Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 15 of 19
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)

Question No. 380--
Mrs. Carol Hughes:
With regard to the trip of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to Madrid, Spain, for the United Nations Climate Change Conference in December 2019: (a) who travelled with the minister, excluding security personnel and journalists, broken down by (i) name, (ii) title; (b) what is the total cost of the trip to taxpayers, and, if the final cost is not available, what is the best estimate of the cost of the trip to taxpayers; (c) what were the costs for (i) accommodation, (ii) food, (iii) anything else, including a description of each expense; (d) what are the details of all the meetings attended by the minister and those on the trip, including the (i) date, (ii) summary or description, (iii) participants, (iv) topics discussed; and (e) did any advocates, consultant lobbyists or business representatives accompany the minister, and, if so, what are their names, and on behalf of which firms did they accompany the minister?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 381--
Mrs. Carol Hughes:
With regard to recommendation 3.30 in Report 3 on fossil fuel tax subsidies of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development: (a) has the Department of Finance established criteria to determine whether a fossil fuel tax subsidy is inefficient, and, if so, what are these criteria and what is the department's definition of "inefficient"; and (b) does the Department of Finance still refuse to implement this recommendation?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 382--
Mrs. Carol Hughes:
With regard to the notice and order sent by a railway safety inspector from Transport Canada to the Central Maine and Quebec Railway dated May 7, 2019: (a) how many ultrasonic rail tests were done on the Sherbrooke subdivision between mileage point 0 and mileage point 125.46, broken down by inspection period (i) between May 1 and June 30, (ii) between September 1 and October 31, (iii) between January 1 and February 28; (b) are the inspection frequencies in (a) still in force, and, if not, why; (c) for each inspection period in (a), what findings were sent to Transport Canada; (d) how many rails are currently faulty; and (e) how many faulty rails does Transport Canada believe are satisfactory for railway safety?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 383--
Mrs. Carol Hughes:
With regard to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB) and his performance agreement with the CIB Board of Directors, broken down by performance cycle since the inception of the CIB: (a) what are the objectives based on the corporate business plan and related performance measures; (b) what are the objectives that reflect the government's priority areas of focus and related performance measures; (c) what are the objectives based on financial management priorities and related performance measures; (d) which objectives are based on risk management priorities and any other management objectives set by the Board of Directors (infrastructure, marketing, governance, public affairs, etc.); (e) which objectives are based on the government's priorities for financial management and related performance measures (infrastructure, marketing, governance, public affairs, etc.); (f) what are the detailed results of the performance measures for each of the objectives in (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e); (g) what were the details of the CEO's compensation, including salary and performance-based variable compensation; (h) how many times was the performance agreement amended during each performance cycle and what was the rationale for each amendment; (i) what was the CEO's performance rating as recommended to the responsible minister by the Board of Directors; (j) which performance objectives were met; (k) which performance objectives could not be assessed and why; (l) which performance objectives were not met; (m) did the CEO receive an economic increase, and, if so, why; (n) did the CEO receive a salary range progression, and, if so, what is the rationale; and (o) did the CEO receive a lump sum payment, and, if so, what was the rationale?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 384--
Mr. Damien C. Kurek:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency: what is the number of audits performed on small businesses since 2015, broken down by year and by province or territory?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 385--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to the usage of the government's Challenger aircraft fleet, since December 1, 2019: what are the details of the legs of each flight, including (i) date, (ii) point of departure, (iii) destination, (iv) number of passengers, (v) names and titles of passengers, excluding security or Canadian Armed Forces members, (vi) total catering bill related to the flight?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 386--
Mr. Ted Falk:
With regard to the commitment made in budget 2017 to invest $5 billion over 10 years for home care, including palliative care: (a) what is the total amount of allocated funding not yet spent; (b) what is the total amount of allocated funding transferred to provinces and territories, broken down by recipient province or territory; (c) what is the complete list of projects which have received funding; and (d) for each project identified in (c), what are the details, including (i) overall funding committed, (ii) amount of federal funding provided to date, (iii) description of services funded, (iv) province or territory in which the project is located?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 387--
Mr. Ted Falk:
With regard to the commitment made in budget 2017 to invest $184.6 million over five years for home and palliative care for First Nations and Inuit: (a) what is the total amount of allocated funding not yet spent; (b) what is the complete list of projects which have received funding; and (c) for each project identified in (b), what are the details, including (i) overall funding committed, (ii) amount of federal funding provided to date, (iii) description of services funded, (iv) province or territory in which the project is located?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 388--
Mr. Matthew Green:
With regard to the Paradise Papers case, the fight against tax non-compliance abroad and abusive tax planning: (a) how many taxpayer or Canadian business files are currently open with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA); (b) how many taxpayer or Canadian business files have been referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; (c) what is the number of employees assigned to the Paradise Papers files; (d) how many audits have been conducted since the Paradise Papers were disclosed; (e) how many notices of assessment have been issued by the CRA; and (f) what is the total amount recovered so far by the CRA?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 389--
Ms. Sylvie Bérubé:
With regard to the consultations that the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations is currently holding in order to develop an action plan to implement the 231 calls for justice of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls: (a) has the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations established a committee to develop this action plan; (b) if so, what mechanisms have been put in place to consult the Government of Quebec about the development of this action plan, including the implementation of the 21 Quebec-specific calls for justice in the report; and (c) if a committee has been established, will the Government of Quebec participate in its work?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 390--
Ms. Sylvie Bérubé:
With regard to the drinking water situation in Kitigan Zibi: has the Department of Indigenous Services (i) analyzed the plans that were submitted by the band council to connect to the Maniwaki water system, (ii) decided whether it will proceed with the connection, (iii) released the funding necessary to complete the connection work, (iv) set a timeline so that the community has access to running water within a reasonable time?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 391--
Mr. Pierre Poilievre:
With regard to forms used by the Government of Canada, broken down by year for the last 10 years: (a) how many forms does the government use; (b) to how many pages do the forms add up; (c) how many person-hours a year do Canadians spend filling out forms for the government; and (d) how many person-hours do government employees spend processing forms filled out by Canadians?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 392--
Mr. Matthew Green:
With regard to the call centres of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), for the fiscal years 2017-18 and 2018-19, broken down by business and by individual: (a) what is the number of calls received by the CRA; (b) what is the number of calls that were neither answered by an agent nor transferred to the automated self-service system; (c) what is the number of calls received by the automated self-service system; (d) what is the number of calls answered by an agent; (e) what is the number of calls not answered, broken down by (i) the number of callers who did not choose to use self-service through the automated service, (ii) the number of callers who got a busy signal; (f) what is the average time spent waiting to speak to an agent; (g) what is the change in the number of agents, broken down by (i) month, (ii) call centre; (h) what is the error rate for call centre agents, broken down by (i) National Quality and Accuracy Learning Program, (ii) Audit, Evaluation and Risk Branch; and (j) what is the number of call centres that have completed the transition to the new telephony platform as part of the Government of Canada Contact Centre Transformation Initiative?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 393--
Mr. Matthew Green:
With regard to the sales tax system between 2011 and 2019, broken down by year: (a) how many compliance audits have been conducted by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to determine whether suppliers of digital goods and services are domestic or foreign and whether they are required to register for the Goods and Services Tax (GST) and the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST); (b) for the compliance audits in (a), how many additional revenue assessments were issued as a result of these audits and what was the total amount; (c) how many GST and HST forms had been submitted by consumers to the CRA for digital goods and services purchased in Canada from foreign suppliers not carrying on business in Canada or not having a permanent establishment in Canada; (d) how many compliance audits have been conducted by the CRA to determine whether taxpayers in Canada who rent their housing for short periods of time are required to register for the GST and HST; (e) for audits in (d), how many additional income assessments have been issued as a result of these audits and what is the total amount of these assessments; and (f) has the CRA finalized the development of a specific compliance strategy to better detect and address GST and HST non-compliance in the e-commerce sector, and, if so, what are the details of this strategy?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 394--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to the Canadian Passport Order, since November 4, 2015, in order to prevent the commission of any act or omission referred to in subsection 7(4.1) of the Criminal Code, broken down by month: how many passports has the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship (i) refused, (ii) revoked, (iii) cancelled?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 395--
Mr. Brad Vis:
With regard to Bill C-7, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying): what is the government’s definition of “reasonably foreseeable” in relation to the context of the bill?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 396--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to the finding published in the 2018-19 Departmental Results Report of the Privy Council Office (PCO) that only 75% of ministers were satisfied with the service and advice provided by the PCO: (a) how was that number determined; (b) which ministers were among the 25% who were not satisfied; and (c) did any of those ministers indicate why they were not satisfied, and, if so, what were the reasons?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 397--
Mr. Mel Arnold:
With regard to sole sourced contracts over $10,000 issued by the Canadian Coast Guard since November 4, 2015: what are the details of all such contracts, including the (i) date, (ii) amount, (iii) vendor name, (iv) vendor location, including city or municipality, province or territory, country, and federal riding, if applicable, (v) start and end date of contract, (vi) description of goods or services provided, including quantity, if applicable?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 398--
Mr. Dave MacKenzie:
With regard to the finding published in the 2018-19 Departmental Results Report of the Privy Council Office (PCO) that 93% of cabinet documents distributed to ministers met the PCO’s standards: (a) in what ways did the other 7% of documents fail to meet the PCO’s standards; (b) why were the non-compliant documents circulated to ministers despite not complying with the standards; and (c) how many of the non-compliant documents were circulated as a result of the direction of (i) the Prime Minister, (ii) his exempt staff?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 399--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to the mortgage insurance and securitization activities carried out by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) on behalf of the government in the fiscal years 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19: (a) what was the CMHC’s total annual authorization from the government to provide new guarantees on National Housing Act Mortgage Backed Securities (NHA MBS), broken down by fiscal year; (b) what was the CMHC’s total annual authorization from the government to provide new guarantees on Canada Mortgage Bonds (CMB), broken down by year; (c) what was the CMHC’s total annual limit for the issuance of portfolio insurance (non transactional), broken down by year; (d) for the portfolio insurance issued in each fiscal year, what was the lender allocation methodology for portfolio insurance and what was the total value allocated to each of the largest six Canadian lenders; (e) for the NHA MBS issued in each fiscal year, was there a lender allocation methodology and what was the total value of NHA MBS, broken down by the largest six Canadian lenders; (f) for the CMB issued in each fiscal year, was there a lender allocation methodology and what was the total value of NHA MBS purchased from each of the largest six Canadian lenders for the purpose of converting the MBS into CMB; (g) for the CMB auctioned in each fiscal year, what percentage were purchased by Canadian investors compared to international investors; (h) for the CMB auctioned in each fiscal year, what percentage were purchased by the Bank of Canada and other investors for which the government is the sole or majority shareholder; (i) for the CMB auctioned in each fiscal year, what was the value purchased by the Bank of Canada and other investors for which the government is the sole or majority shareholder; (j) for the NHA MBS issued in each fiscal year, what percentage were retained by the issuing financial institution for their own balance sheet management purposes; and (k) what is the position of the government on increasing the covered bond issuance limit for federally regulated financial institutions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 400--
Mr. Tim Uppal:
With regard to the government preparations in relation to the coronavirus (COVID-19): (a) what specific procedures are in place at each department and agency to ensure the continuity of government operations and that government services remain available during a pandemic; (b) what specific procedures are in place to ensure the safety and protection of government employees during a pandemic, including any procedures aimed at preventing employees from being exposed to coronavirus; and (c) what is the government’s remuneration, leave or benefit policy for (i) full-time employees, (ii) part-time employees, (iii) casual employees, who are required to be quarantined or otherwise away from the workplace as a result of coronavirus?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 401--
Mr. Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay:
With regard to the criminal charges the government laid in December 2019 against the Volkswagen Group concerning the approximately 120,000 diesel vehicles whose nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions exceeded the standards allowed, broken down by the German companies of the Volkswagen Group, the Canadian companies of the Volkswagen Group, the U.S. companies of the Volkswagen Group, and directors, executives and employees: (a) why did the government file charges for 58 counts of importing non-compliant vehicles instead of one count for each of the 120,000 offences; (b) why did the government file charges for two counts of misleading information instead of one count for each of the 120,000 offences; (c) why did the government not file any charges against the Canadian companies of the Volkswagen Group; (d) why did the government not file any charges against the U.S. companies of the Volkswagen Group that took part in the illegal acts that affected Canada; (e) why did the government not file any charges against the directors, executives and employees who were involved in these offences; (f) why did the government not file any charges regarding the 120,000 offences for selling, renting or distributing these non-compliant vehicles; (g) why did the government not file any charges of fraud concerning the 120,000 pieces of software that prevented the non-compliance from being detected; and (h) why did the government not file any charges regarding the illegal pollution caused by these 120,000 vehicles in Canada?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 402--
Mr. Randall Garrison:
With regard to the Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB) Policy: for each defence procurement project, what projects or transactions have been approved as meeting the contractor’s obligations under the ITB Policy, broken down by (i) contractor, (ii) procurement project, (iii) fiscal year since 2016-17?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 403--
Mr. Colin Carrie:
With regard to government funding for the Scarborough Subway Extension and the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension: (a) what will be the total amount of government funding for each of the projects; and (b) what is the yearly breakdown of when the funding in (a) will be delivered for each year between 2020 and 2030?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 404--
Mrs. Kelly Block:
With regard to search and rescue military operations, since January 1, 2018: what are the details of all instances where a call for emergency assistance was received but personnel were either delayed or unable to provide the emergency assistance requested, including the (i) date of the call, (ii) nature of the incident, (iii) response provided, (iv) length of delay between the call being received and assistance being deployed, if applicable, (v) location of the incident, (vi) reason for the delay, (vii) reason assistance was not provided, if applicable?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 405--
Mr. Martin Shields:
With regard to the government’s Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel: why are there not any panel members from a province other than Ontario or Quebec?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 406--
Mr. Peter Kent:
With regard to the 4,710 individuals who were admitted to Canada in 2019 via humanitarian, compassionate, and other grounds: how many of them were admitted by ministerial exemption, in total and broken down by federal riding?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 407--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to visas issued by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada since May 1, 2019: (a) how many Cuban citizens have applied for Canadian visitor visas (temporary resident visas); (b) how many Cuban citizens have applied for Canadian study permits; (c) how many Cuban citizens have applied for Canadian work permits; (d) how many Cuban citizens have been approved for Canadian visitor visas (temporary resident visas); (e) how many Cuban citizens have been approved for Canadian study permits; (f) how many Cuban citizens have been approved for Canadian work permits; (g) how many Cuban citizens have been denied Canadian visitor visas (temporary resident visas); (h) how many Cuban citizens have been denied Canadian study permits; (i) how many Cuban citizens have been denied Canadian work permits; (j) for the visas in (d), (e) and (f), how many visas were issued to single adult men; (k) for the visas in (d), (e) and (f), how many visas were issued to single adult women; (l) for the visas in (d), (e) and (f), how many visas were issued to married men; (m) for the visas in (d), (e) and (f), how many visas were issued to married women; (n) for the visas in (g), (h) and (i), how many visas were denied to single adult men; (o) for the visas in (g), (h) and (i), how many visas were denied to single adult women; (p) for the visas in (g), (h) and (i), how many visas were denied to married men; and (q) for the visas in (g), (h) and (i), how many visas were denied to married women?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 408--
Mr. Alistair MacGregor:
With regard to judicial nominations, broken down by year, since 2016, and by province and territory: (a) how many judicial candidates assessed as “highly recommended” by a judicial appointments advisory committee were appointed as judges; (b) how many judicial candidates assessed as “recommended” by a judicial appointments advisory committee were appointed as judges; and (c) how many judicial candidates assessed as “unable to recommend” by a judicial appointments advisory committee were appointed as judges?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 409--
Mr. Alistair MacGregor:
With regard to the Panama Papers case, the fight against tax non-compliance abroad and abusive tax planning: (a) how many taxpayer or Canadian business files are currently open with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA); (b) how many taxpayer or Canadian business files have been referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; (c) what is the number of employees assigned to the Panama Papers files; (d) how many audits have been conducted since the Panama Papers were disclosed; (e) how many notices of assessment have been issued by the CRA; and (f) what is the total amount recovered so far by the CRA?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 410--
Mr. Brad Redekopp:
With regard to the decision to award SAP the contract to replace the Phoenix pay system: (a) what will the differences be between the SAP replacement system and the current Phoenix pay system; (b) what are the details of any financial agreements or contracts the government has with SAP in relation to the replacement pay system (e.g. value, start date, rate, scope, etc.); and (c) when does the government expect the current Phoenix pay system to be transferred to the replacement SAP system?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 411--
Mr. Philip Lawrence:
With regard to the government response to the rail blockades in February and March of 2020: (a) what was the total estimated economic impact of the blockades; (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by industry and province; and (c) what are the details of any financial assistance provided by the government for individuals or businesses impacted by the blockades?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 412--
Mr. Tom Lukiwski:
With regard to the administration of the 2019 federal general election: (a) has the Chief Electoral Officer, pursuant to subsection 477.72(4) of the Canada Elections Act, informed the Speaker of the House of Commons of any candidates elected as members of the House that were not entitled to continue to sit or vote as members, and, if so, who were these candidates; and (b) with respect to each candidate in (a), (i) on what date did the entitlement to sit or vote become suspended, (ii) on what date did the Chief Electoral Officer inform the Speaker, (iii) which requirement of the act was not satisfied, (iv) has the requirement in (b)(iii) been subsequently satisfied, and, if so, on what date was it satisfied?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 413--
Ms. Nelly Shin:
With regard to information requests received by departments or agencies from the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) since January 1, 2016: (a) what are the details of all requests and responses, including the (i) request, (ii) date it was received, (iii) date when the information was provided; and (b) what are the details, including the reasons, for all instances where the information was either delayed or not provided to the PBO?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 414--
Mr. Jagmeet Singh:
With regard to the three tax provisions proposed in the Fall Economic Statement 2018 to accelerate business investment for the 2018-19 fiscal year: (a) what is the estimated number of businesses that have benefited, broken down by (i) tax provision, (ii) size of business, (iii) economic sector; (b) what is the estimated increase in total business investment since the three tax provisions came into force; (c) what is the estimate of the number of jobs created by businesses in Canada since the coming into force of these three tax provisions; and (d) what is the estimate of the number of businesses that have chosen to continue operating in Canada rather than relocate abroad since the coming into force of these three tax provisions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 415--
Ms. Niki Ashton:
