Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 40 of 40
View Paul Manly Profile
GP (BC)
View Paul Manly Profile
2020-03-11 15:19 [p.1939]
Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to present a second petition from members in my riding of Nanaimo—Ladysmith.
The petitioners ask that the government commit to uphold the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada by immediately halting all existing and planned construction of the Coastal GasLink project on Wet'suwet'en territory; ordering the RCMP to dismantle its exclusion zone and stand down; schedule nation-to-nation talks between the Wet'suwet'en nation and federal and provincial governments, which I am glad to see has happened; and prioritize the real implementation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'honneur de présenter une deuxième pétition signée par des habitants de ma circonscription, Nanaimo—Ladysmith.
Les pétitionnaires demandent au gouvernement de s'engager à respecter la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones et les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada en interrompant immédiatement tous les travaux en cours et prévus dans le cadre du projet de Coastal GasLink sur le territoire de la nation des Wet'suwet'en; en ordonnant à la GRC de démanteler sa zone d'exclusion et de mettre fin à l'opération; en organisant des discussions de nation à nation entre les membres de la nation des Wet'suwet'en et les gouvernements fédéral et provincial — je me félicite que cela ait été fait — et en mettant l'accent sur la véritable mise en œuvre de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2020-03-11 15:22 [p.1939]
Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to rise in this place to present an e-petition that was started by one of my constituents from Galiano Island. I want send a shout-out to Christina Kovacevic for starting the petition, which has accumulated more than 15,000 signatures.
It calls on the government, as other petitioners today have mentioned, to observe and respect the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, particularly in relation to the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs and land claims; to halt all existing and planned construction of the Coastal GasLink project on their territory; to ask the RCMP to dismantle its exclusion zone; to have nation-to-nation talks, which, we note with real gratitude to the ministers involved, have happened, and there is an agreement currently under consideration with the Wet'suwet'en; and to make sure that it continues toward real implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre pour présenter une pétition électronique qui a été lancée par une habitante de l'île Galiano. Je tiens à remercier Christina Kovacevic d'avoir lancé cette pétition, qui a recueilli plus de 15 000 signatures.
Elle demande au gouvernement, comme l'ont mentionné d'autres pétitionnaires aujourd'hui, de respecter la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, notamment en ce qui concerne les chefs héréditaires des Wet'suwet'en et les revendications territoriales; d'interrompre tous les travaux en cours et prévus dans le cadre du projet de Coastal GasLink sur le territoire de la Première Nation des Wet’suwet’en; de demander à la GRC de démanteler sa zone d'exclusion; d'organiser des discussions de nation à nation — ce qui, nous le soulignons avec une réelle gratitude envers les ministres concernés, a eu lieu, et un accord est actuellement à l'étude avec les Wet'suwet'en; et d'assurer la véritable mise en œuvre de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
View Jenica Atwin Profile
GP (NB)
View Jenica Atwin Profile
2020-03-11 15:26 [p.1940]
Mr. Speaker, I have a second petition. It is similar to other petitions presented today. It calls on the government to uphold the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action by immediately halting existing and planned construction of the Coastal GasLink project on Wet'suwet'en territory; asking the RCMP to dismantle its exclusion zone and stand down; scheduling nation-to-nation talks with the Wet'suwet'en, which has happened; and prioritizing the real implementation of UNDRIP.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai une deuxième pétition, qui ressemble aux autres pétitions présentées aujourd'hui. Elle demande au gouvernement de faire respecter la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones et les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation en interrompant immédiatement tous les travaux en cours et prévus dans le cadre du projet Coastal GasLink sur le territoire des Wet'suwet'en; en ordonnant à la GRC de démanteler sa zone d'exclusion et de mettre fin à l'opération; en organisant des discussions de nation à nation entre les membres de la nation des Wet'suwet'en, ce qui s'est déjà produit; et en mettant l'accent sur la véritable mise en œuvre de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
View Paul Manly Profile
GP (BC)
View Paul Manly Profile
2020-02-25 10:26 [p.1474]
Mr. Speaker, this petition calls upon the government to immediately commit to upholding the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada by halting all existing and planned construction of the Coastal GasLink project on Wet'suwet'en territory, ordering the RCMP to dismantle its exclusion zone and stand down, scheduling nation-to-nation talks between the Wet'suwet'en nation and the federal and provincial governments and prioritizing the real implementation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Monsieur le Président, la présente pétition demande au gouvernement de s'engager à respecter immédiatement la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones et les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation en interrompant tous les travaux en cours et prévus dans le cadre du projet de Coastal GasLink sur le territoire de la nation des Wet’suwet’en; en ordonnant à la GRC de démanteler sa zone d’exclusion et de mettre fin à l’opération; en organisant des discussions de nation à nation entre les membres de la nation des Wet’suwet’en et les gouvernements fédéral et provincial; en mettant l’accent sur la véritable mise en œuvre de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, the young indigenous people whom I met with in the office of the Minister of Northern Affairs were not radical activists. They were sensitive, young indigenous people expressing the importance of the land, water and air.
