Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 3 of 3
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)

Question No. 124--
Mr. Damien C. Kurek:
With regard to the Optional Survivor Benefit (OSB) for common-law partners and the statement on the government’s website that “The Canadian Forces Superannuation Act (CFSA) was amended so that a member living in a common-law relationship can provide a survivor pension if the relationship begins after age 60. However, the regulations must be amended to specify the details. Consequently, the OSB is not yet available for common-law relationships.”: (a) when will the regulations be amended to make the OSB available to those in common-law relationships that begin after age 60; (b) why have the regulations not yet been amended; (c) what are the government’s projections regarding how many such individuals will be eligible for the OSB; and (d) of the individuals in (c), what percentage does the government project will opt in to the OSB?
Response
Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Armed Forces offer competitive salaries and world-class benefit packages that start on the first day of a member’s service, up until after they retire. To ensure members are fairly compensated for their service to Canada, National Defence continues to work on issues, such as the optional survivor benefit for common-law relationships, to better reflect the reality of today’s veterans.
With regard to part (a) of the question, optional survivor benefit regulations are currently in the process of being amended. The amendments are complex and require coordination among multiple departments to ensure they are done properly. This process is being done collaboratively with Treasury Board and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
With regard to part (b), National Defence is currently working collaboratively with Treasury Board and the RCMP to determine a common policy approach for amending regulations. This will ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces, public service and RCMP pension plans are cohesive and contain similar optional survivor benefit provisions.
With regard to parts (c) and (d), National Defence does not maintain this information and it is not available to provide a projection at this time.

Question No. 125--
Ms. Nelly Shin:
With regard to expenditures related to legal proceedings involving veterans and veterans' groups, since January 1, 2018: (a) what is the total amount of expenditures incurred to date, broken down by case; and (b) what are the expenditures in (a), broken down by type and line item?
Response
Hon. David Lametti (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with respect to expenditures incurred in relation to legal proceedings involving veterans and veterans' groups, since January 1, 2018, to the extent that the information requested is or may be protected by any legal privileges, including solicitor-client privilege or settlement privilege, the federal Crown asserts those privileges. In this case, it has only waived solicitor-client privilege to the extent of revealing the total legal costs, as defined below.
The total legal costs, including actual and notional costs, associated with legal proceedings involving veterans and veterans' groups since January 1, 2018, amount to approximatively $5,475,000. These costs cover all types of legal proceedings, including individual and class actions brought by veterans, judicial review applications of decisions of the Veterans Review and Appeal Board and appeals. The Crown is usually not initiating these proceedings but rather acts as a defendant or respondent. The total legal costs are with respect to litigation and litigation support services, which were provided in these cases by the Department of Justice. Department of Justice lawyers, notaries and paralegals are salaried public servants and, therefore, no legal fees are incurred for their services. A “notional amount” can, however, be provided to account for the legal services they provide. The notional amount is calculated by multiplying the total hours recorded in the responsive files for the relevant period by the applicable approved internal legal services hourly rates. Actual costs are composed of file-related legal disbursements paid by the department and then cost-recovered from the client departments or agencies, as well as the costs of legal agents who may be retained by the Minister of Justice to provide litigation services in certain cases. The amount mentioned in this response is based on information currently contained in the Department of Justice systems, as of October 6, 2020.

Question No. 128--
Mr. Garnett Genuis:
With regard to the government’s reaction to the genocide and human rights abuses of Uighurs in Xinjiang Province, China, and the decision as to whether to place Magnitsky sanctions on those responsible: (a) will the government be placing sanctions under the Magnitsky Act on the Chinese government officials responsible for the genocide; (b) if the answer to (a) is affirmative, which Chinese government officials will be subject to the sanctions, and what criteria will the government use to determine which officials will be subject to the sanctions; and (c) if the answer to (a) is negative, then what is the rationale for not placing sanctions on those responsible for this genocide?
Response
Hon. François-Philippe Champagne (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the following reflects a consolidated response approved on behalf of Global Affairs Canada ministers. The promotion and protection of human rights is an integral part of Canadian foreign policy and is a priority in the Government of Canada’s engagement with China. The nature and scale of the abuses by Chinese authorities of Uighurs and other ethnic and religious minorities, under the pretext of countering extremism, are deeply disturbing. The Government of Canada is alarmed by the mass arbitrary detentions, repressive surveillance, allegations of torture, mistreatment, forced labour, forced sterilization of women and mass arbitrary separation of children from their parents. These actions by the Chinese government are contrary to its own constitution, in violation of international human rights obligations and inconsistent with the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.
Canada takes allegations of genocide very seriously. We will continue to work in close collaboration with our allies to push for these to be investigated through an international independent body and for impartial experts to access the region so that they can see the situation first-hand and report back.
Canada has continuously relayed its concerns about China’s actions directly to Chinese officials. Canada has also taken action to speak out at the United Nations in co-operation with partners. For example, in June 2020, during the 44th session of the HRC, Canada and 27 other countries signed a joint statement voicing concerns on the human rights situations in Hong Kong and Xinjiang. Recently, at the UN General Assembly’s Third Committee, on October 6, 2020, Canada co-signed, along with 38 other countries, a joint statement on the human rights situation in Xinjiang and Hong Kong. As part of joint communications, Canada and other countries have repeatedly called on China to allow unfettered access to Xinjiang to UN human rights experts and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.
Canada is judicious in its approach regarding when to deploy sanctions and/or draw on other courses of action in our diplomatic tool kit based on foreign policy priorities. The regulations enacted under the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act allow the Government of Canada to target individuals who are, in the opinion of the government, responsible for, or complicit in, gross violations of internationally recognized human rights or acts of significant corruption. Canada takes the matter of listing individuals under the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act very seriously. A rigorous due diligence process has been established to consider and evaluate possible cases of human rights violations or corruption anywhere in the world against the criteria set out in the act, within the context of other ongoing efforts to promote human rights and combat corruption. Our government believes that sanctions have the maximum impact when they are being imposed in collaboration with other countries.
Please also note that the trade commissioner service has updated its guidance for businesses on the risks of doing business in China, including risks related to human rights abuses. Ensuring companies adhere to responsible business practices is essential to manage social, reputational, legal and economic risks. The Government of Canada expects Canadian companies active abroad, in any market or country, to respect human rights, operate lawfully and conduct their activities in a responsible manner consistent with international standards such as the UN “Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights” and the OECD “Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises”. Among other things, the Government of Canada expects Canadian companies to adopt global best practices with respect to supply chain due diligence in order to eliminate the direct or indirect risk of involvement in any forced labour or other human rights abuses.
Please be assured that the promotion and protection of human rights are core priorities of Canada’s foreign policy. The Government of Canada will continue to raise its concerns regarding the human rights situation in Xinjiang and all of China, and will continue to call on China to live up to its international obligations.

Question No. 131--
Mr. Robert Kitchen:
With regard to isolation housing or quarantine facilities provided to foreign visitors to Canada during the pandemic: (a) how many foreign visitors have required the government to provide isolation housing or quarantine facilities upon arrival to Canada since March 2020; (b) what is the monthly breakdown of the amount spent on housing or quarantine facilities to foreign visitors; and (c) are foreign visitors required to reimburse Canadian taxpayers for the costs related to isolation housing or quarantine facilities, and, if so, (i) how many visitors have paid reimbursements, (ii) what is the total dollar amount collected by the government for such reimbursements?
Response
Mr. Darren Fisher (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), federal quarantine facilities are for any travellers arriving in Canada who do not have suitable options to self-isolate or quarantine through their own means. To date, the Public Health Agency of Canada, PHAC, has housed approximately 32 foreign nationals in federally designated quarantine sites. This excludes repatriation of cruise ship passengers in March 2020. This accounts for less than 3% of travellers who have used these facilities.
With regard to (b), due to current contracting activities, including potential competitive processes, the exact breakdown of costs cannot be publicly disclosed at this time.
With regard to (c), no, foreign visitors are not required to reimburse the Government of Canada for their stay in federally designated sites. With regard to c)(i), PHAC has received quarantine cost reimbursements, approximately $40,000, from a small number of foreign national crew members of four foreign vessels, because there was a failure by shipping agents to abide by public health measures upon entering Canada. With regard to c)(ii), to date, PHAC has invoiced approximately $40,000 to shipping agents for the quarantine of their crew members in federally designated sites.

Question No. 133--
Mr. Dean Allison:
With regard to the Veterans Affairs Canada area offices, which have all been closed to veterans since March 2020: (a) which offices have reopened to clients and what was the reopening date of each office; and (b) of the offices that are still closed, what is the projected reopening date when they will be open to clients, broken down by location?
Response
Hon. Lawrence MacAulay (Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), Veterans Affairs Canada continues to serve veterans and their families by phone and online. In addition to regular services, Veterans Affairs Canada has reached out to 18,000 vulnerable clients since the beginning of the pandemic.
With regard to (b), the health, safety and well-being of veterans and their families, as well as Veterans Affairs Canada employees, is the priority of Veterans Affairs Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Essentially, all Veterans Affairs Canada employees are equipped to work remotely, enabling Veterans Affairs Canada to continue to provide services to veterans and their families in the midst of this global pandemic.
Veterans Affairs Canada will continue to take guidance from public health officials and work with its partners across government to support easing restrictions in a gradual, phased and controlled manner that prioritizes the health and safety of employees and those accessing services at departmental buildings. While access to Veterans Affairs Canada offices is suspended, veterans and their families are still accessing Veterans Affairs Canada programs and services. Veterans Affairs Canada staff are available, working remotely and prioritizing getting benefits to veterans in greatest need.

Question No. 134--
Mrs. Rosemarie Falk:
With regard to sanitizer product purchases since March 13, 2020: (a) how many litres in total have been purchased; (b) of the amount in (a), (i) how many litres have been distributed through the government distribution system, (ii) how many litres of sanitizer have been purchased from off-shore suppliers, (iii) how many litres of sanitizer have been purchased from domestic suppliers; (c) of the amount in (a), how many litres have been purchased from suppliers that have been recalled by Health Canada; (d) have any sanitizers on the recall lists been distributed to Canadian health care providers; and (e) how is the government tracking sanitizer products and other personal protective equipment that has been distributed but later recalled?
Response
Mr. Steven MacKinnon (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), 20,649,819 litres have been purchased.
With regard to (b)(i), 20,649,819 litres have been distributed through the government distribution system.
With regard to (b)(ii), 10,243,813 litres of sanitizer have been purchased from offshore suppliers.
With regard to (b)(iii), 10,406,006 litres of sanitizer have been purchased from domestic suppliers.
With regard to (c) of the amount in (a), none of the sanitizer purchased by PSPC has been recalled.
With regard to (d), none of the sanitizer purchased by PSPC has been recalled.
With regard to (e), none of the sanitizer or personal protective equipment purchased by PSPC has been recalled.

