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Results: 1 - 15 of 99
2020-04-20 [p.401]
Q-378 — Mrs. Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke) — With regard to Health Canada: (a) what is the department’s official position on the health risks and increased health-care costs associated with (i) 5G wireless technology, (ii) exposure to radio frequency radiation (RF or RFR), (iii) exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF); (b) for each official position in (a), when was the position last updated and what was the position previous to the last update; (c) has the department ever funded studies on the health risks or increased health-care costs associated with (i) 5G wireless technology, (ii) exposure to RF or RFR, (iii) exposure to EMF; (d) if the answer to (c) is affirmative, what are the details of the studies, broken down by (i) title, (ii) author, (iii) date published, (iv), findings, (v) amount spent on funding; (e) has the department ever published a report on the health risks or increased health-care costs associated with (i) 5G wireless technology, (ii) exposure to RF or RFR, (iii) exposure to EMF; (f) if the answer to (e) is affirmative, what are the details of the report, broken down by (i) title, (ii) author, (iii) date published, (iv) findings, (v) internal tracking number; (g) have any briefing materials been produced on the health risks or increased health-care costs associated with (i) 5G wireless technology, (ii) exposure to RF or RFR, (iii) exposure to EMF; and (h) if the answer to (g) is affirmative, what are the details, broken down by (i) title, (ii) author, (iii) recipient, (iv) date prepared, (v) internal tracking number? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-431-378.
2020-01-27 [p.98]
Q-165 — Mr. Dowdall (Simcoe—Grey) — With regard to contracts under $25,000 for communications research services or professional communications services signed since January 1, 2018: what are the details of each contract, including (i) vendor, (ii) date and duration of contract, (iii) amount, (iv) description of goods or services provided? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-431-165.
2019-06-18 [p.5693]
— by Mr. Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development) — Copy of Order in Council P.C. 2019-803, dated June 16, 2019, concerning the Order Issuing a Direction to the CRTC on implementing the Canadian Telecommunications Policy Objectives to Promote Competition, Affordability, Consumer Interests and Innovation, pursuant to the Telecommunications Act, S.C. 1993, c. 38, sbs. 10(7). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-927-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology)
2019-06-11 [p.5530]
Pursuant to Order made Monday, June 10, 2019, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Ms. Trudel (Jonquière), — That, given telecommunication services in Canada cost more than most other countries in the world, leaving far too many Canadians with unaffordable, inadequate or no service at all, the House call on the government to implement measures that will make those services more affordable, including: (a) a price cap to ensure every Canadian saves money on their bill; (b) abolishing data caps for broadband Internet and mandating that companies create unlimited data plans at affordable rates for wireless services; (c) putting an end to egregious and outrageous sales and services practices through a Telecom Consumers’ Bill of Rights; (d) revisiting the structure of the spectrum auction to make sure everyday Canadians benefit most from the revenue, rather than repeating the failures of previous Liberal and Conservative governments, which squandered almost $20 billion from previous auctions; and (e) directing the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to reverse their rural and remote broadband implementation policy, which condemns these areas, including many Indigenous communities, to years of substandard broadband and wireless services.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 1349 -- Vote no 1349) - View vote details.
YEAS: 42, NAYS: 246
2019-06-10 [p.5513]
The Order was read for the consideration of the Business of Supply.
Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Ms. Trudel (Jonquière), moved, — That, given telecommunication services in Canada cost more than most other countries in the world, leaving far too many Canadians with unaffordable, inadequate or no service at all, the House call on the government to implement measures that will make those services more affordable, including: (a) a price cap to ensure every Canadian saves money on their bill; (b) abolishing data caps for broadband Internet and mandating that companies create unlimited data plans at affordable rates for wireless services; (c) putting an end to egregious and outrageous sales and services practices through a Telecom Consumers’ Bill of Rights; (d) revisiting the structure of the spectrum auction to make sure everyday Canadians benefit most from the revenue, rather than repeating the failures of previous Liberal and Conservative governments, which squandered almost $20 billion from previous auctions; and (e) directing the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to reverse their rural and remote broadband implementation policy, which condemns these areas, including many Indigenous communities, to years of substandard broadband and wireless services.