With regard to claimed stock option deductions, between the 2012 and 2019 tax years inclusively, broken down by tax years: (a) what is the number of individuals who claimed the stock option deduction whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; (b) what is the average amount claimed by an individual whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; (c) what is the total amount claimed by individuals whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; and (d) what is the percentage of the total amount claimed by individuals whose total annual income is more than $1 million?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 416--
Mr. Colin Carrie:
With regard to the government’s commitment to return the $1.3 billion in surtax assessed on U.S. steel, aluminum, and other products to affected industries between the 2018-19 and the 2023-24 fiscal years: (a) how does the government explain the discrepancy with the estimate from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the government will return $105 million less than it assessed in surtax and related revenues over the period; (b) how does the government plan to return the $1.3 billion; and (c) what is the breakdown of the $1.3 billion by industry and recipient?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 417--
Mr. Brad Vis:
With regard to the $180.4 million listed in Supplementary Estimates (B) 2019-20 under Department of Employment and Social Development (ESDC) to write off 33,098 debts from the Canada Student Loan Program: (a) what information was shared between ESDC and the Canada Revenue Agency to determine which loans would be written off; (b) what specific measures are being taken to ensure that none of the written off loans are from individuals who have the income or means to pay back the loans; and (c) what was the threshold or criteria used to determine which loans would be written off?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 418--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to the $17.6 million contract awarded to Peter Kiewit Sons ULC for the Big Bar Landslide Fish Passage Remediation Project on the Fraser River: (a) how many bids were received for the project; (b) of the bids received, how many bids met the criteria for qualification; (c) who made the decision to award the contract to Peter Kiewit Sons ULC; (d) when was the decision made; (e) what is the start date and end date of the contract; (f) what is the specific work expected to be completed as a result of the contract; and (g) was the fact that the company is currently facing criminal negligence causing death charges considered during the evaluation of the bid, and, if not, why not?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 419--
Mrs. Cathy McLeod:
With regard to investments in Budget 2019 for the Forest Innovation Program, the Investments in Forestry Industry Transformation Program, the Expanding Market Opportunities program, and the Indigenous Forestry Initiative: (a) how many proposals have been received for each program to date; (b) how much of the funding has been delivered to date; (c) what are the proposal criteria for each program; and (d) what are the details of the allocated funding, including the (i) organization, (ii) location, (iii) date of allocation, (iv) amount of funding, (v) project description or purpose of funding?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 420--
Mr. Todd Doherty:
With regard to Transport Canada Concern Paper C-FT-03 (Boeing 737-8 MAX) (file number 5010-A268): (a) on what date did the Minister of Transport, or his office receive or become aware of the document; (b) what action, if any, did the minister take in response to the concerns raised in the document; (c) on what date was the Minister of Transport, or his office, first notified of the concerns raised the document; (d) what action, if any did the minister take in response to the concern; (e) when did deputy minister's office receive the document; (f) on what date was the Minister of Transport, or his office, made aware of Transport Canada's concerns regarding the nose down pitch not readily arrested behaviour in relation to the aerodynamic stall of the 737-8 MAX; (g) was a briefing note on the concern paper provided to the minister or his staff, and, if so, what are the details of the briefing note, including the (i) date, (ii) title, (iii) summary of contents, (iv) sender, (v) recipient, (vi) file number; and (h) what was the Minister of Transport's response to the briefing note in (g)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 421--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA), since July 15, 2018: (a) how many air passenger complaints have been received, broken down by the subject matter of the complaint; (b) of the complaints received in (a), how many have been resolved, broken down by (i) facilitation process, (ii) mediation process, (iii) adjudication; (c) how many air passenger complaints were dismissed, withdrawn and declined, broken down by (i) subject matter of the complaint, (ii) mediation process, (iii) adjudication; (d) for each complaint in (a), how many cases were resolved by a settlement; (e) how many full-time equivalent agency case officers are assigned to deal with air travel complaints, broken down by agency case officers dealing with (i) the facilitation process, (ii) the mediation process, (iii) adjudication; (f) what is the average number of air travel complaints handled by an agency case officer, broken down by agency case officers dealing with (i) the facilitation process, (ii) the mediation process, (iii) adjudication; (g) what is the number of air travel complaints received but not yet handled by an agency case officer, broken down by agency case officers dealing with (i) the facilitation process, (ii) the mediation process, (iii) adjudication; (h) in how many cases were passengers told by CTA facilitators that they were not entitled to compensation, broken down by rejection category; (i) among cases in (h), what was the reason for CTA facilitators not to refer the passengers and the airlines to the Montreal Convention that is incorporated in the international tariff (terms and conditions) of the airlines; (j) how does the CTA define a "resolved" complaint for the purposes of reporting it in its statistics; (k) when a complainant chooses not to pursue a complaint, does it count as "resolved"; (l) how many business days on average does it effectively take from the filing of a complaint to an officer to be assigned to the case, broken down by (i) facilitation process, (ii) mediation process, (iii) adjudication; (m) how many business days on average does it effectively take from the filing of a complaint to reaching a settlement, broken down by (i) facilitation process, (ii) mediation process, (iii) adjudication; and (n) for complaints in (a), what is the percentage of complaints that were not resolved in accordance with the service standards?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 422--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to aviation safety: (a) what was the annual failure rate from 2005 to 2019 for the Pilot Proficiency Check (PPC) conducted by Transport Canada inspectors for pilots working for 705 operators under the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs); (b) what was the annual failure rate from 2005 to 2019 for the PPC in cases where industry-approved check pilots conducted the PPC for pilots working for Subpart 705 operators; (c) how many annual verification inspections did Transport Canada inspectors conduct between 2007 and 2019; (d) how many annual Safety Management System assessments, program validation inspections and process inspections of 705, 704, 703 and 702 operators were conducted between 2008 and 2019; (e) how many annual inspections and audits of 705, 704, 703 and 702 system operators were carried out pursuant to Transport Canada manual TP8606 between 2008 and 2019; (f) how many aircraft operator group inspectors did Transport Canada have from 2011 to 2019, broken down by year; (g) what discrepancies has Transport Canada identified between its pilot qualification policies and the requirements of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) since 2005; (h) what are the ICAO requirements for pilot proficiency checks and what are the Canadian PPC requirements for subparts 705, 704, 703 and 604 of CARs; (i) does Transport Canada plan to hire new inspectors, and, if so, what target has it set for hiring new inspectors, broken down by category of inspectors; (j) what is the current number of air safety inspectors at Transport Canada; (k) for each fiscal year from 2010-11 to 2018-19, broken down by fiscal year (i) how many air safety inspectors were there, (ii) what was the training budget for air safety inspectors, (iii) how many hours were allocated to air safety inspector training; and (l) how many air safety inspectors are anticipated for (i) 2019-20, (ii) 2020-21, (iii) 2021-22?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 423--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to the National Housing Strategy: what is the total amount of funding provided by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation for each year since 2017, broken down by province, for (i) the National Housing Co-Investment Fund, (ii) the Rental Construction Financing Initiative, (iii) the Housing Partnership Framework, (iv) the Federal Lands Initiative?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 424--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to the government’s plan to introduce a new fund to help municipalities and school boards purchase 5,000 zero-emission buses over the next five years: (a) has the government undertaken any forecasting on the total cost of this commitment, and, if so, (i) how much is this commitment forecasted to cost municipalities and school boards, (ii) what is the expected cost of associated charging infrastructure; (b) how much will be provided by the federal government annually in this new fund; (c) what proportion of the total cost to municipalities will be provided by the federal government through this new fund; (d) what will be the application process for municipalities and school boards; (e) will funding be based on ridership in line with existing transit funding; and (f) how does the government plan on ensuring that transit agencies are not forced to delay or forego other transit expansions to purchase zero-emission buses in line with this target?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 380 --
Mme Carol Hughes:
En ce qui concerne le voyage du ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique à Madrid (Espagne) dans le cadre de la Conférence des Nations unies sur les changements climatiques en décembre 2019: a) quelles sont les personnes, autres que le personnel de sécurité et les journalistes, qui ont accompagné le ministre, et quel est leur (i) nom, (ii) titre; b) quel est le coût total du voyage pour les contribuables ou quelle est la meilleure estimation si les coûts exacts ne sont pas disponibles; c) à combien se sont élevés les coûts pour (i) l’hébergement, (ii) les repas, (iii) les autres dépenses, assorties d’une description; d) quels sont les détails relatifs à toutes les réunions auxquelles le ministre et ses accompagnateurs ont assisté, y compris (i) la date, (ii) un résumé ou une description du contenu, (iii) les participants, (iv) les sujets abordés; e) y a-t-il des militants, des lobbyistes conseils ou des représentants d’entreprises qui ont accompagné le ministre et, le cas échéant, quelles sociétés ces personnes représentaient-elles?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 381 --
Mme Carol Hughes:
En ce qui concerne la recommandation 3.30 contenue dans le Rapport 3 de la commissaire à l’environnement et au développement durable sur les subventions fiscales aux combustibles fossiles: a) le ministère des Finances a-t-il défini les critères qui permettent de déterminer l’inefficacité d’une subvention fiscale aux combustibles fossiles, et, dans l’affirmative, quels sont ces critères et comment le ministère définit-il le terme « inefficace »; b) le ministère des Finances refuse-t-il toujours de donner suite à cette recommandation?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 382 --
Mme Carol Hughes:
En ce qui concerne l'avis assorti d'un ordre envoyé par un inspecteur de la sécurité ferroviaire de Transports Canada à Central Maine and Quebec Railway, en date du 7 mai 2019: a) combien d'inspections ont été effectuées par ultrasons des rails sur la subdivision Sherbrooke entre le point milliaire 0 et le point milliaire 125,46, ventilé par périodes d'inspections (i) entre le 1er mai et le 30 juin, (ii) entre le 1er septembre et le 31 octobre, (iii) entre le 1er janvier et le 28 février; b) les fréquences d'inspection en a) sont-elles toujours en vigueur, et, dans la négative, quelles en sont les justifications; c) pour chacune des périodes d'inspections en a), quels résultats ont été communiqués à Transports Canada; d) combien de rails sont actuellement défectueux; e) quel est le nombre de rails défectueux que Transports Canada estime satisfaisants pour la sécurité ferroviaire?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 383 --
Mme Carol Hughes:
En ce qui concerne le président-directeur général (PDG) de la Banque de l’infrastructure du Canada (BIC) et l’entente de rendement qu’il a conclue avec le conseil d’administration de la BIC, pour chaque cycle d’évaluation du rendement depuis la création de la BIC: a) quels sont les objectifs fondés sur le plan d’entreprise et les mesures de rendement afférentes; b) quels sont les objectifs qui correspondent aux secteurs prioritaires du gouvernement et les mesures de rendement afférentes; c) quels sont les objectifs fondés sur les priorités en matière de gestion financière et les mesures de rendement afférentes; d) quels objectifs sont fondés sur les priorités en matière de gestion des risques et autres objectifs de gestion fixés par le conseil d’administration (infrastructure, marketing, gouvernance, affaires publiques, etc.); e) quels objectifs sont fondés sur les priorités du gouvernement en matière de gestion financière et les mesures de rendement afférentes (infrastructure, marketing, gouvernance, affaires publiques, etc.); f) quels sont les résultats détaillés des mesures de rendement associées à chacun des objectifs correspondant en a), b), c), d) et e); g) quelles étaient les modalités prévues pour la rémunération du PDG, y compris en ce qui concerne le salaire et la rémunération variable en fonction du rendement; h) combien de fois l’entente de rendement a-t-elle été modifiée durant chaque cycle d’évaluation du rendement et quelle est la raison de chaque modification; i) quelle cote de rendement le conseil d’administration a-t-il recommandée pour le PDG au ministre responsable; j) quels objectifs de rendement ont été atteints; k) quels objectifs de rendement n’ont pas pu être évalués, et pourquoi; l) quels objectifs de rendement n’ont pas été atteints; m) le PDG a-t-il reçu une augmentation économique et, le cas échéant, pourquoi; n) le PDG a-t-il bénéficié d’une progression dans l’échelle salariale et, le cas échéant, pour quelle raison; o) le PDG a-t-il reçu un montant forfaitaire, et, le cas échéant, pour quelle raison?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 384 --
M. Damien C. Kurek:
En ce qui concerne l’Agence du revenu du Canada: à combien d’audits de petites entreprises a-t-on procédé depuis 2015, ventilé par année et par province ou territoire?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 385 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne l’utilisation de la flotte d’aéronefs Challenger du gouvernement, depuis le 1er décembre 2019: quels sont les détails des étapes de chaque vol, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le point de départ, (iii) la destination, (iv) le nombre de passagers, (v) le nom et le titre des passagers, excluant le personnel de sécurité ou les membres des Forces armées canadiennes, (vi) la facture totale des services de traiteur pour le vol?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 386 --
M. Ted Falk:
En ce qui concerne l’engagement pris dans le budget de 2017 d’investir cinq milliards de dollars sur 10 ans pour les soins à domicile, y compris les soins palliatifs: a) quel est le montant total des fonds alloués qui n’ont pas encore été dépensés; b) quel est le montant total des fonds alloués qui ont été transférés aux provinces et aux territoires, ventilé par province ou territoire ayant reçu des fonds; c) quelle est la liste exhaustive des projets qui ont reçu du financement; d) pour chaque projet énuméré en c), quels sont les détails, y compris (i) l’ensemble des fonds engagés, (ii) le montant du financement fédéral versé jusqu’à présent, (iii) la description des services financés, (iv) la province ou le territoire où le projet a lieu?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 387 --
M. Ted Falk:
En ce qui concerne l’engagement pris dans le budget de 2017 d’investir 184,6 millions de dollars sur cinq ans dans les soins à domicile et les soins palliatifs pour les Premières Nations et les Inuits: a) quel est le montant total du financement alloué qui n’a pas encore été dépensé; b) quelle est la liste exhaustive des projets qui ont reçu du financement; c) pour chaque projet énuméré en b), quels sont les détails, y compris (i) l'ensemble des fonds engagés, (ii) le montant du financement fédéral versé jusqu'à présent, (iii) la description des services financés, (iv) la province ou le territoire où le projet a lieu?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 388 --
M. Matthew Green:
En ce qui concerne l’affaire des « Paradise Papers », la lutte contre le non-respect des obligations fiscales à l’étranger et l’évitement fiscal abusif: a) combien de dossiers de contribuables ou d’entreprises canadiennes l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) traite-t-elle actuellement; b) combien de dossiers de contribuables ou d’entreprises canadiennes ont été transmis au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada; c) combien d’employés sont affectés aux dossiers des « Paradise Papers »; d) combien de vérifications ont été menées depuis la divulgation des dossiers des « Paradise Papers »; e) combien d’avis de cotisation l’ARC a-t-elle émis; f) quel est le montant total recouvré jusqu’à maintenant par l’ARC?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 389 --
Mme Sylvie Bérubé:
En ce qui concerne les consultations que la ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones mène présentement afin d’élaborer un plan d’action visant à mettre en œuvre les 231 appels à la justice de l’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées: a) le ministère des Relations Couronne-Autochtones a-t-il mis en place un comité pour l’élaboration de ce plan d’action; b) le cas échéant, quelles sont les mécanismes mis en place pour consulter le gouvernement du Québec dans l’élaboration de ce plan d’action, y compris pour l’implantation des 21 appels à la justice spécifique au Québec qui sont contenus dans le rapport; c) si un comité a été mis en place, le gouvernement du Québec participera-t-il à ses travaux?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 390 --
Mme Sylvie Bérubé:
En ce qui concerne la situation de l’eau potable à Kitigan Zibi: le ministère des Services aux Autochtones a-t-il (i) analysé les projets de raccordement à l’aqueduc de Maniwaki qui ont été soumis par le conseil de bande, (ii) pris une décision quant à savoir s’il allait de l’avant avec le raccordement, (iii) débloqué les fonds nécessaires afin de parachever les travaux de raccordement, (iv) établis un échéancier afin que la communauté ait accès à l’eau courante dans un délais raisonnable?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 391 --
M. Pierre Poilievre:
En ce qui concerne les formulaires utilisés par le gouvernement du Canada, ventilés par année pour les 10 dernières années: a) combien de formulaires le gouvernement utilise-t-il; b) combien de pages les formulaires comptent-ils au total; c) combien d’heures-personnes les Canadiens consacrent-ils par an à remplir des formulaires pour le gouvernement; d) combien d’heures-personnes les employés du gouvernement consacrent-ils au traitement des formulaires remplis par les Canadiens?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 392 --
M. Matthew Green:
En ce concerne les centres d’appels de l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC), pour les exercices 2017-2018 et 2018-2019, ventilés par entreprises et particuliers: a) quel a été le nombre d’appels reçus par l’ARC; b) quel a été le nombre d’appels non pris en charge par un agent ni transféré au système libre-service automatisé; c) quel a été le nombre d’appels reçus par le système libre-service automatisé; d) quel a été le nombre d’appels non pris en charge, ventilé par (i) le nombre d’appelants qui n’ont pas utilisé le service libre-service automatisé, (ii) le nombre d’appelants qui ont obtenu un signal de ligne occupée; f) quel a été le temps d’attente moyen pour parler à un agent; g) quelle a été la variation du nombre d’agents, ventilée par (i) mois, (ii) centre d’appels; h) quel a été le taux d’erreur des agents des centres d’appel, ventilé par (i) le Programme national d’apprentissage de la qualité et de l’exactitude, (ii) la Direction générale de la vérification, de l’évaluation et des risques; j) quel est le nombre de centres d’appels ayant terminé la transition vers la nouvelle plateforme téléphonique dans le cadre de l’Initiative de transformation des centres de contact du gouvernement du Canada?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 393 --
M. Matthew Green:
En ce qui concerne le régime de taxe de vente entre 2011 et 2019, ventilé par année: a) combien de vérifications de conformité ont été effectuées par l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) afin de déterminer si les fournisseurs de biens et de services numériques proviennent du Canada ou de l’étranger et s’ils sont tenus de s’inscrire aux fins de la taxe sur les produits et services (TPS) et de la taxe de vente harmonisée (TVH); b) pour les vérifications de conformité en a), combien d’évaluations des revenus supplémentaires ont été émises à la suite de ces vérifications et quel était le montant total de ces évaluations; c) combien de formulaires de TPS et de TVH ont été soumis par des consommateurs à l’ARC pour des biens et services numériques achetés au Canada auprès de fournisseurs étrangers qui ne sont pas actifs au Canada ou qui n’ont pas d’établissement permanent au Canada; d) combien de vérifications de conformité ont été effectuées par l’ARC afin de déterminer si des contribuables au Canada qui louent leur logement pendant de courtes périodes sont tenus de s’inscrire aux fins de la TPS et de la TVH; e) pour les vérifications en d), combien d’évaluations des revenus supplémentaires ont été émises à la suite de ces vérifications et quel était le montant total de ces évaluations; f) l’ARC a-t-elle terminé l’élaboration d’une stratégie visant précisément à mieux détecter les cas de non-conformité à la TPS et à la TVH dans le secteur du commerce électronique et à mieux intervenir à leur égard et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de cette stratégie?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 394 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne le Décret sur les passeports canadiens, depuis le 4 novembre 2015, afin de prévenir les actes ou omissions désignés au paragraphe 7(4.1) du Code criminel, ventilé par mois: combien de passeports le ministre de l’Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté a-t-il (i) refusés, (ii) révoqués, (iii) annulés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 395 --
M. Brad Vis:
En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-7, Loi modifiant le Code criminel (aide médicale à mourir): quelle définition le gouvernement donne-t-il à « raisonnablement prévisible » relativement au contexte du projet de loi?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 396 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne la constatation contenue dans le Rapport sur les résultats ministériels 2018-2019 du Bureau du Conseil privé (BCP), selon laquelle 75 % seulement des ministres étaient satisfaits du service et des avis reçus du BCP: a) comment ce chiffre a-t-il été établi; b) quels ministres faisaient partie des 25 % qui n’étaient pas satisfaits; c) l’un ou l’autre de ces ministres ont-ils indiqué pourquoi ils n’étaient pas satisfaits et, le cas échéant, quelles raisons ont été fournies?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 397 --
M. Mel Arnold:
En ce qui concerne les contrats auprès d’un fournisseur unique d’une valeur de plus de 10 000 $ accordés par la Garde côtière canadienne depuis le 4 novembre 2015: quels sont les détails de tous ces contrats, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le montant, (iii) le nom du vendeur, (iv) l’emplacement du vendeur, y compris la ville ou la municipalité, la province ou le territoire, le pays et la circonscription fédérale, le cas échéant, (v) la date de début et de fin du contrat, (vi) la description des biens et des services fournis, y compris la quantité, le cas échéant?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 398 --
M. Dave MacKenzie:
En ce qui concerne la constatation publiée dans le Rapport sur les résultats ministériels 2018-2019 du Bureau du Conseil privé (BCP) selon laquelle 93 % des documents du Cabinet distribués aux ministres respectaient les lignes directrices du BCP: a) en quoi les 7 % restants ne respectaient-ils pas les lignes directrices du BCP; b) pourquoi les documents non conformes ont-ils été distribués aux ministres malgré tout; c) combien de ces documents non conformes ont été distribués par suite d’un ordre (i) du premier ministre, (ii) de son personnel exonéré?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 399 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les activités d’assurance et de titrisation des prêts hypothécaires menées par la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logements (SCHL) pour le compte du gouvernement au cours des exercices 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013, 2013-2014, 2014-2015, 2015-2016, 2016-2017, 2017-2018 et 2018-2019: a) quel était le montant total de l’autorisation annuelle accordée par le gouvernement à la SCHL pour offrir de nouvelles garanties de titres hypothécaires en vertu de la Loi nationale sur l’habitation (LNH), ventilé par exercice; b) quel était le montant total de l’autorisation annuelle accordée par le gouvernement à la SCHL pour offrir de nouvelles garanties d’Obligations hypothécaires du Canada (OHC), ventilé par exercice; c) quelle était la limite annuelle totale de la SCHL à l’égard de la souscription d’assurance de portefeuille (non transactionnelle), ventilée par exercice; d) pour ce qui est de l’assurance de portefeuille souscrite dans chacun des exercices, quelle était la méthode d’attribution aux prêteurs de l’assurance de portefeuille et quelle était la valeur totale attribuée à chacun des six principaux prêteurs canadiens; e) pour ce qui est des titres hypothécaires LNH émis dans chacun des exercices, y avait-il une méthode d’attribution aux prêteurs et quelle était la valeur totale des titres hypothécaires LNH, ventilée selon les six principaux prêteurs canadiens; f) pour ce qui est des OHC émises dans chacun des exercices, y avait-il une méthode d’attribution aux prêteurs et quelle était la valeur totale des titres hypothécaires LNH achetés à chacun des six principaux prêteurs canadiens aux fins de la conversion des titres en OHC; g) pour ce qui est des OHC vendues par adjudication dans chacun des exercices, quel pourcentage des obligations a été acheté par des investisseurs canadiens, comparativement aux investisseurs étrangers; h) pour ce qui est des OHC vendues par adjudication dans chacun des exercices, quel pourcentage a été acheté par la Banque du Canada et par d’autres investisseurs dont le gouvernement est l’unique actionnaire ou l’actionnaire majoritaire; i) pour ce qui est des OHC vendues par adjudication dans chacun des exercices, quelle est la valeur des obligations achetées par la Banque du Canada et par d’autres investisseurs dont le gouvernement est l’unique actionnaire ou l’actionnaire majoritaire; j) pour ce qui est des titres hypothécaires LNH émis dans chacun des exercices, quel pourcentage des titres a été conservé par l’institution financière émettrice pour la gestion de son propre bilan; k) quelle est la position du gouvernement à l’égard du relèvement du plafond d’émission d’obligations sécurisées pour les institutions financières relevant de la compétence fédérale?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 400 --
M. Tim Uppal:
En ce qui concerne les préparatifs du gouvernement relativement au coronavirus (COVID-19): a) quelles sont les mesures en place dans chaque ministère et organisme pour assurer le maintien des activités du gouvernement et pour que les services gouvernementaux demeurent disponibles pendant une pandémie; b) quelles sont les mesures en place pour garantir la sécurité et la protection des fonctionnaires pendant une pandémie, y compris toutes mesures visant à empêcher que les fonctionnaires soient exposés au coronavirus; c) quelle est la politique du gouvernement en ce qui concerne la rémunération, les congés ou les avantages sociaux pour (i) les employés à temps plein, (ii) les employés à temps partiel, (iii) les employés occasionnels, qui doivent se placer en quarantaine ou autrement demeurer hors de leur lieu de travail en raison du coronavirus?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 401 --
M. Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay:
En ce qui concerne les accusations pénales logées par le gouvernement en décembre 2019 contre le groupe Volkswagen relatives aux quelques 120 000 véhicules diesel à émissions d’oxydes d’azote (NOx) excédant les normes permises, ventilées par compagnies allemandes du groupe Volkswagen, par compagnies canadiennes du groupe Volkswagen, par compagnies des États-Unis du groupe Volkswagen, et par dirigeants, cadres et employés: a) pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il déposé 58 chefs d’accusation pour importation de véhicules non conformes au lieu d’un chef d’accusation pour chacune des 120 000 infractions; b) pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il déposé deux chefs d’accusation pour informations trompeuses au lieu d’un chef d’accusation pour chacune des 120 000 infractions; c) pourquoi le gouvernement n’a-t-il déposé aucune accusation contre les compagnies canadiennes du groupe Volkswagen; d) pourquoi le gouvernement n’a-t-il déposé aucune accusation contre les compagnies des États-Unis du groupe Volkswagen qui avaient pris part aux gestes illégaux ayant affecté le Canada; e) pourquoi le gouvernement n’a-t-il déposé aucune accusation contre les dirigeants, cadres et employés ayant pris part à ces infractions; f) pourquoi le gouvernement n’a-t-il déposé aucune accusation concernant les 120 000 infractions de mises en vente, de location ou de mise en circulation de ces véhicules non conformes; g) pourquoi le gouvernement n’a-t-il déposé aucune accusation de fraude concernant les 120 000 logiciels empêchant la détection des non conformités; h) pourquoi le gouvernement n’a-t-il déposé aucune accusation quant à la pollution illégale causée par les 120 000 véhicules au Canada?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 402 --
M. Randall Garrison:
En ce qui concerne la politique des Retombées industrielles et technologiques (RIT): pour chaque projet d’approvisionnement de la défense, quels sont les projets ou les transactions approuvés satisfaisant aux obligations de l’entrepreneur conformément à la politique des RIT, ventilés par (i) entrepreneur, (ii) projet d’approvisionnement, (iii) exercice depuis 2016-2017?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 403 --
M. Colin Carrie:
En ce qui concerne les fonds accordés par le gouvernement pour le prolongement de la ligne de métro vers Scarborough et du prolongement vers l’ouest de la ligne de métro Eglinton Crosstown: a) quel sera le montant total des fonds gouvernementaux accordés à chacun des projets; b) quelle est la ventilation annuelle du moment où les fonds en a) seront fournis pour chaque année de 2020 à 2030?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 404 --
Mme Kelly Block:
En ce qui concerne les opérations militaires de recherche et de sauvetage, depuis le 1er janvier 2018: quels sont les détails relatifs à tous les cas où un appel à l’aide d’urgence a été reçu, mais où le personnel n’a pu fournir l’aide demandée à temps ou n’a pas été en mesure de la fournir, y compris (i) la date de l’appel, (ii) la nature de l’incident, (iii) la réponse fournie, (iv) la durée du délai entre la réception de l’appel et le déploiement de l’aide, le cas échéant, (v) le lieu de l’incident, (vi) la raison du retard, (vii) la raison pour laquelle l’aide n’a pas été fournie, le cas échéant?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 405 --
M. Martin Shields:
En ce qui concerne le groupe d’experts du gouvernement qui se livre à l’examen de la législation en matière de radiodiffusion et de télécommunications: pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas d’experts issus de provinces autres que l’Ontario et le Québec?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 406 --
M. Peter Kent:
En ce qui concerne les 4 710 personnes admises au Canada en 2019 pour des considérations d’ordre humanitaire et autres: combien ont-elles été admises par exemption ministérielle, au total et ventilées par circonscription fédérale?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 407 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les visas délivrés par Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada depuis le 1er mai 2019: a) combien de citoyens cubains ont demandé un visa de visiteur canadien (visa de résidence temporaire); b) combien de citoyens cubains ont demandé un permis d’études canadien; c) combien de citoyens cubains ont demandé un permis de travail canadien; d) combien de citoyens cubains ont obtenu un visa de visiteur canadien (visa de résidence temporaire); e) combien de citoyens cubains ont obtenu un permis d’études canadien; f) combien de citoyens cubains ont obtenu un permis de travail canadien; g) combien de citoyens cubains se sont vu refuser un visa de visiteur canadien (visa de résidence temporaire); h) combien de citoyens cubains se sont vu refuser un permis d’études canadien; i) combien de citoyens cubains se sont vu refuser un permis de travail canadien; j) pour les visas en d), e) et f), combien de visas ont été délivrés à des hommes adultes célibataires; k) pour les visas en d), e) et f), combien de visas ont été délivrés à des femmes adultes célibataires; l) pour les visas en d), e) et f), combien de visas ont été délivrés à des hommes mariés; m) pour les visas en d), e) et f), combien de visas ont été délivrés à des femmes mariées; n) pour les visas en g), h) et i), combien de visas ont été refusés aux hommes adultes célibataires; o) pour les visas en g), h) et i), combien de visas ont été refusés aux femmes adultes célibataires; p) pour les visas en g), h) et i), combien de visas ont été refusés aux hommes mariés; q) pour les visas en g), h) et i), combien de visas ont été refusés aux femmes mariées?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 408 --
M. Alistair MacGregor:
En ce qui concerne les nominations à la magistrature, ventilées par année, depuis 2016, et par province et territoire: a) combien de candidats à la magistrature qui avaient reçu l’évaluation « fortement recommandé » d’un comité consultatif sur les nominations à la magistrature ont été nommés juges; b) combien de candidats à la magistrature qui avaient reçu l’évaluation « recommandé » d’un comité consultatif sur les nominations à la magistrature ont été nommés juges; c) combien de candidats à la magistrature qui avaient reçu l’évaluation « sans recommandation » d’un comité consultatif sur les nominations à la magistrature ont été nommés juges?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 409 --
M. Alistair MacGregor:
En ce qui concerne l’affaire des Panama Papers, la lutte contre l’inobservation fiscale à l’étranger et la planification fiscale abusive: a) combien de dossiers de contribuables ou d’entreprises canadiennes sont présentement ouverts à l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC); b) combien de dossiers de contribuables ou d’entreprises canadiennes ont été renvoyés au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada; c) quel est le nombre d’employés attitrés aux dossiers des Panama Papers; d) combien de vérifications ont été effectuées depuis la divulgation des Panama Papers; e) combien d’avis de cotisation ont été délivrés par l’ARC; f) quel est le montant total récupéré à ce jour par l’ARC?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 410 --
M. Brad Redekopp:
En ce qui concerne la décision d’attribuer à SAP le contrat pour le système visant à remplacer le système de paye Phénix: a) quelles seront les différences entre le nouveau système de SAP et l’actuel système de paye Phénix; b) quels sont les détails de tout accord ou contrat financier que le gouvernement a conclu avec SAP en ce qui concerne le nouveau système de paye (p. ex., valeur, date de début, taux, portée, etc.); c) quand le gouvernement prévoit-il de transférer l’actuel système de paye Phénix vers le nouveau système de SAP?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 411 --
M. Philip Lawrence:
En ce qui concerne la réponse du gouvernement à l’égard des barrages ferroviaires de février et de mars 2020: a) quelle est l’estimation de l’impact économique total découlant des barrages; b) quel est le détail de l’estimation en a) par industrie et par province; c) quels sont les détails de toute aide financière fournie par le gouvernement aux personnes et aux entreprises touchées par les barrages?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 412 --
M. Tom Lukiwski:
En ce qui concerne la conduite de l’élection générale fédérale de 2019: a) le directeur général des élections a-t-il, en application du paragraphe 477.72(4) de la Loi électorale du Canada, informé le Président de la Chambre des communes que des candidats élus ne pouvaient continuer à siéger et à voter à titre de députés à la Chambre et, le cas échéant, qui sont ces candidats; b) pour chacun des candidats en a), (i) à quelle date leur droit de siéger et de voter a-t-il été suspendu, (ii) à quelle date le directeur général des élections en a-t-il informé le Président, (iii) quelle exigence de la Loi a été enfreinte, (iv) l’exigence en b)(iii) a-t-elle été remplie par la suite et, le cas échéant, à quelle date l’a-t-elle été?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 413 --
Mme Nelly Shin:
En ce qui concerne les demandes d’information envoyées aux ministères et organismes par le directeur parlementaire du budget (DPB) depuis le 1er janvier 2016: a) quels sont les détails de toutes les demandes et réponses, y compris (i) la demande, (ii) sa date de réception, (iii) la date à laquelle l’information a été fournie; b) quels sont les détails, y compris les motifs, de tous les cas où l’information a tardé à parvenir ou n’a jamais été fournie au DPB?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 414 --
M. Jagmeet Singh:
En ce qui concerne les trois propositions fiscales de l’Énoncé économique de l’automne 2018 qui visaient à accélérer les investissements dans les entreprises au cours de l’exercice 2018-2019: a) à combien estime-t-on le nombre d’entreprises ayant bénéficié de ces mesures, ventilé par (i) mesure fiscale, (ii) taille des entreprises, (iii) secteur économique; b) à combien estime-t-on l’augmentation des investissements totaux dans les entreprises depuis l’entrée en vigueur de ces trois mesures fiscales; c) à combien estime-t-on le nombre d’emplois créés au Canada par les entreprises depuis l’entrée en vigueur de ces trois mesures fiscales; d) à combien estime-t-on le nombre d’entreprises qui ont choisi de poursuivre leurs activités au Canada plutôt que de déménager à l’étranger depuis l’entrée en vigueur de ces trois mesures fiscales?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 415 --
Mme Niki Ashton:
En ce qui concerne les réclamations de déductions pour options d’achat d’actions au cours des années d'imposition 2012 à 2019 inclusivement, ventilées par année d'imposition: a) combien de personnes ayant réclamé une déduction pour options d’achat d’actions ont des revenus annuels de (i) moins de 60 000 $, (ii) moins de 100 000 $, (iii) moins de 200 000 $, (iv) 200 000 $ à 1 million de dollars, (v) plus de 1 million de dollars; b) quelle est la somme moyenne réclamée par les personnes dont les revenus annuels s’élèvent (i) à moins de 60 000 $, (ii) à moins de 100 000 $, (iii) à moins de 200 000 $, (iv) de 200 000 $ à 1 million de dollars, (v) à plus de 1 million de dollars; c) quelle est la somme totale réclamée par les personnes dont les revenus annuels s’élèvent (i) à moins de 60 000 $, (ii) à moins de 100 000 $, (iii) à moins de 200 000 $, (iv) de 200 000 $ à 1 million de dollars, (v) à plus de 1 million de dollars; d) quel est le pourcentage de la somme totale réclamée par les personnes dont les revenus annuels s’élèvent à plus de 1 million de dollars?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 416 --
M. Colin Carrie:
En ce qui concerne l’engagement du gouvernement à retourner aux industries touchées, entre les exercices 2018-2019 et 2023-2024, la surtaxe de 1,3 milliard de dollars établie à l’égard de l’acier, de l’aluminium et d’autres produits américains: a) comment le gouvernement explique-t-il l’écart par rapport à l’évaluation du directeur parlementaire du budget, selon laquelle le gouvernement retournera 105 millions de dollars de moins que ce qu’il a établi en surtaxes et recettes connexes au cours de la période visée; b) comment le gouvernement compte-t-il retourner le montant de 1,3 milliard de dollars; c) quelle est la ventilation du montant de 1,3 milliard de dollars par industrie et bénéficiaire?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 417 --
M. Brad Vis:
En ce qui concerne le montant de 180,4 millions de dollars indiqué au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) 2019-2020 sous Ministère de l’Emploi et du Développement social (EDSC) pour la radiation de 33 098 créances au titre du Programme canadien de prêts aux étudiants: a) quels renseignements ont été échangés entre EDSC et l’Agence du revenu du Canada afin de déterminer les créances qui allaient être radiées; b) quelles mesures particulières sont prises pour veiller à ce qu’aucune des créances radiées ne soit associée à des personnes qui ont les revenus ou les moyens de rembourser leur emprunt; c) quel seuil ou quels critères ont été utilisés pour déterminer les créances à radier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 418 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne le contrat de 17,6 millions de dollars accordé à Peter Kiewit Sons ULC pour le projet d’assainissement du passage du poisson au niveau du glissement rocheux de Big Bar dans le fleuve Fraser: a) combien de soumissions ont été reçues pour le projet; b) parmi les soumissions reçues, combien satisfaisaient aux critères de qualification; c) qui a pris la décision d’accorder le contrat à Peter Kiewit Sons ULC; d) à quel moment la décision a-t-elle été prise; e) quelle est la date de début et la date de fin du contrat; f) quels sont les travaux précis qui seront réalisés dans le cadre du contrat; g) le fait que l’entreprise fait face à des accusations de négligence criminelle ayant causé la mort a-t-il été considéré pour l’évaluation de le soumission et, dans le cas contraire, pourquoi?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 419 --
Mme Cathy McLeod:
En ce qui concerne les investissements prévus dans le budget de 2019 pour le Programme d’innovation forestière, le Programme Investissements dans la transformation de l’industrie forestière, le programme de développement des marchés et l’Initiative de foresterie autochtone: a) combien de propositions ont été reçues pour chaque programme jusqu’à maintenant; b) quelle part des fonds a été versée jusqu’à maintenant; c) quels sont les critères relatifs aux propositions pour chaque programme; d) quels sont les détails des fonds attribués, y compris (i) l’organisation, (ii) l’endroit, (iii) la date d’attribution, (iv) le montant du financement, (v) la description du projet ou l’objectif du financement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 420 --
M. Todd Doherty:
En ce qui concerne l’exposé des sujets de préoccupation C-FT-03 (Boeing 737-8 MAX) (numéro de dossier 5010-A268): a) à quelle date le ministre des Transports, ou son bureau, a-t-il reçu le document ou a-t-il été mis au fait de son existence; b) quelles mesures, le cas échéant, le ministre a-t-il prises pour réagir aux préoccupations soulevées dans le document; c) à quelle date le ministre des Transports, ou son bureau, a-t-il été avisé pour la première fois des préoccupations soulevées dans le document; d) quelles mesures, le cas échéant, le ministre a-t-il prises pour réagir aux préoccupations; e) à quel moment le bureau du sous ministre a-t-il reçu le document; f) à quelle date le ministre des Transports, ou son bureau, a-t-il été mis au fait des préoccupations de Transports Canada au sujet du mouvement de piqué difficilement modifiable en lien avec le décrochage aérodynamique de l’appareil 737-8 MAX; g) une note d’information sur l’exposé des sujets de préoccupation a-t-elle été fournie au ministre ou à son personnel et, le cas échéant, quels sont les détails de la note d’information, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le titre, (iii) le résumé du contenu, (iv) l’expéditeur, (v) le destinataire, (vi) le numéro de dossier; h) quelle a été la réponse du ministre des Transports à la note d’information dont il est question en g)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 421 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne l’Office des transports du Canada (OTC), depuis le 15 juillet 2018: a) combien de plaintes de voyageurs aériens ont été reçues, ventilé par objet de la plainte; b) parmi les plaintes en a), combien ont été réglées, ventilé par (i) processus de facilitation, (ii) processus de médiation, (iii) décision; c) combien de plaintes de voyageurs aériens ont été rejetées, retirées ou refusées, ventilé par (i) objet de la plainte, (ii) processus de médiation, (iii) décision; d) parmi les plaintes en a), combien ont fait l’objet d’un règlement; e) combien d’agents chargés de cas de l’OTC, en équivalent temps plein, sont affectés au traitement des plaintes de voyageurs aériens, ventilé par agents chargés de cas s’occupant (i) du processus de facilitation, (ii) du processus de médiation, (iii) des décisions; f) quel est le nombre moyen de plaintes de voyageurs aériens traitées par un agent chargé de cas, ventilé par agents chargés de cas s’occupant (i) du processus de facilitation, (ii) du processus de médiation, (iii) des décisions; g) quel est le nombre de plaintes de voyageurs aériens qui ont été reçues mais n’ont pas encore été traitées par un agent chargé de cas, ventilé par agents chargés de cas s’occupant de (i) processus de facilitation, (ii) processus de médiation, (iii) décisions; h) dans combien de cas les facilitateurs de l’OTC ont-ils dit aux voyageurs qu’ils n’avaient pas droit à une indemnisation, ventilé par catégorie de rejet de la demande; i) parmi les cas en h), pour quelle raison les facilitateurs de l’OTC n’ont-ils pas renvoyé le voyageur et le transporteur aérien à la Convention de Montréal, qui est énoncée dans le tarif international (les modalités et conditions) du transporteur aérien; j) comment l’OTC définit-il une plainte « réglée » aux fins d’inclusion dans ses rapports statistiques; k) lorsqu’un plaignant choisit de ne pas donner suite à une plainte, celle-ci est-elle considérée « réglée »; l) combien de jours ouvrables s’écoule-t-il en moyenne entre le dépôt d’une plainte et l’affectation d’un agent à la plainte, ventilé par (i) processus de facilitation, (ii) processus de médiation, (iii) décision; m) combien de jours ouvrables s’écoule-t-il en moyenne entre le dépôt d’une plainte et la conclusion d’un règlement, ventilé par (i) processus de facilitation, (ii) processus de médiation, (iii) décision; n) parmi les plaintes en a), quel est le pourcentage de celles qui n’ont pas été réglées conformément aux normes de service?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 422 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne la sécurité aérienne: a) quel a été le taux d’échec annuel, de 2005 à 2019, au contrôle de la compétence du pilote (CCP) que les inspecteurs de Transports Canada ont fait passer à des pilotes à l’emploi d’exploitants visés par la sous partie 705, en vertu du Règlement de l’aviation canadien (RAC); b) quel a été le taux d’échec annuel au CCP, de 2005 à 2019, dans les cas où des pilotes inspecteurs approuvés par l’industrie ont fait passer le CCP à des pilotes à l’emploi d’exploitants visés par la sous-partie 705; c) combien d’inspections annuelles de vérification les inspecteurs de Transports Canada ont-ils effectuées entre 2007 et 2019; d) combien d’évaluations du système de gestion de la sécurité, d’inspections de validation de programme et d’inspections des processus ont été réalisées annuellement, entre 2008 et 2019, chez les exploitants visés par les sous-parties 705, 704, 703 et 702; e) combien d’inspections et de vérifications annuelles d’exploitants de systèmes visés par les sous-parties 705, 704, 703 et 702 ont-elles été effectuées conformément au manuel TP8606 de Transports Canada entre 2008 et 2019; f) combien d’inspecteurs des groupes d’exploitants d’aéronefs Transports Canada comptait-il de 2011 à 2019, avec ventilation par année; g) quels écarts Transports Canada a-t-il relevés entre ses politiques sur les qualifications des pilotes et les exigences de l’Organisation de l’aviation civile internationale (OACI) depuis 2005; h) quelles sont les exigences de l’OACI concernant le contrôle de la compétence des pilotes et quelles sont les exigences canadiennes relatives au CCP pour les sous-parties 705, 704, 703 et 604 du RAC; i) Transports Canada prévoit-il d’embaucher de nouveaux inspecteurs et, le cas échéant, quelle cible s’est-il fixé à cet égard, ventilée par catégorie d’inspecteurs; j) quel est le nombre actuel d’inspecteurs en sécurité aérienne à Transports Canada; k) pour chaque exercice de 2010-2011 à 2018-2019, ventilé par exercice (i) quel était le nombre d’inspecteurs en sécurité aérienne, (ii) quel était le budget accordé à la formation des inspecteurs en sécurité aérienne, (iii) quel était le nombre d’heures attribuées à la formation aux inspecteurs en sécurité aérienne; l) combien d’inspecteurs en sécurité aérienne sont-ils prévus pour (i) 2019-2020, (ii) 2020-2021, (iii) 2021-2022?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 423 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne la Stratégie nationale sur le logement: quel est le montant total du financement accordé tous les ans depuis 2017 par la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement, ventilé par province, pour (i) le Fonds national de co-investissement pour le logement, (ii) l’initiative de financement de la construction de logements locatifs, (iii) le Partenariat en matière de logement, (iv) l’Initiative des terrains fédéraux?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 424 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne le plan du gouvernement de créer un nouveau fonds pour aider les municipalités et les conseils scolaires à acheter 5 000 autobus ne produisant aucune émission au cours des cinq prochaines années: a) le gouvernement a-t-il établi des prévisions quant au coût total de cet engagement et, le cas échéant, (i) combien cet engagement coûtera-t-il aux municipalités et aux conseils scolaires, (ii) quel est le coût prévu de l’infrastructure de recharge nécessaire; b) combien d’argent le gouvernement fédéral injectera-t-il dans ce nouveau fonds chaque année; c) quelle proportion du coût total que devront débourser les municipalités sera assumée par le gouvernement fédéral grâce à ce nouveau fonds; d) quel sera le processus de demande que devront suivre les municipalités et les conseils scolaires; e) le financement sera-t-il fondé sur le nombre de passagers transportés comme c’est déjà le cas des subventions au transport en commun; f) comment le gouvernement s’assurera-t-il que les sociétés de transport en commun ne sont pas forcées de retarder ou d’abandonner leurs plans de croissance afin d’acheter des autobus ne produisant aucune émission pour respecter cet objectif?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)
8555-431-380 Trip of the Minister of Env ...8555-431-381 Report 3 on fossil fuel tax ...8555-431-382 Railway safety8555-431-383 Chief Executive Officer of ...8555-431-384 Canada Revenue Agency8555-431-385 Challenger aircraft fleet8555-431-386 Home care8555-431-387 Home and palliative care fo ...8555-431-388 Paradise Papers case8555-431-389 Consultations by the Minist ...8555-431-390 Drinking water situation in ... ...Show all topics
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)
Pursuant to subsection 79.2(2) of the Parliament of Canada Act, it is my duty to present to the House a report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer entitled “The Government's Expenditure Plan and Main Estimates for 2020-21”.