One young woman, who had slept in the Minister of Northern Affairs' office for over 10 days, tearfully expressed to me how upsetting it was to see the images and hear from the people being arrested for what they believed in, friendships that began a year ago and then having to witness their new friend being arrested earlier this month.
I believe we have learned from the crises at Oka and Ipperwash, in Caledonia and Gustafsen Lake. I believe the police also understand its role in that. Last year, we said that we never wanted to see again the images of police having to use force in an indigenous community in order to keep the peace.
Canada is counting on us to work together to create the space for respectful dialogue with the Wet'suwet'en peoples. We all want this dispute resolved in a peaceful and durable manner.
The rhetoric and divisive tactics from the other side are irresponsible. We want the Wet'suwet'en peoples to come together and resolve their differences of opinion. We want to work with both the elected chiefs in council and the hereditary chiefs toward a future outside the Indian Act, where, as a nation, they can choose the governance of their choosing, write their own laws and finally be able to have their rights affirmed, as they take decisions with respect to their land, water and air in the best interests of their children and seven generations out.
We are inspired by the courageous Wet'suwet'en people who took the recognition of their rise to the Supreme Court of Canada in the Delgamuukw case in 1997. However, we need to be clear that the court did not at that time grant title to their lands. It affirmed the rights of the Wet'suwet'en, but said the question of title was to be determined at a later time.
It has been more than 20 years, through many federal and provincial governments, and the Wet'suwet'en people are understandably impatient for the question of title to be resolved. I look forward to working together on an out-of-court process to determine title.
The Wet'suwet'en have worked hard on those next steps within the B.C. treaty process and more recently, since 2018, on specific claims, negotiation preparedness, nation rebuilding, with funding from the government for research.
Two years ago I signed an agreement with the hereditary chiefs of the Office of the Wet'suwet'en on asserting their rights on child and family services. At the signing, there was some overlap. Some of the hereditary chiefs also hold or have held office within their communities as chiefs and/or councillors.
Across Canada, over half of the Indian Act bands are sitting down at tables to work on their priorities as they assert their jurisdiction. From education to fisheries to child and family services to policing to court systems, we have made important strides forward in the hard work of what Lee Crowchild describes as “deconstructing the effects of colonization.”
In British Columbia, we have been inspired by the work of the B.C. summit as they have been able to articulate and sign, with us and the B.C. government, a new policy that will, once and for all, eliminate the concepts of extinguishment, cede and surrender for future treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
This new B.C. policy is transformative. It represents years of hard work that has eliminated so many of the obstacles that impeded the treaty process. It will be an essential tool as we are able to accelerate the progress to self-determination. I believe the B.C. policy can provide a template for nations from coast to coast to coast.
We have together agreed that no longer will loans be necessary for first nations to fund their negotiations in Canada. We are forgiving outstanding past loans and, in some cases, paying back nations for loans that had already been repaid.
For over two years, we have worked with the already self-governing nations on a collaborative fiscal agreement that will provide stable, predictable funding, which will finally properly fund the running of their governments.
This new funding arrangement will provide them with much more money than they would have received under the Indian Act.
The conditions are right to move the relationship with first nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada to one based on the affirmation of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership. It has been exciting to watch the creativity and innovation presented by the Ktunaxa and Stó:lo nations in their negotiations of modern treaties.
We were inspired to see the hereditary chiefs and elected chief and council of the Heiltsuk Nation work together to sign agreement with Canada on their path to self-government.
We are also grateful to the B.C. government for its important work on reconciliation, including the passage of Bill 41, implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
I would like to thank Murray Rankin for his important work for B.C. on lands and title with the Wet'suwet'en nation and Nathan Cullen for his work with all those involved in the current impasse.
We have see that real progress can be made when hereditary and elected leadership come together with a shared vision of nation rebuilding and work together on a clear route to self-determination.
I look forward to having these conversations with the Wet'suwet'en nation.
We have an obligation to move beyond the good work we are doing on child and family services to a meaningful discussion on reconstituting the Wet'suwet'en nation.
It is time to build on the Delgamuukw decision, time to show that issues of rights and title can be solved through meaningful dialogue
My job is to ensure that Canada finds out-of-court solutions and to fast-track negotiations and agreements that make real change possible.
I hope that shortly we will be able to sit down with the hereditary chiefs of Wet'suwet'en and work together on their short and long-term goals.
