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View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I call the meeting to order.
Welcome back, everyone. Welcome to meeting number 47 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted in committee on April 12, 2021, the committee has commenced consideration of the study of fair compensation in the field of educational publishing in Canada.
Today's meeting is taking place in a hybrid format. Most of us will be in our own respective virtual rooms, or in the case of Madame Bessette, a virtual environment with a beautiful backdrop. Hopefully you'll get to see that later.
As you know, of course, when you're viewing us from the webcast, the person speaking is the only one you will see on the screen.
Now we get to the crux of the matter. The way this format is going to work is that instead of an hour with each of the witnesses, we're going to have all witnesses. We have six witness groups with us today. We'll carry on. If we need a health break, we'll do that halfway through; nevertheless, we will continue to move on.
I introduce our first witness only because he is not yet with us. He is having a few technical issues. We'll get to him towards the end when he's able to log back on. That would be Bryan Perro, who's a writer, and he's appearing as an individual.
We now go to the organizations. From Access Copyright, we have Roanie Levy, who is the president and chief executive officer; from the Association of Canadian Publishers, Glenn Rollans, who is past president; from the Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators and Performers, Sylvia McNicoll, author; from the Writers' Union of Canada, John Degen, who is the executive director; and from Universities Canada, Philip Landon, who is the chief operating officer of that organization.
To our witnesses, we've all had our sound checks and are ready to go. We'll have five minutes of your opening statements, and following that, we'll go to each of the caucuses represented here on our committee.
That said, Ms. Levy, I'm going to start with you. You have up to five minutes to begin.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much.
Now we go to Glenn Rollans from the Association of Canadian Publishers.
Mr. Rollans, you have up to five minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Rollans.
We're now going to move on to the Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators and Performers. Here is Sylvia McNicoll.
Ms. McNicoll, go ahead, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. McNicoll.
Now we go to the Writers' Union and John Degen, who is the executive director.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Degen.
We go now to Universities Canada. Philip Landon is the chief operating officer.
You have up to five minutes, sir. Go ahead.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Landon.
Now we go to Mr. Perro, who is our final guest.
Mr. Perro—I hope I've pronounced that correctly—it's nice to see you back online. We're going to do a sound check with you to make sure we can hear you. Just one word—
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
That is much better.
Go ahead, Mr. Perro. You have up to five minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Perro.
I think wishing you happy birthday is in order.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Oh, was it? Well, happy belated birthday.
Okay, everyone, thank you very much. That ends our testimony from our witnesses' opening statements.
Now we go into questions, and I have a couple of tips for everyone.
We're now on an expanded list of witnesses, as you know. We have all six of them here. Colleagues, it would help us greatly if you could identify who you want to ask your question to, as opposed to saying that you have a question and anybody can answer. That tends to chew up a lot of time and creates a bit of confusion, since we have six witnesses here. You could help me out.
As for our witnesses, now when I give colleagues time of five or six minutes, the time is their own. If you wish to get in on a conversation, you could wave your hand if you wish, or do something of that nature to try to get the attention of the person asking the question. I would ask my colleagues to be aware of that.
We are now going to the Conservatives and Mr. Rayes. Mr. Rayes, you have six minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Merci.
I provided a little bit of flexibility for our witnesses, but I can't provide too much, as much as I would love to. It's very interesting, though. Thank you.
We will now go to Ms. Ien for six minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I apologize. I should have mentioned at the beginning that if you hear me say "Thank you", I give you the flexibility to finish your sentence. It doesn't mean you have to end right away. I think I unintentionally did that to Mr. Perro as well, so I apologize.
If you hear me say "Thank you", just sum up your thought very quickly. We have to get on to the next questioner.
Speaking of which, go ahead.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you.
Mr. Champoux, you may go ahead. You have six minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you.
We'll now go to Ms. McPherson for six minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'm sorry, folks. I have to stop it right there. We have to go to our second round.
I noticed, Ms. McNicoll, that you had your hand up earlier, but perhaps we could deal with it in the next round of questioning. I want to point out that you did have your hand up, albeit virtually, but it was there.