Question no 124 --
M. Damien C. Kurek:
En ce qui concerne la Prestation de survivant optionnelle (PSO) destinée aux conjoints de fait et la déclaration suivante sur le site Web du gouvernement à l'effet que « La Loi sur la pension de retraite des Forces canadiennes a été modifiée pour permettre à un participant qui vit en union de fait de procurer à son conjoint une pension de survivant même si l’union a débuté après le 60e anniversaire de naissance du participant. Cependant, le règlement doit être modifié pour préciser les modalités d’application de la loi. Conséquemment, la PSO n’est pas encore disponible pour les unions de fait. »: a) quand le règlement sera-t-il modifié pour que la PSO puisse être accordée aux personnes dont l’union a débuté après le 60e anniversaire de naissance du participant; b) pourquoi le règlement n’a-t-il pas encore été modifié; c) quelles sont les prévisions du gouvernement quant au nombre de personnes qui pourraient être admissibles à la PSO; d) parmi les personnes mentionnées en c), selon le gouvernement, quel pourcentage décidera de se prévaloir de la PSO?
Response
Mme Anita Vandenbeld (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Défense nationale, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, les Forces armées canadiennes offrent des salaires compétitifs et des avantages sociaux de classe mondiale qui commencent dès le premier jour de service d'un membre, jusqu'à son départ à la retraite. Pour s'assurer que les membres sont rémunérés équitablement pour leur service au Canada, la Défense nationale continue de travailler sur des questions telles que l'indemnité facultative de survivant pour les conjoints de fait, afin de mieux refléter la réalité des anciens combattants d'aujourd'hui.
En réponse à la partie a) de la question, le règlement sur les prestations facultatives de survivant est en cours de modification. Ces modifications sont complexes et nécessitent une coordination entre plusieurs ministères pour garantir qu'elles soient effectuées correctement. Ce processus se fait en collaboration avec le Conseil du Trésor et la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, ou GRC.
En ce qui a trait à la partie b) de la question, la Défense nationale travaille actuellement en collaboration avec le Conseil du Trésor et la GRC afin d’établir une approche politique commune pour la modification des règlements. Cela permettra de s'assurer que les régimes de retraite des Forces armées canadiennes, de la fonction publique et de la GRC sont cohérents et contiennent des dispositions similaires en matière de prestations facultatives aux survivants.
Enfin, pour ce qui est des parties c) et d) de la question, la Défense nationale ne conserve pas cette information et ne peut pas fournir de projection pour le moment.

Question no 125 --
Mme Nelly Shin:
En ce qui concerne les poursuites judiciaires concernant des anciens combattants et des groupes d’anciens combattants, depuis le 1er janvier 2018: a) quel est le montant total des dépenses engagées jusqu’à maintenant, ventilé par affaire; b) quelles sont les dépenses en a), ventilées par type et par poste?
Response
L’hon. David Lametti (ministre de la Justice et procureur général du Canada, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en ce qui a trait aux dépenses encourues depuis le 1er janvier 2018 dans le cadre de poursuites judiciaires concernant des anciens combattants et des groupes d’anciens combattants, dans la mesure où les renseignements demandés sont ou peuvent être protégés par des privilèges juridiques, y compris le secret professionnel de l'avocat ou le privilège relatif aux règlements, la Couronne fédérale invoque ces privilèges. En l’instance, elle ne renonce qu’au secret professionnel, et ce, uniquement aux fins de divulguer le total des coûts juridiques, tels que définis ci-après.
Le total des coûts juridiques, réels et notionnels, associés aux poursuites judiciaires concernant des anciens combattants et des groupes d’anciens combattants, depuis le 1er janvier 2018, s’élève à environ 5 475 000,00 $. Ces coûts couvrent tous les types de procédures judiciaires, incluant les actions individuelles et recours collectifs engagés par des anciens combattants, les demandes de contrôle judiciaire à l’encontre de décisions du Tribunal des anciens combattants, révision et appel, et les appels. La Couronne n'entreprend généralement pas ces procédures, mais agit plutôt comme partie défenderesse ou intimée. Les coûts juridiques ont trait aux services de contentieux et de support au contentieux qui, en l’instance, ont été offerts par le ministère de la Justice. Les avocats, notaires et parajuristes du Ministère sont des fonctionnaires salariés et, par conséquent, aucuns frais juridiques ne sont encourus pour leurs services. Un « montant notionnel » peut toutefois être établi pour rendre compte des services juridiques qu'ils fournissent. Le montant notionnel est calculé en multipliant le nombre total d'heures enregistrées par ces employés dans les dossiers pertinents pour la période concernée par les taux horaires internes des services juridiques applicables. Les coûts réels comprennent les déboursés légaux liés aux dossiers, payés par le ministère de la Justice puis recouvrés auprès des ministères ou organismes clients, ainsi que les coûts des agents mandataires qui peuvent être engagés par le ministre de la Justice pour fournir des services de contentieux dans certains dossiers. Le montant mentionné dans cette réponse est basé sur les informations contenues dans les systèmes du ministère de la Justice en date du 6 octobre 2020.

Question no 128 --
M. Garnett Genuis:
En ce qui concerne la réaction du gouvernement au génocide et aux violations des droits fondamentaux des Ouïgours dans la province du Xinjiang, en Chine, ainsi que la décision quant à l’imposition de sanctions Magnitski aux responsables: a) le gouvernement imposera-t-il des sanctions en vertu de la loi de Sergueï Magnitski aux représentants du gouvernement chinois responsables du génocide; b) dans l’affirmative, à quels représentants du gouvernement chinois s’appliqueront les sanctions, et quels critères utilisera le gouvernement pour décider à quels représentants appliquer les sanctions; c) dans la négative, pour quelles raisons des sanctions ne seront-elles pas imposées aux responsables de ce génocide?
Response
L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne (ministre des Affaires étrangères, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, la promotion et la protection des droits de la personne font partie intégrante de la politique étrangère canadienne et constituent une priorité dans l’engagement du gouvernement du Canada vis-à-vis de la Chine. La nature et l’ampleur des abus commis par les autorités chinoises à l’encontre des Ouïghours et d’autres minorités ethniques et religieuses, sous prétexte de contrer l’extrémisme, sont profondément inquiétantes. Le gouvernement du Canada est alarmé par les détentions arbitraires massives, la surveillance répressive, les allégations de torture, de mauvais traitements, de travail forcé, de stérilisation forcée des femmes et de séparation arbitraire massive des enfants de leurs parents. Ces gestes du gouvernement chinois sont contraires à sa propre constitution, en violation des obligations internationales en matière de droits de la personne et incompatibles avec la stratégie mondiale de lutte contre le terrorisme des Nations unies.
Le Canada prend les allégations de génocide très au sérieux. Nous continuerons de collaborer étroitement avec nos alliés pour faire en sorte que ces allégations fassent l’objet d’une enquête par un organisme international indépendant et que des experts impartiaux aient accès à la région afin de pouvoir observer la situation de première main et produire un rapport.
Le Canada a continuellement fait part de ses préoccupations concernant les actes de la Chine directement aux responsables chinois. Le Canada a également pris des mesures pour se faire entendre aux Nations unies en coopération avec nos partenaires. Par exemple, en juin 2020, lors de la 44e session du Conseil des droits de l’homme, le Canada et 27 autres pays ont signé une déclaration commune exprimant leurs préoccupations concernant la situation des droits de la personne à Hong Kong et au Xinjiang. Récemment, lors de la troisième commission de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies, soit le 6 octobre 2020, le Canada a cosigné, avec 38 autres pays, une déclaration commune sur la situation des droits de la personne au Xinjiang et à Hong Kong. Dans le cadre de communications conjointes, le Canada et d’autres pays ont demandé à plusieurs reprises à la Chine d’autoriser un accès sans entrave au Xinjiang aux experts des droits de la personne des Nations unies et au Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies aux droits de l’homme.
Le Canada adopte une approche judicieuse en ce qui concerne le moment où il convient de déployer des sanctions ou de s’inspirer d’autres mesures dans sa boîte à outils diplomatique, en fonction des priorités de sa politique étrangère. Les règlements adoptés en vertu de la Loi sur la justice pour les victimes d’agents étrangers corrompus permettent au gouvernement du Canada de cibler les personnes qui, de l’avis du gouvernement, sont responsables ou complices de violations flagrantes des droits de la personne reconnus à l’échelle internationale ou d’actes de corruption importants. Nous prenons très au sérieux la question de l’inscription des individus sur la liste de la Loi sur la justice pour les victimes de fonctionnaires étrangers corrompus. Un processus rigoureux de diligence raisonnable a été mis en place pour examiner et évaluer les cas possibles de violation des droits de la personne ou de corruption partout dans le monde en fonction des critères énoncés dans la loi, dans le contexte d’autres efforts en cours pour promouvoir les droits de la personne et combattre la corruption. Notre gouvernement estime que les sanctions ont le plus grand impact lorsqu'elles sont imposées en collaboration avec d'autres pays.
Il est également à noter que le Service des délégués commerciaux a mis à jour ses conseils aux entreprises sur les risques de faire des affaires en Chine, y compris les risques liés aux violations des droits de la personne. Il est essentiel de veiller à ce que les entreprises adoptent des pratiques commerciales responsables pour gérer les risques sociaux, juridiques, économiques et de réputation. Le gouvernement du Canada s’attend à ce que les entreprises canadiennes actives à l’étranger, quel que soit le marché ou le pays, respectent les droits de la personne, gèrent leurs opérations légalement et mènent leurs activités de manière responsable, conformément aux normes internationales telles que les Principes directeurs des Nations unies concernant les entreprises et les droits de l’homme et les Principes directeurs de l’OCDE à l’intention des entreprises multinationales. Le gouvernement du Canada s’attend notamment à ce que les entreprises canadiennes adoptent les meilleures pratiques mondiales en matière de diligence raisonnable de la chaîne d’approvisionnement afin d’éliminer le risque direct ou indirect de participation à tout travail forcé ou à toute autre violation des droits de la personne.
Je tiens à assurer à la Chambre que la promotion et la protection des droits de la personne sont des priorités fondamentales de la politique étrangère du Canada. Le gouvernement du Canada continuera à faire part de ses préoccupations concernant la situation des droits de la personne au Xinjiang et dans toute la Chine, et continuera à demander à la Chine de respecter ses obligations internationales.

Question no 131 --
M. Robert Kitchen:
En ce qui concerne les installations d’isolement ou de quarantaine offertes aux étrangers en visite au Canada durant la pandémie: a) à combien de visiteurs étrangers le gouvernement a-t-il dû fournir des installations d’isolement ou de quarantaine à leur arrivée au Canada depuis mars 2020; b) quel est le montant, ventilé par mois, des dépenses relatives aux installations d’isolement ou de quarantaine fournies aux visiteurs étrangers; c) les visiteurs étrangers sont-ils tenus de rembourser aux contribuables canadiens les frais des installations d’isolement ou de quarantaine fournies, et, le cas échéant, (i) combien de visiteurs ont remboursé ces frais, (ii) quel montant en dollars le gouvernement a-t-il récupéré au total grâce à ces remboursements?
Response
M. Darren Fisher (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre de la Santé, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, les installations de quarantaine fédérales s’adressent aux voyageurs arrivant au Canada qui ne disposent pas de moyens convenables pour s’isoler ou se mettre en quarantaine. L’Agence de la santé publique du Canada, ou ASPC, a hébergé jusqu’ici environ 32 ressortissants étrangers dans des installations de quarantaine désignées par le gouvernement fédéral — ce chiffre ne comprend pas les passagers de navires de croisière rapatriés en mars 2020 —, ce qui représente moins de 3 % des voyageurs qui ont utilisé ces installations.
En ce qui a trait à la partie b) de la question, parce que des activités de passation de marchés sont en cours actuellement, y compris de possibles processus concurrentiels, nous ne pouvons pas publier à l’heure actuelle la ventilation exacte des coûts.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, non, les visiteurs étrangers ne sont pas tenus de rembourser le gouvernement du Canada pour leur séjour dans des sites désignés par le gouvernement fédéral: d’abord, l’ASPC s’est vu rembourser les coûts de quarantaine, environ 40 000 $, pour un petit nombre de ressortissants étrangers membres des équipages de quatre navires étrangers, parce que les agents maritimes avaient omis de se soumettre aux mesures de santé publique à leur arrivée au Canada; ensuite, à ce jour, l’ASPC a facturé environ 40 000 $ à des agents maritimes pour la mise en quarantaine de membres de leurs équipages dans des installations désignées par le gouvernement fédéral.