There are many parts of Canada where title is very difficult to determine. Many nations occupied the land for different generations. There are other areas like Tsilhqot'in's title land and Haida Gwai where there is clear evidence that the land has been occupied by one nation for millennia.
We are at a critical time in Canada. We need to deal effectively with the uncertainty. Canadians want to see indigenous rights honoured. They are impatient for meaningful progress. Canadians are counting on us to implement a set of rules and processes in which section 35 of our Constitution can be honourably implemented.
Passing legislation and implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, or UNDRIP, is one way to move forward.
Canadians acknowledge that there has been a difference of opinion among the Wet'suwet'en peoples. As was said, 20 elected chiefs and councils have agreed to the project in consultation with their people. Women leaders have expressed an opinion that the project can help eliminate poverty or provide meaningful work for their young men and reduce domestic violence and incarceration
Crystal Smith, chief councillor for Haisla nation, is in favour of the pipeline. She eloquently said this morning on Ottawa Morning that the solutions would be found within the Wet'suwet'en nation and that the outside voices were not helpful.
There needs to be unity and consensus within the community, and today's debate is not helping.
Some have expressed that in an indigenous world view providing an energy source that will reduce China's reliance on coal is good for mother earth We are hoping the Wet'suwet'en people will be able to come together to take these decisions together, decisions that are in the best interests of their children and their children for generations to come.
We applaud the thousands of young Canadians fighting for climate justice.
We know that they need hope. They want to see a real plan to deal with the climate emergency. We believe we have an effective plan in place, from clean tech, renewable energy, public transit and protection of the land and water.
We want the young people of Canada and all those who have been warning about climate change for decades to feel heard.
They need hope, and they need to feel involved in coming up with real solutions.
As I mentioned Tuesday night, we have invested in and are inspired by the work of Val Napoleon and John Burrows at the Indigenous Law Lodge at UVIC. They will be able to do the research on the laws of many nations, so they are able to create a governance structures and constitutions in keeping with their laws.
It is so important to understand the damage done by colonization and residential schools that has led to sometimes different interpretations of traditional legal practices and customs.
We think that, one day, Canada will be able to integrate indigenous law into Canada's legislative process, just as it did with common law and civil law.
We are also striving to implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action and to increase awareness of our shared history.
We need all the indigenous leadership to know that we are serious about rebuilding trust and working with respect, as the Minister of Indigenous Services and the Prime Minister have expressed in such a heartfelt way.
Following up on the repeated and public personal commitments by the Prime Minister and the B.C. premier and our letters of February 16 and yesterday, I and the B.C. Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation continue to offer our commitment to a process based upon trust and mutual respect to address the urgent issues of concern to the hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en nation.
We wrote to them on February 16, offering an urgent meeting with us, and we were willing to meet in Smithers if that was agreeable to them. In an effort to exemplify our commitment and recognizing the urgency of the situation, both of us travelled to Victoria on Monday to allow for short-notice travel to Smithers if that was their reply.
While we have not yet been able to meet in person, we have continued the dialogue through multiple conversations with some of the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs in order to clarify a path forward. That was an important step, and we thank them for coming to the discussion with the same commitment for a peaceful resolution. We understand that they have urgent issues to resolve and require dedicated attention from both levels of government in working with them to chart a peaceful path forward.
We are committed to finding a mutually acceptable process with them and the Wet’suwet’en nation to sit down and address the urgent and long-term issues at hand. We wrote again yesterday to arrange an in-person meeting. We hope that the Wet’suwet’en will be able to express to those in solidarity with them that it is now time for them to stand down and let us get back to work with Wet’suwet’en nation with its own laws and governance and work nation to nation with the Crown. I am hoping to be able to return to British Columbia as soon as possible to continue that work.
In closing, I have to say that as a physician, I was trained to first do no harm. I believe today's debate is harmful to the progress we need to make in order to get to a durable solution.
Madame la Présidente, les jeunes Autochtones que j'ai rencontrés dans le bureau du ministre des Affaires du Nord n'étaient pas des activistes radicaux, mais bien des jeunes Autochtones sensibles qui voulaient parler de l'importance de la terre, de l'eau et de l'air.
Une jeune femme, qui avait dormi dans le bureau du ministre des Affaires du Nord pendant plus de 10 jours, m'a parlé, en larmes, de la frustration qu'elle ressentait après avoir vu et entendu des personnes avec lesquelles elle a noué des liens d'amitié il y a un an se faire arrêter pour leurs convictions au début du mois.
Nous avons tiré des leçons des crises d'Oka, d'Ipperwash, de Caledonia et du lac Gustafsen, et je crois que les policiers comprennent aussi leur rôle dans ce genre de situation. L'an dernier, nous avons dit que nous ne voulions plus jamais revoir d'images de policiers recourant à la force pour maintenir la paix dans une communauté autochtone.
