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Results: 1 - 15 of 53
View Peter Fragiskatos Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
Mr. Neve, it's nice to see you again, first of all.
I have a question about something that we continue to hear, which came up again today: Magnitsky sanctions. If the Government of Canada were to move ahead in that direction, I wonder about the consequences for Canadians in China, namely the two Michaels, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor.
If Canada were to take dramatic action along those lines, what is the prospect for those two individuals? What will happen to the two Michaels? It's obviously impossible to predict, but is it reasonable to suggest and assume that it would dramatically diminish the prospect of the release of Mr. Kovrig and Mr. Spavor?
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much.
Ms. Jelilova, you've held up some documents throughout your testimony. I was wondering if it's possible for you to share those with the clerk so that they may be shared with the committee.
I'd like to go back to your testimony and clarify some of the things you said that were somewhat alarming. You mentioned the injections and the pills that you were forced to take. You didn't indicate what you think the intent of those pills and injections was. Do you know what that caused in your body?
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
Lib. (ON)
I think you are a very strong and courageous women, a survivor. Thank you for speaking.
You mentioned in your testimony, that instead of shooting people, they're giving injections. Do you believe these injections are intended to kill people?
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
Lib. (ON)
I am very grateful that you survived.
Mr. Ali, you mentioned that when you were first detained they brought you to a medical facility and they were checking your liver, your skin, your irises, your kidneys. We hate to think it, but why do you think they were doing that?
View Sameer Zuberi Profile
Lib. (QC)
You're welcome.
You made an account of what happened to you personally. I wanted to know if what happened to you was the norm of what you saw within the camps. I can anticipate your answer.
View Sameer Zuberi Profile
Lib. (QC)
This is happening to everybody, essentially, who is in the camps.
View Iqra Khalid Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Ms. Lehr.
I have one last question.
Mr. Saint-Jacques, you mentioned the number of times you were advocating, in your role as ambassador, for Mr. Celil, who was imprisoned in China.
Over the whole span of trying to advocate and provide consular services, what was the response that you received from the Chinese government?
View Sameer Zuberi Profile
Lib. (QC)
Thank you.
I'd like to shift to the point of forced labour.
We know that an Australian institute, the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, noted that 27 factories, nine of which are in Chinese provinces, are taking forced labour transfers of the Uighur people. We've heard of upwards of 80 companies, including Apple, Dell, Mercedes-Benz and Nike, that are benefiting from supply chains that are taking forced labour materials. What steps do you think businesses can do to prevent this from occurring? Second, what steps can governments take, in particular Canada?
I'd like to hear opinions from the panellists. Feel free, please.
View Sameer Zuberi Profile
Lib. (QC)
I want to thank all the panellists for their strength and testimony here today. It's very touching to hear you and to see you and to see the emotion come through on the camera. Thank you for this.
I wanted to highlight a point that was made by Huseyin Celil's lawyer, Mr. MacLeod. I think it got slightly lost, but we hear media reports that the Chinese government frequently says that Huseyin Celil is only a Chinese national, whereas according to the nationality law of the People's Republic of China, articles 3 and 9 together say.... First, article 3 says, “...China does not recognize dual nationality.” Article 9 says that when somebody has adopted another nationality or been naturalized outside of China, then they automatically lose their Chinese nationality.
Just for the record, I want us to establish that Huseyin Celil is in fact only Canadian, not a Chinese national right now, according to China's own law. I want to highlight this point because we often hear our Canadian officials saying that Huseyin Celil is, according to the Chinese, a Chinese national, whereas in fact by China's own laws he's a Canadian national.
I want to ask this to both Kamila and Mr. MacLeod: Is there anything that you have seen different, in terms of the circumstances globally or internationally with respect to China and the Uighur people, or locally within Canada since 2015 in terms of advocacy around Huseyin Celil's case? What can we do to strengthen advocacy for him, aside from what you mentioned with respect to a special envoy?
View Sameer Zuberi Profile
Lib. (QC)
Have you thought of advocating the special envoy theme with respect to the two Michaels?
I personally don't know if there have been special envoys for specific individuals in the past from Canada for other similar cases. I'm wondering if you are advocating along that line. If there has been a precedent, then it would make sense.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, I want to assure the honourable member that the two Canadians remain our absolute priority. We are going to continue to work tirelessly to secure their immediate release and to stand up for them as a government, as Canadians.
View Marc Garneau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Chair, in all cases similar to Mr. Gauthier's, the Government of Canada, through its consular services, tries to do the best it can under the circumstances. This file is still active.
View Mary Ng Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, the two Michaels are Canadians and are our absolute top priority. We will continue to work tirelessly to secure their immediate release and to stand up for them as a Canadian government and as—
View Sameer Zuberi Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Chair, I will be sharing my time with the member for Thunder Bay—Rainy River.
Over the last two weeks, from Halifax to Vancouver, Calgary to Whitehorse, Canadians have been seized with the Black Lives Matter movement. Yesterday evening, in my own riding of Pierrefonds—Dollard, Kemba Mitchell and the West Island Black Community Association organized a virtual town hall attended by 500 people. Earlier in the day, I took a knee at a Montreal vigil organized by Denburk Reid for the Montreal Community Cares Foundation. On social media, grandmothers, grandfathers, aunts, uncles, parents and young people are all saying that we must do much more to confront anti-black racism and systemic discrimination. Films like 13th that explain the link between racial inequality and over-incarceration are trending online. Everyone is asking how we can move beyond allyship to concrete action. Studies show that black Canadians and indigenous peoples aren't any more likely to commit a crime than the general population. However, over-policing and over incarceration of these communities is well documented.
Deputy Prime Minister, in the spirit of moving us forward, can the government inform the House what measures are being taken by the government to address over-incarceration of indigenous and black Canadians while working to collect and publicly report on race-based data?
View Chrystia Freeland Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, let me start by thanking the member for Pierrefonds—Dollard for his tireless advocacy on these important issues.
We know that indigenous peoples and black Canadians are overrepresented in our criminal justice system, and that needs to change. We are making important investments to support the reintegration of indigenous offenders into their communities and advancing restorative justice approaches while strengthening agreements for healing lodges, which incorporate indigenous values, traditions and beliefs. We are also providing black Canadian offenders with services aimed at supporting their reintegration, including support for career building and mentorship, engaging community members to provide training and funding community organizations.
Furthermore, we will invest an additional $11 million to ensure that all enforcement and security agencies have access to bias-free training we will and implement mandatory training on unconscious bias for all judges in Canada. We know that better, more precise and more consistent tracking, collection and measurement of data are needed and that we have a lot more work to do.
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