Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 12 of 12
View Bob Saroya Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bob Saroya Profile
2020-03-11 15:04 [p.1936]
Mr. Speaker, across the GTA there are shootings almost daily. We know from the Toronto police chief that the weapons of choice for criminals are smuggled guns. When caught, these dangerous criminals get bail. When convicted, they get a slap on the wrist.
Will the Prime Minister commit today to supporting my bill, which would keep criminals behind bars who knowingly use smuggled guns?
Monsieur le Président, des fusillades surviennent presque chaque jour dans la région du Grand Toronto. Le chef de police de Toronto a déclaré que les armes de prédilection des criminels sont les armes passées en contrebande. Lorsqu'ils sont arrêtés, ces dangereux criminels sont libérés sous caution. Lorsqu'ils sont reconnus coupables, on leur donne une tape sur la main.
Est-ce que le premier ministre va s'engager aujourd'hui à appuyer mon projet de loi, qui permettrait de garder derrière les barreaux les criminels qui utilisent sciemment des armes de contrebande?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2020-03-11 15:05 [p.1936]
Mr. Speaker, we are significantly strengthening border control measures to interdict the supply of illegal guns from the United States, but we know that will not be enough. That is why we have made the decision to strengthen gun control by banning assault-style weapons and by moving forward on giving cities the opportunity to restrict handguns within their city limits.
I encourage the member opposite, if he cares about Canadians who are suffering from the impacts of gun violence, to support our decision to strengthen gun control rather than the Conservatives' approach to weaken gun control and make Canadians less safe.
Monsieur le Président, nous avons grandement renforcé les mesures de contrôle à la frontière afin d'empêcher la contrebande d'armes en provenance des États-Unis, mais nous savons que ce ne sera pas suffisant. C'est pourquoi nous avons décidé de renforcer le contrôle des armes à feu en interdisant les armes de type fusils d'assaut et en permettant aux villes d'interdire les armes de poing sur leur territoire.
S'il se soucie des Canadiens qui souffrent des conséquences de la violence liée aux armes à feu, j'invite le député d'en face à appuyer notre décision de renforcer les mesures de contrôle des armes à feu plutôt que l'approche conservatrice qui vise à affaiblir ces mesures et à compromettre la sécurité des Canadiens.
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)
I am ready to rule on the questions of privilege raised on February 25 by the member for Fundy Royal and on February 27 by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons concerning the premature disclosure of two bills.
Allow me first to recapitulate the arguments presented by the two members.
On February 25, 2020, the member for Fundy Royal raised a question of privilege regarding a Canadian Press article published online on February 24 that detailed specific information contained in Bill C-7, an act to amend the Criminal Code with regard to medical assistance in dying, even before it was introduced in the House by the Minister of Justice. The member quoted from the article in question, which mentioned that anonymous sources allegedly discussed the contents of the bill with the journalist while knowing full well that doing so contravened the practices of the House. The member for Fundy Royal feels that this premature disclosure of the bill constitutes a breach of his privileges and contempt of the House.
On February 27, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons raised a question of privilege also concerning the premature disclosure of a bill.
During this intervention, the parliamentary secretary said that a bill entitled “an act to amend the Criminal Code (unlawfully imported firearms)”, put on notice on February 21 by the member for Markham—Unionville, was also the subject of an article published on February 24 in iPolitics before it was introduced in the House. On February 25, the member put another bill on notice, one with a slightly different title, “an act to amend the Criminal Code (possession of unlawfully imported firearms)”. The bill became Bill C-238 after it was introduced on February 27.
The parliamentary secretary feels that the provisions of Bill C-238 correspond to what was described in the iPolitics article, and he presumed, therefore, that the two bills are in large measure the same. The parliamentary secretary suggested that this disclosure contravenes the principle that members are the first to know the contents of a bill. Since a breach of privilege was apparently committed, he suggested referring the matter to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.
On February 28, the member for Markham—Unionville apologized and admitted that he had indeed discussed the contents of the first bill with fellow members and journalists. He said that he had acted in ignorance of the rule prohibiting discussion of bills on notice before they are introduced in the House. He also explained the reasons for the change in title between the two bills.
The same day, the parliamentary secretary to the leader of the government in the House presented his most sincere apologies for the premature disclosure of Bill C-7, saying in passing that no one within the government had been authorized to discuss the bill before its introduction in the House.
I believe that the whole matter can be summarized as follows.