Les Canadiens comptent sur nous pour que nous travaillions ensemble à l'établissement d'un dialogue respectueux avec les Wet'suwet'en. Nous souhaitons tous voir ce conflit se régler de manière pacifique et durable.
La rhétorique et les tactiques de division des députés d'en face sont irresponsables. Nous voulons que les Wet'suwet'en se réunissent pour régler leurs divergences d'opinions. Nous voulons travailler tant avec les chefs de conseil qu'avec les chefs héréditaires pour bâtir un avenir où ils ne seront pas soumis à la Loi sur les Indiens et où ils pourront, comme nation, choisir leur propre mode de gouvernance, rédiger leurs propres lois et, finalement, affirmer leurs droits en prenant des décisions au sujet de leurs terres, de l'eau et de l'air dans l'intérêt de leurs enfants et des sept générations à venir.
Ce qui nous inspire ici, c'est le courage des Wet'suwet'en qui, pour faire reconnaître leurs droits, ont porté l'affaire Delgamuukw jusqu'à la Cour suprême en 1997. Nous tenons à préciser toutefois que la Cour ne leur a pas reconnu un titre sur leurs terres à ce moment-là. Elle a confirmé les droits des Wet'suwet'en mais a reporté à plus tard l'examen du titre.
Plus de 20 ans se sont écoulés depuis qui ont vu de nombreux gouvernements provincial et fédéral se succéder, et les Wet'suwet'en ont maintenant hâte, et pour cause, de voir la question du titre être résolue. Je serai heureuse de travailler avec eux dans ce dossier pour tenter de trouver une solution non judiciaire.
Les Wet'suwet'en travaillent dur sur ces prochaines étapes dans le cadre du processus des traités de la Colombie-Britannique et, plus récemment — soit depuis 2018 —, sur des revendications précises, la préparation des négociations et la reconstruction des nations, avec des fonds provenant du gouvernement à des fins de recherche.
Il y a deux ans, j'ai signé, avec les chefs héréditaires de l'Office of the Wet'suwet'en, un accord affirmant leurs droits sur les services à l'enfance et à la famille. À la cérémonie de signature, il y avait un peu de chevauchement. Certains chefs héréditaires agissaient ou avaient déjà agi également comme chefs de bande ou membres du conseil de bande.
Partout au Canada, plus de la moitié des bandes assujetties à la Loi sur les Indiens siègent maintenant à des tables pour faire avancer les choses dans le sens de leurs priorités, en exerçant leur compétence. Qu'on parle de l'éducation, des pêches, des services à l'enfance et à la famille, des services de police ou des appareils judiciaires, nous avons fait de grands pas dans l'entreprise difficile consistant, selon la description qu'en donne Lee Crowchild, à déconstruire les effets de la colonisation.
En Colombie-Britannique, nous avons été inspirés par le Sommet de la Colombie-Britannique, qui a permis d'élaborer et de signer, avec le fédéral et la province de la Colombie-Britannique, une nouvelle politique selon laquelle les notions d'aliénation, de cession et d'abandon seront à jamais absentes des traités, des accords et des autres ententes constructives.
Cette nouvelle politique de la Colombie-Britannique, fruit de plusieurs années de dur labeur, est porteuse de changements. Elle élimine de nombreux obstacles qui nuisaient au processus des traités. Grâce à cet outil essentiel, nous pouvons accélérer la marche vers l'autodétermination. Je crois que la politique de la Colombie-Britannique pourra servir de modèle pour les nations d'un bout à l'autre du pays.
Nous avons convenu que les Premières Nations n'auront plus besoin d'emprunter de l'argent pour financer leurs négociations avec l'État canadien. Nous avons aussi décidé de radier les prêts existants et avons même, dans certains cas, redonné leur argent aux nations qui avaient fini de rembourser leurs prêts.
Pendant plus de deux ans, nous avons élaboré une nouvelle politique financière collaborative en partenariat avec les Premières Nations déjà autonomes afin qu'elles aient accès à du financement stable, prévisible et adéquat pour voir à leurs affaires.
Ce nouveau mode de financement leur offre beaucoup plus d'argent qu'ils n'en auraient reçu en vertu de la Loi sur les Indiens.
Les conditions sont réunies pour que la relation avec les Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis au Canada soit désormais axée sur la reconnaissance des droits, le respect, la collaboration et le partenariat. Quel plaisir ce fut de voir avec quelle créativité et quel esprit novateur les Ktunaxas et les Sto:los ont abordé la négociation des traités modernes.