Conformément au paragraphe 79.2(2) de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, il est de mon devoir de présenter à la Chambre un rapport du directeur parlementaire du budget intitulé « Le Plan des dépenses du gouvernement et le Budget principal des dépenses pour 2020-2021 ».
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)
Pursuant to section 79.2(2) of the Parliament of Canada Act, it is my duty to present to the House a report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer entitled “Supplementary Estimates (B), 2019-20”.
Conformément à l'article 79.2(2) de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, il est de mon devoir de présenter à la Chambre un rapport du directeur parlementaire du budget intitulé « Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) 2019-2020 »
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2020-01-28 10:08 [p.539]
moved:
That, given the Parliamentary Budget Officer posted on March 15, 2018, that “Budget 2018 provides an incomplete account of the changes to the government’s $186.7 billion infrastructure spending plan” and that the “PBO requested the new plan but it does not exist”, the House call on the Auditor General of Canada to immediately conduct an audit of the government’s “Investing in Canada Plan”, including, but not be limited to, verifying whether the plan lives up to its stated goals and promises; and that the Auditor General of Canada report his findings to the House no later than one year following the adoption of this motion.
He said: Mr. Speaker, I would like to extend my regards to my esteemed colleagues and to Canadians. I am very pleased to rise today to give my first speech in the House in 2020.
Before I get into the meat of today's motion, I am sure that my colleagues really want to know why I am so proud to rise to speak today. What has changed in 2020? What has changed since 2019? We have entered into a new decade. The Conservative leadership race is under way. We have a new Speaker in the House. The Quebec regional media have been saved, and I am now the critic for infrastructure and communities.
That, however, is not what I am most proud of. What then is so special about 2020? Although members may not be able to tell from looking at me, I have changed. It has nothing to do with new year's resolutions. I do not exercise enough, I do not always eat the way I should, and I did not make any resolutions to be kinder to the government in the House. Sorry about that. What has changed is my title.
For a week now, my wife Caro and I have been able to proudly call ourselves grandma and grandpa. My son David and his wife Audrey welcomed a baby boy named Clovis into the world.
I wanted to dedicate this first speech to my very first grandson and to his parents, who have made me so proud today. Welcome, Clovis. It is for you and all other children like you, for their parents, grandparents and great-grandparents, that we all gather here to make Canada a place where families can succeed and thrive.
As parliamentarians, we must never forget that despite our differences of opinion and different visions of how to go about it, we have a duty and a responsibility to safeguard the well-being of our children and all children, as well as their future.
As I said, I did not make a resolution to stop holding this government to account, so it is also for Clovis that I moved a motion today. On behalf of the official opposition, my motion holds the government to account with respect to infrastructure.
The motion is very clear. The 2018 budget provides an incomplete account of the changes to the government's $186.7-billion infrastructure spending plan. The Parliamentary Budget Officer requested a new plan because some of the funds had not been spent, but, unfortunately, he was told such a plan did not exist. That means the Parliamentary Budget Officer is no longer in a position to give parliamentarians the facts. That is why we are now calling on all parliamentarians to ask the Auditor General of Canada to audit the results of the Liberal government's investing in Canada plan and look into how it is being run.
Despite all the Liberals' claims and lofty promises, their infrastructure plan has not achieved the stated goals. They went on and on about how their $186-billion plan would put Canadians back to work, but the numbers make it clear that a significant amount of that money was never actually released, that the impact on employment was not as promised and that promises to grow the GDP were never fulfilled.
I will start with a bit of background. Let us look back to the 2015 election campaign. The 2015 campaign will probably go down in the books as the one when the Government of Canada spent more than at any other time in Canadian history, largely because of a promise that was broken. I must admit that this promise made Canadians happy at the time, but they got duped by a party that was prepared to promise heaven and earth in order to get back in power.
After pulling the wool over their eyes, the leader of that party, the current Prime Minister, soon went back on his word and drove the federal books into his party's trademark colour. Since 2015, Canada has been in the red because of the red party, and the situation keeps getting worse with every passing day.
What was that promise? No, it was not electoral reform, although that pledge did not come true either. The Prime Minister and his then candidates travelled all over the country repeating that they would run modest deficits of $10 billion the first year, $10 billion the second year, and $6 billion the following year, before returning to a balanced budget at the end of their term. They wanted to reassure everyone, because people had a sneaking suspicion that the red party might like red budgets.
The government not only failed to keep its promise, but it even decided that balancing the budget was not important. Indeed, there is no plan to balance the budget in the foreseeable future. There is spending, spending and more spending. What was the justification for this promise?
The government said it wanted to run small deficits to invest in our infrastructure in order to create jobs and wealth. That is what it said. The previous Conservative government managed to bring in an ambitious infrastructure plan that did not burden our grandchildren. The logic was sound. We could take advantage of the low interest rates to take on tangible infrastructure projects. We might have seen something tangible. We might have seen some results. We might have seen Canadians at work. This could have had an impact on our economy. At the very least, if the money from these loans went toward our infrastructure, we might have seen results. The problem is that reality caught up with the government rather quickly. The most positive of Conservative pessimists understood. Spending did increase, the deficit ballooned, but the investments in infrastructure did not materialize.
The Liberals' investing in Canada plan, the government's $186-billion cornerstone of infrastructure spending, made several promises to Canadians:
1. Rate of economic growth is increased in an inclusive and sustainable way.
2. Environmental quality is improved, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are reduced and the resilience of communities is increased.
3. Urban mobility in Canadian communities is improved.
4. Housing is affordable and in good condition and homelessness is reduced year over year.
5. Early learning and child care is of high quality, affordable, flexible and inclusive.
6. Canadian communities are more inclusive and accessible.
7. Infrastructure is managed in a more sustainable way.
That is straight out of the investing in Canada plan. That is what the Liberals promised to do with those billions of dollars.
Have Canadians seen a single one of these objectives materialize? Unfortunately, it is obvious that the government failed to meet its objectives during its first mandate; if we look at the numbers and everything before us, it will not meet them in this mandate.
The government failed miserably. Unfortunately, it also failed to report to parliamentarians on its management of the $186-billion investing in Canada plan. I am sure I am not the only member of Parliament who has been waiting since the announcements, since the last election campaign, to see shovels in the ground across the country over the past four years. We were expecting to see roads, bridges, schools and community centres being built. We thought they would be all over the place. We thought that every single riding we represent would see something. We thought that this multi-billion-dollar investment plan would create jobs.
I now have a question for my colleagues. Have there been many projects in their ridings? Have they seen trucks or shovels in the ground?
Some hon. members: No.
Mr. Luc Berthold: Mr. Speaker, absolutely not. It did not happen. MPs are not the only ones wondering, which brings me to today's motion. On a number of occasions, the Parliamentary Budget Officer and his office have taken a look at expenditures and results of the investing in Canada plan.
We have a role to play as parliamentarians. The role of Parliament, of the House of Commons and MPs, is to grant the government the money it needs to operate. For instance, in a majority situation, the government has no problem spending as much money as it wants, since it holds a majority when the time comes to vote on supply. In a minority situation, if it loses a single supply vote, the government falls and is dissolved. Why? Because the House refused to grant the money it has asked for.
Since parliamentarians are responsible for granting supply, it just makes sense that parliamentarians should have access to all the information on government spending in order to make informed decisions on public finances. Unfortunately, the government has obviously not provided parliamentarians with all the information on the actual status and results of the investing in Canada plan.
We cannot make any assumptions about the government's good or bad faith, and that is why we are calling for an investigation today.
The information may have been buried in the mountain of data coming from the machinery of government, making it impossible to find. There are approximately 5,000 public servants responsible for collecting information in order to report to Canadians. We are all aware of just how much information one person can produce in a day. If all that information was given to parliamentarians before it was sorted or without any explanation or cross-referencing of figures, parliamentarians would obviously have no idea what they were looking at. Despite all the means at our disposal, we would not be able to make any decisions because there is simply too much information.
That is why Parliament created the position of the Parliamentary Budget Officer. I would like to quote the first two paragraphs of the website, which gives the history of that position. It states:
The position of the Parliamentary Budget Officer was created in December 2006 as part of the Federal Accountability Act. It was a response to criticisms surrounding the accuracy and credibility of the federal government’s fiscal projections and forecasting process.
At the time, some economists and parliamentarians were concerned that successive governments in the mid-to-late 1990s through the mid-2000s had shaped fiscal projections, overstating deficits and understating surpluses for political gain.
The role of the Parliamentary Budget Officer is important, which is why we need to take his reports on Canada's public finances very seriously.
He has taken a look at the investing in Canada plan and its actual results. He has mentioned them several times in his reports and in testimony before various parliamentary committees. What he tells us is troubling. It is time for another organization, like the Auditor General of Canada, to take a closer look at how the Liberal government is managing the $186 billion it received from parliamentarians for this infrastructure plan.
I just want to summarize the revelations and observations made by the Parliamentary Budget Officer. I want to thank his team for their collaboration and for answering our questions.
The first report is dated March 29, 2018, and is entitled “Status Report on Phase 1 of the New Infrastructure Plan”. PBO officials essentially state that they noted several information gaps that were primarily due to the inability of departments and agencies to provide enough details to reconcile the overall spending that had been announced with the sum of the individual projects. Despite their experience, the PBO analysts were unable to match the exorbitant amounts that had been announced with the projects on the ground. That is unacceptable.
The report also revealed this:
Of the total $14.4 billion budget for NIP Phase 1, federal organizations have been able to identify $7.2 billion worth of approved projects that were initiated in either 2016-17 or 2017-18. Thus, $7.2 billion of Phase 1 funding is yet to be attributed to projects.
Only half of the total budget was attributed to projects.
We all remember the basic premise: run small deficits to invest in infrastructure and create middle-class jobs. Those small deficits now add up to $26 billion, but only $7.2 billion was actually invested in projects during the government's first term. That is unacceptable.
According to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, “such unexpected delays can also provide insight regarding whether federal infrastructure spending is a useful policy instrument for short-term fiscal stimulus.” Obviously, if we do not invest, there will be no fiscal stimulus. Without money, trucks and workers on the ground, there will be no job creation.
In other words, the Liberals' big promises turned out to be empty ones. Their airy promises of fiscal stimulus amounted to nothing.
According to the same report:
Budget 2016 committed $11.3 billion...in infrastructure spending over 2016-17 and 2017-18, resulting in an expected increase in the level of real GDP of 0.2% and 0.4% in 2016-17 and 2017-18 respectively.
The Parliamentary Budget Officer estimates that GDP only increased by 0.1% over those two fiscal years. We call that missing the mark outright, not just a little.
Here is another quote:
We estimate that Budget 2016 infrastructure investments will provide a modest boost to...GDP and employment over the remainder of the planning horizon.
Not only were results poor in the past, they will be poor in the future.
That is not all. In analysis of budget 2018, the Parliamentary Budget Officer's comments about the Liberal infrastructure plan are scathing.
Budget 2018 provides an incomplete account of the changes to the Government’s $186.7 billion infrastructure spending plan. PBO requested the new plan but it does not exist. Roughly one-quarter of the funding allocated for infrastructure from 2016-17 to 2018-19 will lapse. Both legacy and new infrastructure programs are prone to large lapses.
The Parliamentary Budget Officer then rightly goes on to suggest that parliamentarians may wish to ask questions about that, which is what we are doing today.
After failing to carry out phase 1, the Liberals have no plan for how to invest the tens of billions of dollars allocated to more than 50 programs falling under some 30 agencies and departments. They are incapable of doing the legwork, incapable of reporting to Parliament and incapable of providing a comprehensive investment plan.
We have all day to talk about it. I know that my Liberal colleagues will spend the day telling us about the wonderful projects that have been completed and other projects that have been announced without really knowing when those will get off the ground. Some projects have been announced once, twice, three times. The cost is not calculated. If that is how the Liberals balance their budget, it does not work.
The fact is that there is no plan and management is piecemeal, and so there is no impact on the economy. Instead of celebrating, my colleagues opposite should be as concerned as we are about the government's inability to plan for its infrastructure investments.
I would like to talk about another a report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer. I explained earlier that the government failed to live up to expectations. I will now explain how this Liberal government, which wanted to impose its infrastructure plan on all the provinces, ended up back at square one.
In a report tabled in Parliament in March 2019 entitled “Infrastructure Update: Investments in Provinces and Municipalities”, staff at the office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer said that they were not able to independently verify that the federal funds had indeed increased infrastructure spending overall, since part of the federal increase appears to have been offset by planned decreases in provincial spending.
Am I to understand that the Liberal government forgot that it is not authorized to invest in provinces on its own and that it did not get assurances that the money it was loaning to build roads, bridges and social housing would be used for new investments? All of that lip service and those projections were cancelled out because the Liberals were unable to make sure that the provinces would keep up with their own investments.
Here are some figures from the Parliamentary Budget Officer:
...according to their 2016-17 and 2017-18 budgets, provinces were planning to spend $100.6 billion in capital. Instead, they invested $85.1 billion, which is $15.5 billion lower than their initial plans.
That is what the Liberals are trying to hide. The investing in Canada plan has failed to create wealth for the middle class, failed to achieve anything tangible and failed to be transparent and accountable.
The final straw came during the last election campaign, when we asked the PBO to analyze one of our proposals. Here is the reply I received:
...you asked if we could provide you with a copy of all the data sets provided to us by Infrastructure Canada with regard to a complete list of the projects and their funding allocations.... Unfortunately, Infrastructure Canada considered these data to be confidential, so they were not disclosed.
That response is unacceptable. Given the government's lack of transparency and accountability, the Conservatives believe that the Auditor General must immediately conduct an audit of the investing in Canada plan. Naturally, we are counting on the collaboration of the Bloc Québécois and the NDP to shed as much light as possible on how the Liberals are managing the $186 billion. Canadians and parliamentarians of all stripes have the right to know what the Liberals are doing with their money.
propose:
Que, étant donné que le directeur parlementaire du budget a indiqué le 15 mars 2018 que « le budget de 2018 présente un compte rendu incomplet des changements apportés au plan de 186,7 milliards de dollars de dépenses du gouvernement dans les infrastructures » et que le « DPB a demandé le nouveau plan, mais il n’existe pas », la Chambre demande au vérificateur général du Canada de procéder immédiatement à une vérification du plan gouvernemental « Investir dans le Canada », y compris, mais sans s'y limiter, une vérification permettant de déterminer si les objectifs et promesses liés au plan se sont concrétisés; et que le vérificateur général du Canada fasse rapport de ses constatations à la Chambre au plus tard un an après l’adoption de la présente motion.
— Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais saluer mes chers collègues ainsi que les Canadiens et les Canadiennes. C'est un grand plaisir de prendre la parole aujourd'hui pour un premier discours à la Chambre en cette année 2020.
Avant que j'aborde directement le sujet de la motion d'aujourd'hui, je suis convaincu que mes collègues ont très hâte d'entendre pourquoi je suis aussi fier de prendre la parole devant eux aujourd'hui. Qu'est-ce qui a changé en 2020? Qu'est-ce qui a changé depuis 2019? Nous sommes entrés dans une nouvelle décennie; les conservateurs amorcent une nouvelle course au leadership; nous avons un nouveau président à la Chambre; les médias régionaux au Québec ont été sauvés; et je suis maintenant le porte-parole en matière d'infrastructure et de communautés.
Cependant, ce n'est pas de cela que je suis le plus fier. Qu'a donc de spécial l'année 2020? Même si cela ne paraît pas trop quand on me regarde, c'est moi qui ai changé et cela n'a absolument rien avoir avec les résolutions du Nouvel An. Je ne fais pas assez d'exercice; je mange plus ou moins bien; je n'ai pas pris la résolution d'être plus gentil avec le gouvernement à la Chambre — j'en suis désolé. Ce qui a changé, c'est mon titre.
Depuis une semaine maintenant, mon épouse, Caro, et moi revendiquons fièrement les titres de grand-maman et de grand-papa. Mon fils, David, et sa conjointe, Audrey, ont donné la vie à un magnifique petit garçon qui s'appelle Clovis.
Je voulais dédier ce premier discours à mon tout premier petit-fils et à ses parents qui me rendent si fier aujourd'hui. Bienvenue, Clovis! C'est pour toi et pour tous les autres jeunes comme toi, leurs parents, leurs grands-parents et leurs arrières grands-parents, que nous sommes tous réunis ici pour faire du Canada un endroit où les familles peuvent s'épanouir et réussir.
Comme parlementaires, nous ne devons jamais oublier que, malgré nos divergences d'opinions et nos visions différentes d'y arriver, le bien-être de nos enfants et de tous les enfants, ainsi que leur avenir sont notre devoir et notre responsabilité.
Comme j'ai dit que je n'avais pas pris la résolution de ne pas demander des comptes au gouvernement, c'est aussi pour Clovis, que j'ai déposé aujourd'hui une motion. Au nom de l'opposition officielle, cette motion demande au gouvernement de fournir des comptes sur le plan d'infrastructure.
La motion est très claire. Le budget de 2018 présente un compte rendu incomplet des changements apportés au plan de 186,7 milliards de dollars de dépenses du gouvernement dans les infrastructures. Même si le directeur parlementaire du budget a demandé le dépôt du nouveau plan parce que des sommes n'avaient pas été dépensées, malheureusement il s'est fait répondre que ce plan n'existait pas. Le directeur parlementaire du budget a donc atteint la limite de ses capacités pour donner l'heure juste aux parlementaires. C'est pourquoi nous demandons aujourd'hui la collaboration de l'ensemble des parlementaires pour demander au vérificateur général du Canada de faire une enquête sur l'ensemble des résultats et sur la manière dont est géré le programme « Investir dans le Canada » du gouvernement libéral.
Malgré tout ce que les libéraux prétendent, malgré leurs belles paroles, le plan d'infrastructure des libéraux n'a pas donné les résultats attendus. Alors qu'ils clamaient haut et fort que leur plan de 186 milliards de dollars allait remettre les Canadiens et les Canadiennes au travail, les chiffres nous démontrent clairement aujourd'hui qu'une bonne partie de cet argent ne s'est pas rendu sur le terrain, que l'effet sur les emplois n'a pas été celui promis et que les promesses d'accroître le PIB n'ont pas été respectées.
Commençons par faire un peu d'histoire. Revenons à la campagne électorale de 2015. Cette campagne de 2015 marquera probablement l'histoire comme celle où le gouvernement du Canada aura été à l'origine des plus grandes dépenses que le Canada n'aura jamais connues en raison notamment d'une promesse qui a été brisée. Je dois admettre qu'à l'époque cette promesse avait plu aux Canadiens, qui cependant ont été bernés par un parti qui était prêt à promettre mer et monde pour revenir au pouvoir.
Après les avoir bernés, le chef de ce parti, l'actuel premier ministre, a tôt fait de revenir sur sa parole et a mis la couleur de son parti sur les coffres de l'État. Depuis 2015, le Canada est dans le rouge à cause des Rouges, et nous nous enfonçons davantage chaque jour qui passe.
Quelle était cette promesse? Non, ce n'était pas la réforme électorale, même si celle-là, non plus, n'a pas été réalisée. Le premier ministre et ses candidats et ses candidates de l'époque ont répété partout aux quatre coins du pays qu'ils allaient faire des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars la première année, de 10 milliards de dollars la deuxième année et de 6 milliards de dollars la suivante, pour ensuite revenir à l'équilibre budgétaire, à la fin de leur mandat. On rassurait tout le monde parce que les gens avaient quand même une petite suspicion que les Rouges aimaient le rouge dans les budgets.