Question no 133 --
M. Dean Allison:
En ce qui concerne les bureaux de secteur d’Anciens Combattants Canada qui ont tous fermé leurs portes aux anciens combattants depuis mars 2020: a) lesquels ont rouvert et quelle a été la date de réouverture de chacun d’entre eux; b) quelle est la date de réouverture prévue, des bureaux qui sont toujours fermés, ventilée par emplacement?
Response
L'hon. Lawrence MacAulay (ministre des Anciens Combattants et ministre associé de la Défense nationale, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, Anciens Combattants Canada continue d’offrir les services aux vétérans et à leur famille par téléphone et en ligne. En plus d’offrir les services réguliers, Anciens Combattants Canada a communiqué avec 18 000 clients vulnérables depuis le début de la pandémie.
En ce qui a trait à la partie b) de la question, la santé, la sécurité et le bien-être des vétérans, de leur famille et des employés d’Anciens Combattants Canada sont la priorité d’Anciens Combattants Canada durant la pandémie de COVID-19.
Essentiellement, les employés d’Anciens Combattants Canada disposent des outils nécessaires pour travailler à distance, ce qui permet à Anciens Combattants Canada de continuer d’offrir des services aux vétérans et à leur famille dans le contexte de cette pandémie mondiale.
Anciens Combattants Canada continuera à tenir compte des conseils des responsables de la santé publique et à travailler de concert avec ses partenaires à l’échelle du gouvernement pour appliquer les mesures d’assouplissement de façon graduelle et contrôlée, tout en accordant la priorité à la santé et à la sécurité de ses employés et des clients qui se présentent à ses points de service. Bien que l’accès aux bureaux d’Anciens Combattants Canada soit interrompu, les vétérans et leur famille continuent à recevoir des programmes et des services d’Anciens Combattants Canada. Le personnel d’Anciens Combattants Canada est disponible, travaille à distance et accorde la priorité à offrir des avantages aux vétérans qui en ont le plus besoin.

Question no 134 --
Mme Rosemarie Falk:
En ce qui concerne les achats de produits désinfectants depuis le 13 mars 2020: a) combien de litres ont été achetés; b) sur la quantité en a), (i) combien de litres ont été distribués par l’entremise du système de distribution du gouvernement, (ii) combien de litres de désinfectant ont été achetés de fournisseurs étrangers, (iii) combien de litres de désinfectant ont été achetés de fournisseurs nationaux; c) sur la quantité en a), combien de litres achetés à des fournisseurs ont fait l’objet d’un rappel de Santé Canada; d) des produits désinfectants figurant sur la liste de rappel ont-ils été distribués à des fournisseurs de soins de santé canadiens; e) comment le gouvernement assure-t-il le suivi des produits désinfectants et de l’équipement de protection personnel qui ont été distribués avant de faire l’objet d’un rappel?
Response
M. Steven MacKinnon (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Services publics et de l’Approvisionnement, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, 20 649 819 litres de produits désinfectants ont été achetés depuis le 13 mars 2020.
En ce qui concerne la partie b)(i) de la question, 20 649 819 litres de produits désinfectants ont été distribués par l’entremise du système de distribution du gouvernement.
Pour ce qui est de la partie b)(ii) de la question, 10 243 813 litres de produits désinfectants ont été achetés de de fabricants étrangers.
En ce qui concerne la partie b)(iii) de la question, 10 406 006 litres de désinfectant ont été achetés de fournisseurs nationaux.
En ce qui a trait à la partie c) de la question, aucun des produits désinfectants achetés par SPAC n'a fait l'objet d'un rappel.
Pour ce qui est de la partie d) de la question, aucun des produits désinfectants achetés par SPAC n'a fait l'objet d'un rappel.
Enfin, en ce qui a trait à la partie e) de la question, aucun des produits désinfectants ou des équipements de protection individuelle achetés par SPAC n'a fait l'objet d'un rappel.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)

Question No. 115--
Mr. Corey Tochor:
With regard to the government’s campaign to make Bill Morneau the Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: (a) what is the current budget for the campaign; (b) what are the costs incurred to date, broken down by item; (c) what are the projected costs, broken down by item; (d) how many government officials have been assigned duties in relation to the campaign; (e) what are the duties that each of the officials in (d) have been assigned, broken down by title of the official; and (f) what are the details of any contracts signed in relation to the campaign, including (i) vendor, (ii) date and duration, (iii) amount, (iv) description of goods or services provided?
Response
Hon. François-Philippe Champagne (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the following reflects a consolidated response approved on behalf of Global Affairs Canada ministers. With regard to part (a) of the question, as is the case in campaigns for leadership positions in multilateral organizations, the government will provide diplomatic support, advocacy and strategic advice to advance Mr. Morneau’s candidacy. This support will be cost-effective and consistent with relevant Treasury Board guidelines and policies. As the OECD secretary-general selection process is just beginning, it is not yet possible to estimate the total costs that may be incurred to support Canada’s nominee, particularly in the current context given the global health situation.
With regard to part (b), so far, the campaign has incurred $6,265.76 in hospitality costs to support outreach with OECD member delegates and other OECD-related representatives based in Paris. These expenses reflect standard diplomatic practices, including for such selection processes.
With regard to part (c), as of the date of this request, the department is working on the projection of costs for the secretary-general campaign, which will be aligned with the costs normally associated with campaigns for high-level international positions where member countries put forward candidates.
With regard to part (d), the department has not assigned any officials exclusively for the purposes of the OECD secretary-general campaign. Nevertheless, as the lead department responsible for the relationship with the organization, a number of officials in the department and at the permanent delegation of Canada to the OECD are providing support with respect to the campaign in line with their regular duties.
With regard to part (e), the duties of strategic policy advice, advocacy and support will be carried out by the assistant deputy minister, strategic policy; director general, international economic policy; director, international economic relations and strategy; deputy director, OECD unit, international economic relations and strategy; policy adviser, international economic relations and strategy; policy analyst, international economic relations and strategy; Ambassador, Canada’s permanent delegation to the OECD; deputy permanent representative, permanent delegation to the OECD; counsellor, permanent delegation to the OECD; counsellor, permanent delegation to the OECD; program officer, permanent delegation to the OECD; and strategic communications and program officer, permanent delegation to the OECD.
The duties of communications advice and support will be carried out by the director general, strategic communications; director, strategic communications foreign policy; director, media relations; and senior communications adviser.
The duties of coordination of diplomatic outreach will be carried out by the director, official visits, office of protocol; visits coordinator, office of protocol; and visits officer, office of protocol.
With regard to part (f) of the question, there have been no contracts signed in support of the campaign to date.

Question No. 117--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the Wet’suwet’en Nation and TC Energy’s Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline project: what are the details of all in-person and virtual consultations and meetings conducted by the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and the Minister of Northern Affairs or the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, the Wet'suwet'en elected chiefs and councillors, and the Wet'suwet'en people, and all First Nations along the path of the pipeline, between August 1, 2018, to present, including, for each in-person or virtual consultation or meeting, the (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) name and title of the First Nations, groups, organizations or individuals consulted, (iv) recommendations that were made to the ministers?
Response
Mr. Gary Anandasangaree (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, insofar as Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada is concerned, the response is as follows. With regard to TC Energy’s Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline project, consultations were not conducted by the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations or the Minister of Northern Affairs or the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, as this is a provincially regulated pipeline.

Question No. 120--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the contract signed between Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada and Nathan Cullen (Reference Number: C-2019-2020-Q4-00124): (a) was $41,000 the final value of the contract, and, if not, what was the final value; (b) what was the start and end date of the contract; (c) what specific services did Mr. Cullen provide in exchange for the payment; and (d) was the $41,000 just for Mr. Cullen’s services, or did that amount cover other costs, and, if so, what is the itemized breakdown of which costs the payment covered?
Response
Mr. Gary Anandasangaree (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to part (a), the original estimated contract cost was $41,000, including taxes. The final value of the contract is $21,229.11, including taxes.
With regard to part (b), the start date was February 24, 2020, and the end date was March 17, 2020.
With regard to part (c), the scope of work in the contract defined the following services: discussions between representatives for Canada, British Columbia and the Wet’suwet’en Nation with regard to the establishment of a negotiation process to advance the recognition and reconciliation of Wet’suwet’en aboriginal title and rights; specific interventions when political issues arise; in consultation with the federal team, provide strategic advice to the minister and senior departmental management; provide strategic advice to the federal team; attend engagement sessions and meetings at key times when highly sensitive issues are discussed and/or when important messages have to be delivered to the other parties; and meet with senior officials of CIRNAC.
With regard to part (d), the breakdown of the $41,000 was as follow in the contract: fees: $20,000; other expenses: $10,000; travel: $10,000; GST: $1,000. Payments of $21,229.11 were made against the contract and the details of the amounts paid, final value, are as follows: fees: $16,000; other expenses: $4,980.10; travel: $0; GST: $249.01. “Other expenses” include, but are not limited to, food for participants and conference boardroom charges for the event at the hotel.

Question No. 121--
Mr. Todd Doherty:
With regard to government statistics on the impact of the various measures taken during the pandemic on the mental health of Canadians: (a) has the government conducted any specific studies or analysis on the mental health impacts of the various measures put into place by various levels of government (self-isolation, social distancing, business closures, etc.); and (b) what are the details of all such studies, including (i) who conducted the study, (ii) general findings, (iii) which measures were analyzed, (iv) findings related to each measure, (v) where results were published, if results were made public?
Response
Mr. Darren Fisher (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada recognizes that COVID-19 has resulted in varying degrees of stress for many Canadians who may not have ready access to their regular support networks. That is why the government is funding an online portal of psychosocial supports.
This new portal, called Wellness Together Canada, makes it easier for Canadians to access free, credible information and services to address mental health and substance use issues. The portal also connects Canadians to peer support workers, social workers, psychologists and other professionals for confidential text sessions or phone calls.
The portal is available free to all Canadians in both official languages on a 24-7 basis. It is the result of a consortium of leaders in mental health and substance use care, including Stepped Care Solutions, Kids Help Phone and Homewood Health.
With regard to part (a), the Centre for Surveillance and Applied Research, CSAR, is contributing funding or subject expertise to several studies to understand changes in mental health and mental illness among Canadians during the COVID-19 period. However, these are under way and not yet complete. They include the Survey on COVID-19 and Mental Health, SCMH; the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Ageing, CLSA, COVID-19 study; the Covid-19, Health and Social InteractiON in Neighborhoods, COHESION, study; and the COMPASS study of high school students in Ontario, Alberta, Quebec and British Columbia.
With regard to part (b)(i), the SCMH is being conducted by Statistics Canada. Results will be analyzed by the Public Health Agency of Canada, PHAC. The CLSA COVID-19 study is being led by principal investigators at McMaster, McGill and Dalhousie universities. The COHESION study is being led by researchers at the Université de Montréal and the University of Saskatchewan. PHAC researchers will be involved in future analyses. The COMPASS study is being led by researchers at the University of Waterloo. Some analyses will be conducted by graduate students funded by PHAC.
With regard to part (b)(ii), as these studies are currently under way, there are no findings that can be reported at present. Early findings from the CLSA COVID-19 study are anticipated by the end of 2020, early findings from the COHESION study are anticipated during the first quarter of 2021, and PHAC analyses of SCMH data will begin in February 2021, with the intention of making the results publicly available as soon as possible.
With regard to part (b)(iii), as these studies are currently under way, no analyses have been completed to date.
With regard to part (b)(iv), see response for part (b)(iii).
With regard to part, (b)(v), see response for part (b)(iii).

