Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 19 of 19
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-06-17 14:46 [p.8674]
Mr. Speaker, a person's name is fundamental to who they are. Indigenous names are endowed with deep, cultural meaning and speak to indigenous peoples' presence on the land since time immemorial. Yet, the impact of colonialism means that many indigenous peoples' names have not been recognized.
Could the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship please update the House on the progress the government has made in responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's call to action 17 to enable residential school survivors and their families to reclaim and use their indigenous names on all government documents?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-06-14 15:08 [p.8341]
Mr. Speaker, today the Minister of Canadian Heritage announced the appointees to the first Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages.
The Indigenous Languages Act is historic and demonstrates this government's commitment to support the efforts of indigenous people to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen indigenous languages. The establishment of the Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages achieves a concrete milestone in the implementation of the act.
Could the minister tell us how the commissioner and the directors will support the efforts of indigenous peoples?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-06-02 14:24 [p.7818]
Mr. Speaker, today marks the anniversary of the release of the TRC's 94 calls to action, which was an appeal to mobilize all levels of government, organizations as well as individuals to advance reconciliation through concrete changes in society.
Today, we acknowledge the courage of the former students and families that came forward to share their truth and leadership, and the guidance of the commissioners who provided us with a path forward.
The commission's findings revealed the heartbreaking details of the role that residential schools played in the unacceptable colonial history of Canada and the tragic legacy that continues today. While almost 80% of the calls to action under the sole responsibility of the federal government, or a shared responsibility with provinces, territory governments and other key partners, are completed or well under way, we are committed to accelerating progress on these essential steps toward reconciliation.
Today, we honour and support the survivors and reflect on how all Canadians can support reconciliation.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-06-01 21:59 [p.7809]
Mr. Speaker, I am splitting my time with the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands. I appreciate the time I have to speak tonight, and I am glad another prolonged Standing Committee on Finance meeting ended in time for me to do so.
I ran for the member of Parliament position to help my constituents. Unapologetically, and with everything I do here, my goal is to try to improve their lives and those of their children. Those are my marching orders.
Indigenous constituents make up 50% of the population in the Northwest Territories, and the Northwest Territories has the highest per capita number of residential school survivors, and “survivor” is the accurate term. Those who came home from many of these schools are literally survivors, as has been so shockingly illustrated this past week by the discovery of all those children, those babies in Kamloops.
I am not surprised many Canadians are shocked. However, I am not shocked and neither are many indigenous families. In my hometown of Fort Providence, I can visit a small fenced-in area on the edge of the community that has a monument with the names of 161 children who died at the Sacred Heart Mission school.
In the 1920s, the mission decided to dig up all the priests, nuns and brothers who were buried there and move them to a new gravesite. Then they plowed the graveyard over, over all the bodies that were buried there, over my relatives and the children who were buried there. If our elders had not carried the information forward and convinced our leadership in the 1990s to do some research and find this grave, this would have been all forgotten.
The devastation of these so-called schools has lived through generations. Unfortunately, this devastation has survived as well. In the Northwest Territories, we top many of Canada's lists: addiction rates, suicide rates, crime rates and housing needs. My efforts here in this House have often targeted getting more housing, increasing indigenous policing and accessing more mental health funding.
I have also been advocating for more attention and resources to conclude land claims and self-government. As well as decreasing this constant and large socioeconomic gap between indigenous people and other Canadians, which needs to be a priority, there also needs to be certainty over land rights and empowerment of indigenous people through self-government.
I can see how the government has supported Canada's effort and attention, and the billions of dollars in additional funding to indigenous governments, indigenous organizations and programs that have been created over the five years. Should there be more? I think so. Should it be faster? I think so.
While we are all mourning the children from Kamloops, let us not make it an empty exercise. Let us move faster in fulfilling the important work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Let us focus on reducing and eliminating systemic racism that exists, and that we see in policing and health care, for example.
To the members of the loyal opposition, while posting thoughts on the recent tragedy before us along with pictures of teddy bears, let us not continue to vote against legislation like UNDRIP. Let us work together to support indigenous people in Canada. Let us not continue to make comments on residential schools that are both inaccurate and insensitive.