First, based on a reading of the Canadian Press article on Bill C-7 on medical assistance in dying, and in the absence of any explanation to the contrary, I must conclude that the anonymous sources mentioned were well aware of our customs and practices and chose to ignore them. It seems clear to me that the content of the bill was disclosed prematurely while it was on notice and before it was introduced in the House.
Second, in his apology, the member for Markham—Unionville made it clear that his two bills on firearms were substantially the same, apart from the slightly different titles. It seems clear to the Chair, therefore, that the member also discussed a bill before its introduction. It matters little that the bill in question was subsequently withdrawn and never introduced in the House.
The rule on the confidentiality of bills on notice exists to ensure that members, in their role as legislators, are the first to know their content when they are introduced. Although it is completely legitimate to carry out consultations when developing a bill or to announce one’s intention to introduce a bill by referring to its public title available on the Notice Paper and Order Paper, it is forbidden to reveal specific measures contained in a bill at the time it is put on notice.
In this case, it is clear that the content of the bills, both the private member's bill and the government bill, were revealed to the media before their introduction and first reading. The question now is to determine whether the disclosure of these bills was a breach of the House’s privilege and whether mitigating circumstances should be considered.
In this instance, I am prepared to give the benefit of the doubt to the member for Markham—Unionville when he says that he was unaware of the rules regarding the confidentiality of bills on notice. I believe that his remarks were sincere and that he believed he was advancing his cause in a legitimate fashion.
My analysis is different for the question of privilege raised by the member for Fundy Royal concerning government Bill C-7. Permit me to quote a part of the article at the heart of this matter:
The sources spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to reveal details of the bill prior to its tabling in the House of Commons this afternoon.
Everything indicates that the act was deliberate. It is difficult to posit a misunderstanding or ignorance of the rules in this case.
On April 19, 2016, my predecessor, faced with a similar situation regarding the premature disclosure of Bill C-14 on medical assistance in dying, found a prima facie case of privilege in a decision that can be located on pages 2442 and 2443 of the Debates.
In light of the information provided by the member for Fundy Royal, the precedents and the current practice in this matter, the Chair notes the existence of sufficient grounds to conclude that there was a prima facie breach of the privilege of the House and the members and their right to be the first to know the contents of Bill C-7.
Consequently, I now invite the member for Fundy Royal to move the appropriate motion.
Je suis prêt à me prononcer sur les questions de privilège soulevées le 25 février par le député de Fundy Royal et le 27 février par le secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes concernant la divulgation prématurée de deux projets de loi.
Permettez-moi tout d'abord de rappeler les arguments présentés par l'un et l'autre des députés.
Le 25 février dernier, le député de Fundy Royal a soulevé une question de privilège expliquant qu'un article de La Presse canadienne mis en ligne le 24 février reprenait de l'information détaillée contenue dans le projet de loi C-7, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (aide médicale à mourir) avant même qu'il ne soit déposé à la Chambre par le ministre de la Justice. Le député a cité l'article en question, lequel mentionne notamment que des sources anonymes auraient discuté du contenu du projet de loi avec le journaliste tout en sachant que ceci contrevenait aux pratiques de la Chambre. Pour le député de Fundy Royal, cette divulgation prématurée du contenu du projet de loi porte atteinte à ses privilèges et constitue un outrage à la Chambre.
Le 27 février, le secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes a soulevé une question de privilège portant également sur la divulgation prématurée d'un projet de loi.
Pendant son intervention, le secrétaire parlementaire a fait remarquer qu'un projet de loi intitulé Loi modifiant le Code criminel (armes à feu importées illégalement), mis en avis le 21 février par le député de Markham—Unionville, a lui aussi fait l'objet d'un article publié le 24 février dans iPolitics avant son dépôt à la Chambre. Le 25 février, le député mettait en avis un nouveau projet de loi avec un titre légèrement différent, intitulé Loi modifiant le Code criminel (possession d'armes à feu importées illégalement). Ce projet de loi est devenu depuis C-238 après son dépôt le 27 février.
Aux yeux du secrétaire parlementaire, les dispositions du projet de loi C-238 correspondent à ce qui est décrit dans l'article d'iPolitics et il supposait ainsi que les deux projets de loi sont similaires dans une large mesure. Le secrétaire parlementaire suggérait que cette divulgation va à l'encontre du principe voulant que les députés soient les premiers à prendre connaissance de la teneur d'un projet de loi. Puisqu'une atteinte au privilège aurait ainsi été commise, il suggérait de renvoyer l'affaire au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.