Non seulement le gouvernement n'a pas respecté son engagement, mais il a même décidé que l'équilibre budgétaire n'était pas important. En effet, aucune date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire n'est prévue à l'horizon. Il y a seulement des dépenses, des dépenses et encore des dépenses. Quelle était la justification de cette promesse?
Le gouvernement disait vouloir faire de tout petits déficits pour investir dans nos infrastructures, afin de créer de l'emploi et de la richesse. C'est ce qu'il disait. Le précédent gouvernement conservateur, lui, avait réussi à mettre en place un ambitieux plan d'infrastructure qui ne se faisait pas sur le dos de nos petits-enfants. On pouvait en comprendre la logique: les taux d'intérêt étaient bas, ce qui aurait permis de faire quelque chose de concret sur le plan de l'infrastructure. On aurait pu voir quelque chose de concret. On aurait pu voir quelque chose se réaliser. On aurait pu voir des Canadiens au travail. Il y aurait pu y avoir un effet sur notre économie. Au moins, si l'argent de ces emprunts allait dans nos infrastructures, on aurait pu voir un résultat. Le problème, c'est que la réalité a vite rattrapé le gouvernement. Le plus positif des pessimistes conservateurs a compris. Les dépenses ont en effet augmenté, le déficit a gonflé, mais les investissements en infrastructure n'ont pas été réalisés.
Le plan libéral Investir dans le Canada, la pièce maîtresse des dépenses en infrastructure de 186 milliards de dollars du gouvernement, promettait plusieurs choses aux Canadiens:
1. Le taux de croissance économique augmente d'une manière inclusive et durable;
2. La qualité de l'environnement est améliorée, les émissions de GES sont réduites et la résilience communautaire est renforcée;
3. La mobilité urbaine est améliorée dans les collectivités canadiennes;
4. Des logements abordables et en bon état sont offerts et l'itinérance est réduite année après année;
5. Des services d'apprentissage de la petite enfance et de garde des jeunes enfants de grande qualité, abordables, souples et inclusifs sont offerts;
6. Les collectivités canadiennes deviennent plus inclusives et plus accessibles;
7. L'infrastructure est gérée de façon plus durable.
Il s'agit d'un extrait du plan Investir dans le Canada. C'est ce que les libéraux ont promis de faire avec ces milliards de dollars.
Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes ont-ils vu un de ces objectifs être réalisé? Malheureusement, c'est clair que le gouvernement n'a pas réussi à atteindre ses objectifs au cours de son premier mandat et, si nous nous fions aux chiffres et à tout ce qui est devant nous, il ne réussira pas à les atteindre dans ce mandat-ci.
Le gouvernement a échoué lamentablement. Malheureusement, il échoue aussi à rendre des comptes aux parlementaires quant à la gestion des 186 milliards de dollars du plan Investir dans le Canada. Je ne pense pas être le seul député de la Chambre qui s'attendait, après ces annonces, après la dernière campagne électorale, à voir les pelles et les bennes envahir le pays au cours des quatre dernières années. On pensait voir la construction de routes, de ponts, d'écoles et des salles communautaires. On pensait qu'il y en aurait partout. On pensait qu'il y en aurait dans la circonscription que représente chaque député. On pensait que ce plan d'investissement de milliards de dollars allait permettre des travaux.
Je me tourne maintenant vers mes collègues pour leur poser une question. Y a-t-il eu plusieurs travaux qui ont été réalisés dans leur circonscription? Ont-ils vu des pelles, des bennes et des camions?
Des voix: Non.
M. Luc Berthold: Absolument pas, monsieur le Président. Cela ne s'est pas produit. Il n'y a pas que les députés qui se sont questionnés, et c'est ce qui m'amène à la motion d'aujourd'hui. Le directeur parlementaire du budget et son bureau se sont intéressés à plusieurs reprises aux dépenses et aux résultats du plan Investir dans le Canada.
En tant que parlementaires, nous avons un rôle à jouer. Le rôle du Parlement, de la Chambre de communes, des députés de la Chambre, c'est d'octroyer au gouvernement les sommes qu'il lui faut pour fonctionner. À preuve, en situation de gouvernement majoritaire, le gouvernement n'a aucune difficulté à dépenser tout l'argent qu'il veut bien, puisqu'il détient la majorité des voix lorsque vient le temps de voter les crédits. En situation minoritaire, s'il perd un vote sur les crédits, il est défait et doit être dissous. Pourquoi? Parce que la Chambre refuse de lui donner les crédits qu'il demande.
Si le pouvoir d'octroyer les crédits au gouvernement revient aux parlementaires, il est donc normal, tout à fait simple et logique que les parlementaires, pour prendre des décisions éclairées en matière de finances publiques, aient accès à toute l'information concernant les dépenses du gouvernement. Malheureusement, le gouvernement n'a manifestement pas partagé avec les parlementaires toute l'information sur l'état réel et les résultats du plan Investir dans le Canada.
Nous pouvons présumer de la bonne ou de la mauvaise foi du gouvernement, et c'est pourquoi nous demandons une enquête aujourd'hui.
L'information a pu être noyée dans le flot des données qui émanent de la machine gouvernementale, de sorte qu'il est impossible de s'y retrouver. Il y a environ 5 000 fonctionnaires chargés de colliger des informations dans le but de rendre des comptes aux citoyens et aux citoyennes. Nous sommes tous conscients de la quantité d'information qu'une seule personne peut produire dans une journée. Si toutes ces informations sont remises aux parlementaires sans les trier au préalable, les expliquer, ni recouper les chiffres, il est évident que ces derniers ne s'y retrouveront pas. Malgré tous les moyens à notre disposition, nous ne serons pas capables de prendre des décisions puisqu'il y a tout simplement trop d'informations.
C'est pour cette raison que le Parlement a créé le poste de directeur parlementaire du budget. Je vais citer les deux premiers paragraphes de la page Web relatant l'historique de ce poste:
Le poste de directeur parlementaire du budget a été créé en décembre 2006 dans le cadre de la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité en réponse à des critiques entourant l'exactitude et la crédibilité du processus de prévision financière du gouvernement fédéral.
À l'époque, certains économistes et parlementaires craignaient que les gouvernements successifs, du milieu à la fin des années 1990 jusqu'au milieu des années 2000, aient fait, à des fins politiques, des projections financières gonflant les déficits et sous-estimant les excédents.
Le rôle du directeur parlementaire du budget est important et c'est pourquoi nous devons prendre au sérieux ses rapports sur les finances publiques du Canada.
Il s'est intéressé au plan Investir dans le Canada et à ses résultats réels. Il en a fait mention à plusieurs reprises dans ses rapports et lors de ses différentes interventions en comité parlementaire. Ce qu'il nous apprend est troublant. Il est temps qu'une autre instance, comme le vérificateur général du Canada, jette un œil plus attentif à la manière dont le gouvernement libéral gère les 186 milliards de dollars qui ont été octroyés par les parlementaires au gouvernement dans ce plan d'infrastructure.
Je vais faire le point sur les différentes révélations et constatations du directeur parlementaire du budget. Je remercie d'ailleurs son équipe de sa collaboration et de ses réponses à nos questions.
Le premier rapport date du 29 mars 2018 et s'intitule « Rapport d'étape sur la phase 1 du nouveau plan en matière d'infrastructure ». Les fonctionnaires du directeur parlementaire du budget disent essentiellement qu'ils ont relevé plusieurs lacunes en matière d'information et qu'il s'agit principalement d'une incapacité des ministères et des organismes à fournir des détails qui permettent de concilier les dépenses globales annoncées avec la somme des projets individuels. Malgré leur expérience, les analystes du directeur parlementaire du budget n'arrivent pas à faire le lien entre les sommes faramineuses annoncées et les projets sur le terrain. C'est inacceptable.
Dans ce rapport, nous avons aussi appris ceci:
Du budget total de 14,4 milliards de dollars prévu pour la phase 1 du NPI, les organismes fédéraux ont réussi à cerner des projets approuvés d'une valeur de 7,2 milliards de dollars qui ont été lancés soit en 2016-2017, soit en 2017-2018. Ainsi, 7,2 milliards de dollars du financement prévu pour la phase 1 restent toujours à attribuer à des projets.
Seulement la moitié du budget total a été attribuée à des projets.
On se souvient de l'argument numéro un: de tout petits déficits pour investir en infrastructure et créer des emplois pour la classe moyenne. Or, le total de tous ces tout petits déficits s'élève à 26 milliards de dollars, alors que seulement 7,2 milliards de dollars ont vraiment été investis sur le terrain lors du premier mandat. C'est inacceptable.
Selon le directeur parlementaire du budget, « de tels retards imprévus peuvent aussi donner des indications sur l'utilité de cet instrument de politique que sont les dépenses dans les infrastructures pour la relance budgétaire à court terme ». Bien évidemment, si nous n'investissons pas, il n'y aura pas de relance budgétaire. S'il n'y a pas d'argent, de camions et de travailleurs sur le terrain, il n'y aura pas de création d'emplois.
En d'autres mots, les belles paroles des libéraux n'étaient que de belles paroles. Leur improvisation a fait en sorte que la relance budgétaire promise était de la frime.
Selon le même rapport:
[l]e budget de 2016 prévoyait des dépenses de 11,3 milliards de dollars [...] dans les infrastructures de 2016-2017 à 2017-2018, ce qui devait faire augmenter le niveau du PIB réel de 0,2 % en 2016-2017 et de 0,4 % en 2017-2018.
Or, le directeur parlementaire du budget estime que le PIB n'a en réalité augmenté que de 0,1 % au cours des deux exercices. C'est ce que l'on appelle rater une cible, et pas à peu près.
Voici un autre passage:
[Il] estime que les investissements dans les infrastructures prévus dans le budget de 2016 feront augmenter de façon modeste le PIB [...] et l’emploi au cours du reste de l’horizon de planification.
Alors, non seulement le passé n’est pas bon, mais l’avenir ne le sera pas non plus.
Ce n’est pas tout. Dans son analyse du budget de 2018, le directeur parlementaire du budget est cinglant sur le plan d’infrastructure libéral:
Le budget de 2018 présente un compte rendu incomplet des changements apportés au plan de 186,7 milliards de dollars de dépenses du gouvernement dans les infrastructures. Le DPB a demandé le nouveau plan, mais il n’existe pas. Près du quart des fonds affectés aux infrastructures de 2016-2017 à 2018-2019 seront périmés. Les anciens et les nouveaux programmes d’infrastructure sont susceptibles à des grandes dépenses périmées.
Avec raison, le directeur parlementaire du budget se demande si les parlementaires vont poser des questions à ce sujet-là, et c’est ce que nous faisons aujourd’hui.
Après avoir échoué à réaliser la phase 1, les libéraux n’ont pas de plan sur la manière d’investir des dizaines de milliards de dollars répartis dans plus de 50 programmes sous la responsabilité d’une trentaine d’agences et de ministères. Ils sont incapables de faire le travail sur le terrain, incapables de rendre des comptes au Parlement et incapables de fournir un plan d’investissement complet.
Nous avons toute la journée pour en parler. Je sais que mes collègues libéraux vont passer la journée à nous parler de quelques beaux projets qui ont été réalisés et d'autres projets qui ont été annoncés, sans savoir quand ceux-ci seront réalisés. Certains projets ont été annoncés une fois, deux fois, puis trois fois. On n’additionne pas les sommes. Si c'est comme cela que les libéraux équilibrent leur budget, cela ne fonctionne pas.
La réalité, c'est justement cela: l'absence d'un plan et une gestion à la pièce, sans résultat pour l’économie. Au lieu de se réjouir, mes collègues d’en face devraient être aussi inquiets que nous de l'incapacité du gouvernement à planifier son projet d’investir dans les infrastructures.
J'aimerais parler d’un autre rapport du directeur parlementaire du budget. J’ai démontré plus tôt que le gouvernement n’a pas été à la hauteur des attentes. Je vais maintenant démontrer à quel point ce gouvernement libéral, qui a voulu imposer à toutes les provinces son plan d’infrastructure, s’est retrouvé Gros-Jean comme devant.
Dans un rapport déposé au Parlement en mars 2019 intitulé « Le point sur les infrastructures: Investissements dans les provinces et les municipalités », les fonctionnaires du directeur parlementaire du budget nous apprennent qu'ils n'ont pas été en mesure de vérifier de façon indépendante que les fonds fédéraux ont effectivement tiré parti des nouvelles dépenses globales en infrastructure, car une partie de l’augmentation fédérale semble être compensée par des diminutions des dépenses provinciales prévues.
Ai-je bien compris? Le gouvernement libéral a oublié qu’il n’avait pas l'autorité d'investir dans les provinces tout seul et il n'a pas obtenu l’assurance que l’argent qu’il emprunte pour faire des routes, des ponts et des logements sociaux sert à faire de nouveaux investissements. Toutes ces belles paroles et ces belles projections ont été anéanties parce que les libéraux ont été incapables de s’assurer que les provinces allaient maintenir leur propre niveau d’investissement.
Voici quelques chiffres du directeur parlementaire du budget:
[...] d’après leurs budgets de 2016-2017 et 2017-2018, les provinces prévoyaient des dépenses en immobilisations de 100,6 milliards de dollars. Or, elles n’y ont consacré que 85,1 millions de dollars, soit 15,5 millions de dollars de moins que leurs prévisions initiales.
Voilà la réalité que les libéraux essaient de cacher. Le plan Investir dans le Canada est un échec en matière de création de richesse pour la classe moyenne, un échec en matière de réalisations sur le terrain et un échec en matière de suivi et de transparence.
La goutte qui a fait déborder le vase est arrivée lors de la dernière campagne électorale, lorsqu’on a demandé au bureau du directeur parlementaire du budget d’analyser une de nos propositions. J'ai eu la réponse suivante:
[...] vous avez demandé si nous pouvions vous fournir une copie des ensembles de données qui nous ont été fournis par Infrastructure Canada au sujet d'une liste complète des projets et de leurs allocations de financement [...] Malheureusement, Infrastructure Canada a jugé que ces données étaient confidentielles et qu'elles n'étaient donc pas divulguées.
Cette réponse est inacceptable. Compte tenu du manque de transparence et de responsabilisation du gouvernement, les conservateurs pensent que le vérificateur général doit immédiatement faire une vérification du plan Investir dans le Canada. Nous souhaitons évidemment la collaboration du Bloc québécois et du NPD pour que toute la lumière soit faite sur la manière dont les libéraux gèrent ces 186 milliards de dollars. C’est important. Les Canadiens et les parlementaires de tous les partis ont le droit de savoir ce que les libéraux font de leur argent.
View Andy Fillmore Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Andy Fillmore Profile
2020-01-28 10:46
All of the participating communities repeatedly talked about the major benefits, such as the opportunity to explore new ideas, access means and funding at the municipal level, and integrate even more digital technology and information into community planning.
The Canada Infrastructure Bank, CIB, is a Crown corporation that leverages federal support to attract private sector institutional investment to new revenue-generating infrastructure projects that are in the public interest. The CIB is focused on trade and transportation, public transit, broadband, and green projects, including clean power. It is advancing a new model through expert advice and evidence-based decision-making. By drawing on the capital, experience and expertise of the private sector, the bank is helping to encourage beneficial partnerships between the public sector and the private sector, which in turn make more infrastructure projects for Canadians possible while helping public dollars go further.
We have continued to build on successes and deliver results for communities across Canada. For example, through budget 2019, we provided a one-time top-up to the federal gas tax fund, which provided an additional $2.2 billion to municipalities for their priorities. In Halifax, that meant an additional $26.5 million last year.
The mandate letter for the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities makes additional commitments to Canadians, such as permanent federal public transit funds that will rise with the cost of construction, a national infrastructure fund that will support major nation-building projects, and the promise that any funds from our existing programs for provinces and territories that have not committed to approve projects by the end of 2021 would be reinvested directly into communities through another top-up of the federal gas tax fund.
We are continuing to invest in infrastructure in new and innovative ways, because our government knows that investing in infrastructure is not a one-size-fits-all approach, which is why it is not the work of one department alone.
The investing in Canada plan is the result of 14 federal departments working together to invest in Canadian cities. This approach gives us the flexibility and adaptability to meet Canadians' needs while ensuring that all levels of government make informed, strategic, evidence-based decisions.
To be clear, the provinces, territories and municipalities are the ones that will benefit from this approach, because they own 98% of all core public infrastructure. That is why Infrastructure Canada worked with Statistics Canada to conduct the first national survey to provide a snapshot of the stock, condition and performance of core public infrastructure.
This inventory would not only help municipal, provincial, territorial and federal leaders determine how best to invest federal funding based on what they need and currently have, but it would also help provide baseline evidence to help monitor and assess the impact of federal investments under the plan over time. By including different funding streams with specific outcomes in our plan, and different funding mechanisms, and by working closely with our partners to be responsive to their needs, we are delivering results to Canadians.
In support of the Government of Canada's policy on openness and transparency and to provide the best information to Canadians, Infrastructure Canada, along with the other delivery partners, communicates progress and results on its investments to Canadians through a variety of reporting methods.
A detailed outline of the framework and the objectives of our investing in Canada plan can be found online on the Infrastructure Canada website. Canadians will also find detailed information on the implementation of the plan, the progress that has been made and the latest funds invested, as well as an online map showing the location of infrastructure projects in their communities.
Detailed information on the projects funded through the investing in Canada plan is also a posted on the federal open data portal, shared through various traditional and social media channels and made available in departments' respective annual departmental results reports.
Finally, Infrastructure Canada also issued its first annual progress report in May 2019, which provided an update on the implementation of the plan across all departments. This report is available on the department's website, and we will continue to report transparently to Canadians on an annual basis on the progress and results of the plan.
The Government of Canada is proud of its accomplishments through the investing in Canada plan and how infrastructure investments are helping improve communities across the country.
I have risen in the House today in response to a motion put forward by my colleague, the member for Mégantic—L'Érable. In his motion, he made several statements that I would like to address.
My colleague began by referring to the Parliamentary Budget Officer's March 15, 2018 post, which stated, “Budget 2018 provides an incomplete account of the changes to the Government's $186.7 billion infrastructure spending plan.”
In his March 2018 report, the Parliamentary Budget Officer looked at investments in infrastructure across a number of departments and compared the investments these departments reported to the Government of Canada's planned spending for that period. The PBO asked for information from a number of departments and agencies about their spending on infrastructure.
In light of this, Infrastructure Canada and the other federal departments worked closely with PBO staff to provide updated data and results, and an updated report from the PBO was issued in August 2018.
According to the most recent version of the report, the Government of Canada is fulfilling its promise to make a historic investment of over $180 billion in public infrastructure over 12 years, to grow the economy and to create jobs for Canadians.
The Parliamentary Budget Officer's independent economic analysis concluded that the federal investments made under budget 2016 helped stimulate both economic activity and job creation in its first two years. These benefits have continued to accrue over the remaining life of these programs.
Furthermore, in July 2018, the Governor of the Bank of Canada also reported that the country's economy was operating close to capacity and the labour market was strong. In fact, since the start of our government's mandate, Canada's unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level in four decades.
To return to the motion from the member for Mégantic—L'Érable, he further states that the “PBO requested the new plan but it does not exist”. On the contrary, the plan exists and information on the plan is available to all. As I stated earlier, in April 2018 the then minister of infrastructure and communities released a publication to the media and the public, and posted it on the Infrastructure Canada website, that lays out all of the new funding programs being delivered under the plan by department.
As I mentioned earlier, the annual progress report released in May 2019 is also available on the website. Those viewing the list of programs may note that some are delivered through bilateral agreements between the federal government and the provinces and territories, which I will speak to briefly.
As members know, Infrastructure Canada is a federal funding partner for Canada's core public infrastructure, and most of its funding programs are delivered in partnership with the provinces and territories. The funding programs under the investing in Canada plan are no different in that regard. Under budget 2016, Infrastructure Canada delivered two funding programs: the clean water and wastewater fund and the public transit infrastructure fund. To deliver these programs, Infrastructure Canada signed its first bilateral agreements in 2016 with each of the provinces and territories, which spelled out the terms, obligations and commitments of each party. Under these agreements, the terms and conditions of this funding were clearly defined, as the funding was intended for the repair and rehabilitation of existing infrastructure projects.
As well, funding recipients were asked to report back to the government on a semi-annual basis. To deliver budget 2017 funding, Infrastructure Canada signed new bilateral agreements with the provinces and territories in 2018, which provided updated criteria for the funding streams included in the agreements as well as the new reporting requirements.
The funding criteria under the new bilateral agreements focus on outcomes. Project applications have to show how a project will meet these outcomes. Outcomes can include increased access to potable water or increased energy efficiency of buildings, or in rural and northern communities, improved food security.
The 2018 bilateral agreements also included revised reporting requirements, which include a detailed biannual progress report. These reports are used by the Government of Canada to provide important updates to Canadians on the progress and benefits of the projects in their communities. The full details of the bilateral agreements, including their outcomes and reporting requirements, are all publicly available on Infrastructure Canada's website. I encourage my fellow members to examine these for themselves.
