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View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
moved:
That, in relation to Bill C-13, An Act to amend the Official Languages Act, to enact the Use of French in Federally Regulated Private Businesses Act and to make related amendments to other Acts not more than one further sitting day shall be allotted to the consideration at second reading stage of the Bill; and
That, 15 minutes before the expiry of the time provided for Government Orders on the day allotted to the consideration at second reading stage of the said bill, any proceedings before the House shall be interrupted, if required for the purpose of this order, and, in turn, every question necessary for the disposal of the said stage of the bill shall be put forthwith and successively, without further debate or amendment.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
Pursuant to Standing Order 67.1, there will now be a 30-minute question period. I invite hon. members who wish to ask questions to rise in their places or use the “raise hand” function so the Chair has some idea of the number of members who wish to participate in this question period.
The hon. official opposition House leader.
View John Brassard Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I am certainly not surprised that we are at this point of time allocation by the government considering it is being aided and abetted by the NDP, a party, by the way, that used to rail against time allocation every time it came up in the last Parliament, the Parliament before that and Parliaments before that. As the now moderate wing of the Liberal Party, the NDP is furthering a decline in democracy.
Millions of people voted for opposition parties other than the NDP. Those voices are being silenced as these types of things happen, and it is unfortunate that we are seeing a further decline in our democracy. There is a decline in the faith people have in our institutions when these types of tactics are employed by the government, aided and abetted by its lapdogs in the NDP.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, first and foremost, it is just the opposite. Over the past number of weeks, we have seen many tactics being used by this opposition party. The reason we are moving forward with this today is that we really want to make sure we can move forward with this important piece of legislation.
Bill C-13 would make a real difference in the lives of Canadians, and I am now looking forward to seeing the important work the committee is going to be able to do. We certainly recognize that committees here work independently. They are able to look at bills and move forward with calling in witnesses. From there, we will be able to continue this very important discussion on Bill C-13.
Bill C-13, as I indicated, would make huge differences in the lives of those in official minority communities across this country. That is why it is so important that we move forward. Canadians expect that of us.
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, the previous version of the bill to reform the Official Languages Act was introduced at the end of the previous Parliament by the member for Ahuntsic-Cartierville. We did not really have a chance to debate it since the government had taken almost two years to introduce it. This time, the government introduced the bill and then quickly moved to cut off debate.
The government was taken to court in British Columbia for failing to provide British Columbians with services in French, basically violating its own legislation. Then the government appointed a unilingual anglophone lieutenant governor in one of the Atlantic provinces. The government appears to be trying to hide the fact that it is really struggling to enforce the use of French.
Is that why the government is once again cutting off debate in an affront to democracy?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, just the opposite is true.
Our government is firmly committed to protecting and promoting French across the country, including in Quebec. We recognize that there has been a decline in the use of French across the country, including in Quebec. That is why we are moving forward with this new version of our bill.
The former Bill C-32 was introduced last June. Since being appointed Minister of Official Languages, I have had the good fortune and privilege of meeting many of the people who have been working on this file for years. Based on the information we have received, we can say that they are very happy with the new version of the bill, which they think has more teeth.
That is why we really want to ensure that parliamentarians can continue the debate at the Standing Committee on Official Languages and move Bill C-13 forward.
I would remind the House that following the committee study, the bill will come back to the House before going to the Senate. I look forward to ensuring that this great bill receives royal assent as soon as possible.
View Alexandre Boulerice Profile
NDP (QC)
Madam Speaker, roughly eight months ago, we had a federal election. That was not very long ago. It is not a stretch to think that we could take more time to study Bill C‑13.
That said, francophone communities outside Quebec have been waiting for the modernization of the Official Languages Act for 30 years, not eight months. Let us not forget how critical this file is for them and their vitality, as well as for cultural institutions, positive measures and francophone immigration.
What does the minister think about the fact that these people cannot wait any longer for things to improve?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I want my colleague to know that he is absolutely right.
Official language minority communities have been waiting a long time for the modernization of the Official Languages Act that Bill C‑13 offers them.
Our new version of the former bill has more teeth. As I have said it many times, Bill C‑13 will make a real difference in the lives of Canadians from coast to coast to coast, including official language minority communities.