Le 28 février, le député de Markham—Unionville s'est excusé et il a indiqué qu'il avait effectivement discuté du contenu du premier projet de loi avec des collègues députés et des journalistes. Il a affirmé avoir agi de la sorte ne connaissant pas la règle interdisant de discuter de projets de loi en avis avant leur dépôt à la Chambre. Il a aussi expliqué les raisons entourant le changement de titre entre ses deux projets de loi.
Le même jour, le secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre a présenté ses excuses les plus sincères pour la divulgation prématurée du projet de loi C-7 en précisant au passage que personne au sein du gouvernement n'avait été autorisé à discuter du projet de loi avant son dépôt à la Chambre.
Je crois qu’il est possible de résumer le tout de la manière suivante:
Premièrement, à la lecture de l’article de La Presse canadienne portant sur le projet de loi C-7 sur l’aide médicale à mourir, et en l’absence de quelconque explication contraire, je dois conclure que les sources anonymes mentionnées étaient bien au courant de nos us et coutumes et ont délibérément choisi de les ignorer. Il m’apparaît clair que le contenu du projet de loi a été divulgué prématurément, alors qu’il était en avis et qu’il n’avait pas encore été déposé à la Chambre.
Deuxièmement, lorsqu’il s’est excusé, le député de Markham—Unionville a rendu évident le fait que ses deux projets de loi portant sur les armes à feu étaient substantiellement les mêmes, outre des titres légèrement différents. Il appert donc à la présidence que le député a lui aussi bel et bien discuté d’un projet de loi en avis avant son dépôt. Peu importe si ce projet de loi spécifique a par la suite été retiré et jamais déposé à la Chambre.
La règle entourant la confidentialité des projets de loi en avis existe pour assurer que les députés, à titre de législateurs, sont les premiers à en prendre connaissance au moment de leur dépôt. Même s’il est tout à fait légitime de faire des consultations durant l’élaboration d’un projet de loi ou encore d’annoncer l’intention de déposer un projet de loi en référant à son titre public disponible au Feuilleton et au Feuilleton des avis, il est défendu de dévoiler les mesures spécifiques contenues dans un projet de loi dès sa mise en avis.
Dans le cas présent, il est clair que le contenu des projets de loi, autant celui émanant d’un député que du gouvernement, a été révélé aux médias avant leur dépôt et leur première lecture. La question est maintenant de déterminer si la divulgation de ces projets de loi a porté atteinte au privilège de la Chambre et si des circonstances atténuantes devraient être prises en compte.
En l’état actuel, je suis prêt à donner le bénéfice du doute au député de Markham—Unionville lorsqu’il a affirmé ignorer les règles entourant la confidentialité des projets de loi en avis. Je crois qu’il était sincère dans ses propos et croyait faire avancer sa cause en toute légitimité.
Mon analyse est différente pour ce qui est de la question de privilège soulevée par le député de Fundy Royal concernant le projet de loi C-7 du gouvernement. Je me permets ici de lire une partie de l’article à la base de cette affaire:
Les sources ont parlé sous le couvert de l'anonymat parce qu'elles n'étaient pas autorisées à dévoiler les détails du projet de loi avant la présentation de celui-ci cet après-midi, à la Chambre des communes.
Tout indique que l’acte était délibéré. Il est difficile de faire valoir une incompréhension ou une ignorance des règles dans ce cas-ci.
Le 19 avril 2016, mon prédécesseur, faisant face à une question similaire concernant la divulgation prématurée du projet de loi C-14 sur l’aide médicale à mourir, a jugé l’affaire fondée de prime abord dans une décision qu’on peut trouver aux pages 2442 et 2443 des Débats.
Compte tenu de l’information présentée par le député de Fundy Royal, des précédents et de la pratique actuelle en la matière, la présidence constate l’existence de motifs suffisants pour conclure qu’il y a, de prime abord, atteinte au privilège de la Chambre et des députés dans leur droit de prendre connaissance en premier du projet de loi C-7.
Conséquemment, j’invite maintenant le député de Fundy Royal à proposer la motion appropriée.
View Bob Saroya Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bob Saroya Profile
2020-02-28 10:34 [p.1731]
Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order regarding the parliamentary secretary to the government House leader's question of privilege yesterday, regarding my bill.