Let us work together and not obstruct our attempts to heal and to help and to empower indigenous people, who are still surviving this generational harm that goes by the name of residential schools. Please, let us all focus on helping our constituents.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-06-01 22:05 [p.7809]
Mr. Speaker, I spent my whole life living in a community where there was a residential school. Everybody in my family attended residential school. I attended residential school.
For many years, the people in authority were telling us that it was for our own good, that this was to improve our lives. I always thought that if this was for my own good, I would hate to see what they would do if it was not for my own good. I always questioned when somebody would do anything, when would the government step up. It has only been since this government was elected in 2015, that we started making some movement on accepting and moving forward with Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommendations.
There is a strategy in place. When we did the ground penetrating radar exercises to check all the grave sites around our community, the government paid for it. In the recommendations, it is very clear that all the sites need to be checked, and that should be at the expense of the government. The government is put us in this position along with the churches, and it has responsibility to work through the recommendations.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-06-01 22:08 [p.7810]
Mr. Speaker, the definition of genocide has, since its outset, been debated on many stages at the world level. When I look at the terminology and when I look at the boxes that define genocide, I think we check all almost every box. I certainly will not hesitate to say that this was genocide. We still have a long way to go.
My focus is not to debate whether it was genocide, however. It is time to move forward. It is not time to have more hearings. It is not time to set up more panels. It is not time to discuss whether this clearly fits in that box of genocide. It is time to move forward. It is time to take action. We have to start moving and get all the TRC recommendations done. We have to work on reducing the socio-economic gap between indigenous people and other Canadians. We have to work at eliminating the systemic racism.
There is a lot of work to be done. I have been waiting for a long time to get this going. We have some momentum now, and I want to see it keep going.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-05-31 14:48 [p.7624]
Mr. Speaker, here in Northwest Territories, we have experienced significant flooding in recent weeks. Residents of Fort Simpson, Jean Marie and Fort Good Hope have suffered major damage to their homes, and other communities along the Mackenzie River have also had high water levels.
Can the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness please update the House on how the Government of Canada is working with its partners to assist any areas affected by this flooding?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-03-26 11:47 [p.5360]
Madam Speaker, I was joined by the Minister of Canadian Heritage to meet with the Gwich'in Tribal Council recipients of the indigenous language and cultures program to learn about indigenous language projects in the Northwest Territories. Thanks to the funding received, the Gwich'in Tribal Council was able to deliver 2,700 hours of Language Nest programming and 224 hours of language and culture classes in Gwich'in, as well as produce copies of textbooks and teaching guides in Gwich'in and English.
Can the Minister of Canadian Heritage tell this House what the government is doing to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen indigenous languages?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-03-22 15:39 [p.5049]
Mr. Speaker, today I am presenting a petition signed by over 32,000 Canadians, including 471 of residents of NWT.
This petition was sponsored by the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and calls upon the Government of Canada to apologize for its role in the harmful legacy of Giant Mine. It also calls upon the government to ensure that the YKDFN are properly compensated and are able to fully participate in the site's remediation.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-03-11 14:07 [p.4908]
Mr. Speaker, earlier this week, our government proudly supported a motion to continue the debate on Bill C-5, a national day for truth and reconciliation. It is disappointing that unanimous consent was not reached to continue to advance this important piece of legislation, because the Conservative Party of Canada refused to agree, obstructing the passage of the motion and ultimately the bill.
This new national day of commemoration would honour first nations, Inuit and Métis survivors, their families and communities while raising more awareness among Canadians about the atrocities committed against indigenous people. September 30 builds on the grassroots momentum of Orange Shirt Day, which is already recognized as a day to remember the painful history and legacy of residential schools and move forward on a path toward reconciliation.
Reconciliation should not be partisan. The obstruction and political games must stop so that the House can advance important elements of reconciliation and the TRC's calls to action.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2021-01-28 14:50 [p.3717]
Mr. Speaker, gender violence disproportionately victimizes indigenous women across Canada and in particular in Canada's north. A recent Statistics Canada report confirms that gender-based violence is on the rise, especially against indigenous women, and has gotten worse during the pandemic.
Although a staggering 39% of women in the north report they have experienced sexual assault, the survey also found that just one in eight sexual assaults was reported to police.