As a francophone living in one such community, it is partly thanks to the Official Languages Act that I had the privilege or the right to live in French, attend university in French and work in French. However, we want to make sure we go further by clarifying the definition of part VII in order to achieve substantive equality. We will continue to work on advancing our language rights.
View Stéphane Lauzon Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, as a francophone from Quebec, I concur with the government that Bill C‑13 is extremely important. It is not a question of debating the timing of its introduction, because I do not believe there is a right or wrong time. As my colleague stated earlier, I believe that today, the time has come to move forward.
However, I do have a question for the minister. At what point in this process do we need the support of the other parties to demonstrate to Canadians that we have two official languages and that it is important to protect French in a minority context?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, all members of the House share the objective of protecting our two official languages and ensuring that we do everything possible to protect the French language, given that we recognize that French is in decline in Canada, including in Quebec.
That is why we have worked tirelessly with our partners and stakeholders from across the country, who wanted to improve former Bill C‑32. That is exactly what we did to come up with a new version, Bill C‑13.
It is very important to remember that all members of the House must work in close co-operation. As I mentioned, our common goal is to pass Bill C‑13, which, I repeat, will make a real difference in the lives of official language minority communities.
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Speaker, I like what my colleague, the Minister of Official Languages, is saying, but the government is not walking the talk.
In my opinion, Bill C-13 is very important because it establishes rules to ensure that, in 50 years, Canada will still be a bilingual country, where both French and English are spoken.
The minister is from New Brunswick, the only bilingual province in Canada, yet she is supporting her government as it argues against including a requirement in the act stating that the Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick must be bilingual. I am having a hard time understanding the logic behind what she is saying.
Furthermore, the minister said that stakeholders were happy with what had been done with Bill C‑13. Indeed, it is a step forward, but when I met with the same stakeholders, they told me that it was not enough.
We do need to work on it, but in a democracy like the Canadian Parliament, all parliamentarians must be respected, be given the right to speak and be allowed to express themselves, because this is a very important bill for the future of bilingualism in Canada.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, let us get one thing straight right off the bat. This is day four of debate on Bill C‑13. There have been 63 speeches in the House about this bill: 19 by the Conservative Party, 18 by the Liberal Party, 13 by the NDP and 12 by the Bloc Québécois.
Let us not forget that, even though a big part of the work is done in the House, a lot is done in committee as well. Committee work is very important. I also know that my hon. colleague is a member of the committee, which does great work, often working very closely with all the parties. That does not mean we always agree, but some great work gets done.
At this point, we are very eager for the parliamentary committee to get going on this so the bill can then come back to the House.
View Maxime Blanchette-Joncas Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for her speech.
I would like to ask the minister a question. The government says it recognizes the decline of French in Canada and Quebec, especially in Montreal. However, this bill would give people in Quebec the choice to speak English or French. Quebec is the only place where the official language is French, yet the government wants to give people the choice to speak English.
I would like my colleague to explain how we are supposed to protect French when Bill C‑13 gives federally regulated companies the choice to speak English or French.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, once again, our government is the first to recognize that French is in decline in Canada, including Quebec. That is why we are moving forward with an ambitious bill. We also must recognize that the Bloc Québécois does not represent all of Canada's francophones.
As Minister of Official Languages, I want to ensure that I am putting in place a bill that will respect official language minority communities across the country. That is why I am very pleased to move forward with this ambitious bill that will make a real difference in the lives of those residing in such communities.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, we have seen in the course of last few weeks that we have two blocs in the House of Commons: the Bloc Québécois and the “block everything party”. The “block everything party” has been the Conservative Party.
We have seen its members systematically blocking every single piece of legislation, refusing to have legislation go through to committee to improve it. These are fundamentally important things, yet what we saw this week was absolutely a travesty. Conservative MPs, when we extended hours so that everyone could speak to important legislation, decided they wanted the House of Commons—
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I am sorry to interrupt the member, but the hon. member for Portneuf—Jacques‑Cartier is rising on a point of order.
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Speaker, right now, the House is debating Bill C‑13. We are not debating procedure.
I do not need a lecture from the NDP—
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
That is debate, not a point of order.
The hon. parliamentary secretary has a point of order. As it is on the same point of order, I will say that I ruled it is not a point of order, so I do not think we need further discussion.
The hon. member for New Westminster—Burnaby can wrap up.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, the Conservative Party blocks everything. Why are the Conservatives refusing to refer this bill to committee so the committee can improve it?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.