I worked hard on this bill. I did speak to some of the MPs from the Liberal side and I spoke to a reporter as well, not knowing the rules. I apologize. This is a good bill. I still think it is a good bill. I did not know the rule not to speak to reporters before the bill was tabled.
Regarding the change to the title of the bill, this is the title I always wanted. It is a clear title. I asked my office staff whether we can change the title of the bill and they said I can, which I did.
I appreciate your time, Madam Speaker.
Madame la Présidente, j'invoque le Règlement à propos de la question de privilège qu'a soulevée hier le secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes au sujet de mon projet de loi.
J'ai travaillé fort à l'élaboration de ce projet de loi. J'en ai effectivement parlé à quelques députés libéraux ainsi qu'à un journaliste, car j'ignorais les règles. Je m'en excuse. C'est une bonne mesure législative, j'en demeure convaincu. J'ignorais qu'il ne fallait pas parler d'un projet de loi aux journalistes avant son dépôt.
Pour ce qui est du changement de titre, le titre actuel est celui que je souhaitais depuis toujours. Il est clair. J'ai demandé à mes employés si nous pouvions changer le titre du projet de loi, et ils m'ont dit que c'était possible. Je l'ai donc fait.
Je vous remercie de votre attention, madame la Présidente.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I know that this matter was raised yesterday. I appreciate the additional comments from the member for Markham—Unionville. We will certainly add it to the information that was provided yesterday, and a response will be forthcoming.
Je suis consciente que cette question a été soulevée hier. Je remercie le député de Markham—Unionville d'avoir apporté des précisions. Nous les ajouterons aux renseignements fournis hier. Une réponse suivra sous peu.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-02-28 12:10 [p.1750]
Madam Speaker, in light of an apology from the member for Markham—Unionville with respect to the premature disclosure of his bill, I too, would like to apologize unreservedly for the premature disclosure of the contents of Bill C-7, medical assistance in dying.
I would like to state categorically that no one from the government was authorized to speak publicly on this bill prior to its introduction.
Madame la Présidente, à la suite des excuses formulées par le député de Markham—Unionville à propos de la divulgation prématurée de son projet de loi, je tiens, moi aussi, à présenter mes excuses les plus sincères pour la divulgation prématurée du contenu du projet de loi C-7 sur l'aide médicale à mourir.
J'affirme catégoriquement que personne au sein du gouvernement n'avait l'autorisation de prendre la parole publiquement sur ce projet de loi avant sa présentation à la Chambre.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
I appreciate the additional information. The comments from the parliamentary secretary will certainly be taken into consideration as we bring the decision before the House.
J'apprécie le supplément d'information. Les commentaires du secrétaire parlementaire seront assurément pris en compte quand la présidence informera la Chambre de sa décision.
View Bob Saroya Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bob Saroya Profile
2020-02-27 10:11 [p.1648]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-238, an act to amend the Criminal Code (possession of unlawfully imported firearms).
He said: Mr. Speaker, people from across the GTA and my riding are scared. Every day the media reports new shootings that are more horrible than the last, and this weekend was no different. In 2018, shootings reached an all-time high. In 2019, the record was broken again. We know that organized crime is behind most of the shootings and innocent people get caught up in the violence. According to the Toronto chief of police, smuggled guns are the weapons of choice for these criminals.
When I spoke with members of law enforcement, they said they were frustrated. Police pick up dangerous offenders and they are back on the streets the next day on bail. When convicted, serious criminals are getting a slap on the wrist.
There is no reason to have smuggled guns. Today, I am proposing a bill that would have the punishment fit the crime for this dangerous offence.
demande à présenter le projet de loi C-238, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (possession d’armes à feu importées illégalement).
— Monsieur le Président, les habitants de ma circonscription et de la région du Grand Toronto en général ont peur. Chaque jour, les médias rapportent de nouvelles fusillades pires que les précédentes, et la fin de semaine dernière n'a pas fait exception à la règle. Le nombre de fusillades a atteint un sommet en 2018, puis le record a été battu en 2019. Nous savons que le crime organisé est derrière la plupart de ces fusillades et que des innocents se retrouvent pris au centre de cette violence. Selon le chef de la police de Toronto, les armes de prédilection de ces criminels sont celles qui sont passées en contrebande.
Mes discussions avec les représentants des forces de l'ordre m'ont appris qu'ils se sentent frustrés. Les policiers arrêtent de dangereux délinquants, qui sont remis en liberté sous caution le lendemain. Lorsqu'ils sont reconnus coupables, les criminels aguerris s'en sortent avec une tape sur la main.