Nevertheless, in the second round we now will go to Mr. Waugh for five minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. Levy.
We'll now go to Mr. Louis for five minutes please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
You are. That is exactly five minutes. Thank you very much.
Now we have Mr. Champoux for two and a half minutes.
Go ahead, Mr. Champoux.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you.
Ms. McPherson, you have two and a half minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Ms. McPherson, I apologize, but you have two seconds left.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
No, that's all right. It was very engaging.
Thank you.
We will now go to Mr. Aitchison for five minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Ms. Dabrusin, go ahead for five minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, folks.
I'm sorry, Ms. Dabrusin. I sometimes get a little bit generous with the timing. Unfortunately, I have to move on because we're now starting our third round, which we don't often do, but here we are.
I know Ms. Levy and Mr. Degen had their hands up. I apologize. Hopefully, you can work that in later.
Mr. Shields was originally up, but Ms. Shin, would you like to ask a question? Before you do, can you tell me the name of your riding? I already know it, but I don't think we got a sound check from you at the beginning.
Tell me the name of your riding and in two sentences tell me why it's the best in the country.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
We got a thumbs up for your description and for the sound check itself.
Ma'am, you have five minutes. Go ahead.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. Shin.
Mr. Housefather, you have five minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Degen and Mr. Housefather.
Mr. Champoux, go ahead for two and a half minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Champoux.
Ms. McPherson, you have two minutes and 30 seconds, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Yes, I was a bit generous, Ms. McPherson, only because you provided everyone with a great extro, and thank you for doing that with your time. It's well appreciated.
Folks, I've been through a lot of conversations. As I mentioned, we keep on getting better and better. Today was an excellent meeting, very informative. Thank you to my colleagues for providing that, and equally thank you to our guests, who provided their experience, their work, and their entertainment as many not only young but also older people enjoyed your books and publications. We thank you so much for bringing that experience to us here today as we go forward.
Colleagues, this brings us to our final session of the spring session. I wanted to say a huge thank you to you all. This has been quite an interesting little session we had this spring between legislation, hearings, reports and so on and so forth. Of course, we're not done yet, as we never are, but it was a good session nonetheless.
I want take a special thank you to Aimée, Gabrielle, and to Marion, who are apart of our staff, and in absentia also to Philippe Méla for his work.
If you'll join me, colleagues, I can't think of a more appropriate way to say thank you to a group of people who are highly professional for the wonderful job that they do. They always give us the thumbs-up when we're clear. I would ask you that you join me in giving them a thumbs-up, not just for being clear but also for being incredibly professional and patient. Thank you so much to our interpreters. Thank you.
Let me just name the guests very quickly before I go out.
Now, Ms. Levy, it appears that by a conservative count your name was differently pronounced in about 10 different ways, I think. How do you pronounce your name, Madam?
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Madam, thank you very much for joining us. Roanie comes from Access Copyright.
Mr. Bryan Perro is a writer and author. From the Association of Canadian Publishers, we have Glenn Rollans. From the Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators and Performers, we Sylvia McNicoll. We also have John Degen from The Writers' Union of Canada, and Philip Landon from Universities Canada.
I'll make one quick note before we go.
Colleagues, because we are also embarking upon a study for an independent body for complaints in sports, as we talked about earlier. I know it's probably a long time before we start that, but your ideas for witnesses would truly be appreciated. If you could do that as soon as possible, it would give us a head start on things.
That being the end—
Sorry, Ms. Ien; you have a comment.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. Ien. I appreciate it.
Go ahead, Mr. Rayes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you.
Go ahead, Mr. Champoux.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Champoux.
Go ahead, Ms. McPherson.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
It certainly has. Thank you for that. I appreciate it.
Remember, I sat on the government side when I started. I sat where the Conservatives are, and Ms. McPherson, I sat where you are for many years. That's all a big part of it: empathy.
Thank you so much, everybody. Have yourselves a wonderful summer, and we'll see you soon.
The meeting is adjourned.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Welcome, everybody, to the 46th meeting of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.
Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted in committee on June 11, 2021, the committee will commence consideration of the study of funding to locate the remains of indigenous children buried on the grounds of former residential schools.