As I said, this is the fourth day of debate. At midnight on May 12, I was still in the House, and I was quite disappointed to see the Conservative Party move an amendment and a subamendment that could have killed this bill. Believe it or not, people watch CPAC at midnight, and several people called me to say they were worried about the Conservative Party's interventions.
I repeat: We do not want to play political games. This bill is very important to me, and I want to see it passed as soon as possible. The parliamentary committee has work to do. I am eager to get this bill to committee so it can do its study and get it back to the House for another round of debate. I am also eager for the Senate to be able to do its work, which is very important too.
View René Arseneault Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I am a member of the Standing Committee on Official Languages, along with some of my colleagues currently in the House, whether virtually or in person. I can confirm that this committee has the best team, across party lines, to carry Bill C-13 forward and do exactly what we hope to achieve with it.
I would like to hear more from the minister about what she has heard from stakeholders from coast to coast to coast, wherever they are located in our big, beautiful Canada, about this new version of the legislation.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I want to thank my friend and colleague from Madawaska—Restigouche for his hard work on this file. I know he has spent a good part of his life working to advance the cause of official languages. He is doing an excellent job as chair of the Standing Committee on Official Languages.
Since I was appointed minister, I have had the privilege of meeting stakeholders from coast to coast to coast. People are telling us that they want Bill C-13 to move forward. The feedback we received on the new version of the bill was generally very positive. People appreciate the work we have done. Stakeholders have also told us that they are eager for us to start working on the regulatory framework. Of course we want the bill to pass, but there will be more work to do after that, because the associated regulations need to be developed. Let us not forget that we have an action plan and some consultations coming up soon. We want to prepare our work plan for the next five years. Passing Bill C-13 is one of the steps we hope to accomplish soon.
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Speaker, I want to commend my colleague, the chair of the Standing Committee on Official Languages. We are working together to advance the cause.
We now have the proof that this government is not really paying attention to the French language and has no real intention of protecting it. I would remind members that the first speech, the first debate, was on a Wednesday afternoon. I want to make people at home aware of this. Wednesday afternoons and Friday mornings are the two periods of the week when a member has less speaking time. The last time there was an intervention on this topic was on Thursday.
It is clear that we are in the process of pushing this bill through. This upsets the senior members of the Liberal Party, of the government in place. Unfortunately, the Minister of Official Languages is David against Goliath in her own party. If we look at what happened this week in the news, we see that three Liberal MPs are disputing the Liberal government's decision.
I would like to hear the minister's thoughts on that.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, what truly concerns me is that the Conservative Party is trying to derail this bill.
Last Thursday, the opposition criticized me for being here until midnight talking about this. Canadians expect us to be in the House to do our work as MPs, whether that is Monday morning or Friday afternoon. That is exactly what we are doing by debating this bill.
This is an ambitious bill, since we want to be sure to do everything we can to protect both of this country's beautiful official languages. I hope that we will have the co‑operation of my colleagues from all parties.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, I have a great deal of respect for the Minister of Official Languages. She is very involved and believes in her commitments.
However, I sincerely believe that the government appointment of a unilingual anglophone lieutenant governor in New Brunswick, the only bilingual province, sends the wrong message. That message conveys that the government does not care about French in minority situations, including in New Brunswick.
The minister says that the government promises never to do this again, but it just did. Furthermore, it is defending the right to do this before the courts. How can she justify that?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for the question. I have a great deal of regard for him as well.
Our government is firmly committed to doing everything it can to promote and protect both our beautiful official languages in Canada. That is a priority. I have also stated many times that we agree with the principle that the lieutenant governors of New Brunswick must be bilingual. All of Ms. Murphy's successors will be. We have stated that and we will absolutely abide by it.
What is before the courts is a constitutional matter. It has nothing to do with the principle of the bilingualism of future lieutenant governors. We have made it clear that we will absolutely ensure that the lieutenant governors of New Brunswick appointed after Ms. Murphy will be bilingual.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, we saw this week the travesty of an evening session where parliamentarians were supposed to get together and speak to important legislation, but the Conservatives turned it into a circus where debate was over which Conservative faction would put forward its speaker. It was lamentable. I have not seen, in my years in Parliament, an entire party say to the people of Canada that what is most important is its internal stuff rather than talk about important debates. We have seen bill after bill blocked by the Conservatives.
