pour nous sera un gain pour Vancouver.
J'aimerais remercier Geri McGrath, son personnel et les bénévoles dévoués du Chilliwack Hospice pour les soins qu'ils prodiguent avec compassion à mes concitoyens au moment où ils en ont le plus besoin.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-03-04 15:08 [p.14559]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to present a number of petitions from the people of Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon stating that the House condemn discrimination against females occurring through sex-selective pregnancy termination.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour présenter des pétitions provenant de gens de ma circonscription qui demandent à la Chambre de dénoncer la discrimination exercée contre les femmes lorsqu'on a recours à l'avortement sélectif pour sélectionner le sexe d'un enfant.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-02-25 15:03 [p.14254]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, in a report commissioned by our government, Mr. Emerson confirmed that the Canadian space industry is well positioned to take advantage of emerging opportunities, succeed commercially and contribute to the public good.
Canadians are immensely proud of our space sector and its well known achievements that have contributed to its reputation as a world leader in space technology. Canada has earned this reputation by setting the bar high and aiming for the stars.
Can the Minister of National Defence update the House on the latest developments in the space sector?
Monsieur le Président, dans un rapport commandé par notre gouvernement, M. Emerson nous confirme que l'industrie aérospatiale canadienne est bien placée pour tirer avantage des perspectives nouvelles, pour obtenir de bons résultats commercialement et pour oeuvrer dans l'intérêt général.
Les Canadiens éprouvent une immense fierté à l'égard du secteur canadien de l'aérospatiale, dont les réussites sont bien connues et ont fait de notre pays un chef de file mondial des technologies aérospatiales. Le Canada a mérité cette réputation en se fixant des objectifs ambitieux qui l'ont propulsé dans l'univers des étoiles.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale pourrait-il donner à la Chambre les dernières nouvelles dans le secteur de l'aérospatiale?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-02-05 13:54 [p.13694]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the hon. member for Ajax—Pickering.
As several government members indicated previously, we cannot support the motion, because it simply misrepresents the facts.
The changes we have made to employment insurance are ensuring that Canadians are always better off working than not. That is why it is important to invest in connecting Canadians with available jobs in their local labour markets. The extra-five-weeks pilot project was a temporary measure brought in in 2008 and reintroduced in 2010 through Canada's economic action plan to help EI recipients during the recession. While the opposition continues to fearmonger, the facts simply do not lie. Thanks to our efforts included in Canada's economic action plan, we have seen over 920,000 net new jobs since July 2009.
We are in a period of economic recovery, and we need to help Canadians who want to work connect with those jobs that are available in their areas. Our investments in connecting Canadians with available jobs is about making sure that Canadian workers are better aware of the opportunities available in their local areas and that Canadians always have first crack at jobs in their local communities, before temporary foreign workers do.
Our government is focused on getting Canadians working. We are focused on creating jobs. We are making progress, despite these fragile economic times.
Yet while our government makes improvement after improvement and we continue to see thousands of net new jobs created every month, what do we get from the opposition? We get fearmongering, misrepresentation of the facts and proposals to impose massive new taxes on Canadians. Our government does not accept that as a way to go about fostering continued economic recovery.
To date we have seen the NDP propose over $3.8 billion in annual EI spending. This means that $3.8 billion would be taken from the pockets of hard-working Canadians and small businesses, which would be forced to pay higher premiums. This does not make any sense given the economic times we live in.
Our economic prosperity depends on our ability to meet emerging and growing labour market challenges. It depends on our competitiveness. It depends on our resolve. Foremost among these challenges are skills and labour shortages. According to Statistics Canada, in the fall there were 268,000 job vacancies across the country. Our government is rising to meet this challenge. We have invested heavily in skills and training to ensure that Canadians have the skills and training they need to gain employment in the workplace.
We know that Canadians want to work, but they often face challenges finding work. What are we doing to help unemployed workers find jobs? As announced in economic action plan 2012, our government has been investing to connect unemployed Canadians with available jobs in their local areas that match their skill sets. As part of this initiative, Service Canada is sending job alerts twice a day to Canadians who are receiving employment insurance. These job alerts come from many different sources, including the job bank and private sector providers. As always, employers are required to provide evidence that they have exhausted efforts to hire Canadians before they turn to temporary foreign workers.
The improvements we have made are aimed at ensuring that Canadians receiving EI benefits will always benefit financially from accepting available work. These are common sense changes that also work toward clarifying, not changing, the responsibilities of Canadians who are collecting EI. These changes are about empowering unemployed workers, helping them get back into the workforce, and focusing resources where they are needed most.
We are helping Canadians who want to work get back to work. We are ensuring that all of these changes are grounded in common sense and fairness. It bears repeating that should Canadians who have been making legitimate efforts to find work be unsuccessful, EI will continue to be there for them, as it has always been. We fully recognize that there are Canadians who are having difficulty finding work, particularly in the off-season in parts of the country where much of the economy is based on seasonal industries.
One of the myths the opposition has been spreading is the reference that our EI improvements will result in downloading of costs to the provinces. Nothing could be further from the truth. As we invest in connecting Canadians with jobs, we will actually be helping the provinces, because employed people pay taxes, which in turn helps fund provincial programs.
We will also deliver significant funding to the provinces to invest in the skills training of EI and non-EI recipients to help Canadians get into more stable, higher-paying jobs.
As several members have commented, the changes with respect to a reasonable job search only clarify an existing obligation under the Employment Insurance Act to be actively looking for work.
Personal circumstances will always be taken into consideration. Such circumstances include physical ability, family commitments, transportation options and whether someone would be better off working than not.
EI is an important program in Canada and will continue to be. These improvements have introduced a needed new common sense effort to help Canadians get back to work faster. That is good for Canadians, good for their communities, and most important, good for their families. For these reasons, I urge all members of the House to vote against the motion and to support our efforts to create jobs and get Canadians working.
Monsieur le Président, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député d'Ajax—Pickering.
Comme plusieurs députés du gouvernement l'ont déjà expliqué, nous ne pouvons pas appuyer la motion, car elle déforme les faits.
Les changements que nous avons apportés à l'assurance-emploi visent à ce qu'il soit toujours plus avantageux pour les Canadiens de travailler que d'être en chômage. C'est pourquoi il est important d'investir pour jumeler les Canadiens aux emplois offerts dans leur région. Le projet-pilote accordant cinq semaines supplémentaires n'était qu'une mesure temporaire, qui a été mise en place en 2008 puis à nouveau en 2010 dans le cadre du Plan d'action économique du Canada, pour venir en aide aux prestataires de l'assurance-emploi pendant la récession. L'opposition continue de semer la peur, mais les faits parlent d'eux-mêmes: grâce aux mesures prévues dans le Plan d'action économique du Canada, il s'est créé, net, plus de 920 000 nouveaux emplois depuis juillet 2009.
Nous traversons une période de reprise économique, et nous devons aider les Canadiens qui souhaitent travailler à trouver les emplois offerts dans leur région. Nous faisons des investissements en ce sens, parce que nous voulons que les travailleurs canadiens soient mieux informés des possibilités qui existent dans leur milieu, et qu'ils puissent décrocher les emplois offerts dans leur région avant que les travailleurs étrangers temporaires en aient la chance.
Notre gouvernement est résolu à donner du travail aux Canadiens. Il est déterminé à créer de l'emploi. Et il fait des progrès, malgré un contexte économique fragile.
Alors même que le gouvernement ne cesse d'instaurer des mesures opportunes et que des milliers d'emplois sont créés, net, chaque mois, que fait l'opposition? Elle colporte des propos alarmistes et des faussetés, et elle veut imposer de nouvelles taxes très élevées aux Canadiens. Le gouvernement estime que ce n'est pas ainsi que nous favoriserons la poursuite de la reprise économique.
À ce jour, le NPD a proposé des dépenses annuelles de plus de 3,8 milliards de dollars en ce qui concerne l'assurance-emploi. Ce montant proviendrait des Canadiens et des petites entreprises, qui travaillent fort et qui seraient obligés de verser des cotisations plus élevées. Cela n'a aucun sens dans le contexte économique actuel.
Notre prospérité économique dépend de notre capacité à relever les défis émergents et croissants du marché du travail. Elle dépend aussi de notre compétitivité et de notre détermination. Voici le défi le plus important: la pénurie de compétence et de main-d'oeuvre. Selon Statistique Canada, on comptait 268 000 postes vacants l'automne dernier. Le gouvernement est prêt à relever ce défi. Nous avons effectué des investissements considérables dans le développement des compétences et dans la formation afin que les Canadiens possèdent les compétences et la formation dont ils ont besoin pour trouver un emploi sur le marché du travail.
Nous savons que les Canadiens veulent travailler, mais qu'ils ont souvent de la difficulté à se trouver un emploi. Quelles mesures avons-nous prises pour aider les chômeurs à se trouver un emploi? Comme il l'avait annoncé dans le Plan d'action économique de 2012, le gouvernement investit des sommes afin de jumeler les chômeurs canadiens aux emplois vacants dans leurs régions en fonction de leurs compétences. Dans le cadre de cette initiative, Service Canada envoie, deux fois par jour, des alertes-emplois aux prestataires de l'assurance-emploi. Ces alertes-emploi proviennent de différentes sources, notamment du Guichet emplois et de fournisseurs du secteur privé. Les employeurs doivent, comme d'habitude, prouver qu'ils ont fait tous les efforts possibles pour recruter des Canadiens avant d'avoir recours à des travailleurs étrangers temporaires.
Grâce à ces améliorations, nous souhaitons qu'il soit toujours plus avantageux financièrement pour les Canadiens d'accepter un emploi que d'être prestataire de l'assurance-emploi. Il s'agit de changements judicieux qui visent aussi à préciser, et non à modifier, les responsabilités des Canadiens qui reçoivent des prestations d'assurance-emploi. Ces changements ont pour objet de donner plus de moyens aux chômeurs, de les aider à réintégrer le marché du travail et de diriger les ressources là où on en a le plus besoin.
Nous aidons les Canadiens qui veulent travailler à trouver un emploi. Nous apportons des modifications logiques et justes. Il vaut la peine de répéter que, comme toujours, l'assurance-emploi continuera d'assister les Canadiens qui font un effort raisonnable pour trouver de l'emploi mais qui n'en trouvent pas. Nous reconnaissons tout à fait que certains Canadiens ont de la difficulté à trouver du travail, particulièrement pendant la saison morte dans les régions du pays où l'économie repose en grande partie sur des industries saisonnières.
L'un des mythes propagés par l'opposition est l'idée que les améliorations que nous apportons au régime d'assurance-emploi refileront des coûts aux provinces. Rien ne saurait être plus faux. En investissant dans le jumelage des Canadiens avec les emplois, nous aiderons plutôt les provinces, puisque les personnes salariées paient de l'impôt, lequel contribue à financer les programmes provinciaux.
En outre, nous verserons des fonds considérables aux provinces pour investir dans la formation professionnelle des Canadiens, qu'ils soient prestataires d'assurance-emploi ou non, afin de les aider à décrocher des emplois plus stables et mieux rémunérés.
Comme l'ont dit plusieurs députés, les modifications à l'égard de la recherche d'emploi raisonnable ne font que clarifier l'obligation de chercher activement du travail qui est déjà prévue dans la Loi sur l'assurance-emploi.
Les circonstances personnelles telles que la capacité physique, les engagements familiaux, les options de transport et la question de savoir s'il est plus avantageux pour une personne de travailler que de demeurer sans emploi seront toujours prises en considération.
L'assurance-emploi est un programme important pour le Canada et il continuera de l'être. Ces améliorations sont une démarche logique dont on avait grandement besoin pour aider les Canadiens à trouver du travail rapidement. C'est une bonne chose pour les Canadiens, les communautés et, surtout, les familles. Pour toutes ces raisons, je demande aux députés de la Chambre de voter contre la motion et d'appuyer nos efforts en vue de créer de l'emploi et de faire travailler les Canadiens.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2013-01-29 14:06 [p.13384]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to celebrate the life of a remarkable woman, Dorothy Kostrzewa. Born Dorothy Chung on August 17, 1928, she and her family would survive a devastating fire that destroyed Chilliwack's Chinatown. While others left, her family would stay and Chilliwack is grateful that they did.