Today’s meeting is taking place in a hybrid format, both virtual and in person, pursuant to the House order of January 25, 2021. The webcast will always show the person speaking rather than the entirety of the committee. It will be shown on the House of Commons website once it's available. There will be no photos for social media use. Thank you very much for abiding by that.
I want to make one statement before we commence today's meeting. This is for all staff. Today’s meeting might include some difficult testimony that can affect people in many ways. House employees, including members and their staff, can access support through the administration’s nurse counsellors at ohs-sst@parl.gc.ca, and the employee and family assistance program at 1-800-663-1142. This information is available on the House of Commons website or you can follow up with me or the clerk.
That being said, I want to welcome everyone on this beautiful Friday. It is a beautiful Friday, at least in my neck of the woods here on this little [Technical difficulty—Editor] Newfoundland, the unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq as well as Beothuk.
First of all, I want to acknowledge the fact that we are dealing with a motion from Mr. Waugh. I thank him for that.
I want to welcome our guests. Joining us from the Department of Canadian Heritage is Emmanuelle Sajous, assistant deputy minister, sport, major events and commemorations; and Melanie Kwong, director general, major events, commemoration and capital experience. Joining us from Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada is Amanda McCarthy, director, resolution and partnerships.
As you know, we start with a statement from our officials. We say as a guideline that it's five minutes, but I won't be terribly strict about this. We have perhaps a little bit more than an hour to do our meeting today. I would like to do two rounds of questioning.
Ms. Kwong, you have the floor for five minutes. Welcome.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much, Ms. Kwong. I appreciate that.
I notice that Ms. Sajous was able to join us. I think she's there right now.
Ms. Sajous, can you please say hello and tell us a little bit about yourself in order to get that sound check?
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
It appears that your sound should be okay.
Oh, she was already sound-checked. That's very good.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Trust me, you're not the first one to say that, and you're probably not going to be the last one either. I appreciate your coming on for this important discussion.
Now, folks, for those of you who are unfamiliar—perhaps you're watching us through webcast—those were our opening statements. We now go to the round of questioning from our colleagues.
We are going to start with the Conservative Party, and the man who brought us this motion, Mr. Kevin Waugh.
Mr. Waugh, you have the floor, for six minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. McCarthy, and thank you, Mr. Waugh.
We're now going to Mr. Battiste, who is not a regular member of our committee, but is a special guest today with his expertise. We certainly welcome him.
I know your riding is in Cape Breton, and Sydney is in it, but I've forgotten the official name.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I should know that.
You have six minutes. Please go ahead.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I have paused your time, Mr. Battiste.
I'm not sure if everyone can hear. I'll interrupt if need be, but if Mr. Battiste wants to reiterate the last part of what he said so that everyone can understand, I'll start the clock accordingly.
Go ahead, Mr. Battiste.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Is that for Madam Sajous? We lost her, I think.
Would others like to take that question...?
Madam Sajous, you're back again. Welcome.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Go ahead, Mr. Battiste.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Yes. We have a few seconds. If you want a quick question for the end, please proceed.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
I'm sorry. If you hear me say “thank you”, you can finish your sentence. I'm not that strict over time. It's a very important subject for me to be cutting things off like that. Thank you, Ms. Kwong.
I have just a couple of things.
Ms. McCarthy, could you raise your mike up just a little bit so we can hear you? There have been some issues with that.
Also, we've had some Internet issues with Ms. Sajous again. Perhaps, Ms. Sajous, if you want to, you could turn off your camera to give us more secure sound. That's no reflection on you, of course. It's just that it gives us a better connection so you're able to testify.
I thank you for your patience, everyone.
Next up for questions is Sylvie Bérubé, Bloc Québécois member for Abitibi—Baie‑James—Nunavik—Eeyou.
Welcome, Ms. Bérubé.
The floor is yours for six minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Your time is up.
Thank you very much.
Up next we have the NDP.
I would once more like to welcome Mr. Boulerice from Rosemont—La Petite‑Patrie.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
You have the floor for six minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you.