Why are the Conservatives blocking everything? Why, on a bill as important as official languages, are they refusing to get it to committee so hearings can be held and the legislation improved? These are all things I would think every member of Parliament should take to heart.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, we have to recognize that, yes, important debate happens in the House, but important debate and work also happens at the committee level. That is exactly where we are hoping this work is going to go. We want the committee members to look at this legislation with a fine-tooth comb, because we want to have the best legislation possible. We recognize the Official Languages Act has not been revised substantially over the past 30 years, so Canadians are expecting us to do a really good job and their expectations are very high.
What we saw this week in Parliament, with respect to the Conservative Party playing games, was really disheartening. I know that when my colleagues and people at home are watching this they wonder what is going on here. When we hear bells ringing every 30 minutes and the motion we have to vote on is which Conservative speaker is going to speak next, people wonder if that is really what we are doing here in Ottawa. People really want to see the work and debate being done constructively, and I certainly hope we are going to have the co-operation of all members as we move forward with this really important piece of legislation.
View Darrell Samson Profile
Lib. (NS)
Madam Speaker, I thank you for giving me the opportunity to rise today to speak to Bill C-13.
As an Acadian from Nova Scotia who worked on the ground in the field of education for 30 some years, I was able to witness first-hand the challenges we face in advancing French in our official language minority communities.
We have known about these issues for 30 years, and we know that something needs to be done to remedy them. We have taken some action over the past five or 10 years, namely with the Translation Bureau, the court challenges program, services in French and bilingual judges in the Supreme Court of Canada. Those are all very important things.
Positive measures are essential, and the courts are saying that we need to do more in that regard. Does the minister think that Bill C-13 responds to this request from the courts?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I would like to once again thank my colleague who has been working in this field for several decades. I am extremely grateful to him for that and for the work that he does here in Ottawa as the chair of the official languages caucus.
Positive measures are indeed a very important part of Bill C-13. The stakeholders we spoke to really wanted to see improvements in the definition and handling of positive measures compared to former Bill C-32. That is exactly what we did.
We took care to closely examine every word and every comma in our new bill because we want to ensure that it will really help official language minority communities. We want the positive measures to be clearly defined, because they are a very important component.
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Speaker, I think the Minister of Official Languages needs to understand that this issue is very important to the Conservative Party of Canada, and it is something we want to work on.
If she had listened to my speech during the first day of debate in the House of Commons, during which she gave parliamentarians the privilege of speaking, I made it clear that the Conservative Party was reaching out to the government to improve this bill.
This bill is a step forward, but we need to keep moving. This is important, because now is the time to take action to halt the decline of French.
Unfortunately, if this version of Bill C‑13 were to be implemented tomorrow morning, it would do nothing to halt the decline of French. If the government allows parliamentarians to speak, it will get suggestions to improve the bill in the interests of our two official languages.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I think we share the same goal of improving the bill and ultimately protecting and promoting our official languages. This debate will continue in committee, which is exactly what we want. We want to have a constructive debate with the members of the Standing Committee on Official Languages so we can produce the best version of the bill. The Official Languages Act has not been reviewed in depth in some 30 years.
We want to ensure that discussions continue so we can come up with a bill that the House of Commons can pass.
View Maxime Blanchette-Joncas Profile
BQ (QC)
Madam Speaker, I am hoping the minister can explain something to me. How will bilingualism ensure the equality of French and English? That has been the very objective of the Official Languages Act since it was created.
How can the minister explain that outside Quebec only 6% of anglophones are bilingual, whereas in Quebec almost 40% of francophones are bilingual? It seems that bilingualism only exists there. As Pierre Bourgault said so well, bilingualism is making people believe that a rabbit and a lion in the same cage are equals.
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, if we look at the components of Bill  C-32, our action plan and Bill C-13, it is clear that the common thread is the desire to achieve substantive equality. That is why we are going further with our bill. We want to ensure that we make our contribution to achieving substantive equality. It will not happen overnight. We recognize that French is in decline in this country. French is in decline in Canada. That is why we are moving forward with an ambitious bill. We absolutely want to correct this situation.
View Lindsay Mathyssen Profile
NDP (ON)
Madam Speaker, there is an organization in my riding, London—Fanshawe, called Planète Solidarité that offers services in French for children.