In 1971, Dorothy was elected to Chilliwack's city council, making her the first Chinese Canadian woman to hold elected office in Canada. It would be a position she would hold for 31 years. The accolades she received for public service are too numerous to mention, so allow me to provide just a few highlights. Dorothy was awarded the Order of Chilliwack. She was named the woman of the year, millennium woman of the year and one of one hundred Chinese Canadians making a difference in B.C.
While the community mourns the passing of Chilliwack's grand lady, we celebrate her incredible legacy. We are thankful for having had the privilege of knowing her and thank her family for sharing this remarkable woman with us.
Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole à la Chambre aujourd'hui pour faire l'éloge de Dorothy Kostrzewa, une femme remarquable. Née Dorothy Chung, le 17 août 1928, elle et sa famille ont survécu à un incendie dévastateur qui a détruit le quartier chinois de Chilliwack. Tandis que d'autres ont déménagé, sa famille est restée, et les gens de Chilliwack leur en sont bien reconnaissants.
En 1971, Dorothy a été élue membre du conseil municipal de Chilliwack. Elle est ainsi devenue la première canadienne d'origine chinoise à être titulaire d'une charge élective au Canada, charge qu'elle a occupée pendant 31 ans. Son service public lui a valu tant d'accolades qu'il est impossible d'en dresser la liste complète. Je me permettrai d'en souligner seulement quelques-unes. Dorothy a été décorée de l'Ordre de Chilliwack. Elle a été nommée femme de l'année, femme de l'année de l'an 2000 et l'une des 100 Canadiens d'origine chinoise à avoir eu un impact positif en Colombie-Britannique.
Bien que la collectivité pleure la mort de la grande dame de Chilliwack, elle célèbre néanmoins l'incroyable contribution de cette dernière. Nous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir eu le privilège de la connaître et nous remercions sa famille de l'avoir partagée avec nous.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-12-10 11:17 [p.13041]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, as someone who is undecided on the bill at this point, I want to honestly ask the member this. I have heard concerns from people who are worried that merit would not be the first criterion when we are considering these positions, that the first criterion would become competency in either official language. I am hoping she can address that specific issue as it has been relayed to me. Can these two things reconcile? Can we talk about merit and bilingualism separately, or do they have to be brought together in this case?
Monsieur le Président, je suis encore indécis au sujet de ce projet de loi et j'aimerais en toute honnêteté poser la question suivante à la députée. J'ai entendu des gens exprimer la crainte que le premier critère de sélection pour les postes mentionnés dans le projet de loi soit non pas la compétence des candidats, mais plutôt leur capacité à comprendre et à utiliser les deux langues officielles. J'espère que la députée peut répondre à cette préoccupation, dont on m'a fait part. Ces deux éléments sont-ils conciliables? Peut-on parler de compétence et de bilinguisme séparément, ou faut-il considérer ces deux aspects ensemble dans le cas qui nous occupe?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-12-03 16:43 [p.12774]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am proud to be on this side of the House as part of the Conservative team and it is good to be able to talk today on Bill C-45, the jobs and growth act, 2012.
While I am on feet, I did want to salute the Parliamentary Spouses Association, which today held a fundraiser that raised $10,000 for the Tim Horton Children's Foundation. I would like to salute everyone who had a part in that today.
Bill C-45 is an act to implement certain provisions of the budget. It is the jobs and growth act, and our plan is working. We have seen 820,000 net new jobs created since the recession started in July 2009. There are more people working today than before the recession began, and that is because of the prudent leadership of our Prime Minister, Minister of Finance and our strong plan to ensure that our economy remains strong.
We are among the leaders in economic growth in the industrial world and our debt to GDP ratio is among the lowest in the world. Truly, Canada is the envy of the world right now because of our financial position.
We have had some independent accolades. Members do not have to take my word for it, although I would appreciate it if they would. Canada has had the best banking system in the world for five years in a row, according to the World Economic Forum. As my colleague before me mentioned, Forbes magazine has indicated that Canada is the best country in the world in which to set up a business.
However, we know that the economic recovery is fragile. We cannot take it for granted. We have seen sluggish growth the world over, including Europe, and there are concerns about the fiscal cliff in the United States. There is uncertainty everywhere around the world, in Greece, Italy and Spain. In many countries, the economic future does not look bright. We have to be concerned about that as Canadians. Even though we have had a good run of economic growth, we cannot assume that it will continue forever. That is why we need strong leadership and the strong measures included in Bill C-45.
We must remain vigilant if we are to maintain the significant economic advantage that we have built up over the last number of years. That means continuing to promote things like responsible resource development. We need to continue to promote things like our oils sands and our natural resource sector, provided that we do so in a way that is both economically beneficial and environmentally responsible, and that is what we have committed to doing.
We need to continue to maintain a low-tax plan for jobs and growth. I heard a previous questioner indicate that perhaps we should be raising taxes in order to keep our economy strong. However, on the Conservative side of the House, we disagree. We believe that we need our low-tax plan for jobs and growth. Raising taxes would not lead to growth but in fact hinder growth.
We need to continue to promote trade of our Canadian goods and services, not just to our traditional trading partners but also with the developing world. We need to look to countries that need the things we produce and we need to continue to promote our interests in those countries. That is why I am so pleased that the Minister of International Trade is away from Canada a lot because he is working on our behalf to secure new markets for our goods and services. I want to thank him for that. Indeed, we have learned that we cannot afford to rely solely on the United States because it has economic troubles of its own. We cannot have all of our eggs in that basket. Therefore, we need to continue to promote trade.
These are the kinds of things, in my view, that we need to continue to maintain for Canada's economic advantage. However, there are a few specific items in Bill C-45 that I do want to address, such as improvements to the first nations land management system.
My riding is home to 33 first nation bands. Many of them are under the first nations land management regime. Our government is committed to working with first nations to create conditions that will accelerate economic development opportunities.
Giving interested first nations greater control over their reserve lands and resources would bring a brighter and more prosperous future for them. Our government has already taken steps to enable interested first nations to assume greater control of their own land and resources under the First Nations Land Management Act. I am encouraged to see so many first nations in my riding under that regime.
Under the first nations land management framework, first nations can opt out of the 34 land related sections of the Indian Act and establish their own regimes to govern their lands, resources and environment. Thanks to the actions of our government, in January 2012, there were 18 new entrants that came under the framework. Today, there are 56 first nations that are operating and developing their own land codes. We want to expedite the process to allow more first nations to participate.
On March 15, 2012, the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board voiced its concern with the current process. It said:
First nations do not have an ability to move swiftly in developing their lands as a result of the restrictions that arise under the Indian Act and the red tape that comes with them.
The Auditor General has also identified the designation and leasing process to be a cause of unnecessarily lengthy approval times.
Bill C-45 proposes changes to the First Nations Land Management Act that would reduce voting thresholds to a simple majority vote, eliminating the need to hold repeated votes over a one or two-year period. What sometimes happens now is that if a majority of members of a first nation do not choose to cast their ballot, the First Nations Land Management Act requires them to hold a second vote, which takes time and resources and unnecessarily slows the process. One can imagine if we applied the same rule to a municipality that said it were electing a council and that if over 50% of the people did not bother to show up to vote, that process was not good enough. We think that process needs to be changed so there is one vote with a simple majority allowing first nations to control their own lands.
The second change would eliminate the need for an approval by order in council and allow the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development to authorize land designation. This would make the system more efficient and allow first nations more control, thereby reducing approval times for first nations land management by several months. The streamlining of land related approval processes would encourage economic development on first nations land and create jobs, growth and long-term prosperity there as well.
I also want to talk about something that affects small businesses in my riding. The majority of businesses in my riding are certainly small and medium-size enterprises. Just as they are across the country, they are the major engine of job creation in my riding. Budget 2011 contained a hiring credit for small businesses of up to $1,000. It provided relief to small businesses by helping to defray the cost of new hires. Bill C-45 would extend the credit to an employer's increase on its 2012 EI premiums over those paid in 2011. It has the potential to help over 536,000 employers whose total EI premiums were below $10,000 in 2011. This would reduce payroll costs by $205 million and allow small and medium-size enterprises to continue to hire more folks and to keep their costs in check so they can continue to drive our economy forward.
The Canadian Federation of Independent Business said of the credit:
It is a popular measure among all SMEs but is particularly important among growing firms as it helps them strengthen business performance.
I met with some constituents who had concerns about pipelines in my riding. They asked about credits for oil and gas companies and why we were not doing more to promote green energy. I encouraged them to read Bill C-45, which is rationalizing and phasing out over the medium term inefficient fossil fuel subsidies. We are also promoting the use of green technology through the accelerated tax credit program there.
I want to sum up by saying Bill C-45 continues our government's plan for jobs and growth. The plan is working. The plan is having real results for Canadians. I encourage all members of the House to support it.
Monsieur le Président, je suis fier de siéger de ce côté-ci de la Chambre avec l'équipe conservatrice et je suis heureux de pouvoir parler aujourd'hui du projet de loi C-45, Loi de 2012 sur l'emploi et la croissance.
En prenant la parole, je voulais absolument saluer l'Association des conjoints des parlementaires, qui a tenu aujourd'hui une collecte de fonds qui a permis de recueillir 10 000 $ pour la Fondation Tim Horton pour les enfants. J'aimerais saluer toutes les personnes qui ont participé à cette collecte aujourd'hui.
Le projet de loi C-45, Loi sur l'emploi et la croissance, vise à mettre en application certaines dispositions du budget. Notre plan donne des résultats. Nous avons vu la création nette de 820 000 nouveaux emplois depuis le début de la récession, en juillet 2009. Plus de gens travaillent aujourd'hui qu'avant le début de la récession, et c'est grâce au leadership prudent du premier ministre et du ministre des Finances ainsi qu'à notre plan solide pour maintenir la vigueur de l'économie.
Nous sommes en tête de peloton, dans le monde industrialisé, pour la croissance, et le ratio de notre dette par rapport à notre PIB est parmi les plus bas du monde. À vrai dire, le Canada fait l'envie du monde à l'heure actuelle en raison de sa situation financière.
Nous avons reçu des félicitations de la part d'organismes impartiaux. Les députés n'ont pas à me croire sur parole, même si je leur en serais reconnaissant. Le Forum économique mondial a déclaré, pendant cinq années consécutives, que le système bancaire canadien était le plus solide du monde. Et comme mon collègue vient de le mentionner, le magazine Forbes a indiqué que le Canada était le meilleur pays du monde où fonder une entreprise.
Nous savons toutefois que la reprise économique est fragile. Nous ne pouvons pas la considérer comme un fait acquis. La croissance est léthargique dans le monde entier, y compris en Europe, et le précipice budgétaire suscite des inquiétudes aux États-Unis. L'incertitude règne à la grandeur de la planète, notamment en Grèce, en Italie et en Espagne. Dans de nombreux pays, les perspectives économiques n'ont rien de réjouissant. En tant que Canadiens, nous devons en être conscients. Bien que nous ayons connu une bonne période de croissance économique, nous ne pouvons pas supposer qu'elle se poursuivra indéfiniment. C'est pourquoi nous avons besoin d'un leadership énergique et des mesures rigoureuses contenues dans le projet de loi C-45.
Nous devons rester vigilants si nous voulons conserver l'avantage économique considérable que nous avons acquis au cours des dernières années. C'est pourquoi nous devons, entre autres choses, continuer de promouvoir l'exploitation responsable des ressources. Nous devons continuer de promouvoir les sables pétrolifères et le secteur des ressources naturelles, et le faire d'une manière qui soit à la fois favorable à l'économie et responsable sur le plan environnemental, et c'est l'engagement que nous avons pris.
Nous devons conserver de faibles taux d'imposition pour favoriser l'emploi et la croissance. Quelqu'un a demandé tout à l'heure si nous devrions hausser les impôts pour assurer la solidité de notre économie. Mais du côté conservateur, nous ne sommes pas d'accord avec cette stratégie. Nous sommes convaincus que les faibles taux d'imposition que nous préconisons sont essentiels à la création d'emplois et à la croissance. Une hausse d'impôts nuirait à la croissance au lieu de la favoriser.