By working in close partnership with the provinces, territories, municipalities and indigenous partners, we are ensuring that our smart, strategic investments in infrastructure will continue to help create good jobs and deliver real results for Canadian communities. I am proud of the work our government is doing to ensure that our communities will grow and succeed now and into the future. In respectful and productive collaboration with members on all sides of the House, we look forward to continuing on that path because we know there is still a world of opportunity that awaits us out there.
Every day citizens are developing new ideas and technologies to build better communities for all of us, whether it is at CarbonCure, a company in my home province of Nova Scotia that is helping us reduce the carbon footprint of our built environment by developing greener concrete, or at LakeCity Plastics, also in Nova Scotia, a company that transforms thousands upon thousands of plastic bags into picnic tables like those we recently revealed on the Halifax waterfront.
The future is bright for our cities and towns, because when Canada builds, Canada grows.
Therefore, I would like to move an amendment to the motion. I move that the motion be amended by deleting the words “given the Parliamentary Budget Officer posted on March 15, 2018, that ‘Budget 2018 provides an incomplete account of the changes to the government's $186.7 billion infrastructure plan’” and the phrase “PBO requested the new plan but it does not exist”, and substituting for them the following: “given the House recognizes the importance of making smart infrastructure investments that improve the lives of Canadians”.
I am thankful for the opportunity to rise and speak in the House today.
Toutes les collectivités participantes ont mentionné, et à plusieurs reprises, d’importants avantages, notamment la possibilité d’explorer de nouvelles idées, de se doter de moyens et de fonds à l’échelle municipale et d’intégrer encore plus d’informations et de technologies numériques dans la planification communautaire.
La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada est une société d'État qui investit des fonds du gouvernement fédéral pour attirer des investissements privés et institutionnels dans le cadre de nouveaux projets qui généreront des revenus et qui seront dans l'intérêt du public. Ses secteurs d'investissement prioritaires sont le commerce et le transport, le transport en commun, l'accès à Internet à haut débit et les infrastructures vertes, y compris en matière d'énergie non polluante. La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada fonctionne selon un modèle novateur, et ses décisions sont fondées sur les conseils d'experts et les données probantes. En tirant parti du capital, de l'expérience et de l'expertise du secteur privé, elle favorise la création de partenariats avantageux entre les secteurs public et privé, ce qui permet la concrétisation d'un plus grand nombre de projets d'infrastructure pour les Canadiens et optimise le rendement des deniers publics.
En faisant fond sur nos réussites, nous continuons de livrer la marchandise d'un bout à l'autre du Canada. Par exemple, le budget de 2019 a ajouté un investissement complémentaire ponctuel de 2,2 milliards de dollars au Fonds de la taxe sur l'essence fédéral pour répondre aux priorités des municipalités. À Halifax, cela s'est traduit par 26,5 millions de dollars supplémentaires l'an dernier.
La lettre de mandat de la ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités énonce d'autres engagements envers les Canadiens, tels que rendre permanent le financement du transport en commun et l'augmenter en fonction des coûts de construction, créer un fonds national d’infrastructure pour appuyer de grands projets rassembleurs, et réinvestir directement dans les collectivités, au moyen d’un autre supplément au Fonds de la taxe sur l’essence fédéral, les fonds de nos programmes existants destinés aux provinces et aux territoires qui n'auront pas été affectés à des projets approuvés d'ici la fin de 2021.
Nous continuons à investir dans les infrastructures de façon novatrice parce que le gouvernement sait qu'il ne peut pas adopter une approche unique à ce chapitre, et c'est pourquoi ce n'est pas le travail d'un seul ministère.
En fait, le plan Investir dans le Canada est le fruit d’une concertation de 14 ministères fédéraux qui souhaitent investir dans les villes canadiennes. Cette approche nous procure une réelle flexibilité et une vraie adaptabilité pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens, tout en veillant à ce que tous les ordres des gouvernements prennent des décisions éclairées, stratégiques et bien étayées.
Qu’on se comprenne bien, ce sont les provinces, les territoires et les municipalités qui profiteront de cette approche, puisqu’ils possèdent 98 % de l’ensemble des infrastructures publiques de base. C’est pourquoi Infrastructure Canada s’est associé à Statistique Canada pour mener le premier sondage national sur les infrastructures publiques de base afin de faire le bilan des biens publics et d’en évaluer la condition et le bon fonctionnement.
Cet inventaire aidera non seulement les dirigeants municipaux, provinciaux, territoriaux et fédéraux à déterminer la meilleure façon d'investir les fonds fédéraux en fonction de ce dont ils ont besoin et de ce qu'ils ont déjà, mais il permettra aussi de fournir des données de référence pour surveiller et évaluer l'incidence des investissements fédéraux dans le cadre du plan au fil du temps. En incluant dans notre plan différentes sources de financement visant des objectifs précis ainsi que différents mécanismes de financement, et en collaborant étroitement avec nos partenaires pour répondre à leurs besoins, nous obtenons des résultats pour les Canadiens.
Pour appuyer la politique du gouvernement du Canada sur l'ouverture et la transparence et pour fournir la meilleure information possible aux Canadiens, Infrastructure Canada, de concert avec d'autres partenaires, communique aux Canadiens les progrès réalisés et les résultats obtenus relativement à ses investissements grâce à diverses méthodes de production de rapports.
La publication du plan détaillé Investir dans le Canada, qui décrit clairement le cadre et les objectifs du plan, se trouve en ligne, sur le site Web d’Infrastructure Canada. Les Canadiens y trouveront également de l’information détaillée sur la mise en œuvre du plan, les progrès réalisés et les derniers fonds investis, ainsi qu’une carte en ligne indiquant l’emplacement des projets d’infrastructures dans leur collectivité.
Des renseignements détaillés sur les projets financés dans le cadre du plan Investir dans le Canada sont également fournis sur le portail des données ouvertes du gouvernement fédéral, communiqués dans divers médias traditionnels et médias sociaux, et publiés dans les rapports annuels sur les résultats ministériels de chaque ministère.
Enfin, Infrastructure Canada a aussi publié en mai 2019 son premier rapport d'étape annuel, qui fait le point sur la mise en œuvre du plan dans tous les ministères. Ce rapport est accessible sur le site Web du ministère, et nous continuerons à présenter aux Canadiens un rapport annuel transparent sur les progrès réalisés et les résultats du plan.
Le gouvernement du Canada est fier de ce qu'il a accompli au moyen du plan Investir dans le Canada et de la façon dont les investissements dans les infrastructures améliorent les collectivités dans l'ensemble du pays.
J'ai pris la parole à la Chambre aujourd'hui en réponse à une motion présentée par mon collègue le député de Mégantic—L'Érable. Dans sa motion, il a fait plusieurs déclarations dont je souhaite parler.
Mon collègue a commencé par citer le billet que le directeur parlementaire du budget a publié le 15 mars 2018 et qui dit ceci: « Le budget de 2018 présente un compte rendu incomplet des changements apportés au plan de 186,7 milliards de dollars de dépenses du gouvernement dans les infrastructures. »
Dans son rapport de mars 2018, le directeur parlementaire du budget a examiné les investissements de nombreux ministères dans les infrastructures et comparé les investissements déclarés par ces ministères aux dépenses prévues par le gouvernement du Canada pour cette période. Le directeur parlementaire du budget a demandé de l'information à un certain nombre de ministères et d'organismes au sujet de leurs dépenses en infrastructures.
Infrastructure Canada et les autres entités fédérales ont alors travaillé de près avec le Bureau du directeur parlementaire du budget dans le but de lui fournir des données à jour et des renseignements sur les résultats. Le directeur parlementaire du budget a publié un rapport à jour en août 2018.
On peut lire, dans la dernière version du rapport, que le gouvernement du Canada respecte sa promesse d’investir une somme historique de plus de 180 milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures publiques sur 12 ans, de faire croître l’économie et de créer des emplois pour les Canadiens.
À la lumière de l'analyse économique indépendante qu'il a menée, le directeur parlementaire du budget conclut que les investissements fédéraux faits dans le cadre du budget de 2016 ont contribué à stimuler l'activité économique et la création d'emplois pendant les deux premières années. Ces effets positifs ont continué pendant le reste de la durée des programmes.
Ajoutons qu'en juillet 2018, le gouverneur de la Banque du Canada a déclaré que l'économie tournait presque à plein régime et que le marché du travail était vigoureux. En fait, depuis l'arrivée du gouvernement libéral au pouvoir, le taux de chômage a chuté jusqu'à son niveau le plus bas en quatre décennies.
Je reviens à la motion du député de Mégantic—L'Érable. Il y indique que le directeur parlementaire du budget « a demandé le nouveau plan, mais il n’existe pas ». Au contraire, ce plan existe bel et bien, et tout le monde a accès aux renseignements à son sujet. Comme je l'ai dit, en avril 2018, le ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités de l'époque a publié sur le site d'Infrastructure Canada, à l'intention des médias et de la population, une publication décrivant tous les nouveaux programmes de financement qui font partie du plan, classés par ministère.
Rappelons que le rapport d'étape publié en mai 2019 se trouve aussi sur le site Web. Les gens qui consulteront la liste des programmes remarqueront peut-être que la mise en œuvre de certains d'entre eux s'appuie sur une entente bilatérale entre le gouvernement fédéral et les provinces et territoires. J'aimerais m'attarder un peu sur ce point.
Comme les députés le savent déjà, Infrastructure Canada est un partenaire financier fédéral pour les infrastructures publiques essentielles du Canada, et la plupart de ses programmes de financement sont exécutés en partenariat avec les provinces et les territoires. Les programmes de financement qui font partie du plan Investir dans le Canada ne diffèrent pas à cet égard. Dans le budget de 2016, Infrastructure Canada a mis sur pied deux programmes de financement, soit le Fonds pour l'eau potable et le traitement des eaux usées et le Fonds pour l'infrastructure de transport en commun. Pour ce faire, Infrastructure Canada a signé ses premiers accords bilatéraux en 2016 avec l'ensemble des provinces et des territoires, qui énonçaient les conditions, les obligations et les engagements de chaque partie. Ces accords précisaient clairement que le financement servirait à réparer et à remettre en état les infrastructures existantes.
De plus, on a demandé aux bénéficiaires du financement de rendre des comptes au gouvernement tous les six mois. Pour accorder le financement prévu dans le budget de 2017, Infrastructure Canada a signé de nouveaux accords bilatéraux avec les provinces et les territoires en 2018. Les critères relatifs aux sources de financement contenues dans les accords ont été mis à jour et les nouvelles exigences en matière de rapports ont été ajoutées.
Les critères de financement de ces nouveaux accords bilatéraux sont axés sur les résultats. Les demandes de projets reçues doivent démontrer comment les résultats escomptés seront obtenus, que ce soit l'obtention d'un meilleur accès à de l'eau potable, l'amélioration de l'efficacité énergétique des bâtiments ou encore le renforcement de la sécurité alimentaire dans les collectivités rurales et nordiques.
Les accords bilatéraux de 2018 prévoyaient aussi de nouvelles exigences en matière de production de rapports, dont un rapport provisoire semestriel détaillé. Le gouvernement du Canada se sert de ces rapports pour présenter aux Canadiens l'état d'avancement et les retombées des projets dans leur collectivité. On trouve sur le site d'Infrastructure Canada tous les détails pertinents sur les accords bilatéraux, y compris leurs résultats et les exigences en matière de production de rapports. J'invite les députés à en prendre connaissance.
Parce que nous collaborons étroitement avec les provinces, les territoires, les municipalités et nos partenaires autochtones, les investissements judicieux et stratégiques que nous faisons dans les infrastructures continueront à générer de bons emplois et à produire des résultats concrets partout au pays. Je suis fier du travail que le gouvernement accomplit pour assurer la croissance et la réussite des collectivités, maintenant et dans l'avenir. Nous nous réjouissons à l'idée de poursuivre dans cette voie en collaborant de manière fructueuse et respectueuse avec les députés de tous les partis, car nous sommes conscients qu'une foule de possibilités nous attendent encore.
Tous les jours, des Canadiens élaborent des idées et des technologies nouvelles qui rendent la vie meilleure pour les gens de toutes les collectivités. Par exemple, CarbonCure, une entreprise de la Nouvelle-Écosse, ma province d'origine, contribue à réduire l'empreinte carbonique de notre environnement bâti en élaborant du béton plus écologique. Il y a aussi LakeCity Plastics, une autre entreprise néo-écossaise, qui transforme des milliers de sacs de plastique en tables de pique-nique comme celles que nous avons récemment dévoilées au bord de l'eau, à Halifax.
Nos villes ont un brillant avenir devant elles, car les bâtisseurs au pays aident le Canada à grandir.
Par conséquent, j'aimerais proposer un amendement à la motion. Je propose: Que la motion soit modifiée par substitution, aux mots « étant donné que le directeur parlementaire du budget a indiqué le 15 mars 2018 que « le budget de 2018 présente un compte rendu incomplet des changements apportés au plan de 186,7 milliards de dollars de dépenses du gouvernement dans les infrastructures » et que le « DPB a demandé le nouveau plan, mais il n’existe pas », de ce qui suit: « étant donné que la Chambre reconnaît l’importance de faire des investissements judicieux qui améliorent la vie des Canadiens ».
Je suis heureux d'avoir pu prendre la parole à la Chambre aujourd'hui.
View Mark Gerretsen Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, it is an honour to rise today to speak to this motion, but before I do that, I would ask for your indulgence to mention the passing of an individual in my riding, Jack Armstrong, who passed away last week. Jack was an extremely dedicated individual who cared so much about politics, but was rarely partisan. He spent a lot of time volunteering on campaigns, but would just as likely volunteer on a Conservative campaign as he did for my Liberal campaigns on a number of occasions. Jack will truly be missed, as will everything he offered to my community. Indeed, I miss him a lot having had the opportunity to work so closely with him.
As we talk about this motion today, I will take the opportunity to pick up from where the parliamentary secretary left off. I appreciate his sharing his time with me. What we are seeing today with this opposition motion is a new approach from the opposition, and I really do respect and appreciate it.
We used to see motions that were drafted in such a way that we never even thought would pass. They usually started off with statements about the government being so horrible and the Prime Minister did this and that. That is the way opposition motions used to be presented over the last four years, but now we are seeing a new approach. Perhaps it is the minority government that is creating this sense of desire to be so diligent in how the Conservatives bring forward motions. Now we are seeing motions that actually contain substance because there is an opportunity that motions might actually pass. It is great that the opposition is now taking this new approach. Now we have the opportunity to debate substantive opposition motions. That is great.
To that end, I believe the objectives of this motion are perfectly in line with what is necessary for accountability and transparency. We need to have the kinds of reviews that the Auditor General is being asked to do in this particular motion because this is what gives Canadians the information they need to reflect on how the government is doing.
The problem that comes up, which the parliamentary secretary who spoke before me laid out very well, is when there is information put into the preamble that is, in my opinion, purposely inserted in the motion to create a scenario where the government or the governing party, in this case the Liberal Party, will not support it. The opposition is cherry-picking quotes from a report in March, which was subsequently updated and new information was provided. The report was updated to suggest that the requirements of the government were being met. Why would Conservatives even bother including a quote when they had an opportunity to quote a new report that came out later? I can only come to the conclusion that it was done intentionally to prevent a scenario where the government could vote in favour of the motion.
As a matter of fact, the Conservative member who asked the last question, and I apologize for forgetting his riding, specifically asked why the government is getting caught up in the preamble and who cares about the preamble. I could not agree more with him. As a former mayor, and I know the member for Mount Royal was as well, I can say that nobody cares about the preamble. The city clerk usually just takes everything after “Therefore, be it resolved” because that is the action item in it. That is what actually matters.
The Conservative member asked why the government is getting caught up in the preamble. That is an excellent question. Maybe he missed it earlier when we put forward an amendment to remove that part. If it had been removed, which would have been so easy to do, we would end up with a motion that everybody could support. It is not the direction, in particular everything that follows the word “That” in this motion, that we have a problem with; it is the fact that the preamble sets up a misleading scenario to suggest that after the Auditor General or the Parliamentary Budget Officer made the report in March, that was the end of it, that it ended there. However, that is not the case. More followed.
In August, an additional report was tabled that said something quite different. At that time, the Parliamentary Budget Officer conducted an independent economic analysis and concluded that the federal investments made under phase one helped grow the economy and create jobs over the first two years.
Cherry-picking this information is to the benefit of nobody really because it does not matter. What is important is that we make sure we can look beyond this unnecessary information and unnecessary cherry-picking. The opposition cherry-picked at the beginning of that motion and I am clearly doing it now with another part of that. It does not matter, so why are we getting all caught up in this?
As we talk about infrastructure projects, I am thrilled to talk about the amount that is actually being invested throughout Canada. This fund sets aside $180 billion over a 12-year period. As we know right now, there are at least 52,000 projects that have started or are under way.
Madam Speaker, I know you will be cutting me off here. I look forward to continuing after question period.
Madame la Présidente, ce sera un honneur pour moi de parler aujourd'hui de cette motion, mais avant toute chose, je vous demande d'être indulgente un instant, car j'aimerais saluer la mémoire d'un homme de ma circonscription, Jack Armstrong, qui s'est éteint la semaine dernière. Jack était un homme extrêmement dévoué qui s'intéressait de très près à la politique, mais rarement de façon partisane. Il a fait énormément de bénévolat pour une campagne électorale ou une autre, quelques fois pour les conservateurs, mais quelques fois aussi pour les libéraux, dont moi-même. Jack a laissé sa marque dans la collectivité, et il nous manquera très sincèrement. Il me manque à moi, en tout cas, car j'ai eu la chance de le côtoyer de près.
Pour en revenir à la motion d'aujourd'hui, j'aimerais reprendre là où le secrétaire parlementaire s'est arrêté. Je le remercie d'ailleurs d'avoir partagé son temps de parole avec moi. Avec la motion d'aujourd'hui, nous assistons à une nouvelle façon de faire de la part de l'opposition, et je dois dire qu'elle a tout mon respect, alors bravo.
La plupart du temps, les motions de l'opposition étaient rédigées de telle sorte que tout le monde savait d'avance qu'elles ne seraient jamais adoptées. Elles commençaient généralement par souligner à quel point le gouvernement était horrible avant de reprocher ceci et cela au premier ministre. C'est du moins ainsi que les choses se sont passées durant quatre ans, car nous assistons aujourd'hui à un changement de cap. Peut-être est-ce parce que nous sommes en situation minoritaire que les conservateurs sont aussi enclins à la collaboration? Toujours est-il que, maintenant que les motions de l'opposition ont toutes les chances d'être adoptées, on y trouve réellement de quoi se mettre sous la dent. Je suis ravi que l'opposition ait choisi cette approche, car nous avons désormais l'occasion de débattre de questions de fond. C'est génial.
Dans cette optique, je crois que les objectifs de la motion cadrent parfaitement avec les besoins en matière de reddition de comptes et de transparence. La motion demande au vérificateur général de procéder à une vérification, et de telles vérifications sont nécessaires parce qu'elles donnent aux Canadiens l'information dont ils ont besoin pour se faire une idée de la performance du gouvernement.
Le hic dans la motion, comme l'a si bien expliqué le secrétaire parlementaire qui a pris la parole avant moi, est son préambule qui, à mon avis, a été intentionnellement inséré à la motion pour que le parti au pouvoir — en l'occurrence, le Parti libéral — n'appuie pas cette dernière. L'opposition a cité les éléments qui lui plaisent dans un rapport publié en mars, qui a été ensuite mis à jour à la lumière de nouveaux renseignements. Le rapport mis à jour indique que le gouvernement respecte maintenant les exigences. Pourquoi les conservateurs ont-ils pris la peine d'inclure une citation de l'ancien rapport quand ils auraient pu citer un rapport publié plus tard? Je peux seulement en conclure que cela a été fait intentionnellement pour empêcher le gouvernement de voter en faveur de cette motion.
Le fait est que le député conservateur qui a posé la dernière question — et je m'excuse d'avoir oublié le nom de sa circonscription — a expressément demandé pourquoi le gouvernement bloque sur le préambule. Le préambule, on s'en moque. Je suis on ne peut plus d'accord avec lui. En tant qu'ancien maire — et je sais que le député de Mont-Royal a aussi occupé cette fonction —, je peux dire que personne ne se soucie du préambule. Le greffier municipal se contente généralement de ce qui vient après les mots « il est donc résolu que » parce que c'est ce qui motive le débat. C'est ce qui compte, en fait.
Le député conservateur a demandé pourquoi le gouvernement ne veut pas laisser tomber la discussion sur le préambule, et c'est une excellente question. Peut-être n'a-t-il pas fait attention au fait qu'un peu plus tôt, nous avons proposé un amendement visant à supprimer cette partie. Si elle avait été supprimée, ce qui aurait été facile à faire, nous nous serions retrouvés avec une motion que tout le monde pouvait appuyer. Ce n'est pas la directive, notamment tout ce qui suit le mot « Que », qui nous pose problème dans cette motion. Ce qui nous pose problème, c'est le fait que le préambule laisse croire que, une fois que le vérificateur général ou le directeur parlementaire du budget a présenté son rapport en mars, c'était la fin de l'histoire. C'était tout. Cependant, c'est faux. Il y a eu une suite.
