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Results: 1 - 10 of 10
View Greg Kerr Profile
CPC (NS)
View Greg Kerr Profile
2015-03-12 11:48
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Mr. Chair, I know a lot of us have been through a lot of committees and a lot of processes before, and certainly know how to detect the bit of posturing that's going on. That's part of what politics is about, but I understand that if you are prepared to give him the benefit of the doubt, because obviously a lot of comments are being made without knowing some of the background....
I think what Mr. Byrne was suggesting is to let him know that we'd really like him to appear and that we expect him to appear, and leave the door open for him to respond back that the committee would like to hear what he has to say. I think we all would like to hear what he would say, but to put motive in that sort of way, I think, is just absolutely irresponsible. I'd rather give this individual the chance to explain to us in detail what he sees his position is and what's expected. To condemn him blind, I think, is just absolutely irresponsible.
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View Greg Kerr Profile
CPC (NS)
View Greg Kerr Profile
2015-03-12 12:02
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Mr. Chair, because we have witnesses, we can get on with it. We could continue the hyperbole for a long time here.
What I suggest we do then, if you want, is to make a motion to reinvite the witness and give the witness a chance to come here and explain, as opposed to condemning him before he's even before us.
If it's in order, I will move a motion to reinvite the witness, and you set the date, as chair, as to when the witness appears.
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View Peter Stoffer Profile
NDP (NS)
Yes, sir.
I have a couple of things for you, sir.
Mr. Jenkins mentioned the number of recommendations that your organization and a number of others made with the Gerontological Advisory Council a few years back. He noted the number of recommendations that have been put forward and how very few of them have actually been accepted. I'd just like your view, the Royal Canadian Legion's view, about why there has been a reluctance to accept some of these recommendations...the other ones that have been there. Also, I have another question and it's for both of you. I'll ask the Legion first and then, Mr. Jenkins, you can answer second.
In the Equitas lawsuit, the crown attorneys who were representing the Crown—and I'm paraphrasing them—stated under oath that there was no moral obligation for the crown to care for veterans. I'm paraphrasing more or less what they said. Basically that moral obligation applies only to the aboriginal community.
Obviously many veterans organizations across the country were quite concerned when they heard this. The judge hearing the case indicated that there was an obligation to care for those veterans in that regard. My question, which I've been asking quite repeatedly, is this. Does the government have a moral, legal, social, and financial responsibility to care for those they asked to put themselves in harm's way? I haven't gotten an answer on that question even though this is now the eighth time I've asked it. I'm wondering what the Royal Canadian Legion's view would be on that as well.
I thank you again, you and all the other veterans groups, and especially Mr. Richard Blackwolf, an aboriginal veteran who is here today, for being with all of us. I thank you.
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View Peter MacKay Profile
CPC (NS)
View Peter MacKay Profile
2013-11-28 9:38
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Sure. Thank you very much, Mr. Calkins.
I know that you have been very diligent in your committee work as well as in calling upon our own government to pursue this effort of being accountable, being open and transparent in the finances of every department.
That's what this main estimates and supplementary estimates process is all about. Greater accountability has been the cornerstone of our government, greater ability to translate that to the public in a more understandable way. We're not all accountants. We're not all perhaps as well versed with finances as we should be. Certainly as we approach tax time, this becomes more and more evident in my own household. Having more information presented in a way that the public can digest, that they can understand the line items and what they're connected to....
We were speaking earlier about programming and how that money is spent. That's true across government. People need to see the direct correlation between how money is spent and what results are achieved as a result.
As members of this committee know, this estimates process is really all about that direct accountability. Laying it out in the format as you see before you in clearer and more understandable terms is what we've sought to achieve. I appreciate your having noticed that and pointing it out. It is something that I believe all departments are working very diligently to continue to achieve.
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View Mark Eyking Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Chair, and my thanks to you gentlemen for coming.
I'm going to start off with what has been mentioned. I think you talked previously, Paul, about these logjams and inefficiencies, and how you had to go through different ministers. We're talking about this new super department and one minister is in charge, and you have deputy ministers. Why wouldn't we just get rid of the CIDA minister? We could save the limo and save all the staff. The parliamentary secretaries could cut the ribbons, and you have department heads there already. Do we really need a CIDA minister? We could save taxpayers a lot of money and we could have even more efficiencies.
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View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
I am going to do that, Mr. Chairman.
I want to make this comment though. It's interesting the exchange Ms. Ambler...I just want to walk on that ground too. Ms. Rempel started it with Mr. Tremblay about consultation. Mr. Tremblay, I think you or Ms. Rempel referred to consultation fatigue. Last night before this committee, we had the grand chief of the Assembly of First Nations here, and he talked in very clear terms about a complete and utter lack of consultation. It's why so many of the first nations in this country talk about the government being tone-deaf.
I want to go to Mr. Siddon and I don't want to trespass on my colleague's question too much, Mr. Siddon, but I know you wanted to make three recommendations and you're not going to get a chance to wrap up. One recommendation you made was to split at least the Fisheries Act out of this bill, but you said you had three. I wonder if I could give you a couple of seconds to lay out those other two, please, for us?
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View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Scott Brison Profile
2012-05-29 19:04
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You played a very important role in overseeing the investigation into the taser issue at the Vancouver airport. At that time, you helped to shine light on mistakes that were made, oversights in the process—and culpabilities, ultimately.
Do you see any relationship between the government's decision in 2009 relative to your role and this decision in terms of a general approach to accountability and a desire to shine light on inconvenient truths, perhaps?
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View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Scott Brison Profile
2012-05-17 20:40
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Do you agree that foreign investors are prepared to do business in jurisdictions where rules are transparent and predictable?
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View Mark Eyking Profile
Lib. (NS)
For a country to so-called straighten itself out, it either happens internally or externally. We've seen what happened in South Africa years ago and the pressures of the world that were on it.
Do you see the UN or the African Union playing a bigger role in monitoring this country and what it's doing?
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View Scott Brison Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Scott Brison Profile
2011-11-02 16:54
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In your report today you've provided some advice to Parliament and to parliamentarians. You say:
Transparent fiscal policy means full disclosure of analysis, information and risks. Parliamentarians may wish to ensure full disclosure of the measures covered by the Strategic and Operating Review to be implemented in Budget 2012.
You also say:
...parliamentarians may wish to request that the Government provide full disclosure of departmental plans associated with Budget 2010 operational restraint measures....
Are you saying that that information has yet to be provided to Parliament?
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