Nous devons continuer à promouvoir les biens et les services offerts par le Canada, non seulement auprès de nos partenaires commerciaux traditionnels, mais aussi auprès des pays en développement. Nous devons miser sur les pays qui ont besoin de ce que nous produisons, et continuer à promouvoir nos intérêts dans ces pays. Voilà pourquoi je suis très heureux que le ministre du Commerce international soit souvent à l'étranger, car il nous aide à trouver de nouveaux débouchés pour nos produits et nos services, et je l'en remercie. D'ailleurs, nous avons appris que nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de compter uniquement sur les États-Unis, car ce pays a aussi ses propres problèmes économiques. Nous ne pouvons pas mettre tous nos oeufs dans le même panier. Nous devons donc continuer de promouvoir les échanges commerciaux.
À mon avis, c'est le genre de choses que nous devons continuer à faire pour que le Canada maintienne son avantage économique. Cependant, je tiens à parler d'autres mesures du projet de loi C-45, notamment les améliorations au régime de gestion des terres des Premières Nations.
Ma circonscription compte 33 bandes des Premières Nations, dont un grand nombre sont assujetties au régime de gestion des terres des Premières Nations. Le gouvernement est déterminé à travailler avec les Premières Nations pour créer les conditions qui accéléreront le développement économique.
En permettant aux Premières Nations d'exercer un plus grand contrôle sur les terres et les ressources de leurs réserves, on leur assurerait un avenir meilleur et plus prospère. Le gouvernement a déjà pris des mesures pour permettre aux Premières Nations intéressées d'exercer un plus grand contrôle sur leurs propres terres et ressources dans le cadre de la Loi sur la gestion des terres des premières nations. Je trouve encourageant qu'un grand nombre de Premières Nations dans ma circonscription aient adopté ce régime.
Aux termes de l’Accord-cadre relatif à la gestion des terres de Premières Nations, les Premières Nations peuvent se soustraire aux 34 articles de la Loi sur les Indiens ayant trait aux terres pour établir leur propre régime de gestion des terres, des ressources et de l'environnement. Grâce aux mesures prises par le gouvernement, 18 nouveaux participants ont adopté l'accord-cadre en janvier 2012. Aujourd'hui, 56 Premières Nations mettent en oeuvre et élaborent leur propre code foncier. Nous voulons accélérer le processus pour que d'autres Premières Nations puissent participer.
Le 15 mars 2012, le Conseil national de développement économique des Autochtones a fait valoir ses préoccupations à l'égard du processus actuel. Je le cite:
Compte tenu des restrictions et des tracasseries administratives qui [...] découlent [de la Loi sur les Indiens], il devient impossible pour les Premières Nations d'agir assez rapidement pour la mise en valeur de leurs possessions foncières.
En outre, le vérificateur général a déterminé que les formalités liées à la désignation et à la location retardent indûment le processus d'approbation.
Le projet de loi C-45 propose des modifications à la Loi sur la gestion des terres des premières nations en vertu desquelles il suffirait désormais d'obtenir une majorité simple, ce qui éliminerait la nécessité de tenir des scrutins répétés sur une période d'un an ou deux. À l'heure actuelle, si une majorité des membres d'une Première Nation choisissent de ne pas voter, la Loi sur la gestion des terres des premières nations oblige la tenue d'un deuxième scrutin, ce qui prend du temps et des ressources et ralentit inutilement le processus. On peut imaginer ce qui arriverait si cette même règle s'appliquait à une municipalité, invalidant l'élection du conseil municipal lorsque plus de 50 % de la population ne se donne pas la peine d'aller voter. Nous croyons que cette façon de procéder doit être modifiée de manière à ce que l'obtention d'une majorité simple à l'issue d'un seul scrutin permette à une Première Nation de gérer ses propres terres.
La deuxième modification éliminerait la nécessité d'obtenir une autorisation par décret en investissant le ministre des Affaires autochtones et du développement du Nord canadien du pouvoir d'autoriser la désignation des terres. Ainsi, le système serait plus efficace et les Premières Nations auraient plus de contrôle, puisque les délais d'autorisation relatifs à la gestion des terres des Premières Nations seraient réduits de plusieurs mois. La rationalisation des processus d'autorisation liés à la gestion des terres favoriserait le développement économique des Premières Nations ainsi que la création d'emplois, la croissance et la prospérité à long terme sur leurs territoires.
Je tiens aussi à parler d'une question qui touche les petites entreprises de ma circonscription. Chez moi, la majorité des entreprises sont des PME et, comme partout ailleurs au pays, elles sont le principal moteur de la création d'emplois. Le budget de 2011 comprenait un crédit d'au plus 1 000 $ qui visait à aider les petites entreprises à assumer les coûts liés à l'embauche d'un nouvel employé. Le projet de loi C-45 prolonge ce crédit en l'appliquant à l'augmentation des cotisations d'un employeur à l'assurance-emploi en 2012 par rapport aux cotisations versées en 2011. Cette mesure pourrait aider plus de 536 000 employeurs dont les cotisations à l'assurance-emploi n'atteignaient pas 10 000 $ en 2011. Cette mesure réduirait les coûts salariaux de 205 millions de dollars et permettrait aux PME d'embaucher plus de gens, tout en contrôlant leurs coûts, et ainsi de continuer à stimuler l'économie.
La Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante a dit ceci au sujet du crédit:
[Le crédit à l'embauche pour les petites entreprises] est une mesure populaire chez les PME, mais il s’avère particulièrement important pour les entreprises en croissance, car il aide à améliorer leur rendement commercial.
J'ai rencontré quelques électeurs inquiets au sujet des pipelines dans ma circonscription. Ils ont posé des questions au sujet des crédits accordés aux sociétés pétrolières et gazières, et ont demandé pourquoi nous ne faisions pas plus d'efforts pour promouvoir l'énergie verte. Je les ai invités à lire le projet de loi C-45, dans lequel on prévoit la rationalisation et l'élimination à moyen terme des subventions aux combustibles fossiles, qui sont inefficaces. Nous encourageons également l'usage des technologies vertes par le biais d'un programme accéléré de crédit d'impôt.
Je voudrais conclure en disant que le projet de loi C-45 s'inscrit dans la foulée des plans du gouvernement en matière de création d'emplois et de croissance. Le plan fonctionne, et les Canadiens en retirent des résultats concrets. J'invite tous les députés à l'appuyer.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-12-03 16:54 [p.12775]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to address some of the preamble of that question.
Obviously our government has done nothing but increase transfers to provinces for health care. The health care transfer will be $40 billion by the end of this decade, which is an increase in anyone's books. I do not quite understand how the NDP's math could indicate that a 6% increase for the next three years and 3% going forward is a cut.
We believe that the 2012 budget should be passed in 2012. We do not think that is an unreasonable expectation. There have been hours of debate in the House, hundreds of speeches, and 12 different committees studying different aspects of the bill. We want our jobs and growth plan for 2012 to be passed in 2012. We think that is a reasonable expectation.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais revenir sur le préambule de la question.
Le gouvernement n'a jamais réduit les transferts aux provinces au titre de la santé. Ces transferts se chiffreront à 40 milliards de dollars d'ici la fin de la décennie, ce qui constitue une augmentation, quels que soient les paramètres utilisés. Je n'arrive pas vraiment à comprendre les calculs que font les néo-démocrates pour conclure qu'une augmentation de 6 % au cours des trois prochaines années et de 3 % par la suite constitue une réduction.
Nous croyons que le budget de 2012 devrait être adopté en 2012. Ce n'est pas, à notre avis, une attente déraisonnable. Nous avons débattu de la question pendant des heures à la Chambre, entendu des centaines de discours et confié divers aspects du projet de loi à 12 comités distincts. Nous voulons que notre plan pour l'emploi et la croissance de 2012 soit adopté en 2012. C'est, à notre avis, une attente raisonnable.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-12-03 16:57 [p.12776]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, that is great question by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence.
I think that is the main difference between our government and the opposition. We hear them complaining about cuts. The cuts they complain the loudest about are when we cut taxes. When we cut the GST from 7% to 6%, they complained loudly about that. They complained even more loudly when we cut it from 6% to 5%.
We have heard members here in debate calling for an increase in taxes on the Canadians who are doing well, and for increases in taxes on corporations. We are not going to go down that road. No country has ever taxed itself into long-term prosperity. No country has ever taxed itself into creating jobs and growth.
We will continue on our low-tax plan for jobs and growth because it is the right thing to do.
Le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Défense nationale vient de poser une excellente question, monsieur le Président.
Il s'agit, à mon avis, de la plus grande différence entre le gouvernement et l'opposition. Les députés de l'opposition se plaignent des compressions. C'est quand nous voulons réduire les impôts qu'ils se plaignent le plus. Lorsque nous avons fait passer la TPS de 7 % à 6 %, ils s'y sont vivement opposés, et leurs plaintes ont redoublé lorsque nous l'avons fait passer de 6 % à 5 %.
Des députés ont demandé qu'on hausse l'impôt des Canadiens prospères et l'impôt des sociétés. Ce n'est pas du tout notre intention. Aucun pays n'a pu assurer la prospérité à long terme, la création d'emplois et la croissance grâce à une hausse des impôts.
Nous entendons poursuivre la mise en oeuvre de notre plan d'allègement fiscal afin de stimuler la création d'emplois et la croissance; voilà la chose à faire.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-11-26 12:28 [p.12422]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank both the minister and the parliamentary secretary for their roles and participation in this morning's dedication ceremony of the beautiful stained glass window in the outside foyer commemorating the apology for the residential schools and the efforts to reconcile that. It was a great ceremony.
However, I have a question about this legislation. Would the minister describe the extensive consultation process that took place leading specifically to the development of the bill in relation to the Nunavut planning and project assessment act? Would he share that consultation process with us?
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le ministre et le secrétaire parlementaire de leur participation, ce matin, au dévoilement, dans le foyer extérieur, du superbe vitrail commémorant les excuses présentées pour les pensionnats autochtones et les efforts visant la réconciliation. La cérémonie était magnifique.
Cela dit, j'ai une question à propos du projet de loi. Le ministre peut-il nous expliquer le vaste processus de consultation employé expressément pour élaborer le projet de loi sur l'aménagement du territoire et l'évaluation des projets au Nunavut?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-11-26 13:44 [p.12432]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I want to get the comments of the member for Yukon. Previously the member for Western Arctic complained and indicated that he did not see the reason for this bill and he did not know why the status quo was not the preferred option. I am wondering if the member can tell me what are the elements of the Northwest Territories' surface rights board bill that make it better than the status quo and why we should take the lead of the great member for Yukon over the member for Western Arctic, who seems to prefer the status quo.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais connaître l'opinion du député de Yukon. Plus tôt, le député de Western Arctic s'est plaint et il a dit ne pas comprendre la raison d'être de ce projet de loi et pourquoi nous n'avions pas privilégié le statu quo. Je me demande si le député de Yukon peut me dire quels éléments du projet de loi sur l'Office des droits de surface des Territoires du Nord-Ouest justifient le changement plutôt que le statu quo et pourquoi nous devrions nous fier à son jugement plutôt qu'à celui du député de Western Arctic, qui semble privilégier cette dernière option.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-11-22 15:05 [p.12355]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, our government has consistently been there to provide leadership and support to the provinces and territories to help them with their health care priorities. We are providing the provinces and territories record amounts of support by increasing the size of the Canada health transfer by nearly 35% since we formed government. Unfortunately, some members of the NDP have had difficulty understanding what an increase in the amount of money in transfers to the provinces means.
Could the minister please update this House on what our government is doing to help support the Canadian health care system?
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement a toujours été là pour orienter les provinces et les territoires et les aider à financer leurs priorités en matière de santé. Nous versons aux provinces et aux territoires des sommes sans précédent. Nous avons augmenté de près de 35 % le transfert canadien en matière de santé depuis que nous avons formé le gouvernement. Malheureusement, certains députés néo-démocrates ont de la difficulté à comprendre ce que représente l'augmentation des transferts aux provinces.
La ministre pourrait-elle informer la Chambre de ce que le gouvernement fait pour soutenir le système de santé canadien?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-10-29 14:01 [p.11582]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon is about 1,500 kilometres from Fort McMurray, but the oil sands and natural gas exploration in northern B.C. and Alberta play a major role in our economy. At Britco Structures in the town of Agassiz, 200 workers build mobile housing units for use in the oil patch. At TYCROP in Rosedale, 300 workers produce specialized natural gas equipment. Countless others make the commute to work directly in the oil patch.