Question No. 123--
Mr. Dean Allison:
With regard to the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance program: (a) what was original budget for the program; (b) what is the latest projected budget for the program; (c) what was the original expected number of businesses that would apply for the program; (d) what was actual number of businesses that applied for the program; (e) of the applications in (d), how many were successful; and (f) does the government have any statistics regarding what percentage of commercial property landlords whose tenants enrolled in the program accepted a 25 per cent reduction in rent, and, if so, what are the statistics?
Response
Mr. Adam Vaughan (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development), Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to part (a), the original budget for the Canada emergency commercial rent assistance, CECRA, program was $2.97 billion total combined from federal, provincial and territorial governments. This includes funding for forgivable loans disbursed and program administration costs.
In response to part (b), the projected budget for CECRA is $2.97 billion.
In response to part (c), 60,000 submissions by property owners was the original expected number of applications.
In response to part (d), as October 4, 2020, 74,774 applications had been received for the program from property owners. Each application represents one property with one or more impacted small business tenant.
In response to part (e) of the applications in (d), as of October 5, 2020, 59,404 applications by property owners were approved; 5,935 were under review.
In response to part (f), individual small business tenants did not directly enroll in the CECRA program. Rather, eligibility for CECRA was based on applications submitted by commercial property landlords on behalf of their eligible tenants. All property owners who enrolled in the program were required to provide a 25% rent reduction to their eligible tenants in order to be approved. Failure to comply with this program requirement would put the property owner in default of the loan agreement, and the loan would become repayable.

Question no 115 --
M. Corey Tochor:
En ce qui concerne la campagne du gouvernement visant à faire de Bill Morneau le secrétaire général de l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques: a) quel est le budget actuel de la campagne; b) quels coûts celle-ci a-t-elle engendrés jusqu’à présent, ventilés par article; c) quels sont les coûts prévus, ventilés par article; d) combien de fonctionnaires se sont vu confier des tâches en rapport avec la campagne; e) quelles sont les tâches qui ont été affectées à chacun des fonctionnaires visés en d), ventilées par titre du fonctionnaire; f) quels sont les détails des contrats signés en relation avec la campagne, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) la date et la durée, (iii) la valeur du contrat, (iv) la description des biens ou des services offerts?
Response
L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne (ministre des Affaires étrangères, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, comme c’est le cas dans les campagnes pour des postes de direction dans des organisations multilatérales, le gouvernement fournira un soutien diplomatique, des activités de plaidoyer et des conseils stratégiques pour faire avancer la candidature de M. Morneau. Ce soutien sera rentable et conforme aux lignes directrices et politiques connexes du Conseil du Trésor. Puisque le processus de sélection du secrétaire général de l’OCDE ne fait que commencer, il n’est pas encore possible d’estimer les coûts totaux qui pourraient être engagés à l’appui du candidat canadien, en particulier dans le contexte actuel compte tenu de la situation sanitaire mondiale.
En ce qui a trait à la partie b) de la question, jusqu'à présent, la campagne a nécessité 6 265,76 $ en frais d'accueil à l’appui des activités de sensibilisation auprès de délégués membres de l'OCDE et d'autres représentants œuvrant dans le contexte de l’OCDE à Paris. Ces dépenses s’inscrivent dans les pratiques diplomatiques courantes, y compris celles liées à ces processus de sélection.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, à la date de cette demande, le ministère travaille à la projection des coûts de la campagne du secrétaire général et s'attend à ce qu’ils soient proportionnels aux coûts normalement associés aux campagnes pour des postes internationaux de haut niveau où des pays membres doivent proposer des candidats.
En ce qui concerne la partie d) de la question, le ministère n’a affecté aucun fonctionnaire exclusivement à la campagne de M. Morneau. Néanmoins, en tant que ministère responsable des relations avec l’Organisation, un certain nombre de fonctionnaires du ministère et de la Délégation permanente du Canada auprès de l'OCDE apportent leur soutien à la campagne dans le cadre de leurs fonctions habituelles.
En ce qui a trait à la partie e) de la question, voici la liste pour les conseils stratégiques, plaidoyer et soutien: sous-ministre adjoint, Politique stratégique; directrice générale, Politiques économiques internationales; directeur, Relations économiques internationales et stratégie; directrice adjointe, Unité de l'OCDE, Relations économiques internationales et stratégie; conseillère politique, Relations économiques internationales et stratégie; analyste politique, Relations économiques internationales et stratégie; ambassadrice, Délégation permanente du Canada auprès de l’OCDE; représentante permanente adjointe, Délégation permanente du Canada auprès de l’OCDE; conseiller, Délégation permanente du Canada auprès de l’OCDE; conseiller, Délégation permanente du Canada auprès de l’OCDE; responsable de programme, Délégation permanente du Canada auprès de l’OCDE; et agente des communications stratégiques et des programmes, Délégation permanente du Canada auprès de l’OCDE.
Pour les conseils et soutien en matière de communication, la liste est la suivante: directeur général, Communications stratégiques; directrice, Communications stratégiques, Politique étrangère; directrice, Relations avec les médias; et conseillère principal en communication.
Pour ce qui est de la Coordination de la sensibilisation diplomatique, la liste est la suivante: directrice, Visites officielles, Bureau du protocole; coordonnatrice des visites, Bureau du protocole; et agent des visites, Bureau du protocole.
Enfin, en ce qui concerne la partie f) de la question, aucun contrat n'a été signé pour soutenir la campagne à ce jour.

Question no 117 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne la Première nation Wet’suwet’en et le projet de gazoduc Coastal GasLink de TC Énergie: quels sont les détails de toutes les consultations et les réunions virtuelles et en personne que la ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones et le ministre des Affaires du Nord ou le personnel du ministère des Relations Couronne-Autochtones et des Affaires du Nord ont organisées, du 1er août 2018 à aujourd’hui, avec des chefs héréditaires, des chefs élus, des conseillers ou des membres de la Première nation Wet’suwet’en et de toute autre Première nation sur le territoire de laquelle le gazoduc doit passer, y compris, pour chaque consultation ou réunion, (i) la date, (ii) le lieu, (iii) le nom et le titre des groupes, des organisations et des membres des Premières nations qui ont été consultés, (iv) les recommandations qui ont été faites aux ministres?
Response
M. Gary Anandasangaree (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en ce qui concerne le projet de gazoduc Coastal GasLink de TC Énergie, les consultations n’ont pas été menées par la ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones ou le ministre des Affaires du Nord ou le ministère des Relations Couronne-Autochtones et des Affaires du Nord, car il s’agit d’un gazoduc sous réglementation provinciale.

Question no 120 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne le contrat passé entre Relations Couronne-Autochtones et Affaires du Nord Canada et Nathan Cullen (numéro de référence: C-2019-2020-Q4-00124): a) la valeur finale du contrat était-elle de 41 000 $ et, dans la négative, quelle était la valeur finale du contrat; b) quelles étaient la date de début et la date de fin du contrat; c) quels services précis M. Cullen a-t-il offerts en contrepartie du paiement; d) la somme de 41 000 $ concernait-elle uniquement les services de M. Cullen ou la somme couvrait-elle d’autres coûts, et, le cas échéant, quelle est la ventilation détaillée des coûts couverts par le paiement?
Response
M. Gary Anandasangaree (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, la valeur estimée du contrat d’origine était de 41 000 $, incluant les taxes, mais la valeur finale du contrat a été de 21 229,11 $, incluant les taxes.
En ce qui concerne la partie b) de la question, la date de début était le 24 février 2020, et la date de fin était le 17 mars 2020.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, l’énoncé des travaux dans le contrat indiquait les services suivants: des discussions entre les représentants du Canada, de la Colombie-Britannique et de la nation Wet'suwet'en concernant l'établissement d'un processus de négociation pour faire avancer la reconnaissance et la réconciliation du titre et des droits ancestraux des Wet'suwet'en; des interventions spécifiques lorsque des questions politiques se présentent; en consultation avec l'équipe fédérale, fournir des conseils stratégiques au ministre et à la haute direction du ministère; fournir des conseils stratégiques à l'équipe fédérale; assister à des séances d'engagement, à des réunions à des moments clés où des problèmes très sensibles sont abordés et lorsque des messages importants doivent être transmis aux autres parties; et rencontrer les hauts fonctionnaires de RCAANC.
En ce qui a trait à la partie d) de la question, la ventilation du montant de 41 000 $ dans le contrat était la suivante: 20 000 $ pour les frais de service; 10 000 $ pour les autres coûts, qui incluent sans s’y limiter les repas pour les participants et les frais de salles de conférences pour l’événement à l’hôtel; 10 000 $ pour les voyages; 1 000 $ pour la TPS; et des paiements d’un montant total de 21 229,11 $ qui ont été effectués – le détail de la valeur finale des montants payés est le suivant: 16 000 $ pour les frais de service, 4 980,10$ pour les autres coûts, qui incluent sans s’y limiter les repas pour les participants et les frais de salles de conférences pour l’événement à l’hôtel et 249,01 $ pour la TPS. Le montant octroyé aux voyages était nul.

