Committee
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the new user guides
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 72
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chairman, I have a question regarding your comment. I see that everybody voted in favour, but you said “on division”. I'm not following what that means.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Chair, I'm moving to amend clause 11 by adding after line 4 on page 5 the following:
(2) At least two of the directors must be residents of Yukon, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut.
The intention here is to ensure representation from the territories on the council, as some of the national organizations don't have a presence in the north.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Yes, Mr. Chairman, that's the concern. There is the possibility for many of the regions in the north—for example, Labrador and northern Quebec—to be represented by ITK. However, if people from those regions are selected, then that leaves the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the Yukon out, and also, for example, MNC has no presence in any of the three territories. AFN has no presence in the Yukon, so we could very well have selection from AFN from the south. We could have selection from ITK from Labrador, and that leaves us without anybody from the territories.
We're asking for consideration so that we have some representation on this body.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chair, I want to bring the amendment forward to add, after line 16 on page 5, the following:
(f) survivors of Canadian residential schools or their descendants.
It is important that we have people who have gone through the residential school system or their descendants as part of the discussion. A big part of reconciliation includes the residential schools.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank our presenters today. It's a very interesting discussion and a very important one.
I attended residential school. My whole family attended residential school. My wife's family attended residential school too. I got involved in politics at a very young age because I could see the poverty. I could see the struggles our people were facing. A lot of our elders always spoke about the agreements that were in place through the treaties and through the Métis scrip so we could coexist. I think they're the reasons I stayed in politics, because for the longest time it seemed like nobody was listening.
I want to ask the committee a question about the council and how the elders and survivors fit into the council. When the transitional committee was doing their work, did they envision that there would be seats set aside for elders and survivors, or did they see a separate body set up for the elders to advise and support the NCR?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'm not sure if you answered my question, but I have other questions regarding the body and makeup of this council, and providing oversight.
I've been looking at UNDRIP for a long time, and I always expected there to be an oversight body, a watchdog, because indigenous people don't trust governments. I'm not sure if that would be a separate body or if it would fall under the responsibility of this council, but it seems that a lot of oversight needs to happen. There are truth and reconciliation recommendations, possibly UNDRIP, the sixties scoop and murdered and missing indigenous women and girls. That's a lot of oversight to be responsible for, and if there are nine, 10, 12 or 14 members—whatever the number—it's going to mean a lot of research, it's going to mean a lot discussions and it's going to mean a lot of updates. That's going to be overwhelming for one body to look at, and I'm not sure if the board is big enough or what the structure will end up looking like.
What is the team? How many staff will be there to provide support? I'm sure you guys have looked at something like that. Are you able to tell me? Just give me a general picture of how that would work.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Mr. Chairman, I have a point of order.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
I'm not finding the translation.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to the presenters today. Those were very interesting presentations. It's too bad we don't have more time for everybody to really talk about everything they've put together.
Mr. Chair, I'm assuming that we have confirmation that everybody will be providing their speaking notes to us for review.
I have a question for Marie Wilson, who's from the Northwest Territories. It's good to see that we have representation from the north here. It's not something we always get with our witnesses.
I'm really glad you talked about this whole issue being a Canadian issue versus an indigenous issue. It's so important, I think, to have a non-political oversight body. This may be one body. We may need more. We may need another body—for UNDRIP, for example. This is something that is important. The makeup of the directors on it is also important. We heard some comments to that effect today.
I think you know very clearly that the north was really affected. Out of the 139 recognized residential schools, 32 were in the north, in the Northwest Territories or Yukon or Nunavut. On a per capita basis, the impact was significantly higher in our region. Given this, and given the level of the discussion on how directors should be selected or who should be a director and the number of people who are talking about wanting seats as directors from the national indigenous organizations, I want to ask you if you could speak to the importance of having voices from the territorial north appropriately included in the board and the work of the national council for reconciliation.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you for that.
I wanted to talk a little more about the composition and the work of the board of the national council for reconciliation and how important you think it is for the survivors of the residential school system to be included and involved. I heard it mentioned by another presenter here today, but I wanted to hear what you thought about that.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all the presenters today.
My question is for Garry Bailey from NWT Métis.
The process of reconciliation is right across our country, and the national council for reconciliation is the oversight body that will monitor what is going on. There seem to be challenges historically, and even to this day, of who represents whom.
You were pretty clear in your comments that you're not represented by any of the national indigenous organizations. Does that mean that there is no body out there that represents you at the national level? Do you participate in some of the other organizations, such as the self-governing indigenous governments, SGIGs or Land Claims Agreements Coalition?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
My next question is around.... This board is going to provide oversight over many different things: truth and reconciliation recommendations, UNDRIP, land claims, everything that falls under the title “reconciliation”.
How important do you think it is that there are survivors of the residential school system included as part of the board? We have a high number of people in the Northwest Territories who attended residential schools, so I want to hear your opinion.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to the witness for appearing today. I think that he and I are probably the only two residential school survivors in the room right now. It's really good to hear his point of view.
As an indigenous person and a Métis, I was quite excited to see this board structured, set up and moving forward.
There are many things happening under the label of reconciliation. UNDRIP is one of them, along with the Truth and Reconciliation recommendations and some of the changes to self-government policies. There are many things we can point to that are happening and quite exciting in the world of indigenous people. I think most people would agree.
Most indigenous governments would agree that there has to be oversight. Most indigenous governments don't trust governments. It's important to be able to make sure we're still moving forward to reach the goals we set up.
When it comes to the composition and work of the national council for reconciliation, I think there are some important seats that need to be held by people who went through the residential schools and federal day schools. They need to be included and involved. Right now, I see many national organizations pushing for more seats.
I want to get your opinion on what you think about having seats set aside for people who are residential school and federal day school survivors, or maybe even traditional knowledge holders—people from your organization and government who carry a lot of knowledge and can take it forward.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
My second question is on the goals of the national council. The stated goal of the national council is to advance the efforts of reconciliation with indigenous people, which is a very broad goal. It's going to be done through efforts like developing a national action plan. It will mean conducting research and educating the public.
I want to ask you this: In your opinion, what are some areas and issues you would like to see the national council focus on?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Welcome, Minister. It's certainly good to see you join us here today.
It's also very good to see that the government is working with indigenous people rather than against them as we've seen so many times in our history.
Mr. Minister, I think you know that the Northwest Territories has been dealing with a lot of very serious challenges. A recent report found that one in five homes in the territories was in need of major repairs. In some communities, it's up to 60%. The people in Fort Good Hope are dealing with the aftermath of multiple stabbings last month that left one resident dead. Just this past week, the chief coroner released new data showing that there's been a dramatic increase in the number of suicides this year in the Beaufort Delta. The community of Tuktoyaktuk alone has seen four deaths in the last three months.
At the root of these problems, in my view, is the ongoing impact of colonialism and also the intergenerational trauma from the residential school system. It's no coincidence that the Northwest Territories has the highest rate of residential school survivors per capita.
I want to ask you if you could explain how the work of the national council for reconciliation will ensure that Canada does the work necessary to address these issues.
Results: 1 - 15 of 72 | Page: 1 of 5

1
2
3
4
5
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data