The NDP leader says that the oil sands are hurting manufacturing. In my riding, the oil sands are driving our manufacturing industry, putting millions of dollars back into our local economy and providing high-paying, family-supporting jobs.
Instead of trying to divide Canadians and score cheap political points by stirring up fear, I invite the New Democrats to look at the facts, work with our government to promote responsible resource development and support our continued efforts to ensure we protect the environment while growing our economy.
Monsieur le Président, Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon se trouve à 1 500 kilomètres environ de Fort McMurray, mais la prospection de gisements de sables pétrolifères et de gaz naturel dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique et de l'Alberta joue un rôle de premier plan pour notre économie. Dans l'usine de Britco Structures, à Agassiz, 200 travailleurs construisent des maisons mobiles pour les champs de pétrole. Dans les installations de Tycrop, à Rosedale, 300 autres fabriquent du matériel spécialisé pour l'exploitation du gaz naturel. Et n'oublions pas les innombrables personnes qui vont travailler directement dans les champs de pétrole.
Selon le chef du NPD, les sables pétrolifères nuisent à l'industrie secondaire. Or, dans ma circonscription, ce sont les sables pétrolifères qui propulsent notre secteur de la fabrication, réinjectant des millions de dollars dans notre économie locale et fournissant des emplois bien rémunérés qui permettent de subvenir aux besoins d'une famille.
Au lieu de chercher à semer la discorde entre les Canadiens et de donner dans la politicaillerie en alimentant les craintes, les néo-démocrates devraient constater les faits, collaborer avec notre gouvernement à favoriser l'exploitation responsable des ressources et soutenir nos efforts constants afin de protéger l'environnement tout en stimulant l'économie.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-10-22 15:52 [p.11300]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, Bill C-15 provides a statutory articulation of the objectives, purpose and principles of sentencing in the military justice system. This would provide military judges presiding over courts martial, presiding officers at summary trials and appellant judges in the Court Martial Appeal Court and the Supreme Court of Canada with parliamentary guidance similar to that which is provided to their civilian counterparts, while recognizing the unique characteristics and requirements of the military justice system.
Does the hon. member agree that providing statutory articulation of the objectives, purpose and principles of sentencing to these important actors in the military justice system is something that should be supported by all members of the House?
Monsieur le Président, le projet de loi C-15 prévoit une définition légale des objectifs et des principes de la détermination de la peine dans le système de justice militaire. Il donnerait aux juges militaires présidant les procès en cour martiale, aux officiers présidents des procès sommaires et aux juges de la Cour d'appel de la cour martiale et de la Cour suprême du Canada des directives parlementaires similaires à celles qui sont fournies à leurs homologues civils tout en reconnaissant les caractéristiques et les exigences uniques du système de justice militaire.
Le député convient-il que fournir une définition légale des objectifs et des principes de la détermination de la peine à ces acteurs importants du système de justice militaire est une mesure qui devrait être appuyée par tous les députés?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-09-19 15:30 [p.10152]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to present a petition on behalf of my constituents in Chilliwack calling upon the Parliament of Canada to amend section 223 of our Criminal Code in such a way as to reflect 21st century medical evidence.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai le plaisir de présenter au nom des électeurs de Chilliwack une pétition visant à demander au Parlement du Canada de modifier l'article 223 du Code criminel de manière à ce qu'il tienne compte des connaissances médicales du XXIe siècle.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-06-20 14:17 [p.9872]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, our government understands that opening new markets and creating new business opportunities leads to jobs, growth and long-term prosperity for all Canadians. That is why we are committed to deepening Canada's trading relationships with the dynamic and fast-growing economies of the Asia-Pacific.
The nine current members of the trans-Pacific partnership represent a market of 510 million people and a GDP of nearly $18 trillion. Yesterday, Canada welcomed the support of all TPP members for our participation in the negotiations toward an agreement that would enhance trade in the Asia-Pacific region and would provide greater economic opportunity for all Canadians. Once again, our government is delivering on our pro-trade plan. The Canadian Federation of Agriculture applauded the news, saying, “The TPP represents significant market opportunities for Canadian farmers and a strong boost to the Canadian economy”.
Our government looks forward to helping develop a 21st century agreement as a full and ambitious partner at the table.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement sait que l'ouverture de nouveaux marchés et la création de nouveaux débouchés pour les entreprises mènent à la création d'emplois, à la croissance et à la prospérité à long terme pour tous les Canadiens. Voilà pourquoi nous sommes déterminés à renforcer les relations commerciales du Canada avec les marchés dynamiques et en forte croissance de l'Asie-Pacifique.
À l'heure actuelle, les neuf pays membres du partenariat transpacifique représentent un marché de 510 millions de personnes et un PIB de près de 18 billions de dollars. Hier, le Canada s'est réjoui de l'appui de tous les membres du partenariat transpacifique à sa participation aux négociations d'un accord qui accroîtrait les échanges commerciaux avec les pays d'Asie-Pacifique et élargirait les débouchés économiques pour la population canadienne. Encore une fois, le gouvernement respecte son plan de promotion du commerce. La Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture a applaudi la nouvelle en indiquant: « Le partenariat transpacifique offre d'importants débouchés pour les produits agricoles canadiens et donne une solide impulsion à l'économie canadienne. »
Le gouvernement a bien l'intention de participer à l'élaboration d'un accord du XXIe siècle en tant que partenaire à part entière et ambitieux.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
Mr. Speaker, during the vote it was noted that the member for York West was taking some photographs of members on this side of the House. I would ask that she confirm that she has deleted those photos.
Monsieur le Président, pendant le vote, la députée de York-Ouest a pris des photos de députés de ce côté-ci de la Chambre. J'aimerais qu'elle confirme qu'elle a effacé ces photos.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-06-11 21:54 [p.9207]
Expand
Madam Speaker, I was pleased to have the Parliamentary Secretary in my riding, along with the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, to hear from the municipalities of Chilliwack, Hope, Kent and Harrison Hot Springs. While we were there we discussed how some of those municipalities were spending more money on environmental consulting than on the works on their drainage ditches to keep the roads open and the fields dry.
The one story I recall was in the city of Chilliwack, where DFO allowed the city to clean one half of a ditch, but it was not allowed to clean the other half. Could she talk about how ridiculous some of these policies are and how this budget will clean some of that up?
Madame la Présidente, j'ai eu le plaisir d'accueillir dans ma circonscription la secrétaire parlementaire de même que le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Pêches et des Océans, qui ont eu l'occasion d'entendre le point de vue des municipalités de Chilliwack, Hope, Kent et Harrison Hot Springs. Nous avons notamment discuté du fait que certaines de ces localités consacrent davantage d'argent aux consultations environnementales qu'à l'entretien des fossés de drainage grâce auxquels les routes demeurent carrossables et qui évitent que les champs soient détrempés.
L'histoire qui m'a marqué, c'est celle où Pêches et Océans a permis à la municipalité de Chilliwack de nettoyer la moitié d'un fossé, mais pas l'autre. La secrétaire parlementaire pourrait-elle nous dire à quel point certaines de ces politiques sont ridicules et comment le budget permettra de corriger une partie de ces aberrations.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-09 23:09 [p.7832]
Expand
Mr. Chair, I am grateful for this opportunity to address the committee of the whole and to add my voice to those who have already expressed their support for the men and women of the Canadian Forces. It is good to be here with my colleagues, the Minister of National Defence and the Associate Minister of National Defence, as well as General Natynczyk. Perhaps the greatest honour in my young political career came when I joined the general in Esquimalt to welcome home the HMCS Vancouver and her crew from their deployment in Libya. I thank the general for being there for that.
As we know, the primary responsibility of the Canadian Forces is to protect and defend Canada. This is a vast country, covering 10 million square kilometres and bordered by over 200,000 kilometres of coastline. These numbers are staggering, and it is awe-inspiring to think that roughly 40% of the land mass and 75% of the coastline is contained in our rugged Arctic.
This region has an important historical and symbolic significance to the cultural makeup of our country. As we know, with each passing year more and more northern Canadians are affected, one way or another, by their changing environment. As waterways are becoming increasingly navigable, traffic into and through their region is on the increase. The potential for new transportation and trade routes is becoming a reality, just as the desire, from both inside and outside of Canada, to access the vast resources found in the Arctic increases.
Obviously this is a time of tremendous and, some would say, unequalled opportunity. Mindful of that opportunity, in 2009 our government released its northern strategy on behalf of all Canadians, from the north and the south, to ensure that together we could carefully monitor and protect our Arctic environment, promote and support both economic and social development in the north, improve and devolve governance so that more decision-making is in the hands of northerners and continue exercising Canada's sovereignty in the north so that we can deliver on these goals.
To achieve this vision, our government is working through provincial, territorial and local governance structures. Our government is working with northern Canadians so that they can achieve sustainable improvements to their economic, environmental and social well-being over the long term and exercise the same kind of control over their own future as Canadians do in any other part of the country.
The National Defence team plays a valuable supporting role in the north, collaborating seamlessly with northern communities and with other government departments such as Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, the Department of Public Safety and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and learning from northern residents about how to work and survive in this beautiful and often forbidding part of our country. They have tapped into this fountain of knowledge and experience through the Canadian Rangers program. The Rangers, made up of over 4,000 Canadians of mostly Inuit, first nations and Métis descent, give the Canadian Forces an important and permanent presence in the north. They exercise our sovereignty by reporting unusual activities, collecting local data in support of the Canadian Forces and patrolling our country's Arctic.
Just last month, they and a number of their military colleagues wrapped up Operation Nunalivut, which saw them conduct sovereignty patrols over thousands of kilometres in some of the most remote and inhospitable land on earth. The Rangers also play a valuable role in mentoring and educating troops from the south about how to manage, respect and, ultimately, care for the north. Clearly, they are crucial to Canada's Arctic. This is why our government has taken steps to give them new equipment—including new GPS units, radios, binoculars and survival equipment—to help them better perform their important role. It is why we are committed to expanding the Canadian Ranger program to over 5,000 members, a target our government has made great progress on in the last five years and one that it is now close to meeting.
We are also looking beyond our borders for partners, because we have learned that partnership is not only a way of life in the north, it is the key to success. That is why we recently worked through the Arctic Council to establish a legally binding Arctic search and rescue agreement, something the Canadian Forces continue to lead on, including through a multinational tabletop exercise hosted by Canada last fall. It is why the Chief of the Defence Staff recently hosted a meeting of his counterparts from other northern countries to discuss issues of common interest, particularly support to civilian authorities, and it is why we regularly invite our Arctic neighbours to participate in some of our military training in the region, most notably Operation Nanook, our largest annual Arctic exercise.
This exercise showcases our sovereignty as the Canadian Forces brings together local, territorial and federal stakeholders and it highlights the need for co-operation in a place where no one can hope to succeed alone.
This fact was tragically reinforced during last year's Operation Nanook when First Air flight 6560 crashed near Resolute Bay and the Canadian Forces, working with civilian authorities and other partners, were able to rescue the three survivors and quickly get them to the hospital.
Initiatives like Operation Nanook allow lead departments and the Canadian Forces to combine traditional indigenous knowledge and know-how on the ground with more modern capabilities like aerial patrols conducted by the Royal Canadian Air Force, maritime patrols in partnership with the Canadian Coast Guard and even space-based satellite systems to provide detailed surveillance and monitoring of the north on behalf of the Government of Canada.
Our government recognizes what advanced equipment and facilities can make possible in the north. That is why it is carrying through on measures to increase the Canadian Forces' capabilities and infrastructure in the region.
Six to eight Arctic offshore patrol ships, the first of which we can expect to take to water later in this decade, will provide an important presence in the area as ice-bound passages become navigable. We are also continuing the development of a berthing and refuelling facility in Nanisivik and of an Arctic training centre in Resolute, which will reinforce our presence in the area and, just as important, serve as a place where our men and women in uniform can learn to operate effectively in the north, availing themselves of both the wisdom of the Rangers and of modern technology and approaches.
The Arctic lies at the heart of our identity as Canadians. For decades, its remoteness and severe weather kept it immune from much of the change and many of the dangers affecting the rest of Canada and the world. An increased interest in the Canadian Arctic has brought with it real challenges to this precious part of our country and its inhabitants. The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces play an important and even vital role in Canada's Arctic. Canada's armed forces have developed knowledge, partnerships and capabilities that make it especially suited for work in Canada's north. This government is committed to building on these so the Canadian Forces continues to be a valuable contributor to our Arctic security.