Debate arose thereon.
2019-06-10 [p.5518]
By unanimous consent, it was ordered, — That, at the conclusion of today's debate on the opposition motion in the name of the Member for New Westminster—Burnaby, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, June 11, 2019, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2019-06-10 [p.5519]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Ms. Trudel (Jonquière), in relation to the Business of Supply.
The debate continued.
2019-06-10 [p.5519]
Pursuant to Order made earlier today, the question was deemed put on the motion and the recorded division was deemed requested and deferred until Tuesday, June 11, 2019, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2019-05-08 [p.5275]
Pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Amos (Pontiac), seconded by Mr. Graham (Laurentides—Labelle), — That, in the opinion of the House: (a) a reliable and accessible digital infrastructure, from broadband Internet to wireless telecommunications and beyond, is essential and enables Canadians to seize new business opportunities, create jobs and connect with the global economy; (b) a reliable and accessible digital infrastructure, particularly wireless telecommunications infrastructure, plays a critical role in securing the health and safety of Canadians, notably during emergency situations caused by extreme weather events; (c) innovation occurs everywhere, in rural and remote regions just as much as in urban centres, and all Canadians deserve an equal opportunity to succeed in the digital economy as a matter of fundamental fairness; (d) the government should (i) continue in its efforts to support Canadians, especially those in rural regions, in accessing the digital infrastructure they need to innovate, create economic opportunity and maintain public safety, (ii) examine the possibility of enabling further investments in rural digital infrastructure, including by reviewing the terms and conditions of the federal infrastructure program Investing in Canada, to incentivize investments in rural connectivity by the private sector and by leveraging funds from other orders of government, (iii) continue to work with telecommunication companies, provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities and relevant emergency response organizations to enhance rural connectivity and ensure maximum preparedness in emergency situations; (e) the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology should be instructed to undertake a comprehensive study on rural wireless infrastructure, focusing particularly on (i) the underlying causes of, and prospective solutions to the gaps in wireless infrastructure deployment in rural Canada, (ii) the regulatory role of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, (iii) the fiscal and regulatory approaches to incentivize more significant investments in rural wireless infrastructure, and report to the House at its earliest convenience; and (f) the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security should be instructed to undertake a comprehensive study on the public safety dimensions of wireless infrastructure deployment in rural Canada, and report to the House at its earliest convenience. (Private Members' Business M-208)
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 1313 -- Vote no 1313) - View vote details.
YEAS: 276, NAYS: 0
2019-05-03 [p.5237]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Amos (Pontiac), seconded by Mr. Graham (Laurentides—Labelle), — That, in the opinion of the House: (a) a reliable and accessible digital infrastructure, from broadband Internet to wireless telecommunications and beyond, is essential and enables Canadians to seize new business opportunities, create jobs and connect with the global economy; (b) a reliable and accessible digital infrastructure, particularly wireless telecommunications infrastructure, plays a critical role in securing the health and safety of Canadians, notably during emergency situations caused by extreme weather events; (c) innovation occurs everywhere, in rural and remote regions just as much as in urban centres, and all Canadians deserve an equal opportunity to succeed in the digital economy as a matter of fundamental fairness; (d) the government should (i) continue in its efforts to support Canadians, especially those in rural regions, in accessing the digital infrastructure they need to innovate, create economic opportunity and maintain public safety, (ii) examine the possibility of enabling further investments in rural digital infrastructure, including by reviewing the terms and conditions of the federal infrastructure program Investing in Canada, to incentivize investments in rural connectivity by the private sector and by leveraging funds from other orders of government, (iii) continue to work with telecommunication companies, provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities and relevant emergency response organizations to enhance rural connectivity and ensure maximum preparedness in emergency situations; (e) the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology should be instructed to undertake a comprehensive study on rural wireless infrastructure, focusing particularly on (i) the underlying causes of, and prospective solutions to the gaps in wireless infrastructure deployment in rural Canada, (ii) the regulatory role of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, (iii) the fiscal and regulatory approaches to incentivize more significant investments in rural wireless infrastructure, and report to the House at its earliest convenience; and (f) the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security should be instructed to undertake a comprehensive study on the public safety dimensions of wireless infrastructure deployment in rural Canada, and report to the House at its earliest convenience. (Private Members' Business M-208)
The debate continued.