Question no 121 --
M. Todd Doherty:
En ce qui concerne les statistiques du gouvernement quant à l’incidence des différentes mesures prises durant la pandémie sur la santé mentale des Canadiens: a) le gouvernement a-t-il effectué des études ou des analyses axées sur les répercussions sur la santé mentale qu’ont eues les différentes mesures mises en place par les divers ordres de gouvernement (auto-isolement, distanciation physique, fermetures d’entreprises, etc.); b) quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes ces études, y compris (i) qui a réalisé l’étude, (ii) quels sont les résultats généraux, (iii) quelles mesures ont fait l’objet d’une analyse, (iv) quelles sont les constatations relatives à chacune de ces mesures, (v) à quel endroit, s’ils ont été rendus publics, les résultats ont-ils été publiés?
Response
M. Darren Fisher (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre de la Santé, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement du Canada est conscient que la COVID-19 a entraîné différents niveaux de stress chez de nombreux Canadiens qui n’auront pas facilement accès à leurs réseaux de soutien habituels. C’est pour cette raison que le gouvernement finance un portail en ligne de soutien psychosocial.
Ce nouveau portail, intitulé Espace mieux-être Canada, permet aux Canadiens d’accéder plus facilement des informations crédibles et des services afin de résoudre les problèmes de santé mentale et de consommation de substances. Le portail met également les Canadiens en contact avec des travailleurs de soutien par les pairs, des travailleurs sociaux, des psychologues et d'autres professionnels pour des sessions de texte ou des appels téléphoniques confidentiels.
Le portail est offert gratuitement à tous les Canadiens dans les deux langues officielles 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7. C’est le résultat d'un consortium de chefs de file dans le domaine des soins de santé mentale et de consommation de substances, notamment: Stepped Care Solutions, Jeunesse, J'écoute et Homewood Health.
En réponse à la partie a) de la question, le Centre de surveillance et de recherche appliquée, le CSRA, fournit du financement ou une expertise en la matière pour plusieurs études visant à comprendre les changements concernant la santé mentale et la maladie mentale chez les Canadiens pendant la pandémie de COVID-19. Cependant, les études suivantes sont en cours et ne sont pas encore achevées: l’Enquête sur la COVID-19 et la santé mentale, ou ECSM; l’étude sur la COVID-19 de l’Étude longitudinale canadienne sur le vieillissement, ou ELCV; l’étude COHESION, pour Covid-19, Health and Social InteractiON in Neighborhoods; et l’étude COMPASS chez des élèves du secondaire en Ontario, en Alberta, au Québec et en Colombie-Britannique.
En ce qui a trait à la partie b)(i) de la question, l’ECSM est réalisée par Statistique Canada. Les résultats seront analysés par l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada, ou ASPC. L’ELCV est dirigée par des chercheurs principaux aux universités McMaster, McGill et Dalhousie. L’étude COHESION est dirigée par des chercheurs à l’Université de Montréal et à l’Université de la Saskatchewan, et des chercheurs de l’ASPC participeront à de futures analyses. L’étude COMPASS est dirigée par des chercheurs à l’Université de Waterloo. Des analyses seront réalisées par des étudiants diplômés financés par l’ASPC.
Pour ce qui est de la partie b)(ii) de la question, ces études sont en cours donc aucune constatation ne peut être communiquée à l’heure actuelle. Les premières constatations découlant de l’ELCV sont attendues d’ici la fin de 2020, les premières constatations découlant de l’étude COHESION sont attendues au cours du premier trimestre de 2021, les analyses de l’ASPC des données de l’ECSM commenceront en février 2021, et nous avons l’intention de rendre les résultats accessibles au public dès que possible.
En ce qui concerne la partie b)(iii) de la question, aucune analyse n’a été achevée à ce jour.
La réponse à la partie b)(iv) est la même que pour la partie (b)(iii).
La réponse à la partie b)(v) est la même que pour la partie (b)(iii).

Question no 123 --
M. Dean Allison:
En ce qui concerne l’Aide d’urgence du Canada pour le loyer commercial: a) quel était le budget original du programme; b) quel est le dernier budget prévisionnel pour le programme; c) selon les prévisions de départ, combien d’entreprises devaient présenter une demande au titre du programme; d) dans les faits, combien d’entreprises ont présenté une demande au titre du programme; e) sur les demandes en d), combien ont été acceptées; f) le gouvernement possède-t-il des statistiques sur le pourcentage des locateurs d’immeubles commerciaux, dont les locataires se sont inscrits au programme, qui ont accepté une réduction de loyer de 25 % et, le cas échéant, quelles sont ces statistiques?
Response
M. Adam Vaughan (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Famille, des Enfants et du Développement social (Logement), Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, le budget original du programme de l’Aide d’urgence du Canada pour le loyer commercial, ou AUCLC, s’élevait à 2,97 milliards de dollars. Il s’agit du total provenant des gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux. Cela comprend le financement des prêts-subventions consentis et les frais d’administration du programme.
En ce qui concerne la partie b) de la question, le budget prévisionnel pour l’AUCLC est de 2,97 milliards de dollars.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, le nombre initial prévu de demandes présentées par des propriétaires d’entreprises était de 60?000.
En ce qui a trait à la partie d) de la question, en date du 4 octobre 2020, 74?774 demandes avaient été reçues pour le programme de la part de propriétaires. Chaque demande représente une propriété avec un ou plusieurs locataires de petites entreprises touchés.
En ce qui concerne la partie e) de la question, en date du 5 octobre 2020, 59?404 demandes de propriétaires avaient été approuvées, et 5?935 demandes étaient à l’étude.
Enfin, pour ce qui est de la partie f) de la question, les propriétaires de petites entreprises n’ont pas directement adhéré à l’AUCLC. L’admissibilité à l’AUCLC était plutôt fondée sur les demandes présentées par les propriétaires de propriétés commerciales au nom de leurs locataires admissibles. Tous les propriétaires inscrits au programme devaient accorder une réduction de loyer de 25 % à leurs locataires admissibles pour être approuvés. Le fait de ne pas se conformer à cette exigence du programme mettrait le propriétaire en défaut de l’entente de prêt, et le prêt deviendrait remboursable.
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)

Question No. 102--
Mr. Dan Albas:
With regard to the government's announcement in the Speech from the Throne to create one million jobs through environmentally focused measures: (a) what sectors will these jobs be in, and how many jobs are expected to be created in each sector; (b) what is the breakdown of where these jobs are expected to be created by province or territory and municipal region; (c) what is the breakdown of the educational attainment required for these jobs; (d) what is the projected cost to create these jobs; (e) is it the government's intent to employ unemployed retail and hospitality workers to build green infrastructure; (f) what is the projected cost to retrain a million workers for these jobs; (g) what is the demographic balance of people who currently work in the green energy sector; (h) what is the demographic balance of people currently most unemployed due to the crisis; (i) will there be private sector investment to create these jobs or will it be solely government funding; (j) how long does the government anticipate it will take to train unemployed retail, hospitality, and entertainment workers to build green infrastructure; and (k) what is the projected cost of this training?
Response
Mr. Irek Kusmierczyk (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Speech from the Throne outlined the government’s intent to launch a plan to create over one million jobs to help restore employment to previous levels. The plan will use a range of tools, including direct investment in the social sector and infrastructure, immediate training to quickly skill up workers and incentives for employers to hire and retain workers.
This commitment is part of the government’s four-pillar foundation to help build a stronger and more resilient Canada, including, first, fight the pandemic and save lives; second, support people and businesses through this crisis; third, build back better by strengthening the middle class, supporting job creation and long-term competitiveness with clean growth; and fourth, stand up for who we are as Canadians by achieving progress on gender equality, walking the road of reconciliation and fighting discrimination of every kind.
This plan also builds on the Government of Canada’s immediate and decisive action to support Canadians and businesses facing hardship as a result of the pandemic. Programs such as the Canada emergency response benefit, or CERB, have provided millions of Canadians with the financial support they needed to get by. Other measures such as the Canada emergency wage subsidy, or CEWS, have provided support to Canadian businesses, helping them to avoid layoffs, rehire employees and create new jobs. Close to nine million Canadians were helped by the CERB and over 3.5 million jobs were supported by the wage subsidy.
This plan is already working. The Canadian economy had lost three million jobs at the peak of the COVID-19 economic impact. By September, the Canadian economy had recovered about 2.3 million jobs.
However, clearly more needs to be done. This is why, through the Speech from the Throne, the government laid out a solid economic recovery plan that will restore employment to previous levels and ensure Canadians return to work and thrive economically.

Question No. 103--
Mr. Dan Albas:
With regard to the government's plan to declare single-use plastics as a harmful substance: (a) what is the timeline for implementing such a declaration; (b) has there been any analysis of the trade implications of such a declaration, and, if so, who conducted the analysis, and what were the findings; (c) has there been a job impact analysis prepared, and, if so, who conducted the analysis, and what were the findings; (d) if this plan is implemented, what are the projected job impacts in Canada's petrochemical industry; (e) were there consultations undertaken with the provinces on such a declaration, and, if so, what are the details; (f) what is the policy justification to use environmental protection legislation to ban a consumer good, which is regulated provincially; and (g) has a legal analysis been conducted to ensure the legality of such a declaration, and, if so, who conducted the analysis and what were the findings?
Response
Hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, regarding part (a) of the question, as required under section 332 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, CEPA, a draft order in council proposing to add “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 of CEPA was published in the Canada Gazette, part I, on October 9, 2020, for a 60-day public comment period. After the public comment period is complete, Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada will review comments received and determine whether adjustments are needed to the draft order. A final order in council adding “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 will be published in Canada Gazette, part II, in 2021.
With regard to part (b) of the question, the “Cabinet Directive on Regulation” requires departments and agencies to ensure Canada’s international commitments are met when carrying out their regulatory activities, including in the area of international trade. In addition, the directive requires departments and agencies to analyze the potential positive and negative impacts of a proposed regulation and its feasible alternative options on Canadians, businesses, governments and the environment, and identify how impacts are distributed across the various parties.
A cost-benefit analysis was conducted for the draft order in council that proposes to add “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 of CEPA, and found that the addition of “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 would not, on its own, impose any regulatory requirements on businesses or other entities, and would therefore not result in any incremental compliance costs for stakeholders. The small business lens analysis concluded that the proposed order would have no associated impact on small business, as it does not impose any administrative or compliance costs on businesses. This can be found in the “Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement” accompanying the draft order in council in Canada Gazette, part I.
With regard to part (c) of the question, the “Cabinet Directive on Regulation” requires departments and agencies to examine the potential impacts on employment of a proposed regulation and its feasible alternative options on Canadians, businesses, governments and the environment, and identify how impacts are distributed across the various parties. A cost-benefit analysis was conducted for the draft order in council that proposes to add “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 of CEPA and found that the addition of “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 would not, on its own, impose any regulatory requirements on businesses or other entities, and would therefore not result in any incremental compliance costs for stakeholders. The small business lens analysis concluded that the proposed order would have no associated impact on small business, as it does not impose any administrative or compliance costs on businesses. This can be found in the “Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement” accompanying the draft order in council in Canada Gazette, part I.
Regarding part (d) of the question, any risk management measures developed using the enabling authorities provided by adding “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 of CEPA, including regulations prohibiting or restricting the use of certain single-use plastic items, will undergo all of the analysis required by the “Cabinet Directive on Regulations”, including analysis of benefits and costs. As the government is still consulting partners and stakeholders and is still developing an approach for prohibiting or restricting certain single-use plastic items, this level of analysis is not yet available. However, this detailed analysis will accompany any draft regulations published in Canada Gazette, part I.
Regarding part (e) of the question, the Government of Canada has been working closely with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment to develop and implement the strategy on zero plastic waste, which seeks to move Canada toward a circular economy for plastics, positioning the country as a leader in forward-looking and innovative waste prevention and management solutions.
Provinces and territories have been provided regular updates on the Government of Canada’s comprehensive agenda for achieving zero plastic waste through the CCME, which often serves a forum for exchanging information on federal, provincial and territorial initiatives. For example, at the latest CCME meeting in July 2020, federal, provincial and territorial ministers devoted a major portion of their meeting to sharing perspectives and strategies for a sustainable post-pandemic recovery. Provinces and territories were also provided with early copies of the discussion paper that was released on October 7 for their review, and federal officials presented on the integrated management approach to the CCME’s waste reduction and recovery committee in September 2020.
With regard to part (f) of the question, the Government of Canada’s approach is based on the best available science and evidence. The scientific basis is outlined in the “Science Assessment of Plastic Pollution”, developed jointly by Environment and Climate Change Canada and Health Canada. The science assessment confirms that, among other things, plastic items greater than five millimetres in diameter have been shown to cause harm to living organisms and their habitat. Wildlife ingest or become entangled in these plastics, which result in direct harm and, in many cases, mortality. The science assessment confirms that action is needed to reduce plastics that end up in the environment.
In addition, data from shoreline cleanups and municipal litter audits show that single-use plastics are prevalent in the environment and pose a threat to wildlife. With this basis of science and evidence, the Government of Canada has proposed using enabling authorities under CEPA to regulate certain single-use plastics. CEPA is an important part of Canada's federal environmental legislation aimed at preventing pollution and protecting the environment and human health. CEPA provides a range of tools that allows the government to target sources of plastic pollution and change behaviour at key stages in the life cycle of plastic products, such as design, manufacture, use, disposal and recovery, in order to reduce pollution and create the conditions for achieving a circular plastics economy.
Regarding part (g) of the question, the recommendation to add a substance to schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, CEPA, is on the basis of the provisions outlined in CEPA. In particular, subsection 90(1) of CEPA authorizes the Governor in Council to add a substance to schedule 1 if it is satisfied, on the recommendation of the ministers of health and environment, that the substance meets any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the act, i.e., if the substance poses a risk to the environment, human health or both. The “Science Assessment of Plastic Pollution” provided the ministers with the evidence to recommend adding “plastic manufactured items” to schedule 1 of CEPA, an action that would help address the potential ecological risks associated with plastic manufactured items becoming plastic pollution.