I have a question for the associate minister. Our Conservative government made a commitment to rebuild the fleets of the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard and, as a result, launched the national ship procurement strategy for which our government was widely commended. While much of the focus has been on the shipbuilding contract award process, what has not been as clear is the impact this will have on the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Forces as a whole. Could the associate minister explain the benefits that this will have for our Canadian Forces?
Monsieur le président, je suis heureux de pouvoir m'adresser au comité plénier et de m’associer à ceux qui ont déjà manifesté leur appui aux hommes et aux femmes des Forces canadiennes. Il est bon d'être en compagnie de mes collègues, le ministre de la Défense nationale et le ministre associé de la Défense nationale, ainsi que le général Natynczyk. J'ai probablement vécu le plus grand moment de gloire de ma jeune carrière quand j'ai rejoint le général à Esquimalt pour accueillir le NCSM Vancouver et son équipage qui revenait de Libye. Je remercie le général de m'avoir invité à cette occasion.
Nous ne sommes pas sans savoir que les Forces canadiennes ont comme principale responsabilité d’assurer la protection et la défense du Canada. Notre pays est vaste, avec une superficie de 10 millions de kilomètres carrés et des côtes qui s’étendent sur plus de 200 000 kilomètres. Ce sont des chiffres stupéfiants, et il est impressionnant de penser que cette région sauvage qu’est l’Arctique canadien englobe environ 40 p. 100 de la masse territoriale et 75 p. 100 de ces côtes.
Cette région revêt une grande importance historique et symbolique dans la composition du patrimoine culturel du pays. Comme nous le savons, d’année en année, les Canadiens du Nord subissent de plus en plus -- d’une manière ou d’une autre -- les changements qui se manifestent dans leur environnement. Comme les voies maritimes sont de plus en plus ouvertes à la navigation, on assiste à une augmentation de la circulation vers cette région et à l’intérieur de celle-ci. Les possibilités de construire de nouvelles voies de transport et de commerce se concrétisent, à mesure que s’accroît le désir d’accéder aux vastes ressources de l’Arctique tant ici qu'à l'étranger.
Il apparaît évident que nous entreprenons une ère offrant d’énormes possibilités, que certains qualifieraient même d’inégalées. Conscient de cette situation, le gouvernement a publié en 2009 sa Stratégie pour le Nord au nom de tous les Canadiens -- tant ceux du Nord que ceux du Sud -- de sorte qu’ensemble, nous puissions surveiller attentivement l'Arctique et le protéger, favoriser le développement économique et social dans le Nord, améliorer et décentraliser la gouvernance afin que les décisions soient plus souvent prises par les habitants du Nord et continuer à assurer la souveraineté du Canada dans le Nord afin d'atteindre ces objectifs.
Pour mettre en oeuvre cette vision, le gouvernement s’appuie sur les structures de gouvernance provinciales, territoriales et locales. Il travaille de concert avec les Canadiens du Nord, de sorte qu’ils puissent améliorer de façon durable leur économie, leur environnement et le bien-être de leur collectivité et qu’ils puissent contrôler eux-mêmes leur avenir, comme le font les autres Canadiens, ailleurs au pays.
L'équipe de la Défense nationale joue un important rôle de soutien dans le Nord, en collaborant étroitement avec les collectivités du Nord et d'autres ministères comme Affaires autochtones et Développement du Nord Canada, le ministère de la Sécurité publique et le ministère des Pêches et des Océans et en apprenant auprès des gens du Nord comment travailler et survivre dans cette région magnifique mais souvent inhospitalière de notre pays. Cette équipe a eu accès à une vaste source de connaissances et d'expérience grâce au programme des Rangers canadiens. Les Rangers, qui comptent plus de 4 000 Canadiens qui sont pour la plupart des Inuits, de membres des Premières nations et des Métis, assurent aux Forces canadiennes une présence importante et permanente dans le Nord. Ces gens affirment la souveraineté du Canada en signalant les activités inhabituelles, en recueillant des données sur place à l'appui des Forces canadiennes et en patrouillant l'Arctique canadien.
Le mois dernier, les Rangers ainsi qu'un certain nombre de leurs collègues militaires ont achevé l'opération Nunalivut, dans le cadre de laquelle ils ont effectué des patrouilles de souveraineté, parcourant des milliers de kilomètres dans les régions les plus éloignées et les inhospitalières de la planète. Les Rangers jouent en outre un grand rôle lorsqu’il s’agit d’encadrer et de former les militaires du Sud. Ils leur apprennent en effet à bien gérer, à respecter et à aimer le Nord. De toute évidence, la présence des Rangers est essentielle dans l'Arctique canadien. C’est pourquoi le gouvernement a pris des dispositions en vue de leur fournir de nouveaux équipements, notamment de nouveaux appareils du système mondial de localisation GPS, des radios, des jumelles, ainsi que du matériel de survie, afin de leur permettre de mieux s’acquitter de leur rôle important. C'est pour cette raison que le gouvernement leur a fourni du nouveau matériel, qu'il s'agisse de nouveaux systèmes de localisation GPS, de radios, de jumelles ou d'équipement de survie, afin de les aider à mieux jouer ce rôle important. C'est aussi pourquoi nous sommes résolus à accroître l’ampleur du programme des Rangers canadiens afin d’accueillir plus de 5 000 participants. Le gouvernement a fait de réels progrès vers la réalisation de cet objectif au cours des cinq dernières années et il est tout près de l’atteindre.
Nous cherchons aussi des partenaires au-delà de nos frontières, car nous avons appris que les partenariats ne font pas seulement partie du mode de vie dans le Nord, mais qu'ils sont la clé du succès. Voilà pourquoi nous avons dernièrement travaillé à l’établissement, par l’entremise du Conseil de l’Arctique, d’un accord contraignant en matière de recherche et de sauvetage dans l’Arctique, un domaine dans lequel les Forces canadiennes demeurent d'ailleurs un chef de file, notamment dans le cadre d'un exercice multinational organisé par le Canada l'automne dernier. C'est pourquoi le chef d'état-major de la Défense a récemment organisé une rencontre avec ses homologues des autres pays nordiques afin de discuter de questions d'intérêt commun, plus particulièrement le soutien aux autorités civiles, et que nous invitons régulièrement nos voisins de l'Arctique à participer à certains exercices militaires que nous menons dans la région. C'est le cas particulièrement lors de la tenue de l’opération Nanook, le plus gros exercice annuel que nous organisons dans l’Arctique.
Cet exercice met en valeur la souveraineté canadienne, puisque les Forces canadiennes rassemblent des intervenants locaux, territoriaux et fédéraux. Il démontre aussi la nécessité de faire preuve de coopération dans un endroit où l’on ne peut espérer réussir sans aide.
Nous en avons eu un exemple tragique l'an dernier, pendant l'opération Nanook, quand le vol 6560 de First Air s'est écrasé près de Resolute Bay. Les Forces canadiennes, travaillant de concert avec les autorités civiles et d'autres partenaires, ont alors pu porter secours à trois survivants et les transporter rapidement à l'hôpital.
C'est grâce à des initiatives telles qu'opération Nanook que les ministères responsables et les Forces canadiennes peuvent combiner les connaissances et le savoir-faire traditionnel des Autochtones sur le terrain avec des capacités plus modernes comme les patrouilles aériennes menées par l'Aviation royale canadienne, les patrouilles maritimes exécutées en partenariat avec la Garde côtière et même les systèmes de satellites spatiaux pour assurer une étroite surveillance du Nord pour le compte du gouvernement du Canada.
Le gouvernement est conscient que l'équipement et les installations de pointe peuvent offrir beaucoup de possibilités dans le Nord. C'est pourquoi il met en place des mesures qui visent à renforcer les capacités et l'infrastructure des Forces canadiennes dans cette région.
De six à huit navires de patrouille extracôtiers pour l'Arctique, dont le premier devrait être mis à l'eau d'ici 2020, assureront une importante présence quand les passages autrefois bloqués par les glaces seront ouverts à la navigation. Nous poursuivons aussi la construction d'une installation d’accostage et de ravitaillement en carburant à Nanisivik et d'un centre d'entraînement à Resolute. Ces installations renforceront notre présence dans la région. Elles offriront aussi un autre avantage important, puisqu'elles permettront aux militaires canadiens d'apprendre à mener efficacement des opérations dans le Nord en tirant profit à la fois de la sagesse des Rangers et de la technologie et des méthodes modernes.
L’Arctique est au cœur de notre identité en tant que Canadiens. Pendant des décennies, son éloignement et son climat extrême l’ont préservé du changement et des nombreux dangers qui pesaient sur le reste du Canada et le monde. L'intérêt accru dans l'Arctique canadien a entraîné de réels problèmes pour cette précieuse partie de notre pays et ses habitants. Le ministère de la Défense et les Forces canadiennes jouent un rôle important et même vital pour l'Arctique canadien. Les Forces armées canadiennes ont acquis les connaissances et les capacités nécessaires, et établi des partenariats qui font qu’elles sont très bien équipées pour travailler dans le Nord canadien. Le gouvernement est résolu à poursuivre sur cette lancée de sorte que les Forces canadiennes puissent continuer de contribuer efficacement à la sécurité de l’Arctique canadien.
Je souhaite poser une question au ministre associé. Le gouvernement conservateur s'est engagé à renouveler les flottes de la Marine royale canadienne et de la Garde côtière canadienne et il a donc annoncé la mise en oeuvre de la Stratégie nationale d'approvisionnement en matière de construction navale, pour laquelle le gouvernement a été largement salué. On a grandement mis l'accent sur le processus d'octroi des contrats de construction de navires, et l'incidence que cette initiative aura sur la Marine royale du Canada et les Forces canadiennes dans leur ensemble n'a pas été aussi bien expliquée. Le ministre associé pourrait-il expliquer les avantages de cette stratégie pour les Forces canadiennes?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-09 23:20 [p.7833]
Expand
Mr. Chair, this question is for the Minister of National Defence.
The brave men and women of the Canadian Forces have demonstrated leadership on a global scale and have taken on a leadership role in a multitude of missions across the world.
Maritime security offers another opportunity for Canada to continue to play a leadership role with our allies. Maritime security is an ongoing concern for not only Canada, but many of our major allies and partners.
Is the Minister of National Defence able to inform the committee of the whole of Canada's contributions to address global maritime security concerns?
Monsieur le président, ma question s'adresse au ministre de la Défense nationale.
Les valeureux membres des Forces canadiennes ont fait preuve de leadership sur la scène internationale et ont assumé un rôle de premier plan dans une multitude de missions à travers le monde.
Le secteur de la sécurité maritime représente une autre occasion pour le Canada de continuer à assumer un rôle de chef de file auprès de ses alliés. La sécurité maritime est une source de préoccupation constante, non seulement pour les Canadiens, mais aussi pour bon nombre de nos principaux alliés et partenaires.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale pourrait-il informer le comité plénier de l'apport que fournit le Canada en vue de répondre aux préoccupations touchant la sécurité maritime à l'échelle mondiale?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-09 23:23 [p.7834]
Expand
Mr. Chair, when I was with the general on the HMCS Vancouver, I saw him gather the sailors around and say to them, “It's who ought to ask for help”. At the highest level, the general has made it clear that the mental health of the soldiers, sailors and aircrew is of the utmost importance.
Could the Minister of National Defence expand once again on the investments we have made in the area of mental health?
Monsieur le président, lorsque j'étais sur le NCSM Vancouver avec le général, je l'ai vu réunir les marins et leur dire: « La question est de savoir qui devrait demander de l'aide ». Ce faisant, le général montrait clairement que la santé mentale des soldats, des marins et des membres d'équipage est d'une importance capitale en haut lieu.
Le ministre de la Défense nationale pourrait-il de nouveau parler des investissements que nous avons faits dans le domaine de la santé mentale?
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-03 15:37 [p.7537]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Vancouver South for splitting her time with me. It is a pleasure to rise in the House today to speak in favour of our government's economic action plan. Allow me to start by quoting just one of the many positive assessments of our recent budget.
David Frum of the National Post wrote that under this Prime Minister, “...Canada can fairly claim to be the best-governed country among advanced democracies in the world” and that the recent “federal budget locks up Canada’s lead”. He explained that the world's major economies share a common economic problem. How do we nurture a fragile economic recovery while returning to a balanced budget?