I have forgotten the word in French, but for children with autistm disabilities and issues with autism, and to provide those services for their parents and children in French.
How would this bill help with the people who are fighting in that organization in my riding, Planète Solidarité?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for her question. It is very important to our government to support organizations in official language minority communities. If we want to sustain the vitality of these communities, we must make the necessary investments. Ever since coming to power, our government has made historic investments in all areas of official languages. Our government will continue to do the work that needs to be done.
I am very much looking forward to starting the national consultations on developing the next action plan, which will enable us to develop a road map for the next five years. I am really looking forward to our cross-Canada consultations.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, it appears that the Conservatives do not even know what we are debating right now, based on the point of order that came earlier. The suggestion was that we were debating Bill C-13. We are not. We are actually debating a motion to time allocate it, because we have to: It is a position that the Conservatives have put us in.
The member for New Westminster—Burnaby actually was spot-on as to why we are in the situation that we are in: Conservatives are just putting up person after person for no reason other than to obstruct this Parliament. We saw that on Monday night, when they put up speaker after speaker on a bill that they supposedly support.
Can the minister please explain to the House how she sees the difficulties coming from the other side?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, again, I think that we recognize that Bill C-13 is a really important piece of legislation. Yes, debate has happened in the House. This is the fourth day, but we want this debate to continue. There have been a lot of games that have been played over the past number of weeks, and we certainly do not want to see this bill stalled. Canadians are expecting us to take action when it comes to official languages, and people are watching this debate very closely.
That is why we are moving forward with making sure that we finish the debate today in the House. From there, the committees will be able to do the important work that they have to do.
The committee's work is independent. It is going to be able to look at this bill and make the proper assessment of it.
View Joël Godin Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Speaker, how does the minister feel today knowing that the House is debating Bill C‑13 while government lawyers are preparing a court challenge against francophones in British Columbia?
View Ginette Petitpas Taylor Profile
Lib. (NB)
Madam Speaker, as the Minister for Official Languages, I am very pleased to present Bill C-13. As I mentioned, I hope that the debates will continue so that our bill can be improved.
However, this is the fourth day of debate in the House, and the Standing Committee on Official Languages will continue the work. I look forward to closely following this debate.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
The question is on the motion.
If a member of a recognized party present in the House wishes to request a recorded division or that the motion be adopted on division, I would invite them to rise and indicate it to the Chair.
The hon. member for Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne.
View Sherry Romanado Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, I request that the motion be carried on division.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
The hon. member for Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston.
View Scott Reid Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I request a recorded division.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I declare the motion carried.
View Lindsay Mathyssen Profile
NDP (ON)
Madam Speaker, there has been consultation among the parties and I believe if you seek it you will find unanimous consent for the following motion:
That, notwithstanding any standing order, special order or usual practice of the House, the House do now proceed to Statements by Members followed by Oral Questions, and that the usual allotment of time be afforded for each rubric.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
All those opposed to the hon. member moving the motion will please say nay.
Okay.
The House has heard the terms of the motion. All those opposed to the motion will please say nay.
View Joanne Thompson Profile
Lib. (NL)
Madam Speaker, in my beautiful riding of St. John's East, 336 kilometres of magnificent hiking trails await. The East Coast Trail is made up of 25 hiking paths, and along it we see towering cliffs and headlands, sea stacks, fjords, and a natural wave-driven geyser. There are also seabird colonies, whales, icebergs, historic sites and a 50-metre suspension bridge.
There is no better way to see the natural beauty and cultural heritage of Newfoundland and Labrador's eastern edge than the East Coast Trail. Since 1994, the East Coast Trail Association has worked to reopen trails that have linked communities for generations.
I am pleased to share that an additional 52 kilometres of trails and three paths from Topsail Beach to Cape St. Francis has now been opened. The trail raiser community hike will be in full force on June 4, and I invite everyone to come to the East Coast Trail.
View Colin Carrie Profile
CPC (ON)
View Colin Carrie Profile
2022-05-20 11:23
Madam Speaker, this week is Naturopathic Medicine Week. As a chiropractor myself, I understand and have seen first-hand what Canada's incredible naturopathic doctors do. Canada's naturopathic doctors are primary care providers and experts in natural medicine. Naturopathic medicine blends the healing power of nature with modern scientific knowledge to offer a new perspective on safe and effective ways to restore health.
