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Results: 1 - 15 of 182
View Pat Kelly Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, on Tuesday, MPs from all parties of the finance committee unanimously passed a motion calling on the government to fully fund the Auditor General. Massive pre-COVID spending, a failing infrastructure program with 20,000 projects unaccounted for, new Crown corporations with giant budgets and unprecedented COVID support programs have vastly increased the Auditor General's workload.
Yesterday the Minister of Canadian Heritage said that if the Auditor General needed more money all he had to do was ask. Mr. Chair, he's already asked. The Auditor General has repeatedly asked for an additional $11 million. They've been asking for this money since 2018 and the government keeps saying no. Now, the Auditor General has stopped working on performance audits and for two years in a row has testified at the public accounts committee that the Office of the Auditor General doesn't have enough money to do its job.
This government is hiding from Parliament and it's hiding from the Auditor General, while hundreds of billions of dollars are being rushed out the door.
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, yesterday, in a stunning display of ignorance the Minister of Canadian Heritage stated that the government would be happy to provide the Auditor General with additional resources, if only the Auditor General asked.
Well, news flash to the minister, both the former and current Auditor General have very publicly stated that the office is underfunded by $11 million. As a result, nearly all non-COVID-related audits will be put on hold this year. For a government that is spending more than half a trillion dollars a year, surely it can find $11 million, a rounding error, so that the Auditor General can follow the money and do his job. Canadian taxpayers deserve nothing less.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, over the last 10 years, the size of the government has doubled, but the number of audits conducted by the Auditor General has gone down by half. Massive Liberal spending programs lack basic accountability and transparency. For their $180-billion infrastructure program, they can't even provide a full list of the number of projects.
What is the government trying to hide by starving the Auditor General's office by not properly funding it?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'm delighted to take this question and to signal both the urgency and transparency of our actions, especially in the current context. We look forward to providing the support the Auditor General requires, as we've done over the last few years. We know how important the work is, and we'll continue to work with the Auditor General.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, they say they want to work with the Auditor General, and that's nice to hear, but the fact is the former interim auditor general testified at two public accounts committees that he asked this government twice for additional funds, first in 2018 and again in 2019, only for those requests to be ignored.
Canadians deserve to know how their money is being spent. This government must be properly audited. When will this government finally be accountable to taxpayers and fully fund the Auditor General's office?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Again, to provide the information Canadians need and deserve is our priority. We are doing this over time, especially in an emergency context. In 2018, we were pleased to substantially increase the budget of the Auditor General. We are going to work closely with her.
By the way, I congratulate her on her important appointment.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, the fact is the newly appointed Auditor General started earlier this week and before she even started, she expressed concerns about the lack of funding from the government for her office. Will the government give the Auditor General the money her office requires to properly run the Auditor General's office?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
That's a great opportunity. I'm grateful for that to continue and to say that not only are we proud of her appointment, but we also are proud of the important work she will do on behalf of all Canadians, and all members of this House, to make sure Canadians and members of this House are able to follow the important investments we are making in the—
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, it's nice to hear the Liberals continue to make more investments, but what we need is, as they're spending, the number of audits should go up, not be cut down, and that's the situation right now.
Tuesday the finance committee unanimously approved a Conservative motion calling on the government to fully fund the Auditor General and for her to fully audit all federal programs and any other work she deems appropriate. Will the government listen to its own members who voted for that motion, respect taxpayer dollars and fully fund the Auditor General?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
We're proud and pleased to see the Conservatives did bring that motion, given the fact that in 2014 they cut the budget of the Auditor General.
We are working in a different framework. We are going to make sure the Auditor General—I again congratulate her on her appointment—has all the tools she needs to do the work that Canadians and members of Parliament expect of her.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, the government loves to reach back in history and try to blame someone else for its mistakes. Yes, several years ago—actually two auditors general ago—the Auditor General at that time volunteered reductions to his office, but this did not affect the number of audits it conducted. Right now, the fact is that spending has doubled and the number of audits has gone down. How does the Treasury Board president explain that?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I think we all agree, including the opposition members, on the important role the Auditor General in general and the new Auditor General in particular have in our democracy. That's why we increased the budget of the Auditor General at that time in 2018, leading to the creation of more positions in that office to provide the important information Canadians need and deserve.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister is doing everything to avoid being accountable to Canadians. He is refusing to table a budget, refusing to provide an economic update and refusing to let the House of Commons do its work.
Will he at least provide the Auditor General with the additional funding she needs to look into government expenditures?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, not only are we introducing a bill this afternoon to help Canadians with the Canada emergency response benefit and those living with disabilities, but we are also proposing to the opposition parties that we hold a debate and a vote on that. I hope the opposition parties will allow a vote and a debate in the House on this important bill.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister wants parliamentarians to vote on aspects of the government's spending. We want the Auditor General to be able to examine that government spending.
Under the government, the Auditor General has had to do more with less, and her ability to conduct audits is being affected. The Auditor General has indicated that she will be able to do half as many audits, despite an almost doubling in the size of government spending.
I have a simple question. Will the Prime Minister give the Auditor General the money she needs to do her job, yes or no?
Results: 1 - 15 of 182 | Page: 1 of 13

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