In the United Kingdom we see the danger of moving too quickly: the economic recovery falters. In the United States we see the danger of moving too slowly: dangerous debt levels and the loss of the country's AAA credit rating. Canada has the pace just right. We are on track to balance the budget in the medium term. The Canadian economy continues to grow. In fact, Canada's economy has expanded in nine out of the last ten quarters. Since July 2009, the Canadian economy has created nearly 700,000 net new jobs, the strongest job growth record in the G7.
Contrary to the assertions by the members opposite, these employment gains have been in high quality jobs, with 90% in full-time positions, and over three-quarters in high-wage industries and in the private sector. For the first time in more than three decades Canada's unemployment rate is well below that of the United States.
Among major industrialized countries Canada has an enviable economic record. The world has taken notice. The World Economic Forum has ranked Canada's banking system as the soundest in the world for the fourth consecutive year. Forbes magazine ranked Canada number one in the world for business to grow and create jobs. Our economy outperforms our major trading partners. Canada is well ahead of other G7 countries in returning to balanced budgets. The International Monetary Fund projects that by 2016, Canada's total debt-to-GDP ratio will remain at about one-third of the G7 average and more than 20 percentage points below that of Germany, the G7 country with the next lowest ratio.
This afternoon I will speak to three reasons why I believe MPs should support our economic action plan.
First, the economic action plan continues our focus on creating jobs, growth and long-term prosperity for all Canadians.
Second, our action plan will ensure Canada's social programs are sustainable in the long term so that they will be there for future generations when we need them.
Third, we will return Canada to balanced budgets by achieving fair, balanced and moderate savings.
Our action plan proposes a number of measures to create jobs and opportunities for Canadians. I will focus on one measure, our responsible resource development initiative. Here are some important facts. In 2010, natural resource sectors employed over 760,000 workers. In the next 10 years, new investments of more than $500 billion are planned across Canada. The problem is that those who wish to invest in our country have been facing an increasingly complicated and cumbersome set of rules that add costs, delay projects and kill jobs.
In my home province of British Columbia, in the government's 2010 Speech from the Throne, it was noted that some $3 billion in provincially approved projects were “stranded in the mire of federal process and delay.” The B.C. Minister of Finance, Kevin Falcon said, “We have many projects on the table today that are in the billions of dollars that could have important ramifications for jobs and employment and revenues.”
There are numerous examples of economic opportunities missed and jobs lost due to needless bureaucratic duplication and red tape. I will provide one such example. There is a proposal to develop a 396 megawatt offshore wind energy project in Haida Gwaii in British Columbia. The proponent estimates that the project would have a capital investment of $1.6 billion and would create up to 200 construction jobs. The federal decision to approve the process came 16 months after the provincial decision.
Our action plan 2012 proposes to remove these impediments that are unnecessarily delaying responsible resource development and costing Canadians jobs.
The Conservative government would focus on four major areas to streamline the review process for major economic projects. We would make the review process for major projects more predictable and timely, we would reduce duplication and regulatory burden, we would strengthen environmental protection, which is very important to note, and in British Columbia, as across the rest of the country, it is very important that we would enhance our consultation with first nations people.
As has already been established, Canada's financial situation, compared to other advanced democracies in the world, is enviable. Our government is not content to rest on our laurels and ignore the challenges that will face Canada in the coming decades. Our action plan is proposing necessary changes to our retirement system to ensure that it will be there for all Canadians.
Here is the challenge that we will be facing in the not too distant future. In the 1970s, there were seven workers for every one person over the age of 65 collecting old age security. Today, there are four workers for every senior collecting OAS, and in 20 years the number will be only two. In addition, in 1970 life expectancy was age 69 for men and 76 for women. Today it is 79 for men and 83 for women. At the same time, Canada's birth rate is falling. Given these demographic changes and realities, the cost of the old age security system will grow from $38 billion in 2011 to $108 billion in 2030. This program is funded out of general revenue every year and this increase is simply unsustainable.
Our action plan 2012 would put the OAS program on a sustainable path by proposing legislation to raise the age of eligibility for OAS and GIS benefits gradually. The phase-in period would begin in April 2023 and it would not be fully implemented until January 2029. Let me be very clear. These proposals would not impact those currently collecting benefits or those nearing retirement. An 11-year notification period followed by a six-year phase-in period would ensure that individuals have significant advance notification to plan their retirement and make necessary adjustments.
At least 34 other countries are increasing the age of eligibility for their programs. They all realize that they need to ensure the sustainability of those programs for future generations. Our actions would ensure that OAS remains strong and is there for future generations when they need it and is available for all seniors today who are currently receiving the benefits.
Finally, our action plan 2012 would keep Canada on track to a balanced budget over the medium term. We would not raise taxes. Doing so kills jobs. We would not cut transfers to individuals, nor would we cut transfers to other levels of government for health care, education and social services, as was done by previous governments. Our government would return to balanced budgets while continuing sustainable increases in transfers for health, education and social programs. Federal transfers to my home province of British Columbia would total over $5.6 billion in 2012-13. This represents a 23% increase, over $1 billion more, than the province received from the former Liberal government.
Canada is a very blessed country. Due to the leadership of our Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance, our country has avoided the worst of the global economic storm and is on a sound financial footing. The measures I have discussed today—responsible resource development, long-term sustainability of our social programs and modest cost savings to return to a balanced budget—are part of our action plan that will create jobs, economic growth and prosperity for all Canadians.
I would ask all hon. members to join with our government and support economic action plan 2012.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie la députée de Vancouver-Sud d'avoir partagé son temps de parole avec moi. J'ai le plaisir de prendre la parole aujourd'hui pour appuyer le Plan d'action économique du gouvernement. Permettez-moi de citer quelques-unes des critiques positives que notre plus récent budget a reçues.
David Frum, du National Post, écrit que, depuis que le premier ministre est au pouvoir, « [...] le Canada peut à juste titre se proclamer le pays le mieux géré parmi les démocraties évoluées de ce monde ». L'auteur ajoute que « le budget fédéral va permettre au Canada de conserver son avance ». Il explique que les grandes économies du monde ont toutes le même problème: comment encourager une reprise économique précaire tout en retrouvant l'équilibre budgétaire?
Au Royaume-Uni, on constate les conséquences néfastes de mesures précipitées: la reprise économique est chancelante. Aux États-Unis, on voit les inconvénients d'une démarche trop lente: des niveaux d'endettement dangereusement élevés et la perte de la cote de crédit triple A. Le Canada a su trouver le bon rythme. Nous sommes sur la bonne voie pour équilibrer le budget à moyen terme. L'économie canadienne poursuit sa croissance. En fait, elle a progressé durant neuf des dix derniers trimestres. Depuis juillet 2009, l'économie canadienne a favorisé la création de 700 000 emplois, ce qui représente la plus forte croissance de l'emploi des pays du G7.
Contrairement à ce que prétendent les députés d'en face, les emplois créés étaient de bonne qualité: 90 p. 100 étaient à temps plein et plus des trois quarts ont été créés dans des secteurs où les salaires sont relativement élevés dans le secteur privé. Pour la première fois depuis trois décennies, le taux de chômage du Canada est beaucoup plus bas que celui des États-Unis.
Le Canada a un bilan économique enviable si on le compare à celui des principaux pays industrialisés. Le monde a pris note de cette situation. Le Forum économique mondial a déclaré que le système bancaire du Canada était le plus solide du monde pour la quatrième année consécutive. Le magazine Forbes a classé le Canada comme le meilleur pays au monde pour faire prospérer une entreprise et créer des emplois. Notre économie surpasse celle de nos principaux partenaires commerciaux. Le Canada devance, et de loin, les autres pays du G7 en ce qui concerne le retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Le Fonds monétaire international prévoit que d'ici 2016 le rapport dette-PIB total du Canada restera à près du tiers de la moyenne des pays du G7 et à plus de 20 points de pourcentage en dessous de celui de l'Allemagne, le pays du G7 ayant le deuxième plus bas ratio.
Cet après-midi, je donnerai aux députés trois bonnes raisons de voter pour notre Plan d'action économique.
Premièrement, le Plan d'action économique continue de mettre l'accent sur la création d'emplois, la croissance et la prospérité à long terme de tous les Canadiens.
Deuxièmement, notre plan d'action garantit la viabilité à long terme des programmes sociaux du Canada afin que les générations futures puissent en bénéficier.
Troisièmement, nous résorberons le déficit du Canada en prenant des mesures de réduction équitables, équilibrées et modérées.
Notre plan d'action propose de nombreuses mesures visant à créer des emplois pour les Canadiens et à leur offrir des possibilités. Je mettrai l'accent sur une mesure en particulier, soit l'initiative Développement responsable des ressources. Voici quelques faits importants. En 2010, le secteur des ressources naturelles employait plus de 760 000 travailleurs. Pour les 10 prochaines années, on prévoit plus de 500 milliards de dollars en nouveaux investissements à l'échelle du pays. Malheureusement, les personnes qui souhaitent investir dans notre pays doivent se plier à des règles de plus en plus lourdes et compliquées qui viennent augmenter les coûts, retarder les projets et faire disparaître les emplois.
Dans le discours du Trône de 2010, on a noté que dans ma province, la Colombie-Britannique, des projets évalués à plus de 3 milliards de dollars et approuvés par la province étaient « bloqués dans les méandres du processus fédéral et par les délais qu’il engendre ». Le ministre des Finances de la Colombie-Britannique, Kevin Falcon, a affirmé: « Nous examinons actuellement de nombreux projets d'une valeur de plusieurs milliards de dollars. Ces projets pourraient avoir une incidence considérable sur les emplois et les revenus. »
Nombre de possibilités économiques et d'emplois ont été perdus en raison de chevauchements et de formalités administratives inutiles. Je pense à un exemple précis. On propose de réaliser un projet d’énergie éolienne en haute mer de 396 mégawatts dans l’archipel Haida Gwaii en Colombie-Britannique. Selon le promoteur, le projet nécessitera des investissements de 1,6 milliard de dollars et pourrait créer jusqu’à 200 emplois dans le secteur de la construction. La décision fédérale a été rendue 16 mois après celle de l’administration provinciale.
Le Plan d'action économique de 2012 vise à supprimer les obstacles qui retardent inutilement le développement responsable des ressources et font perdre des emplois aux Canadiens.
Le gouvernement conservateur axerait ses efforts sur quatre grands secteurs pour simplifier le processus d'examen des projets économiques d'envergure. Il est très important de souligner que nous rendrons ce processus d'examen plus prévisible et plus rapide, que nous réduirons les chevauchements et le fardeau réglementaire et que nous renforcerons la protection environnementale. De surcroît, en Colombie-Britannique, comme partout ailleurs au pays, il est primordial que nous consultions davantage les peuples des Premières nations.
Comme il a déjà été établi, comparativement à d'autres démocraties évoluées dans le monde, la situation financière du Canada est enviable. Le gouvernement ne restera pas assis sur ses lauriers et il ne fera pas abstraction des défis auxquels sera confronté le Canada dans les prochaines décennies. Notre plan d'action propose des changements nécessaires à notre système de retraite pour en assurer la pérennité.
Voilà le défi auquel nous serons confrontés dans un avenir rapproché. Dans les années 1970, on comptait sept travailleurs pour chaque personne de plus de 65 ans bénéficiant de la Sécurité de la vieillesse. À l'heure actuelle, il y a quatre travailleurs pour chaque prestataire de la Sécurité de la vieillesse et, dans 20 ans, ce sera deux travailleurs pour chaque prestataire. De plus, en 1970, l'espérance de vie était de 69 ans pour les hommes et de 76 ans pour les femmes. Aujourd'hui, elle est de 79 ans pour les hommes et de 83 ans pour les femmes. Parallèlement, le taux de natalité chute au Canada. En raison de ces changements et de ces réalités démographiques, le coût du programme de la Sécurité de la vieillesse passera de 38 milliards en 2011 à 108 milliards de dollars en 2030. Ce programme est financé à même les recettes générales annuelles et sera tout simplement insoutenable à cause de cette hausse.
