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Results: 1 - 15 of 16036
View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:47
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Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, to both of our witnesses, for being here today.
Ms. Strom, I'd like to start with you and to talk to you about the use of a shadow carbon price. I know that Suncor is familiar with this. Different companies in the Canadian energy sector are using a shadow carbon price, and some companies use it to drive their performance or to create opportunities like technological innovation or increasing their market access. Other companies, I know, use it to just straight-up evaluate GHGs coming from particular projects. But it seems to me that the use of this shadow carbon price in the Canadian energy market lays a bit of the groundwork for the fact that companies are already thinking about a price on carbon, that a price on carbon wouldn't actually be that disruptive.
I know that Suncor is familiar with the shadow carbon price and uses it. I'd love to hear from you a bit about that, but I guess my question for you is this. If a company like yours is already engaged in a shadow carbon price, wouldn't there be a benefit in levelling the playing field and ensuring that all companies have certainty and build in that same price?
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View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:49
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Understood.
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View Megan Leslie Profile
NDP (NS)
View Megan Leslie Profile
2015-06-18 9:50
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Thanks very much. My second question is for Madame Grondin.
It seems to me, listening to your testimony and doing a little bit of research before coming here today, that AEM is really making an effort to be responsible in its operations when it comes to the environment.
Back to this idea of levelling the playing field, do you agree that a sound and consistent and well-funded regulatory structure would help keep out some bad actors? The mining sector has a bit of a cowboy reputation, rightly or wrongly. I certainly wouldn't include your company in that reputation.
We need some sort of consistent policy across the board. In that vein, would you support a national fund to ensure site remediation and cleanup that all operations would pay into? Again, it's this idea of levelling the playing field.
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View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2015-06-16 15:57
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Let's hear your French, Ben.
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View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2015-06-16 16:13
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Thank you, witnesses, for your presentations.
I can tell you that these statistics—80% more women die from lung cancer than from breast cancer and 200% more men die from lung cancer than from prostate cancer—were shocking to me. Those are shocking facts based on the publicity out there on breast and prostate cancers.
With regard to one of the key causes of lung cancer, smoking, how are we doing in Canada? I'm from Prince Edward Island and I see more young people smoking than I did a few years ago. I have no statistics or anything. I don't know. How are we actually doing especially in terms of young people smoking? One of the things I hear is that flavoured tobacco products are in fact potentially enticing youth to smoke. What's your view on that?
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View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2015-06-16 16:15
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I think the reality is that if you can target young people and prevent them from starting to smoke, that's where the efforts have to be made. I look back to my own time in school, in high school, when if you didn't smoke, you were on the wrong side of societal favour. That's changed immensely, but I still see too much of it.
You're basically suggesting that we ban menthol and flavoured tobacco products, and I know they've moved on that in my province.
On early detection, you mentioned that there is a screening program in place in the United States. What has the experience been under that program? Do you have any idea of the cost? We have a public health care system here, so you have to look at the cost as an investment more than just as a cost. Can you comment on that?
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View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2015-06-16 16:19
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Coming back to the early detection, what can be done both federally and provincially to enhance early detection? I hear too many stories. In fact, I was talking to a husband this morning whose wife had died and who had waited for a year before she could get into our hospital system. Would it have made a difference? We don't know.
What can be done to enhance the early detection, and operations if needed, in these kinds of matters from a policy perspective at the governmental level?
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View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2015-06-16 17:09
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Thank you, Chair.
Thank you to all the witnesses on this panel.
I'd like to start with you, Dr. Ricard. Thank you for the reality check. You make a potent point, I think, on the need for funding for research and early detection methods. I can't help but think that in your occupation you would likely be one who would be getting regular checks. That is so different from many in society, who don't get regular checks.
From your experience, or from having gone through what you've gone through, is there anything that you think governments can do, or the health system can do, that would make a difference in earlier detection?
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View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2015-06-16 17:12
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Thank you for that answer.
Dr. Pantarotto, you mentioned that in Ottawa, going from an abnormal CT scan to really getting into the system for treatment takes 117 days, I think. I can tell you that's far, far, far better than it is in a lot of regions in this country. I can name my own, Prince Edward Island, as one. We finally just put a second shift on CAT scans, and we've been fighting for that for years.
First, what has to be done and what can be done by governments to reduce those wait times much more?
Second to that, I said in an earlier question that I see it as an investment. I think if you get early detection and early treatment, your expenditures within a public health care system will be a heck of a lot less.
Perhaps you could respond to that.
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View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Mr. Zealand, thank you very much for your patience in finally getting here to speak to our committee, but also for your work in this important area of the recreational fishery. I am interested in the management relationship between DFO and the co-management boards that are established under the land claim settlements. I wonder if you could speak to how effective that is and how it works.
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View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
The department mainly provides technical support to the boards in its decisions and issues around development and habitat management and protection, those sorts of things.
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View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Right. Do you get a lot of out-of-territory sports fishermen coming in? Do you have a system of guides and so on?
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View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Do out-of-territory fishermen have to have a guide to come to fish?
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View Robert Chisholm Profile
NDP (NS)
Okay, interesting.
I'm going to pass it on to my colleague Mr. Cleary. Thank you, Mr. Zealand, for your participation.
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View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Lawrence MacAulay Profile
2015-06-16 11:36
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Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.
Welcome, Mr. Zealand.
On the invasive species issue, first of all I congratulate you. If you can keep it under control you'll save a lot of money, because after it happens it seems to be a desperate problem. I'm sure you're fully aware of that.
Do you have catch and release in the Yukon?
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