2019-05-03 [p.5238]
The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the recorded division was deferred until Wednesday, May 8, 2019, immediately before the time provided for Private Members' Business.
2019-02-26 [p.4657]
— by Mr. Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development) — Proposed Order under section 8 of the Telecommunications Act — Policy Direction to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (JUS-6068783), pursuant to the Telecommunications Act, S.C. 1993, c. 38, sbs. 10(1). — Sessional Paper No. 8560-421-909-01. (Pursuant to Standing Order 32(5), permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology)
2019-02-20 [p.4603]
Mr. Amos (Pontiac), seconded by Mr. Graham (Laurentides—Labelle), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House: (a) a reliable and accessible digital infrastructure, from broadband Internet to wireless telecommunications and beyond, is essential and enables Canadians to seize new business opportunities, create jobs and connect with the global economy; (b) a reliable and accessible digital infrastructure, particularly wireless telecommunications infrastructure, plays a critical role in securing the health and safety of Canadians, notably during emergency situations caused by extreme weather events; (c) innovation occurs everywhere, in rural and remote regions just as much as in urban centres, and all Canadians deserve an equal opportunity to succeed in the digital economy as a matter of fundamental fairness; (d) the government should (i) continue in its efforts to support Canadians, especially those in rural regions, in accessing the digital infrastructure they need to innovate, create economic opportunity and maintain public safety, (ii) examine the possibility of enabling further investments in rural digital infrastructure, including by reviewing the terms and conditions of the federal infrastructure program Investing in Canada, to incentivize investments in rural connectivity by the private sector and by leveraging funds from other orders of government, (iii) continue to work with telecommunication companies, provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities and relevant emergency response organizations to enhance rural connectivity and ensure maximum preparedness in emergency situations; (e) the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology should be instructed to undertake a comprehensive study on rural wireless infrastructure, focusing particularly on (i) the underlying causes of, and prospective solutions to the gaps in wireless infrastructure deployment in rural Canada, (ii) the regulatory role of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, (iii) the fiscal and regulatory approaches to incentivize more significant investments in rural wireless infrastructure, and report to the House at its earliest convenience; and (f) the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security should be instructed to undertake a comprehensive study on the public safety dimensions of wireless infrastructure deployment in rural Canada, and report to the House at its earliest convenience. (Private Members' Business M-208)
Debate arose thereon.
2018-09-17 [p.3947]
Q-1842 — Mr. Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex) — With regard to the total amount of late-payment charges for telephone services, since September 1, 2016, and broken down by late charges incurred by government department, agency, Crown corporation, or other government entity: what is the total amount late-payment charges and interest charges incurred in each month for services provided by (i) Rogers, (ii) Bell, (iii) Telus, (iv) other cellular or cable provider? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-421-1842.
2018-05-23 [p.3275]
Pursuant to Standing Order 93(1), the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Oliver (Oakville), seconded by Mr. Graham (Laurentides—Labelle), — That the House: (a) recognize that the Internet has thrived due to net neutrality principles of openness, transparency, freedom, and innovation; (b) recognize that Canada has strong net neutrality rules in place that are grounded in the Telecommunications Act and enforced by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC); (c) recognize that preserving an open Internet and the free flow of information is vital for the freedom of expression and diversity, education, entrepreneurship, innovation, Canadian democracy, and the future economic and social prosperity of Canadians; (d) express its firm support for net neutrality and the continued preservation of an open Internet, free from unjust discrimination and interference; and (e) call on the government to include net neutrality as a guiding principle of the upcoming Telecommunications Act and Broadcasting Act reviews in order to explore opportunities to further enshrine in legislation the principles of neutrality in the provision and carriage of all telecommunications services. (Private Members' Business M-168)
The question was put on the motion and it was agreed to on the following division:
(Division No. 674 -- Vote no 674) - View vote details.
YEAS: 277, NAYS: 0
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