Nous avons été inspirés de voir les chefs héréditaires, le chef élu et le conseil de bande des Heiltsuks unir leurs efforts pour conclure un accord sur l'accession à l'autonomie gouvernementale avec le Canada.
Nous sommes également reconnaissants au gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique pour l'important travail qu'il a effectué pour faire avancer la réconciliation, y compris l'adoption du projet de loi 41, qui met en oeuvre la Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
J'aimerais remercier Murray Rankin de tout le travail qu'il a effectué pour la Colombie-Britannique sur la question des territoires et des titres avec la nation des Wet'suwet'en et Nathan Cullen, pour son travail avec toutes les parties à l'impasse actuelle.
Nous avons vu qu'il est possible de faire véritablement avancer les choses lorsque les chefs héréditaires et élus se donnent une vision commune de la reconstruction des nations et travaillent ensemble pour établir un plan clair vers l'autonomie gouvernementale.
Je suis impatiente d'avoir ces discussions avec les Wet'suwet'en.
Nous faisons du bon travail sur la question des services à l'enfance et à la famille. Nous avons aussi l'obligation de passer à des discussions sérieuses sur la reconstruction de la nation des Wet'suwet'en.
Le temps est venu d'appliquer l'arrêt Delgamuukw, de montrer que la solution à la question des droits et des titres ancestraux passe par le dialogue.
Mon travail consiste à assurer que le Canada trouve des solutions hors tribunaux, ainsi qu'à accélérer les négociations et les ententes aux tables où un véritable changement peut avoir lieu.
J'espère que nous pourrons bientôt nous asseoir avec les chefs héréditaires des Wet'suwet'en pour collaborer à l'atteinte de leurs objectifs à court et à long terme.
Dans bon nombre de régions du Canada, il est très difficile de déterminer qui détient un titre sur des terres, car différentes nations ont occupé de mêmes territoires au fil du temps. Dans d'autres cas, comme celui du territoire tsilhqot'in, on a la preuve manifeste que des terres ont été occupées par une seule nation pendant des millénaires.
Le Canada vit un moment décisif. Nous devons composer efficacement avec l'incertitude. Les Canadiens souhaitent que les droits autochtones soient respectés. Ils ont hâte de constater de véritables progrès, et comptent sur nous pour mettre en place un ensemble de règles et de procédures qui permettront d'appliquer de manière honorable l'article 35 de la Constitution canadienne.
Légiférer et mettre en œuvre la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, la DNUDPA, est une voie possible pour la suite.
Les Canadiens sont conscients qu'il y a des opinions divergentes parmi les Wet'suwet'en. Comme il a été dit, 20 chefs élus et leurs conseils ont approuvé le projet en consultation avec leur communauté. Des dirigeantes ont exprimé leur avis en disant que le projet peut éliminer la pauvreté ou créer des emplois intéressants pour les jeunes hommes tout en contribuant à réduire la violence familiale et le taux d'incarcération.
Crystal Smith, la conseillère en chef des Haislas, est favorable au projet de pipeline. Ce matin, elle a déclaré avec éloquence à l'émission Ottawa Morning qu'il revient à la nation des Wet'suwet'en de trouver une solution, et que les avis externes n'arrangent rien.
La communauté des Wet'suwet'en doit s'unir et parvenir à un consensus, et ce n'est pas le débat d'aujourd'hui qui va régler la situation.
Certaines personnes ont affirmé que, selon la vision autochtone du monde, le fait d'offrir une source d'énergie qui aidera la Chine à s'affranchir partiellement des centrales au charbon est une bonne chose pour la Terre mère. Nous espérons que les Wet'suwet'en pourront s'entendre et prendre ensemble des décisions qui seront dans l'intérêt supérieur de leurs enfants, de leurs petits-enfants et des prochaines générations.
Nous soulevons les milliers de jeunes Canadiens qui luttent pour la justice climatique.
Nous savons qu'ils ont besoin d'espoir. Ils veulent un véritable plan d'attaque contre la crise climatique. Nous estimons avoir mis en place un plan efficace, qu'il s'agisse des technologies propres, de l'énergie renouvelable, du transport en commun ou de la protection des terres et des eaux.
Nous voulons que les jeunes Canadiens et tous ceux qui sonnent l'alarme concernant les changements climatiques depuis des décennies se sentent entendus.
Ils doivent avoir de l'espoir et se sentir partie prenante dans l'élaboration de véritables solutions.
Comme je l'ai dit mardi soir, nous investissons dans le travail de Val Napoleon et de John Borrows au pavillon en droit autochtone, l'Indigenous Legal Lodge, de l'Université de Victoria, et nous nous en inspirons. On pourra mener des recherches sur les lois de nombreuses nations afin de créer une structure de gouvernance et des constitutions qui les respectent.