En août, on a déposé un rapport supplémentaire qui précisait quelque chose de bien différent. À ce moment-là, le directeur parlementaire du budget a effectué une analyse économique indépendante et a conclu que les investissements fédéraux réalisés pendant la première étape du projet avaient contribué à stimuler l'économie et à créer des emplois au cours des deux premières années.
Le fait de ne retenir que ce qui nous plaît dans l'information ne profite à personne parce que ce n'est pas important. Ce qui est important, c'est de veiller à ce que nous ne nous perdions pas dans les détails inutiles. Les députés de l'opposition ont choisi de parler de détails inutiles lorsque la motion a été présentée, et c'est exactement ce que je suis en train de faire maintenant. Tout cela est sans importance. Pourquoi alors nous retrouvons-nous dans ce genre de situation?
En ce qui concerne les projets d'infrastructure, je suis ravi de parler de la somme qui sera déboursée dans l'ensemble du Canada. Le fonds prévoit 180 milliards de dollars sur 12 ans. À notre connaissance, au moins 52 000 projets ont été entamés ou sont en cours.
Madame la Présidente, je sais que vous devez m'interrompre, mais je me réjouis à la perspective de poursuivre mon intervention après la période des questions.
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
2020-01-28 15:33 [p.592]
Mr. Speaker, it is with great interest that I rise in the House today to speak to this important motion put together and introduced by my colleague from Mégantic—L'Érable, a motion calling for the Auditor General of Canada to immediately proceed with an audit regarding the government's investing in Canada plan announced back in 2016.
We all know that government investments in infrastructure are a very important part of the success of the economic development in our country, provinces and urban and rural communities. Without these investments, it is impossible to ensure strong, long-term economic development in our communities because this is directly linked to their infrastructure needs.
If a rural riding like mine has trouble developing and modernizing, residents will leave its cities, which will have a direct impact on the local economy and broaden the tax base considerably, thereby leaving the remaining population in a more vulnerable position.
I would like to remind our constituents that in 2015, the future Prime Minister announced that he was in favour of imposing modest deficit on Canadians, very temporary deficits, with the aim of significantly increasing his infrastructure spending from coast to coast to coast, which would boost our Canadian internal economy.
We have known for the last few years that this is totally false and that our financial situation is precarious and fragile. The former Conservative government made significant investments in this area and it is therefore difficult to understand the current situation. The Liberal government had announced in 2016 and 2017 its intention to spend $186.7 billion over 12 years on infrastructure projects. I will say that number again, because every time I do it kind of throws me off because it is such a large number: $186.7 billion over 12 years.
Since this announcement, infrastructure spending has been subject to delays. Moreover, it has not actually been as high as the number that was first announced. Today I cannot explain to my constituents, the mayors, the businesses or the entrepreneurs why we are dealing with such a disproportionate deficit from the Liberal government and why the funds planned for many of our infrastructure projects are still on ice, delayed, unanswered or simply refused. I also cannot explain to them how a government that continues to boast that the Canadian economy is doing well is unable to finance its needed and urgent infrastructure projects to create jobs, contribute to economic development and ensure the survival of rural communities, particularly as job creation would significantly reduce the number of citizens in rural regions departing for larger urban centres.
In 2020, the situation is clear. The only record that the Liberals have in terms of infrastructure is their failure. Already in 2017 we learned from the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberals had barely spent half of the planned infrastructure investments. The following year, in 2018, facing this complete irresponsible and unacceptable situation, the Parliamentary Budget Officer asked for the Liberal infrastructure plan in order to have a better understanding of the situation and quickly realized that the plan did not even exist.
That is not all. A year later, in 2019, the Parliamentary Budget Officer, in order to help us better understand this disaster, asked for something very simple, something basic that any responsible and respectful government of hard-working taxpayers deserve to have in Canada: a list of all specific project commitments under the investing in Canada plan. However, the Liberal government has not been able to provide that data.
Again, this is totally unacceptable and irresponsible. Taxpayers in my riding, across Atlantic Canada and across the country demand the right to have a clear answer about how their money is being spent. Conservatives believe that the Auditor General of Canada must immediately investigate the matter and conduct an in-depth audit of the government's investing in Canada plan.
Given the out-of-control deficits, with more on the horizon, minimal investment in communities, job losses, dearth of job creation, lack of accountability and lack of transparency, there is clearly nothing positive coming our way under the Liberals.
Back at home in my beautiful riding of West Nova, there is an urgent need for infrastructure funding for our local projects. Our local economy depends on it, as I said earlier. If we want to preserve our achievements, continue to develop our markets, share our expertise and attract new investors, it is essential that our infrastructure projects get their funding.
West Nova has been waiting for years for certain pieces of infrastructure. Some, I admit, require partnership with other levels of government, which takes longer to negotiate. Some are completely the responsibility of the federal government. Roads and bridges, especially along the 100-series highways, part of the Trans-Canada system, need partnership, and so far have seen nothing.
There are a couple of interchanges that have been announced, due to their current “unsafe” listing, that need to be installed. Far too many accidents and deaths are occurring, yet before the election, a new interchange a couple of hundred kilometres away from my riding, up the highway in the South Shore riding, was announced. This underlines the government's planning process, to announce projects that are politically expedient and not announce them in other areas.
I am not saying that the Bridgewater intersection is not important, but one of the intersections in West Nova was identified as the third most dangerous interchange in Nova Scotia. You would think it would have been “safety first” when we announced these projects, but I guess not.
Speaking of safety and the effects of sea level rise, there are several instances where roads that never flooded are now flooding at every high tide. The Province of Nova Scotia applied for climate change mitigation funding, a part of this project, but it seems that these smaller projects are falling off the table. I need to see work done. My constituents need to see work done on the Rocco Point Road and many others, so that children can get to school, people can get to work and seniors can get to their doctor's appointments. God forbid there might be an emergency when there is one of these high tides.
I move now to Internet and cellphone service. This is a requirement of this century, but many parts of our riding still have poor or no service. It requires support from all levels of government to help build out these large infrastructures. The Nova Scotia government has money available. The municipalities are ready to support projects that make sense, but it seems that several of these projects have been turned down, making organizations and municipalities go back to the drawing board.
I am all for cheaper rates as a goal that has been put forward by the Liberal government; it is one that I support. Let us not forget that many Canadians do not have access to good Internet service or cellular service. I worry that the government pushing back in this respect is pushing back on the very companies that they want to partner with to provide these kinds of infrastructures.
Finally, West Nova probably has the highest seafood landings in all Canada, and the fishers rely on government-owned infrastructure to bring their catches in safely. These ports, in many cases, are anything but safe. Some of them are actually falling into the water. Due to chronic underfunding of these structures over the years, I estimate they will require almost $500 million of investment. Some fall under DFO and small craft harbours, like Port Maitland, East Pubnico and Pubnico, but others, like Digby, due to the failed divestiture program of the Chrétien Liberals, fall under this larger invisible program. Digby has become the safe harbour on the eastern side on the Bay of Fundy.
We are responsible to provide safe harbour for those boats and fishers who will find themselves in unsafe situations due to weather. We can see Digby's usage swell to close to 135 vessels, which is effectively almost double the capacity of that port. They need help. The fishery is important, and it is time we actually paid attention to it.
Today, in Ottawa, I am working hard to ensure that West Nova's infrastructure projects get their fair share of funding so they can be completed.
When I was a provincial MLA, I always did everything in my power to defend Nova Scotia's interests. Until Conservatives form the next government, I want to ensure that the current Liberal government finally provides the answers to all Canadian taxpayers that they are entitled to receive.
Monsieur le Président, c'est avec beaucoup d'intérêt que je prends la parole aujourd'hui à la Chambre au sujet de l'importante motion présentée par mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable. Cette motion demande au vérificateur général du Canada de procéder immédiatement à une vérification du plan gouvernemental Investir dans le Canada, qui avait été annoncé en 2016.
Nous savons tous que les investissements du gouvernement dans les infrastructures contribuent grandement à l'essor économique du pays, des provinces et des collectivités urbaines et rurales. Sans ces investissements, il est impossible d'assurer un développement économique solide à long terme dans nos collectivités parce que ce développement est directement lié à leurs besoins en infrastructures.
Si une circonscription rurale comme la mienne a de la difficulté à se développer et à se moderniser, ses résidants quitteront ses villes, ce qui causera un impact direct sur son économie locale et augmentera considérablement son assiette fiscale, rendant ainsi la population restante plus vulnérable.
J'aimerais rappeler aux électeurs que, en 2015, le futur premier ministre a annoncé qu'il souhaitait imposer aux Canadiens un modeste déficit, des déficits temporaires, dans le but d'accroître considérablement les dépenses d'infrastructure d'un bout à l'autre du pays, ce qui stimulerait notre économie nationale.
Nous savons depuis quelques années que cette annonce était complètement fausse, et que nous nous trouvons dans une situation financière précaire et fragile. L'ancien gouvernement conservateur a investi considérablement dans ce domaine. Il est donc difficile de comprendre comment nous en sommes parvenus là. Pourtant, en 2016-2017, le gouvernement libéral avait annoncé son intention de consacrer 186,7 milliards de dollars sur 12 ans à des projets d'infrastructure. Je vais répéter cette somme parce que, chaque fois que je le fais, je suis impressionné par son énormité: 186,7 milliards de dollars sur 12 ans.
Depuis cette annonce, les dépenses en matière d'infrastructures ont fait l'objet de retards. De plus, le montant des dépenses n'est pas aussi élevé que ce qui avait été annoncé. Actuellement, je n'arrive pas à expliquer aux gens, aux maires, aux entreprises ou aux entrepreneurs de ma circonscription pourquoi le gouvernement libéral accumule un déficit aussi disproportionné et pourquoi un si grand nombre de projets voient leur financement mis en suspens, retardé, ignoré ou tout simplement refusé. Je n'arrive pas non plus à expliquer pourquoi un gouvernement qui ne cesse de dire que l'économie se porte bien est incapable de financer des projets d'infrastructure fort nécessaires et urgents, qui généreraient des emplois, stimuleraient le développement économique et assureraient la survie de collectivités rurales, car la création d'emplois réduirait considérablement l'exode d'habitants des régions rurales vers de grands centres urbains.
En 2020, la situation est claire. Le bilan des libéraux en matière d'infrastructures se résume à un échec. Déjà en 2017, le directeur parlementaire du budget rapportait que les libéraux avaient à peine dépensé la moitié des investissements prévus pour les infrastructures. L'année suivante, en 2018, constatant le manque inacceptable de responsabilité, le directeur parlementaire du budget a réclamé le plan d'infrastructure des libéraux afin de mieux comprendre la situation et il s'est rendu compte rapidement que ce plan n'existait pas.
Ce n'est pas tout. Un an plus tard, en 2019, le Bureau du directeur parlementaire du budget a demandé, pour nous aider à mieux comprendre ce désastre, quelque chose de très simple, de fondamental: une liste de tous les projets relevant du plan Investir au Canada. Les contribuables qui travaillent dur méritent cela, et c'est ce qu'on attend de tout gouvernement responsable et respectueux. Or, le gouvernement libéral n'a pas été en mesure de fournir ces données.
C'est encore une fois tout à fait inacceptable et irresponsable. Les contribuables de ma circonscription, du Canada atlantique et de tout le pays veulent savoir exactement comment leur argent est dépensé. Les conservateurs estiment que le vérificateur général du Canada doit enquêter séance tenante et procéder à un audit approfondi du plan Investir au Canada du gouvernement.
Étant donné des déficits hors de contrôle — et d'autres, déjà prévus —, le peu d'investissements dans les communautés, les pertes d'emploi, l'absence de création d'emplois, le manque de responsabilisation et encore moins de transparence, il est clair qu'il n'y a rien de positif à l'horizon sous les libéraux.
Dans mon coin de pays, la magnifique circonscription de Nova-Ouest, les besoins en matière d'investissement dans les projets d'infrastructure locaux sont pressants. L'économie locale en dépend, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt. Pour préserver nos réalisations, continuer à développer nos marchés, partager notre expertise et attirer de nouveaux investisseurs, il est essentiel que nos projets d'infrastructure obtiennent du financement.
Voilà des années que l'on attend la construction de certaines infrastructures dans Nova-Ouest. Il est vrai que certains projets nécessitent un partenariat avec d'autres ordres de gouvernement, ce qui entraîne des négociations plus longues. D'autres projets relèvent entièrement du gouvernement fédéral. Les routes et les ponts, surtout à proximité des autoroutes de la série 100, qui font partie du réseau transcanadien, doivent s'appuyer sur un partenariat. Il n'y a eu aucun progrès jusqu'à maintenant.
Quelques échangeurs ont fait l'objet d'annonces parce qu'ils sont considérés comme « dangereux », ayant causé beaucoup trop d'accidents et de morts. Or, avant les élections, on a annoncé la construction d'un nouvel échangeur à quelques centaines de kilomètres de ma circonscription, le long de l'autoroute dans la circonscription de South Shore. Voilà qui en dit long sur le processus de planification du gouvernement: annoncer les projets qui sont politiquement rentables au détriment de ceux d'autres régions.
Je ne dis pas que l'intersection Bridgewater n'est pas importante. Or, une intersection dans Nova-Ouest a été classée troisième parmi les intersections les plus dangereuses de la Nouvelle-Écosse. On pourrait croire que l'annonce des projets de ce genre s'appuierait d'abord et avant tout sur la sécurité, mais il semble que non.
Puisqu'on parle de sécurité et des effets de l'élévation du niveau de la mer, nombre de routes qui n'étaient jamais inondées auparavant le sont maintenant à chaque marée haute. La Nouvelle-Écosse a demandé des fonds dans le cadre du programme d'adaptation aux effets des changements climatiques, mais on dirait que ces projets plus modestes sont mis de côté. Je veux que les travaux avancent. Les gens de ma circonscription veulent que les travaux avancent sur la route Rocco Point et à bien d'autres endroits afin que les enfants puissent aller à l'école, que les gens puissent aller au travail et que les aînés puissent se rendre à leur rendez-vous médical. Il ne faudrait surtout pas qu'une urgence se produise pendant la marée haute.
Je vais maintenant parler des services d'Internet et de téléphonie cellulaire. Ce sont des services essentiels au XXIe siècle, mais ces services sont encore de piètre qualité ou inexistants dans bien des secteurs de ma circonscription. Il faut de l'aide de tous les ordres de gouvernement pour bâtir ces grandes infrastructures. Le gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Écosse a des ressources financières à sa disposition. Les municipalités sont prêtes à appuyer des projets appropriés, mais on dirait que nombre de ces projets ont été rejetés, ce qui oblige les organisations et les municipalités à retourner à la case départ.
J'appuie l'objectif du gouvernement libéral, soit celui d'avoir des tarifs plus économiques. N'oublions pas que de nombreux Canadiens n'ont pas accès à un réseau Internet ou cellulaire de qualité. J'ai bien peur que l'hésitation du gouvernement dans ce dossier fasse reculer les entreprises avec lesquelles il souhaite collaborer pour fournir les infrastructures nécessaires aux Canadiens.
Enfin, le port de Nova-Ouest est sûrement celui où il y a le plus grand nombre de débarquements de fruits de mer au Canada, et les pêcheurs dépendent des infrastructures gouvernementales pour rapporter leurs prises de manière sécuritaire. Dans la plupart des cas, ces ports sont tout sauf sécuritaires. Certains d'entre eux s'enfoncent même sous l'eau. Comme ces infrastructures souffrent d'un sous-financement chronique depuis bien des années, j'estime qu'il faudra leur consacrer près de 500 millions de dollars. Certains ports relèvent du ministère des Pêches et des Océans et des ports pour petits bateaux, comme Port Maitland, East Pubnico et Pubnico, mais d'autres aussi, comme Digby, sont visés par le programme de cession plus vaste et invisible des libéraux de Chrétien. Digby est devenu le port le plus sécuritaire de la rive est de la baie de Fundy.
Nous avons la responsabilité de fournir un port où les navires et les pêcheurs peuvent s'amarrer et se réfugier lorsqu'ils se trouvent dans des situations précaires en raison de la météo. La fréquentation du port de Digby a presque doublé et près de 135 navires s'y abritent désormais. On a besoin d'aide. Cette pêcherie est importante, et il est temps que nous l'aidions.
Aujourd'hui, à Ottawa, je continue de travailler fort pour m'assurer que les projets en infrastructure à Nova-Ouest reçoivent leur juste part de fonds pour être réalisés.
Lorsque j'étais député provincial, j'ai toujours tout fait en mon pouvoir pour défendre les intérêts de la Nouvelle-Écosse. D'ici à ce que les conservateurs forment le prochain gouvernement, je tiens à m'assurer que le gouvernement libéral actuel fournit enfin aux contribuables canadiens les réponses auxquelles ils ont droit.
View James Cumming Profile
CPC (AB)
View James Cumming Profile
2020-01-28 16:19 [p.600]
Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the member for Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon.
I rise today on the opposition day motion regarding this mind-boggling infrastructure spending debacle that the Liberal government has gotten itself into.
It is a very simple motion that would allow the Auditor General to determine whether “the government’s Investing in Canada Plan, including, but not be limited to, verifying whether the plan lives up to its stated goals and promises; and that the Auditor General of Canada report his findings to the House no later than one year following the adoption of this motion.”
The program that the Liberals had come up with was supposed to do a few things. It was going to have these tiny deficits that would improve economic growth. They said that the program would improve productivity and suggested it would create a lower-carbon environment. All of those things are measurables and should have outcomes that we can look at. There is no accountability and there are no measurables.
Therefore, this is not about the spending necessarily, but the principles of the program. It is about no deliverables, no follow-up, no transparency, no economic growth and no tracking of productivity, all the things the Liberals promised to do within the program. It is important for taxpayers to see they are getting value for the dollar.
The way the Liberals have crafted this program, there are over 50 individual programs scattered over 32 departments. It is like an octopus across government, with very serious gaps. It is like Swiss cheese. It is really difficult for anybody to determine where the spending is and whether we are getting value for the spending.
Looking at this from my business background, if I had a strategic plan that was to make some investments and spend some money, I would certainly have measurables and outcomes and I would be able to report back to the shareholders that we were getting the things we said we were going to invest in. This, according to the PBO, is sadly lacking.
From the taxpaying end, the funding recipients are not being held accountable. When the cash is being put out, it should certainly be incumbent upon the grantees to report back to government. We should be able to see results from them and they seem to be amiss on this.
Most of the projects in place, according to the PBO, have either been behind schedule in delivery or have not even been started, and there should be some accountability around that. This is why the Conservatives are asking the Auditor General to look at this use of funds and ensure we are getting these deliveries.
One of the reasons the deliveries are behind schedule is because the government has gone ahead with funding portions before the provincial governments have been able to come up with all the money. There seems to be a lack of coordination, another thing on which the Auditor General could report back. Sometimes provinces are not even contributing to shared projects and shared costs because the feds are not collaborating in advance.
Therefore, there are a lot of flaws and problems within the program, and we are here to protect taxpayer money. We are here to ensure there is accountability for any kind of investment spent and we get the results we expect.
On the productivity front, all the spending was supposed to enable or increase it; However, in good old Liberal fashion, the government has not been able to tell us if it has been able to increase productivity, and that was one of the main goals of the program. Therefore, some kinds of measures should be in place to ensure we get productivity. In fact, on the spending side, only 3% goes toward trade and transportation, which strikes me as a big productivity issue in the country, and we are not investing in it.
We seem to get a lot of answers that are predominantly word soup and we do not really get the hard answers for which we are looking.
On failed spending, the PBO has shown that the Liberals have failed even to get their own infrastructure money out the door and that infrastructure money lapses 60% per year for the first two years. One cannot force-feed the infrastructure with potential amounts of money. These projects have to be well thought out and designed so we get the outcomes on productivity and growth. We certainly are not seeing that today.
The truth is that nobody really knows what is being spent. This business of spreading it out over a large area into a bunch of different programs and departments makes me think it is like a shell game that we would see at the circus: Where is the ball? We never know where the ball is. That is what this looks like. We are having a hard time finding the truth.
The PBO analysis also showed that despite all of the promises and spending, there was no annual increase in infrastructure in Canada. Here is a quote: “Never has a politician boasted so loudly and spent so much to achieve so little.” That was Andrew Scheer. Just 3% of spending is designated for trade- and efficiency-enhancing infrastructure that would increase productivity and GDP.
All in all, the reason we want the Auditor General to get involved is that there is a lack of transparency. The PBO asked some very specific questions about very specific projects and could not get any answers. They said it was a secret, so the projects could not be divulged.
It strikes me that if we really want to make improving the economy and dealing with productivity our goals, then no one should have an issue with a motion like this. It is just good governance to get the Auditor General involved. It is not uncommon to ask for something like this, and it is worthy in this particular case. The motion certainly should have the support of all parties.
I fail to understand why anyone would have difficulty with asking the Auditor General to review this entire program to make sure that the core fundamentals are fulfilled. The core fundamentals that the government said it wanted to be accountable for were productivity, an increase in GDP and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. It is not too much to ask the Auditor General to look at that and report back to the House in a timely fashion. It would be in the best interests of taxpayers. That is why we are here. We need to make sure that taxpayers get the answers they deserve in a timely fashion.
Monsieur le Président, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon.