Thank you, Mr. Boulerice.
We will now go to our second round.
Mr. Shields, you have five minutes, please.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Mr. Shields. I appreciate that.
Ms. Ien, you have five minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. Kwong, and thank you, Ms. Ien.
Mr. Champoux, please go ahead for two and a half minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you, Ms. Sajous.
Mr. Boulerice, you have two and a half minutes.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Thank you very much, everyone.
Because we started late, I have about five minutes left.
I don't normally do this, but given the conversation that we were having and the importance of this issue, if anybody has any quick questions—and I mean very quick, for clarification or something of that nature—would you like to ask it now before we end the meeting? All I need is a virtual show of hands if someone would like to ask something.
Okay.
Folks, I just want to say thank you very much. I want to say a big thank you to our guests here today.
Emmanuelle Sajous, I apologize for the Internet inconvenience.
She's the assistant deputy minister of sport, major events and commemorations. That also goes to Melanie Kwong, director general of major events, commemorations and capital experience. Joining us from Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, we had Amanda McCarthy, who is director of resolution and partnerships.
Now folks, this is the first half of a motion that was put forward by Mr. Waugh, as I mentioned. The other half is regarding Chief Casimir, who wanted to be available but she could not be available today. We are not done with this particular part of the motion; therefore, we'll have to make that up when we return. That would have to be after Monday, whenever that may be. I won't presuppose when that will be.
Nevertheless, is there anything further to add? No.
I just want to say thank you again to our guests.
I want to say a very special thank you to our colleagues who are guesting here today as well as my own colleagues. I want to end by saying thank you and have a great weekend, everybody.
Have a good weekend. Meegwetch.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:16
I now call this meeting to order.
Welcome to meeting number 37 of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on April 21, the committee is meeting for its study on corporate offshore licences.
Today’s meeting is taking place in a hybrid format pursuant to the House order of January 25, and therefore members can attend in person in the room and remotely using the Zoom application. The proceedings are made available via the House of Commons website, and the webcast will show only the person speaking, rather than the entire committee.
To ensure an orderly meeting, I would like to outline a few rules to follow. Members and witnesses may speak in the official language of their choice. Interpretation services are available for this meeting. You have the choice at the bottom of your screen of either the floor or English or French. You will also notice the platform’s “raise hand” feature on the main toolbar should you wish to speak or alert the chair. Before speaking, please click on the microphone to unmute yourself. When you are not speaking, your mike should be on mute.
I would now like to welcome our witnesses for today. For the first panel, we have, from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Adam Burns, director general, fisheries resource management; Heather McCready, director general, conservation and protection; and David Whorley, director, national licensing operations.
Before we go to the opening remarks by Mr. Burns, I would like to welcome Mr. D'Entremont, from West Nova, back to our committee again. Also, of course, we have Mr. Kent, the member for Thornhill, with us. It's good to see you both here today.
Mr. Burns, when you're ready, you can start, for five minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:24
Thank you, Mr. Burns.
We'll now start our first round of questioning.
Before I go to Mr. Arnold for six minutes or less, I would remind members to please identify who you want to have answer the question. It will make better use of your time, so to speak.
We'll go to Mr. Arnold for six minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:31
Thank you, Mr. Arnold.
We'll now go to Mr. Battiste for six minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:37
Thank you, Mr. Battiste.
We'll now go to Madame Gill for six minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:38
Pardon, Madame Gill—
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:44
Thank you, Madam Gill.
We'll now go to Mr. Johns for six minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:51
Thank you, Mr. Johns. Your time has gone way over.
If there is an answer to that, I would ask the witnesses to submit it in writing over the next day or so.
We'll now go to Mr. Mazier for five minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 16:57
Thank you, Mr. Mazier.
We'll now go to Mr. Morrissey for five minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 17:03
Thank you, Mr. Morrissey.
We'll now go to Madame Gill, for two and a half minutes or less, please.
View Ken McDonald Profile
Lib. (NL)
View Ken McDonald Profile
2021-06-16 17:06
Thank you, Madam Gill.
We'll now go to Mr. Johns for two and a half minutes.
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