Il est très important de comprendre les dommages causés par la colonisation et les pensionnats, ce qui a parfois entraîné des interprétations différentes des pratiques et des usages juridiques traditionnels.
Nous pensons qu'il sera un jour possible pour le Canada d'intégrer le droit autochtone, comme nous l'avons fait dans le cas de la common law et du droit civil dans le processus législatif canadien.
Nous visons également à mettre en oeuvre les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation ainsi qu'à faire mieux connaître notre histoire commune.
Nous voulons que tous les leaders autochtones constatent notre volonté réelle de rétablir un climat de confiance et de travailler dans le respect, comme l’ont déjà déclaré avec tant de sincérité le ministre des Services aux Autochtones et le premier ministre.
Dans la foulée des engagements publics et répétés du premier ministre et de son homologue de la Colombie-Britannique, et de nos lettres du 16 février et d’hier, le ministre provincial des Relations avec les Autochtones et de la Réconciliation et moi-même sommes toujours désireux de maintenir un processus fondé sur la confiance et le respect mutuel pour remédier aux enjeux criants soulevés par les chefs héréditaires de la nation des Wet’suwet’en.
Nous leur avons écrit le 16 février dernier pour leur proposer une rencontre d’urgence et les aviser que nous pouvions les rencontrer à Smithers si cela leur convenait. Signe de notre engagement et de l'urgence de la situation, nous nous sommes tous les deux rendus à Victoria ce lundi pour être rapidement à Smithers si tel était leur volonté.
Bien que nous n’ayons pas encore pu nous rencontrer, nous poursuivons le dialogue grâce aux nombreuses conservations que nous avons avec des chefs héréditaires de la nation des Wet’suwet’en afin de dénouer l'impasse. C’était une étape importante, et nous les remercions de prendre part à la discussion avec le même désir d’en venir à une résolution pacifique. Nous savons qu’ils ont des enjeux urgents à résoudre et que ceux-ci nécessitent une attention particulière des deux ordres de gouvernement, qui doivent collaborer avec eux pour paver la voie à une résolution pacifique.
Nous nous engageons à trouver avec eux et la nation des Wet'suwet'en un processus mutuellement acceptable qui nous permettrait de négocier et de traiter les questions urgentes et les questions à long terme. Nous leur avons à nouveau écrit hier pour organiser une réunion en personne. Nous espérons que les Wet'suwet'en pourront signifier à ceux qui sont solidaires avec eux qu'il est maintenant temps pour eux de se retirer. Nous devons nous remettre au travail avec la nation des Wet'suwet'en dans le respect de ses lois et de sa gouvernance, et travailler de nation à nation avec la Couronne. J'espère pouvoir dès que possible repartir en Colombie-Britannique pour poursuivre ce travail.
En conclusion, je dirais que, en tant que médecin, on m'a d'abord appris à ne pas faire de mal. Or, le débat d'aujourd'hui me semble préjudiciable aux progrès que nous devons accomplir pour parvenir à une solution durable.
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2020-02-20 11:40 [p.1301]
Madam Speaker, as always, I am extremely honoured to stand in this House, the people's House, to represent the people of Timmins—James Bay on unceded Algonquin territory. Let us just reflect on that a moment. This is not just some nice thing we Canadians now say, when we do the land recognition. It is a statement of understanding that there are outstanding historical rights and land issues running across our country, and we need to acknowledge that. That is one of the reasons we are here today.
We are at an unprecedented moment in Canada's history, a moment when we can all come together and rise up to meet the challenge, or we can give in to our lazier base motives of political machismo and spite. I believe we are now dealing with a crisis that has moved from Wet'suwet'en territory out across Canada, and it requires leadership. It requires us, as parliamentarians, to recognize it and be honest with each other. This is bigger than all of us, but if we do not rise to the task, the risks to our nation right now are very serious.
We can come together and try to untangle this extremely complex Gordian knot, or we can play to the usual base in this House of division. I find this opposition motion from the Conservatives to be very telling of their political tactics. This motion has us standing in this House today to “condemn the radical activists who are exploiting divisions within the Wet’suwet’en community”.
It is our job to recognize that there needs to be a conversation not only with the Wet'suwet'en people, but also with indigenous people across this country. It is not for us to say that if they support a gas line we will support them and to have Parliament come down in the middle of a very tense motion.
I point to the other motion the Conservatives brought forward. They were willing to use this national crisis to try to bring down the government and save the opposition leader's political career, who has been rejected by his own party. That is not leadership. That is more of the same kind of joker chaos politics that we do not need at this time.
This past weekend, I joined thousands of young people in the streets of Ottawa. People were also marching in Montreal, Halifax and Vancouver. It was extremely inspiring to see these young people, young indigenous leadership, stepping forward at the front of the march. I spoke to many of them and asked where they were from. They were from places such as Kanesatake, Kitigan Zibi, Fort Albany and Barriere Lake.