Question No. 104--
Mr. Eric Melillo:
With regard to the decision by the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor) to provide a $800,000 loan to skritswap Inc.: (a) how many of the seven positions the government’s website claims will be created from the loan will be located (i) in Northern Ontario, broken down by location, (ii) in Canada, (iii) in the United States; (b) did the government verify that the company was actually primarily based out of Sault Ste. Marie as opposed to the company’s locations in Waterloo, Ontario, or San Mateo, California; (c) if the government did verify that the company had a permanent head office in Northern Ontario by visiting the location, which government official visited the location; (d) did FedNor receive a commitment from the company that any jobs created from the loan would be created in Northern Ontario, and, if so, what are the details of the commitment; and (e) what is the breakdown of the anticipated economic benefit or jobs being created by municipality?
Response
Hon. Mélanie Joly (Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is committed to growing the economy in northern Ontario and creating good local jobs. The Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario, or FedNor, has always been a key partner for entrepreneurs in northern Ontario and an integral part of the economic development of the region.
In this specific case, the funding was given to support a woman entrepreneur in growing her business in northern Ontario. FedNor is aware of this situation, is in contact with the business and will continue to monitor the situation closely. The business is fully aware that if it fails to meet the parameters set by the contribution agreement, it will need to immediately pay back the funds it received.
FedNor will continue to work closely and strategically with businesses and community partners to build a stronger northern Ontario.

Question No. 108--
Ms. Michelle Rempel Garner:
With regard to changes or modifications made to the operations and alert systems of the Global Public Health Intelligence Network, since January 1, 2016: (a) what are the specific details of each change or modification, including (i) the description of change or modification, (ii) the date of the decision, (iii) the date the change came into effect, (iv) who recommended the change or modification, (v) the date the Office of the Minister of Health was notified; (vi) the date the Privy Council Office or the Prime Minister's Office was notified; (vii) the date on which the change was made public, if applicable; (b) for each change in (a), were other countries informed of the change and what are the details of each such instance, including (i) the date, (ii) notified countries, (iii) the summary of change; and (c) for each change in (a), was the World Health Organization notified, and, if so, on what date?
Response
Mr. Darren Fisher (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to part (a) (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), from the program’s inception until late 2018, the Global Public Health Intelligence Network, GPHIN, alerts were identified and issued by the program’s analysts. The purpose of an alert is to direct international and Canadian subscribers to a particular media article without any summary or additional analysis. In the fall of 2018, the health security infrastructure branch, HSIB, began a review of program information products, including GPHIN alerts and their associated approval processes.
Following internal discussions, a decision was made to raise the approval level to HSIB’s vice-president in order to maintain awareness of the Public Health Agency of Canada’s, PHAC’s, senior officials concerning alerts being published by the system.
Approval of the GPHIN daily reports, which provides a comprehensive summary of multiple media articles, remained at the analyst level and so had no change. In September 2020, approval for alerts was set at the director level.
All other GPHIN information products, such as the GPHIN daily report, previously called the situational awareness section daily report, continue to be distributed directly from GPHIN to subscribers, including senior management at PHAC and other government departments.
At no time has GPHIN been directed to cease or slow its information gathering. Information-sharing activities continue to take place in a timely manner. GPHIN’s primary role as a global event-based surveillance system has remained unchanged, and its capacity has been enhanced over a number of years via collaborations with partners such as the National Research Council.
With regard to part (a) (v), (vi), (vii), and parts (b) and (c), the above changes were made internally to PHAC. There is no documentation indicating that the change in the approval process for GPHIN alerts was communicated to the organizations listed above.

Question No. 111--
Ms. Michelle Rempel Garner:
With regard to the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine: (a) what is the expected timeline for the distribution of a vaccine; (b) once the vaccine is approved by Health Canada, which population groups will be designated priority groups to receive the vaccine first; (c) what is the current time estimate to vaccinate all of the groups in (b), broken down by priority groups; (d) what is the current time estimate to give access to the general population once a vaccine is approved; (e) what is the current time estimate to vaccinate all Canadians who desire or require a vaccine; (f) what percentage of doses will be allocated to each of the initial priority groups; (g) what percentage of doses will be allocated to the general population; and (h) what criteria did the government use to determine which groups would receive priority access?
Response
Mr. Darren Fisher (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, with regard to part (a), the Public Health Agency of Canada, PHAC, anticipates limited vaccine to be available for distribution in Canada in the first part of 2021. Any vaccine that is distributed in Canada must have regulatory approval or an interim order. The initial supply is expected to be constrained, improving over time as manufacturing is scaled up and the availability of products that have completed clinical trials are approved by Health Canada.
With regard to part (b), guidance on the use of a pandemic vaccine, including recommendations on key populations for early vaccination when initial vaccine supply is limited, has been provided by Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization, NACI, an external expert advisory body that provides advice to PHAC on the optimal use of vaccines in Canada. NACI is identified in the federal, provincial and territorial Canadian pandemic plan as the authoritative body for advice on vaccine prioritization and vaccine public health program design.
On November 3, 2020, NACI released preliminary guidance on key populations for early COVID-19 immunization, with the goal of providing a plan for the efficient, effective and equitable allocation of a COVID-19 vaccine once it is authorized for use in Canada when limited initial vaccine supply will necessitate the prioritization of immunization in some populations earlier than others. This document can be found online at www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/guidance-key-populations-early-covid-19-immunization.html
Once a vaccine candidate has completed advanced clinical trials, NACI will refine and recalibrate its preliminary guidance on target groups, based on additional safety and efficacy data from advanced clinical trials; availability of supply; one- or multi-dose schedules; whether/how to vaccinate children and pregnant women; and policy frameworks regarding ethics, equity and economics.
With regard to part (c), at this time, a number of vaccines for COVID-19 are undergoing clinical testing in Canada and internationally and PHAC does not yet know which ones will prove safe and effective. In addition, significant uncertainty remains regarding the level and type of protection an approved vaccine might be able to induce in different population groups, e.g., age, underlying condition, previous infection, etc.. Until this information is known, PHAC cannot estimate the time it will take to vaccinate priority groups.
With regard to part (d), see response for part (a).
With regard to part e), see response for part (a).
With regard to part (f), once a vaccine candidate has completed advanced clinical trials, NACI will refine and recalibrate its preliminary guidance on target groups, based on additional safety and efficacy data from advanced clinical trials; availability of supply; one- or multi-dose schedules; whether/how to vaccinate children and pregnant women; and policy frameworks regarding ethics, equity and economics.
Provinces and territories, P/Ts, are responsible for the administration and delivery of health care services, including immunization-related programs. Immunization policies and schedules are developed by P/Ts or their expert immunization advisory committees, based on jurisdiction-specific needs, other immunization recommendations, such as NACI, program resource availability and constraints, and identified priorities. As such, each P/T will determine the percentage of doses that will be allocated to each of its initial priority groups.
With regard to part (g), see response for part (f).
With regard to part (h), NACI reviewed available evidence on the epidemiology and burden of COVID-19 to develop its preliminary guidance on priority immunization strategies with associated target groups. As noted, once a vaccine candidate has completed advanced clinical trials, NACI will refine and recalibrate its preliminary guidance on target groups, based on additional safety and efficacy data from advanced clinical trials; availability of supply; one- or multi-dose schedules; whether/how to vaccinate children and pregnant women; and policy frameworks regarding ethics, equity and economics.

Question No. 114--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to taxpayer money being used to sue the Conservative Party of Canada: what are the total legal fees and other related expenditures to date spent by CBC/Radio-Canada in relation to its ongoing lawsuit against the Conservative Party of Canada?
Response
Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in processing parliamentary returns, the government applies the Privacy Act and the principles set out in the Access to Information Act. Information on the expenditures made in relation to the current civil litigation action against the Conservative Party of Canada has been withheld on the grounds that the information constitutes solicitor-client privilege.

Question no 102 --
M. Dan Albas:
En ce qui concerne l'annonce faite par le gouvernement dans le discours du Trône de créer un million d’emplois au moyen de mesures axées sur l’environnement: a) dans quels secteurs ces emplois seront-ils créés, et combien d’emplois devraient être créés dans chaque secteur; b) quelle est la ventilation des endroits où ces emplois devraient être créés par province ou territoire et par région municipale; c) quelle est la ventilation du niveau de scolarisation requis pour ces emplois; d) quel est le coût prévu pour la création de ces emplois; e) le gouvernement a-t-il l’intention d’employer des travailleurs au chômage du commerce au détail et du secteur touristique pour bâtir des infrastructures vertes; f) quel est le coût prévu pour recycler le million de travailleurs nécessaires pour occuper ces emplois; g) quelle est la composition démographique de la main-d’œuvre qui travaille actuellement dans le secteur de l’énergie verte; h) quelle est la composition démographique des travailleurs qui sont pour la plupart au chômage en raison de la crise actuelle; i) le secteur privé participera-t-il au financement de la création de ces emplois ou s’agira-t-il uniquement de fonds publics; j) combien de temps faudra-t-il, selon le gouvernement, pour former les travailleurs au chômage du commerce au détail, du secteur touristique et du secteur du divertissement qui seront employés pour bâtir les infrastructures vertes; k) quel est le coût prévu de cette formation?
Response
M. Irek Kusmierczyk (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d’œuvre et de l'Inclusion des personnes handicapées, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le discours du Trône a décrit le plan du gouvernement visant à créer plus de 1 million d’emplois pour aider à rétablir l’emploi aux niveaux précédents. Le plan se fera à l’aide d’une gamme d’outils comprenant des investissements directs dans le secteur social et les infrastructures, une formation immédiate pour renforcer rapidement les compétences des travailleurs et des mesures incitatives pour encourager les employeurs à embaucher et à maintenir en poste des travailleurs.
Cet engagement fait partie des quatre piliers du gouvernement pour aider à bâtir un Canada plus fort et plus résilient, notamment: lutter contre la pandémie et sauver des vies; soutenir les gens et les entreprises aussi longtemps que la crise durera; rebâtir mieux en renforçant la classe moyenne, en appuyant la création d’emplois et en mettant en place une compétitivité à long terme grâce à une croissance propre; et être fidèle à qui nous sommes en tant que Canadiens en faisant des progrès sur le plan de l’égalité entre les sexes, en œuvrant à la réconciliation et en luttant contre la discrimination sous toutes ses formes.
Ce plan s’appuie également sur l’action immédiate et décisive du gouvernement du Canada pour soutenir les Canadiens et les entreprises qui font face à des difficultés en raison de la pandémie. Voici quelques exemples. D’abord, des programmes comme la Prestation canadienne d’urgence, ou PCU, ont fourni à des millions de Canadiens le soutien financier dont ils avaient besoin pour s’en sortir. Ensuite, d’autres mesures comme la Subvention salariale d’urgence du Canada, la SSUC, ont fourni un soutien aux entreprises canadiennes, les aidant ainsi à éviter les mises à pied, à réembaucher des employés et à créer de nouveaux emplois. Enfin, près de 9 millions de Canadiens ont été aidés par la PCU et plus de 3,5 millions d’emplois ont été soutenus grâce à la subvention salariale.
Ce plan fonctionne. L’économie canadienne avait perdu 3 millions d’emplois au plus fort des répercussions de la pandémie de COVID-19. En septembre, l’économie canadienne avait récupéré environ 2,3 millions de ces emplois.
Cela dit, il reste encore beaucoup à faire. C’est pourquoi, dans le discours du Trône, le gouvernement a présenté un plan solide de relance économique qui rétablira l’emploi aux niveaux antérieurs et qui garantira que les Canadiens retournent au travail et prospèrent économiquement.