Could the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness please update the House on what the RCMP is doing toward reconciliation with indigenous people and ensuring that everyone can feel safe?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-11-30 14:05 [p.2676]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to pay tribute to a strong advocate for the north, the hon. member for Yukon. It was 20 years ago, on November 27, 2000, that he was first elected to the House. As the third longest-serving MP in Yukon's history, he has served six terms under four prime ministers. He has earned a reputation as one of the hardest-working MPs.
The member has been a passionate voice for a variety of environmental and social justice issues, a long-time advocate for ending poverty and homelessness, a founding member of the Parliamentary Friends of Burma, a proponent of the rights of those with FASD, a defender of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the Porcupine caribou herd, and a voice for climate change and its dramatic impacts in the north.
I congratulate my territorial colleague on this milestone. I thank him for his many years of service.
Mahsi cho.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-11-19 14:09 [p.2127]
Mr. Speaker, today I want to recognize two of my constituents, Roy Helmer and Shelly Wood.
In the early hours of October 16, Shelly heard sounds that would bring any of us into a full state of panic. Upon investigation, she was shocked to see a bear attacking someone just outside her door. She tried to distract it, but then ran to get Roy, who grabbed what was readily available. He hit the bear with a small concrete statue, which gave him just a moment to quickly pull the injured girl into the house. Many Canadians live near wildlife, but we still do not expect this.
I would like to recognize and commend Shelly and Roy for their actions. Their quick-thinking response saved this girl from a much more severe outcome. I would also like to thank first responders, Hay River RCMP and the staff from Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada for their assistance. I wish a speedy recovery to the young girl who was so unexpectedly attacked.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-11-02 18:30 [p.1564]
Madam Speaker, I would like to acknowledge that I am speaking from the traditional homeland of the Dene, Métis and Inuvialuit of the Northwest Territories.
I am of Métis descent. I am a member of the Dehcho First Nations. We are known as the “big river” people. I believe I am the only sitting member who attended the residential school program, or the hostel program as we knew it.
I am grateful to have the opportunity to speak in support of the government’s bill that would revise the oath of citizenship. It continues our government’s important work to walk the shared path of reconciliation and the implementation of the TRC's calls to action.
I would like to point to a number of key legislative initiatives that address calls to action and advance reconciliation.
Bill C-91, the Indigenous Languages Act, received royal assent in June 2019. This act supports the Government of Canada’s efforts to reclaim, revitalize, strengthen and maintain indigenous languages in Canada. The act was developed to address calls to action numbers 13, 14 and 15; elements of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, or UNDRIP; and the Government of Canada’s commitment to a renewed relationship with indigenous people based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership.
That same month, in June 2019, royal assent was given to Bill C-92, an act respecting first nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families. It came into force on January 1, 2020. This act was codeveloped as part of Canada’s efforts to reform indigenous child and family services, which included implementing call to action number 4. It affirms the rights of first nations, Inuit, and Métis to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services and establishes national principles such as the best interests of the child, cultural continuity and substantive equality, which help guide the provision of indigenous child and family services.
The act was the result of extensive engagement with first nations, Inuit and Métis, treaty nations, self-governing first nations, provincial and territorial governments, and those with lived experience, including elders, youth and women. It reaffirms the government’s commitment to advancing self-determination and eliminating existing disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous children and youth.
The act also lays out flexible pathways for indigenous governing bodies to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services at a pace they choose. Through the act’s legislative framework, they can move forward with their own service delivery models and laws and choose their own solutions for their children and families. It ensures indigenous children are cared for in the right way, with connections to their communities, cultures and languages. Furthermore, since January 1, 2020, every service provider, province or territory delivering child and family services to indigenous children and families will need to follow the minimum standards found in the act.
Bill C-5, an act to amend the Bills of Exchange Act, the Interpretation Act and the Canada Labour Code regarding a national day for truth and reconciliation, was introduced by the Minister of Canadian Heritage on September 29, 2020. If passed, this bill will be an important step in responding to call to action number 80 by establishing the national day for truth and reconciliation on September 30 as a statutory holiday for federally regulated workers. This national day would honour survivors, their families and communities. It would also remind the public of the tragic and painful history and legacy of residential schools that remains a vital component of the reconciliation process.