J'interviens aujourd'hui dans le cadre de la motion de l'opposition au sujet de cet hallucinant fiasco des dépenses en infrastructures dans lequel le gouvernement libéral s'est empêtré.
Il s'agit d'une motion très simple qui permettrait au vérificateur général de déterminer si le « plan gouvernemental Investir dans le Canada, y compris, mais sans s'y limiter, une vérification permettant de déterminer si les objectifs et promesses liés au plan se sont concrétisés; et que le vérificateur général du Canada fasse rapport de ses constatations à la Chambre au plus tard un an après l’adoption de la présente motion. »
Le programme mis sur pied par les libéraux était censé apporter certains résultats. Ce programme allait créer de minuscules déficits pour améliorer notre niveau de croissance économique. Les libéraux ont prétendu que ce programme allait augmenter la productivité et créer un environnement moins pollué par le carbone. Tous ces éléments sont mesurables et devraient conduire à des résultats observables. Pourtant, il n'y a eu aucune reddition de comptes, et aucun élément n'a été mesuré.
Il n'est donc pas nécessairement question des dépenses, mais des principes mêmes du programme. Le problème, c'est l'absence de résultats, de suivi — y compris de la productivité —, de transparence, et de croissance économique, pourtant tous des éléments dont les libéraux ont promis de s'occuper dans le cadre du programme. Il est important que les contribuables voient qu'ils en ont pour leur argent.
Les libéraux ont conçu ce programme de sorte qu'il compte plus de 50 programmes répartis entre 32 ministères. On peut le voir comme une pieuvre qui s'étend sur l'ensemble du gouvernement, et il comporte des lacunes criantes. Il est un véritable labyrinthe. Il est incroyablement difficile pour quiconque de déterminer où l'argent est dépensé et de savoir si nous obtenons une juste valeur en contrepartie.
Venant du monde des affaires, je peux dire que si l'on me demandait de suivre un plan stratégique qui exigeait de réaliser des investissements et d'engager des dépenses, je m'assurerais certainement d'avoir des jalons et des résultats concrets pour être en mesure de confirmer aux actionnaires que nous obtenions bel et bien ce pour quoi nous avions dit que nous allions investir. Selon le directeur parlementaire du budget, ces genres de renseignements font ici cruellement défaut.
Les gens qui reçoivent de l'argent des contribuables ne sont pas tenus de rendre des comptes. Quand des fonds sont versés, il devrait certainement incomber aux bénéficiaires de rendre des comptes au gouvernement. Nous devrions être en mesure de voir les résultats, mais cela ne semble pas être le cas.
Selon le directeur parlementaire du budget, la plupart des projets en place sont en retard ou n'ont même pas commencé. Il y a donc lieu de rendre des comptes. Voilà pourquoi les conservateurs demandent au vérificateur général d'examiner l'utilisation des fonds et de s'assurer que les projets se concrétisent.
L'une des raisons pour lesquelles les projets sont en retard est que le gouvernement a octroyé une partie des fonds avant que les gouvernements provinciaux ne soient en mesure de réunir leur part des fonds. Il semble y avoir un manque de coordination, un autre point sur lequel le vérificateur général pourrait faire rapport. Il arrive que les provinces ne contribuent même pas aux projets communs et aux coûts partagés parce que le gouvernement fédéral n'affecte pas les fonds assez tôt.
Le programme comporte donc beaucoup de lacunes et de problèmes, et nous sommes là pour protéger l'argent des contribuables. Nous sommes là pour nous assurer que l'on rende compte de tout montant dépensé et que nous obtenions les résultats escomptés.
Pour ce qui est de la productivité, toutes les dépenses étaient censées la favoriser ou l'accroître. Toutefois, à la bonne vieille façon libérale, le gouvernement n'a pu nous dire s'il avait pu accroître la productivité. Or, c'était l'un des principaux objectifs du programme. Par conséquent, il devrait y avoir certaines formes de mesures pour garantir la productivité. En ce qui a trait aux dépenses, seulement 3 % visent les secteurs du commerce et des transports, où, à mon avis, il y a un gros problème de productivité dans notre pays, et nous n'investissons pas dans ces secteurs.
Il semble que beaucoup des réponses qu'on nous donne ne sont que du blabla, et nous n'obtenons pas les réponses précises que nous cherchons à obtenir.
Le directeur parlementaire du budget a montré que les libéraux n'ont même pas réussi à utiliser les fonds qu'ils destinaient aux infrastructures et que 60 % de ces fonds étaient restés inutilisés pendant les deux premières années. On ne peut forcer la réalisation de projets d'infrastructure simplement en offrant des fonds potentiels. Ces projets doivent être réfléchis et conçus de manière à se traduire par la productivité et la croissance voulues. Ce n'est certainement pas ce que nous voyons en ce moment.
La vérité, c'est que personne ne sait réellement où va l'argent. Sa répartition dans plusieurs programmes et ministères me fait penser à un tour de passe-passe que l'on verrait au cirque. Sous quel verre est la balle? Nous ne savons jamais où elle est. C'est difficile de connaître la vérité.
L'analyse du directeur parlementaire du budget a également démontré que malgré toutes les promesses et les dépenses, il n'y a eu aucune augmentation des dépenses annuelles dans les projets d'infrastructure au Canada. Comme l'a dit Andrew Scheer, « Il s'agit du premier politicien à se vanter si fort et à dépenser autant pour en accomplir si peu. » Seulement 3 % des dépenses sont destinées aux infrastructures qui permettront d'accroître l'efficacité et le commerce dans le but d'augmenter la productivité et le PIB.
Somme toute, nous voulons que le vérificateur général intervienne parce qu'il y a un manque de transparence. Le directeur parlementaire du budget a posé des questions très précises à propos de projets très précis et n'a pas reçu de réponse. Ils ont dit que l'information sur les projets ne pouvait pas être divulguée parce qu'elle était secrète.
Il me semble qu'une telle motion ne devrait poser problème à personne si nous voulons réellement améliorer l'économie et augmenter la productivité. Demander l'intervention du vérificateur général n'est qu'une question de bonne gouvernance. Il n'est pas rare qu'une telle demande soit faite, et elle est valable en l'occurrence. La motion devrait assurément bénéficier de l'appui de tous les partis.
Je ne comprends pas pourquoi quiconque aurait des réserves à l'idée de demander au vérificateur général d'examiner l'ensemble du programme pour veiller au respect des objectifs fondamentaux fixés par le gouvernement, à savoir l'amélioration de la productivité, une hausse du PIB et une réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Il n'est pas exagéré de demander au vérificateur général d'examiner le programme et de faire rapport à la Chambre en temps opportun. Ce serait dans l'intérêt des contribuables. C'est pourquoi nous sommes ici. Nous devons faire en sorte que les contribuables obtiennent les réponses qu'ils méritent rapidement.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2020-01-28 18:01 [p.614]
Madam Speaker, I would like to put things into perspective. The City of Winnipeg recently released an infrastructure program that has established priorities, and I believe somewhere in the neighbourhood of 45 priorities were established. When we take a look at the cost of those 45 projects, it is well over $5.5 billion. That is just 45 projects. If one reads through the projects, one would see that they do not include many of the community streets and neighbourhoods that I represent, or that other members of Parliament represent throughout the city of Winnipeg. It is virtually an endless pit when it comes to just how much money we could be spending on fixing roads, back lanes, community structures and so forth.
If one wants to get a sense of it, one can take a look at this. The city of Winnipeg is not the only community that publishes documents that illustrate how the spending of infrastructure dollars is prioritized. Winnipeg is one of many cities in Canada, with a population of 700,000. One can only imagine the demands for infrastructure in all regions of our country, whether urban or rural.
When I was in opposition a number of years ago, I challenged the Harper government to seriously look at investing nationally in infrastructure. I pointed out the types of deficits of infrastructure in the city of Winnipeg. I believe that back then I even underestimated it. This is nothing new. It has been happening now for many years. The difference is that back in 2015 there was one political party that was campaigning saying that it wanted to invest in Canada. Liberals wanted to invest in Canada's infrastructure. This is something that urban and rural municipalities and many different stakeholders wanted to hear. For so many years, the Harper government was starving the investments in infrastructure and adding to the infrastructure deficit.
When Liberals took the reins of government back in 2015, no one in Canada was surprised that we came out with a record number of commitments toward building Canada's infrastructure. This was virtually universally applied in all the different regions of our country. Back then, there were Conservatives and New Democrats who were more focused on balancing the budget, not realizing that investing in infrastructure builds the economy, and that building the economy helps the larger picture, including revenue coming back to the government. We are the only party that was committed to really investing in infrastructure.
The motion brought forward by the official opposition makes reference to the Parliamentary Budget Officer. I have often made reference to the Parliamentary Budget Officer. In the Liberal caucus, we have a deep respect for the office, and we have consistently had that respect, contrary to the official opposition.
On March 15, the PBO posted, “Budget 2018 provides an incomplete account of the changes to the Government’s $186.7 billion infrastructure spending plan.” That was part of the concern. Let us take a look at the motion. What opposition members are doing is trying to mislead Canadians through motions like this one. They do not make reference to the fact that the Parliamentary Budget Officer met with the different departments after it was explained to the departments that we needed to be able to provide additional information. In August, another report was released, which opposition members do not make reference to.
The report stated that the Parliamentary Budget Officer confirmed that the original report showed we were delivering exactly what we said we would. The Parliamentary Budget Office was doing its job, as it should, and we were doing our job, as we should. When we told Canadians that we were prepared to commit to infrastructure dollars, we did that.
I listened to the debate, and it has been relatively interesting. Many members on the opposition benches have been saying that more money should be spent on infrastructure. They cite projects. The opposition has come a long way. Now it seems that the members, if not directly are indirectly supporting what we promised to do in 2015. We are now delivering on that. Now they are on side with the fact that we should be investing in Canada's infrastructure.
The members talk a lot about the process. I would like to go over the process a little.
I pointed out the City of Winnipeg plan. It is in a great position, from a local perspective. When people complain about potholes, or streets or community facilities, they contact the city. The city has a limited tax base, through property tax and a few other sources, to generate revenue. If it were left up to the city or the municipal governments, that overall infrastructure deficit would continue to grow. Provincial governments of all political stripes have recognized that, and so has the national government.
In the last four or five years, we have seen a national government that truly cares about the infrastructure. We have actually done two things. Not only have we allocated record amounts of money for infrastructure, but looking at the last budget we presented, we doubled down on the gas tax for that budget year. That meant tens of millions of more dollars for the City of Winnipeg to do some of the more common things, such as fixing potholes or identifying some streets in Winnipeg North and other ridings that needed a little more attention. We have been dependent on the local levels of government to establish those priorities, to work with the provincial entities and to see if we can get the different levels of government participating.
That is the essence of what has been taking place. Would we have liked to see some additional projects? Personally I would have loved to see the Chief Peguis extension. The member for Kildonan—St. Paul talked about the Chief Peguis extension. I agree that it is important. However, like me, she and other MPs who feel this is a priority should emphasize that to the City of Winnipeg. It is in a better position to prioritize the areas in our communities where those rare dollars will be invested. It is a limited amount of money at the end of the day, and we could spend a whole lot more than required.
I am very proud of the fact that we have a national government that is committed to investing in infrastructure. I would challenge any member of the opposition to demonstrate where in the last 50 years we have seen the type of commitment this government has made to building Canada's infrastructure from coast to coast to coast.
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais remettre les choses en perspective. La Ville de Winnipeg a récemment publié un programme d'infrastructures dans lequel elle établit des priorités. Il y en a environ 45 si je ne m'abuse. Le coût de ces 45 projets dépasse amplement les 5,5 milliards de dollars. On parle de 45 projets seulement. Si on prend le temps de passer en revue cette liste de projets, on peut voir qu'un grand nombre des quartiers que moi et certains de mes collègues représentons dans Winnipeg n'y figurent pas. On pourrait dépenser des sommes incalculables pour réparer les routes, les ruelles, les structures communautaires et ainsi de suite.
Ce genre de documents peut nous donner une idée. La Ville de Winnipeg n'est pas la seule à publier des documents qui nous montrent comment elles établissent leurs priorités en matière de dépenses en infrastructures. Avec ses 700 000 habitants, Winnipeg n'est qu'une ville parmi bien d'autres au Canada. Imaginons quelle peut être l'ampleur des besoins en infrastructures à l'échelle du pays, dans toutes les régions, urbaines et rurales.
Lorsque je siégeais dans l'opposition il y a quelques années, j'ai mis le gouvernement Harper au défi d'envisager sérieusement d'investir dans les infrastructures à l'échelle nationale. J'ai souligné les types de déficits en matière d'infrastructure dans la ville de Winnipeg. Je crois que je les ai même sous-estimés à l'époque. Ce n'est pas nouveau. Cela se produit maintenant depuis de nombreuses années. La différence, c'est que, lors de la campagne électorale de 2015, un parti politique a dit qu'il voulait investir dans le Canada. Les libéraux voulaient investir dans les infrastructures du Canada. C'est ce que voulaient entendre des municipalités urbaines et rurales et beaucoup d'intervenants différents. Pendant de nombreuses années, le gouvernement Harper a privé d'investissements le secteur des infrastructures et a aggravé le déficit en matière d'infrastructure.
Lorsque les libéraux sont arrivés au pouvoir en 2015, personne au Canada n'a été surpris de les voir prendre un nombre record d'engagements visant à accroître les infrastructures du pays. Ces engagements ont été respectés dans pratiquement toutes les régions du pays. À l'époque, les conservateurs et les néo-démocrates s'attachaient davantage à rétablir l'équilibre budgétaire. Ils ne se rendaient pas compte que le fait d'investir dans les infrastructures renforce l'économie, ce qui permet de renflouer les coffres du gouvernement. Nous sommes le seul parti résolu à investir concrètement dans les infrastructures.
La motion présentée par l'opposition officielle fait référence au directeur parlementaire du budget. J'ai moi aussi souvent fait référence à lui. Au sein du caucus libéral, nous avons un profond respect pour son bureau. Nous en avons toujours eu, contrairement à l'opposition officielle.
Le 15 mars, le directeur parlementaire du budget a indiqué que le « budget de 2018 présente un compte rendu incomplet des changements apportés au plan de 186,7 milliards de dollars de dépenses du gouvernement dans les infrastructures ». C’était l'une de ses préoccupations. Examinons la motion. En présentant des motions comme celle-ci, les députés de l'opposition tentent d'induire les Canadiens en erreur. Ils ne font pas allusion au fait que le directeur parlementaire du budget a rencontré des représentants des différents ministères concernés après qu'on eut expliqué à ces ministères que nous devions pouvoir fournir des renseignements supplémentaires. En août, un autre rapport a été publié, mais les députés de l'opposition ne le mentionnent pas.
Selon le rapport, le directeur parlementaire du budget a confirmé que le rapport initial établissait que nous avions tenu toutes nos promesses. Le directeur parlementaire du budget faisait son travail, comme il se doit, et nous faisions le nôtre, comme il se doit. Lorsque nous avons promis aux Canadiens des fonds d'infrastructure, c'est ce que nous avons fait.
J'ai écouté le débat, et il a été assez intéressant. De nombreux députés de l'opposition ont déclaré qu'il fallait consacrer plus d'argent aux infrastructures. Ils citent des projets. L'opposition a fait beaucoup de chemin. Maintenant, j'ai l'impression que les députés appuient, directement ou indirectement, ce que nous avions promis en 2015. Nous respectons cet engagement. Ils conviennent enfin que nous devons investir dans les infrastructures au Canada.
Les députés parlent souvent du processus. J'aimerais l'expliquer brièvement.
J'ai parlé du projet de la ville de Winnipeg. Au plan local, elle est dans une excellente position. Lorsque les gens veulent se plaindre des nids-de-poule, des rues ou des équipements collectifs, ils communiquent avec la ville. Or, celle-ci dispose d'une assiette fiscale limitée, assurée par les impôts fonciers et d'autres sources. Si l'on s'en remettait uniquement à la ville ou aux administrations municipales, le déficit global en matière d'infrastructures ne cesserait de s'aggraver. Les gouvernements provinciaux de toutes les allégeances et le gouvernement fédéral en sont conscients.
Au cours des quatre ou cinq dernières années, nous avons dirigé un gouvernement auquel les infrastructures tiennent à cœur. En fait, nous avons fait deux choses. Non seulement nous avons affecté des montants records aux infrastructures, mais dans le dernier budget que nous avons présenté, nous avons redoublé d'efforts à l'égard de la taxe sur l'essence pendant l'année budgétaire. Cela nous a permis de dégager des dizaines de millions de dollars supplémentaires pour permettre à la Ville de Winnipeg de réparer les nids-de-poule ou de s'occuper de la voirie dans les quartiers nord de la ville. Nous avons compté sur les administrations locales pour qu'elles établissent ces priorités et qu'elles collaborent avec diverses instances provinciales, dans l'espoir de voir participer les différents paliers du gouvernement.
Voilà essentiellement ce qui s'est produit. Aurions-nous aimé que d'autres projets soient mis en œuvre? En ce qui me concerne, j'aurais aimé qu'on mène à bien le projet d'agrandissement de la route Chief Peguis. La députée de Kildonan—St. Paul en a parlé. Je conviens que c'est un projet important. Cependant, comme moi, elle et d'autres députés qui considèrent que c'est un projet prioritaire devraient en faire part à la Ville de Winnipeg, qui est mieux placée pour répondre aux besoins prioritaires dans les secteurs de nos collectivités où ces précieuses ressources financières seront investies. En fin de compte, ces ressources sont limitées, et nous pourrions dépenser beaucoup plus que nécessaire.
Je suis très fier de voir le gouvernement national déterminé à investir dans les infrastructures. Je mets n'importe quel député de l'opposition au défi de m'indiquer à quel moment, dans les 50 dernières années, on a déjà vu un gouvernement aussi déterminé que le gouvernement actuel à soutenir des projets d'infrastructure d'un bout à l'autre du pays.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2019-12-09 21:43 [p.166]
Madam Chair, I gather that the President of the Treasury Board does not have an answer for us.
Before the election, the Parliamentary Budget Officer asked for a list of all the specific infrastructure projects funded by the government, but he did not get a response. Why?
Madame la présidente, ce que je comprends, c'est que le Président du Conseil du Trésor n'a pas de réponse à nous donner.
Avant les élections, le directeur parlementaire du budget a demandé une liste de tous les projets d'infrastructures spécifiques financés par le gouvernement, mais il n'a pas reçu de réponse. Pourquoi?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 21:43 [p.166]
Madam Chair, I am pleased to talk about the Parliamentary Budget Officer because he does exceptional work. We will continue to work with him to ensure that the work of MPs, in the House in particular, is done as transparently and openly as possible.
Madame la présidente, je suis heureux de parler du directeur parlementaire du budget, parce qu'il fait un travail exceptionnel. C'est avec lui que nous continuons à travailler pour faire en sorte que le travail des députés, en particulier à la Chambre, soit fait de la manière la plus transparente et ouverte possible.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2019-12-09 21:43 [p.166]
Madam Chair, in that case, will the government commit to tabling the list of all the specific infrastructure projects as requested by the Parliamentary Budget Officer?
Madame la présidente, dans ce cas-là, est-ce que le gouvernement s'engage à déposer la liste de tous les projets d'infrastructures spécifiques, tel que l'a demandé le directeur parlementaire du budget?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 21:43 [p.166]
Madam Chair, the answer is yes. We will do everything possible to ensure that the member, who is interested in our infrastructure program, can receive all the information he wants.
Madame la présidente, la réponse est oui. Nous allons faire tout ce qu'il faut pour que le député, qui s'intéresse à notre programme d'infrastructures, puisse recevoir toutes les informations qu'il souhaite obtenir.
View Luc Berthold Profile
CPC (QC)
View Luc Berthold Profile
2019-12-09 21:44 [p.166]
Madam Chair, subsequent to an incomplete report on changes made to the government's $186.7-billion infrastructure spending plan, the Parliamentary Budget Officer asked for an investment plan. He was told that no such plan existed.
How can the President of the Treasury Board accept that almost $200 billion were spent without a plan?
Madame la présidente, après un rapport incomplet des changements apportés au plan de dépense pour l'infrastructure de 186,7 milliards de dollars du gouvernement, le directeur parlementaire du budget a demandé un plan d'investissement. Il s'est fait répondre qu'un tel plan n'existait pas.
Comment le président du Conseil du Trésor peut-il accepter que près de 200 milliards de dollars soient dépensés sans plan?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 21:44 [p.166]
Madam Chair, it is fantastic to be able to answer this question. The plan is why we were elected in 2015 and why we were elected again in 2019. Unlike other philosophical approaches that lack ambition for Canada, it is an extraordinary plan that I am always happy to discuss.
Madame la présidente, c'est extraordinaire de pouvoir répondre à cette question. Le plan, c'est celui qui nous a fait élire en 2015 et c'est celui qui nous a fait réélire en 2019. En contraste avec d'autres approches philosophiques qui manquent d'ambitions pour le Canada, c'est un plan extraordinaire dont je parlerai toujours avec plaisir.
Results: 1 - 15 of 19 | Page: 1 of 2

1
2
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data