Rien ne justifie ces armes de contrebande. C'est pourquoi je propose aujourd'hui un projet de loi qui prévoit une punition proportionnelle au crime que représente cette dangereuse infraction.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-02-27 16:46 [p.1708]
Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege respecting the premature disclosure of the contents of a bill between the notice and introduction period.
The member for Markham—Unionville gave notice of a bill entitled “an act to amend the Criminal Code (unlawfully imported firearms)”, on Friday, February 21. On February 24, the member for Markham—Unionville, in an article published on iPolitics, disclosed the contents of the bill.
The article in question revealed the following. It states:
[The member for Markham—Unionville] is introducing legislation that would amend the Criminal Code to increase the mandatory sentence to three years for someone found in possession of a gun illegally brought into Canada. If an offender were found guilty of owning a smuggled gun a second time, their prison sentence would be a minimum of five years.
The article continues to disclose the content of the bill. It states:
[The] proposed law changes would also see the maximum amount of prison time that could be awarded to somebody who owns a smuggled gun increased to 14 years, both the first time they break the law and in every offence that follows.
On Tuesday, February 25, the member for Markham—Unionville gave notice of a new bill entitled “an act to amend the Criminal Code (possession of unlawfully imported firearms)”. Today, February 27, the member introduced the bill as Bill C-238. While I would note that there was a slight change to the long title, Bill C-238 accords directly with the details of the bill that were published in the article by iPolitics on February 24.
Clause 2.1 of Bill C-238 states:
Every person who commits an offence under subsection (1) when the object in question was obtained by the commission of an offence under subsection 103(1) is, if prosecuted by indictment, liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of
(a) in the case of a first offence, three years; and
(b) in the case of a second or subsequent offence, five years.
The provisions of Bill C-238, which I just quoted, accord directly with the characterization in the iPolitics article on February 24, which was provided earlier in my intervention. While I do not want to impute unworthy motives on the part of the member for Markham—Unionville with respect to his bill, it does raise certain questions.
I submit that the member for Markham—Unionville is attempting to do indirectly what he knows he cannot do directly. I submit that the practice of placing a bill on notice, making public the content of the bill, then placing another bill with a slightly different title to avoid a charge of premature disclosure of the content of a bill would set a dangerous precedent. In short, using this approach would subvert the principle that members should be the first to see the contents of a bill.
I would also like to draw the attention of members to the Speaker's ruling earlier this day concerning two bills that were substantially similar, despite a different long title.
The Speaker stated, “I would like to take a few minutes to inform members of an error on the Order Paper. Two private member's bills, which are substantially the same, are currently listed under Private Members' Business. Items outside of the Order of Precedence, specifically Bill C-221 on the Employment Insurance Act standing in the name of the member for Elmwood—Transcona was introduced and read the first time on Thursday, February 20, 2020, and Bill C-217 standing in the name of the member for Salaberry—Suroît was introduced and read a first time on Monday, February 24, 2020.
“Pursuant to Standing Order 86(4), the Speaker can refuse notice if he determines the two items as to be substantially the same. As a result, Bill C-217 is currently before the House in error. I therefore direct it that the order for the second reading of Bill C-217 be discharged and the bill be dropped from the Order Paper.”
It would be interesting to see if the first bill that the member for Markham—Unionville had placed on notice, if introduced, would be determined to be substantially similar to Bill C-238. While I cannot confirm this to be the case, it certainly gives rise to the assumption that the bills would be substantially similar.
I further submit that if this practice was determined to be an acceptable practice, I can only assume that this approach could become common practice. Imagine the government placing a bill on notice, then making a public statement which comprehensively discloses the content of a bill, then make a slight change to the long title and place this new bill on notice followed by its introduction. This would be seen by members and perhaps by you, Mr. Speaker, as a clear departure from the long-standing principle that members should be the first to see the contents of a bill.
I will not waste the precious time of the House reciting the numerous precedents that support the conclusion that the premature disclosure of the contents of a bill between the notice and introduction period has been determined to be a bonafide question of privilege.
I do not begrudge the member for Markham—Unionville for his attempt to get out his message about what his bill would accomplish and to provide the details of his bill to solicit the public's support for the bill. The fact remains that it is an affront to the privileges of the House to disclose a bill's contents before members of the House have had the opportunity to see the bill once introduced.