The Government of Canada continues to work closely with partners to address the remaining calls to action.
In June 2019, the government received the final report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, entitled “Reclaiming Power and Place”. It responded to call to action number 41, which called for the launch of a public inquiry into the disproportionate victimization of indigenous women and girls.
Furthermore, the Government of Canada is committed to gender equality and reconciliation with indigenous peoples, and has eliminated all the remaining sex-based inequalities in the Indian Act registration provisions, which go back to its inception 150 years ago. We committed to eliminating all sex-based discrimination in the Indian Act registration, and we delivered on that promise.
Bringing Bill S-3 into force also responds to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls calls to justice and provides justice to women and their descendants, who fought for these changes for decades. We will continue with partners and other levels of government to respond to the findings of the national inquiry and to this national tragedy.
In closing, I reiterate that the government is determined to address the historical, colonial racism and injustice of yesterday, just as we are determined to root out and expose the racism of today. As Canadians have seen all too clearly during this difficult time, racism, both systemic and social, continues to be all too prevalent in our country. It must not and cannot be tolerated, for that, too, is part of the healing process, just as this bill is part of the healing process.
This bill represents progress on the shared path to healing and reconciliation. It responds to concerns expressed in the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It points the way to a more inclusive Canada. Moreover, by amending the oath of citizenship, it represents greater awareness and answers call to action 94.
I am pleased to offer my full support of the bill before us.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-11-02 18:39 [p.1566]
Madam Speaker, for 10 years, when the Conservatives were in power, there was very little hope among the indigenous population of this country. We saw many attempts to muzzle indigenous people. We are now making progress. We are on the right path. Progress is not as fast as we expected it to be, not as fast as we want it to be, but we are heading in the right direction.
It took 150 years to get to this point, and it may take just as long to see reconciliation take place. I am hoping that things will happen more quickly, but I am convinced that it will be many generations before we see true reconciliation, and that means everyone has to do their part.
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was endorsed by our government in May 2016, which was after many years of the previous Conservative government not being willing to do so. When we did move forward on this piece of legislation, we did not see strong support from a number of parties, and that included people in the Senate.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-11-02 18:41 [p.1566]
Madam Speaker, infrastructure is very important to us, especially in the area of transportation. We have very few roads and most of the airports in our communities are very small. However, there have been some very important investments made by the Liberal government. Over the last fives years, I have made many announcements on behalf of the government and some of them have really taken hold. We are going to see some very good results. We have seen investments in airports, which are now under construction. Within the next year, we will be cutting the ribbon on a road to Whati, a very important road to that community but also to a mine development project that will probably take off once the road is completed.
We could do more, but we have a pretty good track record up until now.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-10-22 14:09 [p.1112]
Mr. Speaker, Secret Path Week marks the dates that both Chanie Wenjack and Gord Downie passed away.
Chanie Wenjack was a 12-year-old boy who died of exposure while attempting to get back home to his family from residential school.
Secret Path Week is about creating a national platform to have conversations, learn about indigenous culture and create awareness of a true history regarding residential schools. The Downie and Wenjack fund has implemented legacy school programs in over 1,300 schools in every province and territory in Canada.
We urge all parliamentarians, and all Canadians, to answer Gord Downie's call to action to do something by supporting reconciliation to further the conversation about the history of residential schools.
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-10-09 12:03 [p.807]
Madam Speaker, in cities across the country we are seeing the number of COVID-19 cases rise. We know that first nations, Inuit and Métis face unique challenges combatting the spread of COVID-19.
Could the parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Indigenous Services update the House on how the government is supporting indigenous people living off reserve and in urban centres?
View Michael McLeod Profile
Lib. (NT)
View Michael McLeod Profile
2020-10-01 14:49 [p.427]
Mr. Speaker, I know our government has been outspoken in the past about opposing the United States administration's plan to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to oil drilling and that it could auction off drilling leases this calendar year. The ANWR is a critically important calving ground for the Porcupine caribou herd. With the ongoing decline in many herds, we need to collectively protect them and assist in their recovery.
What has Canada done and what more can we do to address this incoming threat?
Results: 1 - 19 of 19

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data