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Results: 1 - 15 of 47
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you for that answer.
Also, as you know, this backlog started to really become alarming in 2017.
Many veterans who are watching today also watched a vote in the House of Commons on September 25, 2018. It was discovered that a non-veteran, a civilian, Christopher Garnier, who had murdered Catherine Campbell in Truro, Nova Scotia, and became convicted in a court of law of not only brutally killing her but taking her body and putting it into a container and putting it under a bridge, was receiving veteran benefits vis-à-vis his father who was a veteran. We asked the House of Commons to vote on whether this was appropriate for a convicted killer.
By the way, Catherine was 31 years old. She was a police officer and also a volunteer firefighter. She and her family have inspired me over the years. We recently lost her father who went from this world knowing that the man who brutally murdered and strangled his daughter is receiving veterans benefits. To a person on the government side, it was voted to maintain those benefits for Mr. Garnier.
Is Mr. Garnier still receiving benefits from the financial side of Veterans Affairs Canada?
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
I am absolutely happy to reframe it for the member, because he voted to maintain the benefits for Mr. Garnier, the convicted killer of Catherine Campbell.
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Chair, through you to the witness, supplementary estimates contain money that flows from the treasury into Veterans Affairs Canada to supply money, such as Mr. Garnier is receiving, as far as we know, to the programs. That's the connection to the supplementary estimates.
I am asking the minister this: Is Mr. Garnier continuing to receive benefits as he sits in prison as the convicted murderer of Catherine Campbell?
View Phil McColeman Profile
CPC (ON)
I would like to know the date it stopped, because as of September 25, 2018, he was receiving benefits. Could I direct my question to the deputy? What was the date that Mr. Garnier stopped receiving veterans benefits?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank both of you, not only for your testimony today but for your service to Canada.
I want to start with Ambassador Saint-Jacques. Sir, you mentioned the Garratt case, which is, of course, of great interest to this committee. The Garratts were released, and of course, we're hoping for a similar outcome in the present cases. I wonder if you could share a little bit, briefly, about what led to success in the context of the Garratt case.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
Just to follow up on that, in Jonathan Manthorpe's famous book Claws of the Panda, he wrote this about this case, which is similar to what you said:
The price of Garratt’s release appears to have been an extradition treaty. Ottawa soon issued a communiqué: “The two sides determined that the short-term objectives for Canada-China co-operation on security and rule of law are to start discussions on an Extradition Treaty and a Transfer of Offenders Treaty as well as other related matters.”
You used the term “negotiate” the release. In August, Bill Morneau was in China, and it was at that time when he announced Canada's desire to enter the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. We have the implication in Mr. Manthorpe's book that there was a sort of quid pro quo around the beginning of those extradition discussions and the release of the Garratts. Is this what you mean by negotiation? Was there some kind of quid pro quo here?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Can I just ask a quick question? It wasn't perceived as a quid pro quo in your mind. Is there a possibility that this was interpreted on the Chinese side as involving some kind of quid pro quo around some of these policy decisions that were taken at the same time, or in the same visits, that the Garratt issue was discussed?
View Rob Morrison Profile
CPC (BC)
Okay.
In some past meetings, correctional officers noted that the needle programs in other countries are operated as safe injection sites. Specifically, needles remain in the hands of medical staff and aren't brought back into cells.
Is this the case in Canada?
View Marc Dalton Profile
CPC (BC)
Okay. Thank you.
La Presse had an article on situations happening where Quebec inmates, and it's elsewhere too, could declare themselves as Métis and receive some significantly improved benefits without necessarily any proof of attachment to the Métis community. I speak as a Métis person myself. I'm concerned about that. I'm wondering if you can make some comments as far as this being abused by those who are not Métis.
View Rob Morrison Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you.
Dr. Zinger, I have an issue that I have had a bit of experience with, and I'm wondering if you would support this. It is maybe a separate program focusing on drug rehabilitation. Crystal meth addicts, for example, rather than going directly into the general population in the prison system, could go into another system that focuses specifically on a rehab program.
I know crime reduction is pretty easy; you just put people in jail. Crime prevention is very difficult, and it's a long-term program. I know the U.K. has a similar program, because I've been over there and have investigated that. I'm wondering if you have any thoughts on that, or what your opinion is, please.
View Dan Albas Profile
CPC (BC)
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