I understand that there was a very similar issue raised on February 25, with respect to the unfortunate premature disclosure of the medical assistance in dying legislation. As a result, if you determine, Mr. Speaker, that this matter is a prima facie question of privilege, I would suggest that both matters be heard together at the procedure and house affairs committee.
Mr. Speaker, I await your decision, and if you agree, I would be prepared to move the appropriate motion at the said time.
Monsieur le Président, je soulève une question de privilège au sujet de la divulgation prématurée du contenu d'un projet de loi entre la période de préavis et la présentation du projet.
Le vendredi 21 février, le député de Markham—Unionville a donné avis de son intention de présenter un projet de loi intitulé « Loi modifiant le Code criminel (armes à feu importées illégalement) ». Le 24 février, le député de Markham—Unionville a divulgué le contenu du projet de loi dans un article paru dans iPolitics.
L'article en question a révélé ce qui suit:
[Le député de Markham—Unionville] présente un projet de loi qui visant à modifier le Code criminel afin de porter à trois ans la peine obligatoire pour tout individu reconnu coupable de possession d'une arme à feu importée illégalement. À la deuxième offense, les contrevenants seraient passibles d'une peine minimale de cinq ans.
L'article continue de divulguer le contenu du projet de loi comme suit:
[Les] modifications législatives proposées visent également à faire passer à 14 ans la durée maximale de la peine d'emprisonnement pouvant être infligée aux individus pris en possession d'une arme de contrebande, et ce, à la première infraction et pour chaque récidive.
Le mardi 25 février, le député de Markham—Unionville a fait part de son intention de présenter un nouveau projet de loi intitulé « Loi modifiant le Code criminel (possession d’armes à feu importées illégalement)  ». Aujourd'hui, le 27 février, le député a présenté le projet de loi C-238. Bien que je constate une légère différence dans son titre intégral, le projet de loi C-238 correspond directement à la description du projet de loi qui se trouve dans l'article paru dans iPolitics le 24 février.
L'article 2.1 du projet de loi C-238 dit ceci:
Dans le cas où l’objet en cause est obtenu par suite de la perpétration de l’infraction prévue au paragraphe 103(1), quiconque commet l’infraction prévue au paragraphe (1) est passible, s’il est poursuivi sur acte d’accusation, d’un emprisonnement maximal de quatorze ans, la peine minimale étant:
a) de trois ans, dans le cas d’une première infraction;
b) de cinq ans, en cas de récidive.
Les dispositions du projet de loi C-238, que je viens de citer, correspondent directement à la description qui se trouve dans l'article d'iPolitics du 24 février, que j'ai aussi cité tout à l'heure. Je ne veux pas faire un procès d'intention au député de Markham—Unionville par rapport à son projet de loi, mais cette situation soulève certaines questions.
À mon avis, le député de Markham—Unionville cherche à faire indirectement ce qu'il sait qu'il ne peut pas faire directement. J'estime que le fait d'inscrire un projet de loi au Feuilleton des avis, de rendre publique la teneur de ce projet de loi, puis d'inscrire un autre projet de loi ayant un titre légèrement différent — afin d'éviter de se faire accuser de divulguer prématurément la teneur du projet de loi — crée un dangereux précédent. Autrement dit, cette façon de procéder va à l'encontre du principe voulant que les députés soient les premiers à prendre connaissance de la teneur d'un projet de loi.
Je rappelle aussi aux députés la décision que le Président a rendue aujourd'hui à propos de deux projets de loi très semblables ayant des titres intégraux différents.
Le Président a déclaré: « J'aimerais prendre quelques minutes pour informer les députés d'une erreur dans le Feuilleton. Deux projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire, qui sont sensiblement identiques, sont actuellement inscrits sous la rubrique Affaires émanant des députés — Affaires qui ne font pas partie de l'ordre de priorité. Il s'agit du projet de loi C-221, sur la Loi sur l'assurance-emploi, qui est inscrit au nom du député d'Elmwood—Transcona et qui a été présenté et lu une première fois le jeudi 20 février 2020, et du projet de loi C-217, qui est inscrit au nom de la députée de Salaberry—Suroît et qui a été présenté et lu une première fois le lundi 24 février 2020. »
« Conformément à l'article 86(4) du Règlement, le Président peut refuser un avis lorsqu'il détermine que les deux affaires soumises se ressemblent suffisamment pour être substantiellement identiques. Par conséquent, la Chambre est présentement saisie par erreur du projet de loi C-217. J'ordonne donc que l'ordre portant la deuxième lecture du projet de loi C-217 soit révoqué et le projet de loi, rayé du Feuilleton. »
Si le premier projet de loi que le député de Markham—Unionville avait inscrit au Feuilleton avait été présenté, il aurait été intéressant de voir si son contenu était largement semblable à celui du projet de loi C-238. Je ne peux pas le confirmer, mais on peut supposer que les projets de loi auraient été similaires dans une large mesure.