Question no 103 --
M. Dan Albas:
En ce qui concerne l’intention du gouvernement de déclarer que les plastiques à usage unique constituent une substance nocive: a) à quel échéancier une telle déclaration serait-elle mise en œuvre; b) les répercussions commerciales d’une telle déclaration ont-elles fait l’objet d’une analyse, et, le cas échéant, qui a mené cette analyse et quelles en ont été les conclusions; c) l’incidence sur l’emploi a-t-elle fait l’objet d’une analyse, et, le cas échéant, qui a mené cette analyse et quelles en ont été les conclusions; d) si si ce plan est mis en œuvre, quels sont les impacts prévus sur l'emploi dans le secteur canadien de la pétrochimie; e) une telle déclaration a-t-elle fait l’objet de consultations auprès des provinces, et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de ces consultations; f) quelle est la justification du point de vue de la politique publique du recours à une loi sur la protection de l’environnement pour interdire un bien de consommation réglementé par les provinces; g) la légalité d’une telle déclaration a-t-elle été établie au moyen d’une analyse juridique, et, le cas échéant, qui a mené cette analyse et quelles en ont été les conclusions?
Response
L’hon. Jonathan Wilkinson (ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, je dirai que, comme l’exige l’article 332 de la Loi canadienne sur la protection de l’environnement de 1999, ou LCPE, un projet de décret proposant d’ajouter les « articles manufacturés en plastique » à l’annexe 1 de la LCPE a été publié dans la Partie 1 de la Gazette du Canada le 9 octobre 2020 pour une période de 60 jours durant laquelle quiconque peut présenter des observations au ministre. Lorsque cette période de 60 jours sera terminée, Santé Canada et Environnement et Changement climatique Canada examineront les commentaires reçus et détermineront si des ajustements au projet de décret sont nécessaires. Une version définitive du décret ajoutant « articles manufacturés en plastique » à l’annexe 1 de la LCPE sera publiée dans la Partie 2 de la Gazette du Canada en 2021.
En ce qui concerne la partie b) de la question, la Directive du Cabinet sur la réglementation exige de la part des ministères et des organismes gouvernementaux qu’ils respectent les engagements internationaux du Canada, y compris en matière de commerce international, dans le cadre de leurs activités de réglementation. De plus, cette directive exige que les ministères et organismes gouvernementaux examinent les répercussions éventuelles favorables et néfastes d’un règlement proposé et des options de rechange possible sur les Canadiens, les entreprises, les gouvernements et l’environnement. Ils doivent aussi déterminer la façon dont les répercussions sont réparties parmi les différentes parties touchées.
Une analyse des avantages et des coûts du projet de décret proposant l’ajout des « articles manufacturés en plastique » à l’annexe 1 de la LCPE a été effectuée. La conclusion de cette analyse est que cet ajout n’imposerait pas en soi des exigences réglementaires aux entreprises ou à d’autres entités, et par conséquent n’entraînerait aucun coût supplémentaire associé à la conformité pour les parties intéressées. L’analyse de la lentille des petites entreprises a conclu que le projet de décret n’aurait aucune incidence associée sur les petites entreprises, car celui-ci n’impose pas de fardeau administratif ou de coûts associés à la conformité pour les entreprises. Ces renseignements figurent dans le résumé de l’étude d’impact de la réglementation qui accompagne la publication du projet de décret dans la Partie 1 de la Gazette du Canada.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, la Directive du Cabinet sur la réglementation exige de la part des ministères et des organismes gouvernementaux qu’ils examinent les répercussions éventuelles d’un règlement proposé et des options de rechange possibles sur les possibilités d’emploi, les Canadiens, les entreprises, les gouvernements et l’environnement. Ils doivent aussi déterminer la façon dont les répercussions sont réparties parmi les différentes parties touchées. Une analyse des avantages et des coûts du projet de décret proposant l’ajout des « articles manufacturés en plastique » à l’annexe 1 de la LCPE a été effectuée. La conclusion de cette analyse est que cet ajout n’imposerait pas en soi des exigences réglementaires aux entreprises ou à d’autres entités et, par conséquent, n’entraînerait aucun coût supplémentaire associé à la conformité pour les parties intéressées. L’analyse de la lentille des petites entreprises a conclu que le projet de décret n’aurait aucune incidence associée sur les petites entreprises, car celui-ci n’impose pas de fardeau administratif ou de coûts associés à la conformité pour les entreprises. Ces renseignements figurent dans le résumé de l’étude d’impact de la réglementation qui accompagne la publication du projet de décret dans la Partie 1 de la Gazette du Canada.
En ce qui a trait à la partie d) de la question, les éventuelles mesures de gestion des risques élaborées au moyen des pouvoirs habilitants conférés par l’ajout des « articles manufacturés en plastique » à l’annexe 1 de la LCPE, y compris des règlements interdisant ou limitant l’utilisation de certains plastiques à usage unique, devront faire l’objet de toutes les études requises dans le cadre de la Directive du Cabinet sur la réglementation, y compris une analyse des coûts et des avantages. Comme le gouvernement consulte encore les partenaires et les intervenants, et comme une approche pour l’interdiction ou la restriction de certains plastiques est encore en cours d’élaboration, ces analyses ne sont pas encore disponibles. Par contre, ces analyses détaillées accompagneront les projets de règlements qui seront publiés dans la Partie 1 de la Gazette du Canada.
En ce qui concerne la partie e) de la question, le gouvernement du Canada travaille étroitement avec les provinces et les territoires dans le cadre du Conseil canadien des ministres de l’Environnement, ou CCME, afin d’élaborer et de mettre en œuvre la Stratégie visant l’atteinte de zéro déchet de plastique. L’objectif de cette stratégie est de faire migrer le Canada vers un modèle d’économie circulaire pour les matières plastiques, positionnant ainsi le pays comme un leader à l’échelle mondiale en matière de solutions d’avenir innovantes pour la gestion et la réduction des déchets.
Les provinces et les territoires font régulièrement le point sur le programme exhaustif du gouvernement du Canada visant l’atteinte de zéro déchet de plastique au CCME, qui sert souvent de forum d’échange de renseignements sur les initiatives fédérales, provinciales et territoriales. Par exemple, lors de la dernière réunion du CCME en juillet 2020, les ministres fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux ont consacré une grande partie de la réunion à échanger des points de vue et des stratégies pour une reprise durable des activités après la pandémie. Les ministres provinciaux et territoriaux ont aussi reçu en primeur un exemplaire du document de travail publié le 7 octobre, afin qu’ils l’examinent. Enfin, les fonctionnaires fédéraux ont présenté un exposé sur l’approche de gestion intégrée au Comité sur la réduction et la récupération des matières résiduelles du CCME en septembre 2020.
Pour ce qui est de la partie f) de la question, l’approche du gouvernement du Canada s’appuie sur les études scientifiques et les données probantes les plus solides. Les fondements scientifiques sont présentés dans l’Évaluation scientifique de la pollution plastique, réalisée conjointement par Santé Canada et Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. Les résultats de l’évaluation scientifique confirment, entre autres, que les morceaux de plastique ayant un diamètre supérieur à 5 mm causent des dommages aux organismes vivants et à leur habitat. Les animaux sauvages avalent ces résidus de plastique ou s’y emmêlent, ce qui entraîne des dommages physiques directs et, dans de nombreux cas, la mort. L’évaluation scientifique confirme également que des mesures pour réduire la quantité de plastique rejetée dans l’environnement sont nécessaires.
De plus, des données provenant de nettoyages de rivages et de vérifications de détritus municipaux montrent que les plastiques à usage unique sont prévalents dans l’environnement et représentent une menace pour la faune sauvage. En s’appuyant sur ces études et données probantes, le gouvernement du Canada a proposé de recourir aux pouvoirs habilitants découlant de la LCPE pour réglementer certains plastiques à usage uniques. La LCPE constitue une part importante de la législation fédérale visant la prévention de la pollution et la protection de l’environnement et de la santé humaine. La LCPE donne accès à un éventail d’outils qui permettent au gouvernement de cibler des sources de pollution plastique et de modifier des comportements à des étapes clés du cycle de vie des produits de plastique, comme la conception, la fabrication, l’utilisation, l’élimination et la récupération, afin de réduire la pollution et de créer les conditions favorables à la mise en place d’une économie circulaire pour les matières plastiques.
Enfin, en ce qui a trait à la partie g) de la question, la recommandation d’ajouter une substance à l’annexe 1 de la Loi canadienne sur la protection de l’environnement de 1999 se fonde sur certaines dispositions de la LCPE. En particulier, le paragraphe 90(1) de la LCPE autorise le gouverneur en conseil à ajouter une substance à l’annexe 1 s’il est convaincu, sur recommandation des ministres de la Santé et de l’Environnement, qu’une substance répond à au moins un des critères énoncés à l’article 64 de la Loi, c’est-à-dire si la substance pose un risque pour l’environnement, la santé humaine ou les deux. Or l’Évaluation scientifique de la pollution plastique a fourni aux ministres des données probantes pour appuyer la recommandation d’ajouter les « articles manufacturés en plastique » à l’annexe 1 de la LCPE, une mesure qui contribuera à l’atténuation des risques écologiques associés à la pollution plastique issue de ces articles.