Focusing on health promotion and disease prevention, naturopathic doctors work with patients to identify the root causes of disease and to identify all the factors that are affecting their health. Addressing a variety of health concerns including acute and chronic conditions, naturopathic medicine can ease symptoms and help to reduce the use of prescription medications, making it a valuable complement to conventional treatments.
Especially as we emerge from the COVID-19 virus, I am asking all members of the House to join me in thanking our naturopathic doctors for all they have been doing to help patients in their communities across Canada.
View Lena Metlege Diab Profile
Lib. (NS)
Madam Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge a dedicated physician, Dr. Joseph Lawen, who recently announced his upcoming retirement. I have known Dr. Lawen and his family for a long time through his involvement in our community and through his church Saint Antonios.
During his 33 years as a urologist in Halifax, his work has had an immeasurable impact on his patients and their families across Atlantic Canada. Throughout his career, he has performed over 2,000 kidney transplants, more than any other transplant surgeon at the QEII. He has been a true pioneer, constantly developing his expertise in a very complex surgical procedure.
Though he intended to retire in 2019, Dr. Lawen stayed on another three years to mentor his successor. He has also trained over 50 fellows, hundreds of residents and many more medical students. He also inspired his eldest son, Tarek, to follow in his footsteps.
I ask all members to join me in thanking Dr. Lawen for his remarkable career and service.
View Bonita Zarrillo Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I rise today on behalf of young women in my riding of Port Moody—Coquitlam who have expressed to me sincere concern regarding the Supreme Court of Canada ruling on self-induced intoxication in cases of violent crimes.
Youth-led, non-profit BOLT Safety Society wrote to me stating, “Court decision threatens Section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights, which affirms everyone the right to life, liberty and security. In no manner does defending perpetrators for their conscious choice of self-intoxication guarantee Canadians this right, and this bolsters a dangerous narrative in a justice system that is built upon precedents”.
In Canada, there are five million survivors of sexual assault. With this ruling, figures are set to boom, putting more woman, girls and LGBTQ2+ Canadians at risk as overwhelmingly the defendants are men and the victims are women. The gaps in this law relating to self-induced intoxication need to be amended immediately.
View Angelo Iacono Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, over 3,300 young athletes from across the province will be participating in the 55th Quebec Games in Laval from July 22 to July 30.
The Quebec Games are more than just a competition. They are an excellent opportunity to celebrate sports and sportsmanship. This event enables young people from everywhere in Quebec to show off their talent in their favourite sport and to build relationships with their peers. It is an unforgettable and life-changing experience.
These athletes will serve as an inspiration to young people in Laval through their discipline and perseverance. It is an honour for our city to host such an event.
Let us play together. Sports unite us.
I encourage the people of Laval to come out in great numbers to cheer on our athletes. To the athletes, I say that nothing is impossible with hope and hard work. Game on, Laval.
View Darren Fisher Profile
Lib. (NS)
Madam Speaker, it is paddling and rowing season in Dartmouth—Cole Harbour. Folks from all walks of life are getting their canoes and their kayaks out and heading out onto the incredible lakes and waterways. There is a reason why Dartmouth is called the “City of Lakes”. We are home to the world's very best competition course, historic Lake Banook. In fact, this beautiful lake will host incredible competitions this year, such as Canoe '22, and the ICF Canoe Sprint and Paracanoe World Championships.
In Dartmouth, folks do not ask if one paddles, they ask where one paddles. From Abenaki to Senobe, North Star to Banook and, of course, to my home club, Mic Mac, we have incredible aquatic clubs that inspire kids to enjoy sports, and to even become Olympic athletes.
I wish Dartmouth—Cole Harbour a safe and incredible paddling and rowing season in 2022.
View Kelly Block Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Speaker, the irrational stubbornness of the government when it comes to vaccine mandates is frustrating to a broad range of Canadians. Whether it is federal public sector unions, the tourism and travel industry, military and RCMP members or Canadians who just want to travel, they want the government to end the mandates. Continuing to impose mandates is causing stress and hardship. Businesses are hurt as interprovincial and international travel is more difficult.