J'ajouterais que, si on déterminait que cette pratique est acceptable, je ne peux que supposer qu'elle deviendrait pratique courante. Imaginons que le gouvernement inscrive un projet de loi au Feuilleton, puis qu'il fasse une déclaration publique qui révèle de nombreux détails du projet de loi pour ensuite apporter une légère modification au titre intégral, inscrire ce nouveau projet de loi au Feuilleton et le présenter. Cela pourrait être perçu par les députés, voire par vous-même, monsieur le Président, comme une atteinte flagrante au principe de longue date selon lequel les députés devraient être les premiers à voir le contenu d'un projet de loi.
Je ne vais pas gaspiller le précieux temps de la Chambre en citant les nombreux précédents à l'appui de la conclusion voulant que la divulgation prématurée du contenu d'un projet de loi entre le moment de son inscription au Feuilleton et celui de sa présentation donne véritablement matière à soulever la question de privilège.
Je n'en veux pas au député de Markham—Unionville d'avoir voulu annoncer l'objet de son projet de loi et fournir des détails sur son contenu afin de solliciter l'appui de la population à l'égard du projet de loi. Il n'en demeure pas moins qu'on porte atteinte aux privilèges de la Chambre lorsqu'on divulgue le contenu d'un projet de loi avant que les députés aient eu l'occasion d'en prendre connaissance, lors de sa présentation.
Je crois comprendre qu'une question très similaire a été soulevée, le 25 février, à la suite de la divulgation malheureuse et prématurée de détails concernant le projet de loi sur l'aide médicale à mourir. Par conséquent, monsieur le Président, si la question de privilège vous paraît fondée à première vue, je propose que les deux affaires soient étudiées ensemble au comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.
Monsieur le Président, j'attends votre décision, et si vous êtes d'accord, je suis prêt à présenter la motion appropriée au moment opportun.
View John Brassard Profile
CPC (ON)
View John Brassard Profile
2020-02-27 16:54 [p.1709]
Mr. Speaker, while I respectfully disagree with the hon. member, I would like to reserve the right of the official opposition to respond at some point to the question of privilege.
Monsieur le Président, je suis respectueusement en désaccord avec le député, mais j'aimerais donner à l'opposition officielle l'occasion de répondre à un certain moment à la question de privilège.
View Rob Moore Profile
CPC (NB)
View Rob Moore Profile
2020-02-27 16:54 [p.1709]
Mr. Speaker, the hon. member mentioned that he did not want to waste the time of the House, yet he went on, when we are debating medical assistance in dying, on a question of privilege about a private member's bill. I would point him back to earlier this week when the entire contents of Bill C-7, medical assistance in dying, was in a CP story the morning before the bill was introduced. This is just for his reference.
Monsieur le Président, le député a affirmé qu'il ne voulait pas faire perdre de temps à la Chambre. Or, pendant notre débat sur l'aide médicale à mourir, il s'est étendu longuement sur une question de privilège concernant un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. J'aimerais lui rappeler ce qui s'est passé la semaine dernière, lorsque le contenu intégral du projet de loi C-7, sur l'aide médicale à mourir, figurait dans un article de la Presse canadienne le matin précédant la présentation du projet de loi à la Chambre. Je tenais à le lui rappeler.
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2020-02-27 16:55 [p.1709]
The intention was not to get into debating various aspects of the question of privilege at this point in time. I can assure the hon. parliamentary secretary that we will get back to the House in due course. I have noted the hon. member for Barrie—Innisfil's intention to come back to this at a later time as well.
À l'heure actuelle, l'objectif n'est pas de débattre des divers aspects de la question de privilège. Je peux assurer au secrétaire parlementaire que nous reparlerons de cette question en temps et lieu. J'ai aussi remarqué que le député de Barrie—Innisfil a signalé son désir d'y revenir ultérieurement.
Results: 1 - 12 of 12

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data