I think of the Leader of the Opposition who told these young indigenous people to check their privilege. I know he was not serious. I know he was just doing it as a dig, a slur, a spite, but that is not leadership. The message it is sending to this young generation is that this Parliament is in opposition to their hopes and dreams, and that is not Canada.
I think of the young woman I met from Fort Albany, and the Conservatives would tell her to check her privilege. Her grandparents were at Federal Court this week for the St. Anne's residential school crisis, where some of the worst crimes in history committed against children happened. Her grandparents in Fort Albany are still fighting, and Conservatives would tell this young woman to check her privilege.
I think of Kanesatake and the Mohawk people who have been there since long before us and who will be there long after us, and the Leader of the Opposition is telling the woman I met to check her privilege. Of course he has a $900,000 slush fund for treats and perks. That is quite privileged.
I also think of the amazing young woman I met who spoke up from Barriere Lake, Quebec. Barriere Lake's territory has been stripped of forestry and has been flooded out time and time again by massive hydro dams, and the people have received nothing. Her parents, grandparents and great-grandparents have fought just to stay on that land. To tell her to check her privilege is not on.
Then there is Kitigan Zibi. There are so many young people from Kitigan Zibi. Kitigan Zibi is not very far from Ottawa. It is an incredible Algonquin community right beside Maniwaki. Maniwaki has clean drinking water, but Kitigan Zibi does not. The Conservatives tell the world that they can drive a bitumen pipeline through the Rocky Mountains, but we cannot get clean water to a community that close to Ottawa. This is why people are marching.
What we need to do here today is to not play games with these kinds of motions that the Conservatives are using to divide the Wet'suwet'en people.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
Mr. Charlie Angus: We need to say we have a much bigger crisis. We need to start to untangle this and find a way to de-escalate, because—
Madame la Présidente, comme toujours, je suis très honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre des communes, la Chambre du peuple, en territoire algonquin non cédé, pour représenter la population de Timmins-Baie James. Pensons-y un instant. Ce n’est pas que pour bien paraître que nous, les Canadiens, reconnaissons maintenant le territoire sur lequel nous nous trouvons. Si nous le faisons, c'est pour montrer que nous savons qu’il existe des droits ancestraux ainsi que des revendications territoriales en suspens d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Nous devons en être conscients. C’est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous sommes ici aujourd’hui.
Nous sommes à un moment sans précédent dans l’histoire canadienne, et nous pouvons nous unir pour relever le défi, ou céder par paresse à des motifs primaires dictés par un machisme politique doublé de mépris. À mon avis, nous faisons face à une crise qui a quitté le territoire des Wet'suwet'en pour gagner tout le Canada, et il faut faire preuve de leadership. Cette crise nous oblige, les parlementaires, à en prendre acte et à nous montrer honnêtes les uns avec les autres. Elle nous dépasse tous, mais si nous ne nous montrons pas à la hauteur, les risques actuels pour le pays sont très graves.
Nous pouvons soit collaborer pour essayer de démêler ce nœud gordien très complexe, soit continuer de faire de la rhétorique partisane dans cette Chambre divisée. Cette motion de l’opposition présentée par les conservateurs est, à mon sens, très révélatrice de leurs tactiques politiques. Ils y demandent que la Chambre « condamne les activistes radicaux qui exploitent les divisions au sein de la communauté des Wet’suwet’en ».
Il est de notre devoir de reconnaître qu’une conversation s’impose non seulement avec les Wet'suwet'en, mais aussi avec les Autochtones de tout le pays. Il ne nous appartient pas de dire que s’ils soutiennent un gazoduc, nous les soutiendrons, et le Parlement n’a pas à s’immiscer dans une situation si tendue.
J’attire l’attention sur l’autre motion présentée par les conservateurs. Ils sont prêts à utiliser cette crise nationale pour essayer de faire tomber le gouvernement et sauver la carrière politique du chef de l’opposition, que son propre parti a rejeté. Ce n’est pas faire preuve de leadership. Ce n'est que leur même vieille politique de la discorde, et nous n'en avons nul besoin en ce moment.
Le week-end dernier, je me suis joint à des milliers de jeunes dans les rues d’Ottawa. Des Canadiens manifestaient aussi à Montréal, à Halifax et à Vancouver. Il est très stimulant de voir ces jeunes, ces jeunes dirigeants autochtones, marcher au premier rang de la manifestation. J’ai parlé à beaucoup d’entre eux et je leur ai demandé d’où ils venaient. Ils venaient d’endroits comme Kanesatake, Kitigan Zibi, Fort Albany et Lac-Barrière.