One example is Josh, a farmer in my riding, who is at risk of losing hundreds of thousands of dollars due to the uncertainty of international travel. Whether impacted financially or not by the federal mandates, all Canadians are negatively impacted by the divisiveness of the Prime Minister.
Regardless of their vaccination status, many feel like the government has created two classes of citizens. This has to stop. Canada needs to join the rest of the world and get back to normal.
View Jenna Sudds Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I am deeply proud of the deep telecom history and innovation in my riding of Kanata—Carleton. The decision to prohibit Huawei and ZTE from accessing and developing within Canada's 5G networks is the right decision, as 5G is a critical piece of Canada's digital infrastructure. As 5G technology becomes more prevalent, our government must be stringent about which trusted partners have access to our highly integrated technological realm.
Prohibiting foreign firms such Huawei and ZTE from accessing our network will reinforce the confidence and integrity of our telecommunications industry. It will invite continued partnership and development from trusted firms.
I look forward to the forthcoming legislative framework to codify Canada's commitment and protect our telecommunications industry from exploitation.
View Jasraj Singh Hallan Profile
CPC (AB)
Madam Speaker, May 18 was Mullivaikkal Remembrance Day. This year marks the 13th anniversary of the genocide, where tens of thousands of lives were tragically lost near the end of the Sri Lankan civil war. The Tamil diaspora in Canada has a rich history and is deeply connected to our communities all across the country. Many of them came to Canada because of the civil war and to start a new life in safety, free from persecution and violence.
On May 18, we remember the pain, the loss and brutality faced by Tamil Canadians and Tamils. We remember all of those who disappeared and were murdered. As we observe Mullivaikkal Remembrance Day, we must commit ourselves to stand with all Tamil people in the search for truth and justice. We join in the desire to create a more just world, free from this inhumane and shameful violence.
View Mike Kelloway Profile
Lib. (NS)
Madam Speaker, yesterday and today, Cape Breton University hosted their spring convocation ceremonies, celebrating the class of 2022. As a CBU graduate myself, I welcome the new class to the Cape Breton University alumni family. I have no doubt that this is just the beginning of a long road of success, happiness and well-being for each of them.
On behalf of all members in the House, I would like to extend a congratulations to the graduating class on achieving a huge milestone today. Each graduate has shown immense resiliency in this chapter while navigating the new world of online learning and doing all of that during a global pandemic.
I would like to extend a special congratulations to two members of my team: Natasha Kochhar, graduating with her MBA, and Madlyn O'Brien, graduating with her bachelor of arts in political science. Both Madlyn and Natasha committed to finishing their degrees while working exceptionally hard for the people of Cape Breton—Canso. I extend my thanks to them and to the graduating class.
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Speaker, it is never a good thing when the government turns a blind eye to violence, especially if it is politically motivated. The character of our nation is at greater risk if there is any perception of a double standard based on political bias and interests. Canadians do not want to go down that dangerous path.
On February 17, we saw a vicious attack on the Coastal GasLink work camp in British Columbia. A mob of masked attackers carried torches and flare guns, and wielded axes, causing millions of dollars in damage. There have been reports of ongoing damage to vehicles and private property linked to executives of the bank that is funding the project. Destroying property can all too easily spread to harming human life as well, and it inspires similar crimes.
Despite a lot of talk about an investigation by over 40 RCMP officers, we have seen no action from the current government, not like we saw with its reaction to the bouncy castles and hot tubs here in Ottawa. With its so-called emergency out of the way, it is time for the Liberals to get serious and deal with real crime and violence.
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Madam Speaker, virtual Parliament was meant to be a temporary measure to deal with a worldwide pandemic, but it has the effect of reducing the accountability of government. That is fine with the current Prime Minister and his cabal, but it should not be fine with Canadians.
As workers across the country are back at work, is it not a little rich for the government to insist that it is not safe to do our work in person? We are no more special than the rest of Canadians. Trying to represent our constituents from the comfort of our homes just does not cut it. Continuing with a hybrid parliament diminishes this institution.
Conservatives believe it is time to get democracy working again. The Prime Minister and his NDP-Liberal government have demonstrated repeatedly that they are willing to do anything to avoid the oversight of Parliament. Virtual sittings reduce accountability and transparency in our democratic parliamentary system. We have seen it clearly in question period, where answers to serious questions are obfuscated at best.
This needs to end now, so we can bring back a real democratic Parliament to Canadians.
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