Notre plan d'action de 2012 vise à assurer la viabilité du programme de Sécurité de la vieillesse en proposant de relever progressivement l'âge d'admissibilité à la Sécurité de la vieillesse et au Supplément de revenu garanti. La période de transition ne débutera pas avant avril 2023 et la mesure ne sera pleinement mise en oeuvre qu'en janvier 2029. Permettez-moi d'être bien clair. Ces propositions n'auront aucune incidence sur ceux qui reçoivent déjà des prestations, ni sur ceux qui prendront bientôt leur retraite. Un préavis de 11 ans suivi d'une période de transition de six ans donneront suffisamment de temps aux gens pour planifier leur retraite et apporter les ajustements nécessaires.
Au moins 34 autres pays relèvent l'âge d'admissibilité pour leurs régimes. Ils sont tous conscients de la nécessité d'en assurer la viabilité pour les générations futures. Notre réforme garantira que la Sécurité de la vieillesse demeurera solide et accessible, à la fois pour les générations montantes lorsqu'elles en auront besoin et pour tous les aînés d'aujourd'hui qui touchent présentement des prestations.
Enfin, notre plan d'action pour 2012 gardera le Canada sur la voie de l'équilibre budgétaire à moyen terme. Nous n'augmenterons pas les impôts, car cela engendrerait des pertes d'emplois. Nous ne diminuerons pas les transferts aux particuliers. Nous ne sabrerons pas dans les transferts aux provinces dans les domaines de la santé, de l'éducation et des services sociaux, comme l'ont fait des gouvernements précédents. Notre gouvernement renouera avec l'équilibre budgétaire tout en continuant d'accorder des hausses durables pour les transferts relatifs à la santé, à l'éducation et aux programmes sociaux. Les transferts fédéraux versés à la Colombie-Britannique, ma province d'origine, totaliseront plus de 5,6 milliards de dollars en 2012-2013. Cela représente une augmentation de 23 p. 100, une hausse de plus d'un milliard de dollars par rapport à ce que la province a reçu de l'ancien gouvernement libéral.
Le Canada est un pays privilégié. Grâce au leadership de notre premier ministre et du ministre des Finances, notre pays a évité le pire de la tempête économique mondiale, et sa situation financière est solide. Le développement responsable des ressources, la viabilité à long terme de nos programmes sociaux et les réductions de coûts modestes permettant le retour à un budget équilibré sont autant de mesures de notre plan d'action qui stimuleront la création d'emplois, la croissance économique et la prospérité pour tous les Canadiens.
J'invite tous les députés à se rallier au gouvernement et à appuyer le Plan d'action économique pour 2012.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-03 15:48 [p.7538]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, what we are doing is standing up for Canadian citizens and for Canadian jobs, 760,000 jobs in the natural resources sector.
We know the NDP members oppose any development of the oil sands and have called for a moratorium on the development. They oppose any hydrocarbon, fossil fuel development at all. So it is no surprise that they are also opposing the Canadian jobs that result from these projects.
We have seen that they oppose Keystone XL which created over 140,000 jobs. They opposed the northern gateway pipeline, right off the top. They are also opposing the private sector unions which are clearly onside with natural resources development, and have said they support our regulatory reform because they know that these projects give good jobs and good benefits to Canadians. That is why we will continue with our responsible resource development plan.
Monsieur le Président, nous défendons les citoyens canadiens et le secteur de l'emploi, y compris les 760 000 emplois du secteur des ressources naturelles.
Nous savons que les députés néo-démocrates sont contre l'exploitation des sables pétrolifères: ils ont réclamé un moratoire à cet égard. Ils sont aussi contre la mise en valeur des hydrocarbures, de l'énergie fossile. Par conséquent, il n'est pas étonnant qu'ils soient aussi opposés aux emplois qui découleront de ces projets.
Nous les avons entendus dénoncer le projet Keystone XL, qui a créé plus de 140 000 emplois. Ils ont aussi rejeté dès le départ le projet d'oléoduc Northern Gateway. Ils ont aussi vilipendé les syndicats du secteur privé qui ont appuyé ouvertement le développement des ressources naturelles et qui ont adhéré à notre réforme réglementaire, sachant que ces projets engendrent de bons emplois et des avantages intéressants pour les Canadiens. Voilà pourquoi nous maintiendrons notre plan Développement responsable des ressources.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-03 15:50 [p.7538]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's question was all over the map, from British Columbia to Newfoundland. I will try to focus on equalization and transfers to the provinces.
I do not know the hon. member's electoral history or if he was here during the time when the Liberal government cut $25 billion in transfers in health and social transfers to the provinces. Certainly, we did fix the equalization program to ensure that it was fair for all Canadians.
I also have no problem discussing the small-town impacts of our bill. I toured a local production facility, Britco in Agassiz, British Columbia. It produces housing units for natural resource development projects. The company sees a direct link between our plan to have regulatory reform and its business model. It has increased the number of its good, high-paying, high-skilled jobs, because of our program to ensure that we have responsible resource development.
I will continue to support the budget, as people in small-town Canada do.
Monsieur le Président, le député s'est complètement dispersé de la Colombie-Britannique à Terre-Neuve. Je vais essayer de me concentrer sur la péréquation et les transferts aux provinces.
J'ignore le passé électoral du député et je ne sais pas s'il était là quand le gouvernement libéral a supprimé 25 milliards de transferts en matière de santé et de programmes sociaux à destination des provinces. Nous, nous avons rectifié le programme de péréquation pour qu'il soit équitable pour tous les Canadiens.
Je n'ai aucun problème à discuter des répercussions de notre projet de loi sur les petites villes. Je suis allé visiter une petite entreprise de construction, Britco, à Agassiz, en Colombie-Britannique. Elle fabrique des logements pour des projets de développement des ressources naturelles. Cette entreprise constate une adéquation entre notre plan de réforme de la réglementation et son modèle d'entreprise. Grâce à notre programme, elle a augmenté le nombre de ses bons emplois spécialisés et bien payés pour nous permettre d'assurer le développement responsable de nos ressources.
Je continuerai d'appuyer ce budget, comme le font les habitants des petites villes du Canada.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-02 15:25 [p.7466]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present two petitions today.
The first petition calls on the House of Commons to amend section 223 of the Criminal Code in such a way as to recognize 21st century medical evidence.
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux aujourd'hui de présenter deux pétitions.
La première exhorte la Chambre des communes à modifier l'article 223 du Code criminel de manière à ce qu'il tienne compte des connaissances médicales du XXIe siècle.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-05-02 15:26 [p.7466]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, the second petition is from the good people of Simcoe—Grey who are calling upon the government to clarify food labels for food products that are peanut-free, tree nut-free, only peanut-free and only tree nut-free, so that there is a national standard for labels and symbols that indicate whether or not a product contains these life-threatening allergens.
Monsieur le Président, la seconde pétition a été signée par les bons citoyens de Simcoe—Grey qui demandent au gouvernement de clarifier l'étiquetage des produits alimentaires qui ne referment ni arachide ni noix, ceux qui sont seulement sans arachide et ceux qui sont seulement sans noix. Ils souhaitent l'instauration d'une norme nationale d'étiquetage et la création de symboles indiquant si un produit donné renferme de tels allergènes potentiellement mortels.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-04-30 11:55 [p.7306]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for St. John's East for providing me with this opportunity to express my esteem for search and rescue services. I also congratulate him on his re-elevation to defence critic. As a member of the national defence committee, I look forward to working with him again.
Coming from British Columbia, I have a unique appreciation of the reliability and efficiency of this service and of the extraordinary work of all those who contribute to it, whether professional or volunteer, in uniform or not.
I will take a moment to thank the RCMP, Kent Harrison Search and Rescue and Chilliwack Search and Rescue, which just yesterday participated in a very difficult, very dangerous recovery effort after a tragic hang-gliding accident in my riding of Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon.
We western Canadians are blessed with a natural environment of exceptional beauty. Enjoying the great outdoors has become a key part of our lifestyle and identity. Western Canada has also become a prime destination for visitors from all over the country and from abroad who want to take advantage of the unparalleled recreational opportunities that we have to offer, activities like skiing, rock climbing, kayaking, hiking or camping, to name just a few. However, while our lakes, rivers, forests, mountains, coastlines and island chains are among the most spectacular in the world, they are not without dangers. This is something that we can easily forget.
We sometimes also forget that our environment can make search and rescue operations particularly challenging. Fortunately, we can rely upon the dedication and expertise of search and rescue professionals. such as the two Canadian Forces SAR techs from 442 Squadron in Comox who parachuted out of a CC-115 to a plane crash site 130 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake, B.C. on January 22. Because of their actions and the response of the 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron, all four occupants of the aircraft were found alive.
Not all incidents are that extreme, but I think all of us from the west can think of many incidents where search and rescue services were called upon. Because of that, we appreciate the importance of ensuring the quality of these services. Therefore, I fully understand and share the desire of the hon. member for St. John's East to provide Canadians with the best system of search and rescue services possible.
However, I cannot support the motion that we are debating today. Focusing uniquely on the issue of Canadian Forces' response posture does not accurately reflect the nature of Canada's search and rescue system, nor the specific needs of Canadians.
We have already heard that there is no mandated international norm for response posture. Focusing solely on the Canadian Forces would also be a mistake, because they are only one part of a larger system. What really matters to this government, and what I believe matters to Canadians, is having a search and rescue service that is well suited to the specific challenges of our Canadian environment.
Therefore, in taking part in this debate today, I will speak to some of those particular challenges as well as help Canada's current search and rescue system do a good job of addressing them.
Canada is a uniquely challenging environment for search and rescue. As we all know, we live in an extremely vast country, with a land mass of almost 10 million square kilometres and the world's longest coastline. However, Canada's area of responsibility for search and rescue extends even further than that, totalling approximately 18 million square kilometres when the ocean regions for which we are responsible are included. Within this space, a relatively small population is dispersed over great distances. Needless to say, a country as vast as ours contains enormous geographical diversity.
What is more, the Canadian climate can be very hostile, with temperatures ranging from 35°C to -50.
Taken together, all of these characteristics make Canada unique in the world when it comes to search and rescue and to inherent challenges of trying to reach people in distress, of trying to cover vast distances quickly and then to locating and assisting people in hard to reach places and often under difficult conditions.
Such a unique environment calls for an equally unique search and rescue system. Fortunately, Canada has just such a system, one that is specifically tailored to meet the needs of Canadians and one that is very successful at quickly responding to emergencies and saving lives, at no cost to the user, I should add.
I will now take a few moments to explain that system so as to ensure the motion before the House is taken in the proper context.
Given the particular conditions and challenges of our country that I have just described, no single organization, not even one as versatile and responsive as the Canadian Forces, could possibly cover every inch of our territory all of the time.
Canada's search and rescue system is based on extensive collaboration and co-operation between numerous different departments, agencies, levels of government and other actors. This includes other federal departments and agencies, provincial and territorial governments, municipal and local organizations, commercial companies and volunteer organizations.
Co-operation among these various stakeholders helps ensure that, in every part of the country, local knowledge and expertise can be harnessed in support of search and rescue efforts. It also ensures that people and resources already in the area can provide as fast and effective a response as possible.
Of course, none of these organizations can operate in isolation. Instead, they work together and support one another within the framework of our comprehensive and collaborative approach. Within this context, the Canadian Forces play a crucial role in responding to many different emergencies but are by no means the only provider of search and rescue services. Together with the Canadian Coast Guard, they coordinate the country's response to air and sea incidents by operating the Joint Rescue Coordination Centres in Victoria, Trenton and Halifax. With respect to the provision of air search and rescue services, the Canadian Forces have primary responsibility in cases of downed aircraft and are responsible for providing air support to the Canadian Coast Guard in emergencies at sea.
However, the response to search and rescue incidents on land is different. In cases of ground emergencies, provincial or territorial governments lead the response, including the provision of air services, while the Canadian Forces' role is solely to provide assistance if and when it is requested by the local authorities. It makes perfect sense to rely primarily on local organizations, police forces, volunteer associations, commercial companies et cetera in cases of ground SAR because they have the knowledge, the resources, the expertise and the experience required to respond in the fastest, most appropriate way.
Of the approximately 9,000 search and rescue incidents reported annually in Canada, military assets are deployed for approximately 1,100 and help to save an average of 1,200 lives each year. However, operational statistics only tell part of the story when it comes to this government's commitment to search and rescue. Beyond the responses themselves, the Department of National Defence and, indeed, the government more broadly are actively engaged on a number of fronts to help improve the preparation and coordination of stakeholders as well as the availability of information and public education about the dangers of the Canadian environment.