Question no 104 --
M. Eric Melillo:
En ce qui concerne la décision de l’Initiative fédérale de développement économique dans le Nord de l’Ontario (FedNor) d’accorder un prêt de 800 000 $ à skritswap Inc.: a) combien des sept postes que le prêt devrait permettre de créer selon le site Web du gouvernement seront situés (i) dans le Nord de l’Ontario, ventilé par localité, (ii) au Canada, (iii) aux États-Unis; b) le gouvernement a-t-il vérifié si l’entreprise était effectivement établie principalement à Sault-Ste-Marie, plutôt qu’à Waterloo, en Ontario, ou à San Mateo, en Californie, où elle a des établissements; c) si le gouvernement s’est assuré que le siège permanent était effectivement situé dans le Nord de l’Ontario en se rendant sur les lieux, quel fonctionnaire s’est rendu sur place; d) FedNor a-t-il obtenu un engagement de l’entreprise selon lequel tout emploi créé à l’aide du prêt serait situé dans le Nord de l’Ontario, et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de l’engagement; e) quelle est la ventilation des avantages économiques attendus ou des emplois qui seront créés par municipalité?
Response
L’hon. Mélanie Joly (ministre du Développement économique et des Langues officielles, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement du Canada s'est engagé à faire croître l'économie du Nord de l'Ontario et à créer de bons emplois locaux. L'Initiative fédérale de développement économique pour le Nord de l'Ontario, soit FedNor, a toujours été un partenaire clé pour les entrepreneurs du Nord de l'Ontario et une partie intégrante du développement économique de la région.
Dans ce cas précis, le financement a été accordé pour aider une femme entrepreneur à faire croître son entreprise dans le Nord de l'Ontario. FedNor est conscient de cette situation, est en contact avec l'entreprise et continuera à suivre la situation de près. L’entreprise est pleinement consciente que si elle ne respecte pas les paramètres fixés par son accord de contribution, elle devra immédiatement rembourser les fonds qu'elle a reçus.
FedNor continuera à travailler en étroite collaboration et de manière stratégique avec les entreprises et les partenaires communautaires afin de renforcer le Nord de l'Ontario.

Question no 108 --
Mme Michelle Rempel Garner:
En ce qui concerne les changements ou modifications au fonctionnement et aux systèmes d’alerte du Réseau mondial d’intelligence santé publique, depuis le 1er janvier 2016: a) quels sont les détails particuliers de chaque changement ou modification, y compris (i) la description du changement ou de la modification, (ii) la date de la décision, (iii) la date où le changement est entré en vigueur, (iv) qui a recommandé le changement ou la modification, (v) la date où le Bureau de la ministre de la Santé a été avisé, (vi) la date où le Bureau du Conseil privé ou le Cabinet du premier ministre a été avisé, (vii) la date où le changement a été rendu public, le cas échant; b) pour chaque élément en a), d’autres pays ont-ils été informés des changements et quels sont les détails de chaque avis, y compris (i) la date, (ii) les pays avisés, (iii) le résumé du changement; c) pour chaque changement en a), l’Organisation mondiale de la santé a-t-elle été avisée, et, le cas échéant, à quelle date?
Response
M. Darren Fisher (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre de la Santé, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse aux parties a)(i), (ii), (iii) et (iv) de la question, depuis le début du programme jusqu’à la fin de 2018, les alertes du RMISP étaient déterminées et diffusées par les analystes du programme. Les alertes visent à diriger les abonnés vers un article de presse en particulier, sans présenter de sommaire ni d’analyse supplémentaire. À l’automne 2018, la Direction générale de l’infrastructure de sûreté sanitaire, ou DGISS, a entrepris un examen des produits d’information du programme, y compris des alertes du RMISP et des processus d’approbation connexes.
Après des discussions internes, il a été décidé d’élever l’approbation au niveau de la vice-présidente de la DGISS afin de maintenir la sensibilisation des cadres supérieurs de l’ASPC au sujet des alertes diffusées par le système.
L’approbation du rapport quotidien du RMISP, qui présente des résumés détaillés de plusieurs articles de presse, a continué de relever des analystes et avait donc aucun changement. Depuis septembre 2020, l’approbation des alertes relève du directeur.
Tous les autres produits d’information du RMISP, comme le rapport quotidien du RMISP, continuent d’être diffusés directement du RMISP aux abonnés, qui comprennent les cadres supérieurs de l’APSC et des autres ministères.
Le RMISP n’a jamais reçu comme directive de cesser ou de ralentir sa collecte d’information. La diffusion de l’information se poursuit de façon opportune. Le rôle principal du RMISP comme système de surveillance des évènements à l’échelle mondiale reste inchangé, et sa capacité a été améliorée au fil des ans grâce à des collaborations avec des partenaires comme le Conseil national de recherches.
Pour ce qui est des parties a)(v), (vi), (vii), b) et c), les changements ci-dessus ont été apportés à l'interne à l’ASPC. Aucun document n’indique que la modification du processus d’approbation des alertes du RMISP ait été communiquée aux organisations mentionnées ci dessus.

Question no 111 --
Mme Michelle Rempel Garner:
En ce qui concerne la distribution d'un vaccin contre la COVID-19: a) quel est l’échéancier prévu pour la distribution d'un vaccin; b) lorsque Santé Canada aura approuvé son utilisation, quels groupes de la population seront désignés comme groupes qui devraient recevoir un vaccin en priorité; c) quel est l'estimé de temps pour vacciner tous les groupes visés en b), ventilé par groupes prioritaires; d) quel est l'estimé de temps prévu actuellement pour vacciner la population en général après l’approbation d'un vaccin; e) quel est l'estimé de temps prévu actuellement afin que tous les Canadiens qui désirent ou qui ont besoin d'un vaccin soient en mesure de le recevoir; f) quel pourcentage de doses seront allouées à chacun des groupes prioritaires initiaux; g) quel pourcentage de doses seront allouées à la population en général; h) quels critères le gouvernement a-t-il utilisés pour déterminer quels groupes bénéficieraient d’un accès prioritaire à un vaccin?
Response
M. Darren Fisher (secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre de la Santé, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, en réponse à la partie a) de la question, l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada, ou ASPC, prévoit que des vaccins limités seront disponibles pour distribution au Canada dans la première partie de 2021. Tout vaccin distribué au Canada doit avoir une approbation réglementaire ou une ordonnance provisoire. On s'attend à ce que l'approvisionnement initial soit limité, s'améliorant avec le temps à mesure que la fabrication s'intensifie et la disponibilité des produits qui ont terminé les essais cliniques et qui sont approuvés par Santé Canada.
En ce qui concerne la partie b) de la question, le Comité consultatif national de l’immunisation, le CCNI, du Canada a fourni des conseils sur l’utilisation équitable des vaccins contre la pandémie, notamment des recommandations sur les populations clés pour la vaccination précoce contre la COVID-19 lorsque l’approvisionnement initial en vaccins est limité; le CCNI est un organisme consultatif externe qui conseille l’ASPC sur l’utilisation optimale des vaccins. Dans le plan canadien fédéral-provincial-territorial de lutte contre la pandémie, le CCNI est désigné comme l’organisme faisant autorité en matière de conseils sur la priorisation des vaccins et l’élaboration des programmes de vaccination de santé publique.
Le 3 novembre, 2020, le CCNI a publié des directives préliminaires sur les populations clés pour le début de l’immunisation de la COVID-19, dans le but de fournir un plan pour la planification de l'allocation efficace, utile et équitable d'un nouveau vaccin contre la COVID-19 une fois que son utilisation sera autorisée au Canada, lorsque le stock initial limité de doses nécessitera d'immuniser en priorité certaines populations avant d’autres. Ce document se trouve en ligne ici; https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/guidance-key-populations-early-covid-19-immunization.html.
Après les stades avancés des essais cliniques sur un vaccin expérimental, le CCNI peaufinera et révisera ses recommandations préliminaires concernant les groupes cibles, en fonction des éléments suivants: les données additionnelles sur l’innocuité et l’efficacité obtenues au cours des stades avancés des essais cliniques; la disponibilité de l’approvisionnement; les calendriers à dose unique ou à doses multiples; la nécessité ou non de vacciner les enfants et les femmes enceintes; et les cadres stratégiques concernant l’éthique, l’équité, l’économie, et le reste.
Pour ce qui est de la partie c) de la question, à l’heure actuelle, plusieurs vaccins contre la COVID-19 font l’objet d’essais cliniques au Canada et à l’étranger et nous ne savons pas encore lesquels se révéleront sécuritaires et efficaces. En outre, une grande incertitude subsiste quant au niveau et au type de protection qu’un vaccin approuvé pourrait induire dans différents groupes de population, pour ce qui est de l’âge, par exemple, d’un problème médical sous-jacent ou d’une infection antérieure. Il sera impossible d’estimer le temps nécessaire pour vacciner les groupes prioritaires tant que ces renseignements ne seront pas connus.
En ce qui a trait à la partie d) de la question, il faut se référer à la réponse à la partie a).
En ce qui a trait à la partie e) de la question, il faut se référer à la réponse à la partie a).
En ce qui concerne la partie f) de la question, après les stades avancés des essais cliniques sur un vaccin expérimental, le CCNI peaufinera et révisera ses recommandations préliminaires concernant les groupes cibles, en fonction des éléments suivants: les données additionnelles sur l’innocuité et l’efficacité obtenues au cours des stades avancés des essais cliniques; la disponibilité de l’approvisionnement; les calendriers à dose unique ou à doses multiples; la nécessité ou non de vacciner les enfants et les femmes enceintes; et les cadres stratégiques concernant l’éthique, l’équité, l’économie, et le reste.
Les provinces et territoires sont responsables de l’administration et de la prestation des services de soins de santé, y compris des programmes liés à l’immunisation. Les politiques en matière d’immunisation et les calendriers de vaccination sont élaborés par les provinces et territoires ou leurs comités consultatifs d’experts en immunisation, et sont basés sur les besoins propres aux provinces et territoires, d’autres recommandations en matière d’immunisation, du CCNI, par exemple, la disponibilité des ressources et les contraintes liées aux programmes ainsi que sur les priorités établies. Ainsi, chaque province et chaque territoire détermineront le pourcentage de doses qui sera alloué à chacun de ses groupes prioritaires initiaux.
En ce qui a trait à la partie g) de la question, il faut se référer à la réponse à la partie f).
Enfin, pour ce qui est de la partie h) de la question, le CCNI a examiné les données disponibles sur l’épidémiologie de la COVID-19 et le fardeau associé à cette dernière, afin d’élaborer ses orientations provisoires sur les stratégies de vaccination prioritaires avec les groupes cibles associés. Comme nous l’avons indiqué, après les stades avancés des essais cliniques sur un vaccin expérimental, le CCNI peaufinera et révisera ses recommandations préliminaires concernant les groupes cibles, en fonction des éléments suivants: les données additionnelles sur l’innocuité et l’efficacité obtenues au cours des stades avancés des essais cliniques; la disponibilité de l’approvisionnement; les calendriers à dose unique ou à doses multiples; la nécessité ou non de vacciner les enfants et les femmes enceintes; et les cadres stratégiques concernant l’éthique, l’équité, l’économie, et le reste.

Question no 114 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne l'argent des contribuables utilisé pour poursuivre en justice le Parti conservateur du Canada: à combien s’élèvent au total les honoraires d’avocats et les autres frais connexes dépensés à ce jour par CBC/Radio-Canada relativement à leur poursuite en cours contre le Parti conservateur du Canada?
Response
Mme Julie Dabrusin (secrétaire parlementaire du ministre du Patrimoine canadien, Lib.):
Monsieur le Président, lorsqu’il traite les documents parlementaires, le gouvernement applique la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les principes de la Loi sur l’accès à l’information. Les informations concernant les dépenses engagées dans le cadre du litige civil en cours contre le Parti conservateur du Canada n’ont pas été communiquées, car elles relèvent du secret professionnel de l’avocat.
Results: 1 - 3 of 3

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data