Each year, the government invests millions through the SAR new initiatives fund to enhance the effectiveness, efficiency, economy and innovation of search and rescue response and prevention activities across Canada. On the international stage, Canada also continues to work with like-minded nations to discuss and review search and rescue efforts. For example, last year we organized and hosted the first ever gathering of specialists from eight Arctic Council nations, in Whitehorse. This year, we welcomed the defence chiefs of those same countries, in Goose Bay, to encourage closer co-operation in dealing with emergencies in the Arctic.
Through all of these programs and initiatives, the government is consistently taking steps to improve the search and rescue service in Canada not just by improving response times but also by improving the coordination and co-operation of stakeholders, by helping develop new technologies and practices so that authorities can be notified of emergencies faster and, perhaps most importantly of all, by providing funding to improve the availability of information and public education on the hazards of our Canadian environment so that fewer of these emergencies occur in the first place. We do all of this because we are committed to the quality of our search and rescue system.
Although I am happy to see that the opposition shares in this commitment, I cannot support the motion before us today.
For the reasons I have just described, I ask the opposition to expand its perspective beyond the narrow issue of military response postures to the broader realities of search and rescue in Canada and to support this government in continuing to find ways to invest our resources where they can make a real difference in the safety and survival of Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de St. John's-Est de me donner l'occasion d'exprimer toute l'estime que j'ai pour les services de recherche et de sauvetage. Je le félicite également d'avoir été de nouveau nommé porte-parole de l'opposition en matière de défense. Moi qui suis membre du Comité de la défense nationale, je suis impatient de travailler de nouveau avec lui.
Comme je viens de la Colombie-Britannique, je connais comme pas un la fiabilité et l'efficacité de ces services ainsi que le travail extraordinaire des gens qui les offrent, qu'il s'agisse de professionnels ou de bénévoles, de militaires ou de civils.
Je tiens aussi à remercier la GRC, le service de recherche et de sauvetage Kent Harrison et le service de recherche et de sauvetage de Chilliwack qui, pas plus tard qu'hier, ont pris part à une intervention de sauvetage très difficile et dangereuse après un tragique accident de deltaplane survenu dans ma circonscription, Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon.
Nous, Canadiens de l'Ouest, avons le bonheur de vivre dans un environnement naturel d'une beauté exceptionnelle. Le plein air est devenu un aspect essentiel de notre identité et de notre mode de vie. L'Ouest canadien est aussi devenu une destination de choix pour les touristes canadiens et étrangers qui veulent profiter des activités récréatives sans pareilles que cette région a à offrir, notamment le ski, l'escalade, le kayak, la randonnée pédestre et le camping. Les lacs, les fleuves, les forêts, les montagnes, les côtes et les archipels de l'Ouest sont parmi les plus spectaculaires du monde entier, mais ils ne sont pas exempts de dangers. Il est facile de l'oublier.
De plus, nous oublions parfois que le milieu où on se trouve peut rendre les opérations de recherche et de sauvetage particulièrement difficiles. Or, nous avons la chance de pouvoir compter sur le dévouement et le savoir-faire de professionnels de la recherche et du sauvetage, comme les deux techniciens du 442e escadron des Forces canadiennes qui, le 22 janvier, ont été parachutés d'un CC-115 sur les lieux de l'écrasement d'un appareil à 130 kilomètres au sud-ouest du lac Williams, en Colombie-Britannique. Grâce à leurs efforts et à l'intervention du 442e Escadron de transport et de sauvetage, les quatre occupants de l'appareil ont pu être retrouvés vivants.
Les incidents ne sont pas tous aussi sérieux, mais je crois que tous ceux qui viennent de l'Ouest peuvent penser à de nombreux cas où l'on a fait appel aux services de recherche et de sauvetage. C'est pourquoi nous sommes conscients de l'importance d'assurer la qualité de ces services. Je comprends donc parfaitement et je partage le désir du député de St. John's-Est d'assurer aux Canadiens le meilleur système de recherche et de sauvetage possible.
Je ne peux cependant pas appuyer la motion dont nous débattons aujourd'hui. Mettre l'accent uniquement sur le délai de disponibilité opérationnelle des Forces canadiennes ne rend pas compte avec exactitude de la nature du système de recherche et de sauvetage du Canada, ni des besoins particuliers des Canadiens.
Nous avons déjà entendu qu'il n'y a pas de norme internationale obligatoire pour ce qui est du délai de disponibilité opérationnelle. Ce serait une erreur de s'arrêter uniquement à ce que font les Forces canadiennes, car celles-ci ne représentent qu'une partie d'un vaste système. Ce qui compte vraiment pour le gouvernement, et pour les Canadiens aussi, je pense, c'est que nous disposions d'un service de recherche et de sauvetage qui convienne aux défis propres à l'environnement canadien.
Dans mon intervention aujourd'hui, je parlerai donc de certains de ces défis particuliers et j'aimerais aider le service de recherche et de sauvetage actuel du Canada à s'y attaquer efficacement.
L'environnement canadien rend les interventions de recherche et de sauvetage particulièrement difficiles. Comme nous le savons tous, nous vivons dans un pays immense, dont la masse terrestre est d'environ 10 millions de kilomètres carrés et dont le littoral est le plus long au monde. Cependant, la zone de responsabilité du Canada en matière de recherche et de sauvetage est encore plus étendue et compte environ 18 millions de kilomètres carrés quand les régions océaniques dont nous avons la responsabilité sont comprises. Dans cet espace, une population relativement peu nombreuse est dispersée sur de grandes distances. Il va sans dire que, dans un pays aussi vaste que le nôtre, la diversité géographique est énorme.
Qui plus est, le climat du Canada peut être très dur, la température variant entre 35 oC et -50 oC.
Ensemble, ces caractéristiques font du Canada un pays unique au monde pour ce qui est des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage et de la difficulté à arriver aux personnes en détresse, à parcourir rapidement de longues distances, puis à repérer et à secourir les gens dans des endroits difficiles d'accès et souvent dans des conditions pénibles.
Un environnement unique demande un système de recherche et de sauvetage également unique. Heureusement, le Canada a justement un tel système, qui est parfaitement adapté aux besoins des Canadiens et qui réussit très bien à répondre rapidement aux urgences et à sauver des vies, sans qu'il en coûte rien aux usagers, devrais-je ajouter.
Je prendrai maintenant quelques instants pour expliquer ce système afin de situer la motion dont nous sommes saisis dans le contexte approprié.
Compte tenu des conditions et des défis que je viens de décrire, aucun organisme, pas même un organisme aussi polyvalent et souple que les Forces canadiennes, ne pourrait couvrir chaque pouce du territoire canadien en permanence.
Le système de recherche et de sauvetage du Canada repose sur une collaboration à grande échelle entre différents ministères, organismes, ordres de gouvernements et d'autres intervenants, y compris d'autres ministères et organismes fédéraux, les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux et des organismes municipaux et locaux, des sociétés commerciales et des organismes bénévoles.
La coopération entre ces différents intervenants contribue à assurer que, dans chaque région du pays, la connaissance et le savoir-faire locaux peuvent être mis à contribution pour appuyer les efforts de recherche et de sauvetage. En outre, elle permet de s'assurer que les personnes et les ressources qui sont déjà sur place peuvent intervenir le plus rapidement et efficacement possible.
Bien entendu, aucun de ces organismes ne peut agir seul. Ces organismes travaillent plutôt ensemble et s'entraident dans le cadre de notre approche intégrée de collaboration. Dans ce contexte, les Forces canadiennes jouent un rôle crucial en intervenant dans de nombreuses situations d'urgence, mais elles ne sont pas les seules à fournir des services de recherche et de sauvetage. En collaboration avec la Garde côtière canadienne, elles coordonnent les interventions lors des incidents aériens et maritimes par l'intermédiaire des centres conjoints de coordination des opérations de sauvetage, à Victoria, Trenton et Halifax. Quant à la prestation de services de recherche et de sauvetage aériens, les Forces canadiennes sont les principales responsables lorsqu'un avion s'est abîmé et elles prêtent main forte à la Garde côtière canadienne dans les situations d'urgence en mer.
Toutefois, il en va autrement dans le cas d'interventions au sol. Dans ces cas, c'est le gouvernement provincial ou territorial qui dirige les opérations, y compris la prestation de services aériens, tandis que le rôle des Forces canadiennes se limite à fournir de l'aide à la demande des autorités locales. Il est tout à fait logique de s'en remettre d'abord aux organismes, aux forces policières, aux associations bénévoles et aux entreprises de l'endroit pour les opérations de recherche et de sauvetage au sol, parce que ces intervenants possèdent les connaissances, les ressources, le savoir-faire et l'expérience nécessaires pour intervenir de la manière la plus rapide et la plus indiquée qui soit.
Les militaires interviennent dans environ 1 100 des 9 000 opérations de recherche et de sauvetage menées annuellement au Canada et ils contribuent à sauver en moyenne 1 200 vies chaque année. Cependant, les statistiques opérationnelles ne disent pas tout en ce qui concerne l'engagement du gouvernement en matière de recherche et de sauvetage. Au-delà des interventions comme telles, le ministère de la Défense nationale et, bien entendu, l'ensemble du gouvernement travaillent activement dans de nombreux domaines pour mieux préparer les intervenants, mieux coordonner les opérations et mieux informer la population des dangers que présente l'environnement canadien.
Chaque année, le gouvernement investit des millions de dollars dans le Fonds des nouvelles initiatives de recherche et de sauvetage pour accroître l'efficacité, l'efficience, la rentabilité et l'innovation en matière d'intervention de recherche et de sauvetage et pour organiser des activités de prévention partout au Canada. À l'échelle internationale, le Canada continue de collaborer avec des pays aux vues similaires pour discuter des initiatives de recherche et de sauvetage et les examiner. Par exemple, l'année dernière, nous avons organisé à Whitehorse le tout premier rassemblement de spécialistes venant de huit pays du Conseil de l'Arctique. Cette année, nous avons reçu à Goose Bay les chefs d'état-major de ces mêmes pays, de façon à favoriser une coopération plus étroite pour réagir aux situations d'urgence dans l'Arctique.
Dans le cadre de ces programmes et ces initiatives, le gouvernement prend des mesures visant à améliorer les services de recherche et de sauvetage au Canada. Ce faisant, il améliore, entre autres, les délais d'intervention, la coordination des activités et la coopération entre les intervenants. Il participe également à l'élaboration de nouvelles technologies et de nouvelles pratiques afin que les autorités soient avisées plus rapidement des situations d'urgence. Par surcroît, il fournit un financement pour mieux informer et sensibiliser la population à l'égard des dangers de l'environnement canadien pour réduire le nombre d'urgences. Essentiellement, l'objectif est d'assurer la qualité du système de recherche et de sauvetage.
Même si je suis heureux de constater que l'opposition partage cet engagement, je ne peux pas appuyer la motion que nous examinons aujourd'hui.
Pour les raisons que je viens d'exposer, je demande à l'opposition de ne pas se limiter aux délais de disponibilité opérationnelle militaire, mais de tenir compte de la réalité globale de la recherche et du sauvetage au Canada, et d'appuyer les efforts du gouvernement pour trouver des moyens d'investir les ressources de façon à améliorer véritablement la sécurité des Canadiens et leurs chances de survie .
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-04-23 15:12 [p.7016]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to present a petition on behalf of residents of Chilliwack, Abbotsford and Langley calling on Parliament to speedily enact legislation that restricts abortion to the greatest extent possible.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai le plaisir de présenter une pétition au nom des gens de Chilliwack, Abbotsford et Langley qui demandent au Parlement d'adopter rapidement une loi visant à limiter l'avortement le plus possible.
Collapse
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Strahl Profile
2012-04-05 12:43 [p.6961]
Expand
Mr. Speaker, I have several petitions to present today.
The first petition is from the people of Chilliwack calling upon the House of Commons to speedily enact legislation that restricts abortion to the greatest extent possible.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai plusieurs pétitions à présenter aujourd'hui.
La première pétition est signée par des gens de Chilliwack, qui exhortent la Chambre des communes à promulguer rapidement une loi limitant le plus possible l'avortement.
Collapse
Results: 1 - 60 of 100 | Page: 1 of 2

1
2
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data