Je pense au chef de l’opposition qui a dit à ces jeunes Autochtones de prendre conscience de leurs privilèges. Je sais qu’il ne parlait pas sérieusement. Je sais qu’il ne le disait que par sarcasme, par dénigrement, par mépris, mais ce n’est pas cela le leadership. Le message qu’il envoie à cette jeune génération, c’est que le Parlement s'élève contre leurs espoirs et leurs rêves, et ce n’est pas cela le Canada.
Je pense à la jeune femme de Fort Albany que j’ai rencontrée, et les conservateurs lui diraient de prendre conscience de ses privilèges. Ses grands-parents étaient à la Cour fédérale cette semaine au sujet de la crise du pensionnat St. Anne, où des crimes parmi les pires de l’histoire ont été commis contre des enfants. Ses grands-parents à Fort Albany continuent de se battre, et les conservateurs diraient à cette jeune femme de prendre conscience de ses privilèges.
Je pense à Kanesatake et au peuple mohawk, qui était là bien avant nous et qui restera bien après notre départ. Le chef de l’opposition dirait à la femme que j'ai rencontrée qu'elle devrait prendre conscience de ses privilèges. Bien entendu, il dispose d'une caisse occulte de 900 000 $ pour des avantages et des à-côtés.
Je pense aussi à l'intervention de la formidable jeune femme du lac Barrière, au Québec. Le territoire du lac Barrière a vu ses forêts coupées de façon sauvage et subit sans cesse des inondations causées par d'énormes barrages hydroélectriques, et les habitants n'ont pas été dédommagés. Les parents, les grands-parents et les arrière-grands-parents de cette femme ont lutté pour demeurer sur ce territoire. On est à côté de la plaque lorsqu'on lui dit de prendre conscience de ses privilèges.
Il y a aussi Kitigan Zibi, où se trouvent beaucoup de jeunes gens. Kitigan Zibi n'est pas très éloignée d'Ottawa. C'est une communauté algonquine remarquable, à proximité de Maniwaki. Maniwaki a accès à de l'eau potable, mais pas Kitigan Zibi. Les conservateurs disent à tout le monde qu'ils peuvent faire transporter du bitume par pipeline à travers les Rocheuses, mais ils sont incapables de fournir de l'eau potable à une communauté située aussi près d'Ottawa. Voilà pourquoi on proteste.
Il faut que nous cessions dès aujourd'hui de finasser avec le genre de motions dont les conservateurs se servent pour diviser le peuple wet'suwet'en.
Des voix: Oh, oh!
M. Charlie Angus: Nous devons admettre qu'il existe une crise bien plus grave. Il faut dénouer l'impasse et trouver une façon de désamorcer la situation, parce que...
View Alexandre Boulerice Profile
NDP (QC)
Madam Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for her remarks. We have essentially the same point of view.
The Conservatives are talking a lot about legality when we know that, historically, with colonialism, legislation has often been used to steal land and violate the rights of indigenous peoples.
I would like to know what she thinks of the 1997 Supreme Court ruling that makes hereditary chiefs stewards of the land.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie ma collègue de son discours. Nous avons sensiblement le même point de vue.
Les conservateurs parlent beaucoup de la légalité alors qu'on sait que, historiquement, avec le colonialisme, la loi a souvent servi à voler des territoires et à brimer les droits des peuples autochtones.
Je voudrais savoir ce qu'elle pense de l'arrêt de 1997 de la Cour suprême qui donne aux chefs héréditaires la responsabilité de la protection du territoire.
View Pam Damoff Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I am not a lawyer and I am not going to pretend to be an expert on decisions, but I do know that Supreme Court decisions are ones that must be respected and I do not think any of us in this place should be so presumptuous as to speak for the Wet’suwet’en people. It really does a disservice to walking on this path of reconciliation for anyone in this place to think that he or she can speak for the Wet’suwet’en people.
Madame la Présidente, je ne suis pas avocate, et je ne vais pas prétendre être une experte des décisions judiciaires. Cependant, je sais que les décisions de la Cour suprême doivent être respectées, et je crois qu'aucun député ne devrait être présomptueux au point de parler au nom des Wet’suwet’en. Le fait que certains députés pensent pouvoir le faire nuit vraiment aux efforts de réconciliation.
View Lindsay Mathyssen Profile
NDP (ON)
View Lindsay Mathyssen Profile
2020-02-20 15:31 [p.1336]
Madam Speaker, the rail stoppage is affecting people's jobs and livelihoods. People in London—Fanshawe, my community, have certainly commented on that, and they want a clear resolution.
However, we need a real, lasting solution. We do not want to just get back to the way that things were. We need to really move forward in positive ways.
I need to know, will the government commit to working out a lasting, sustainable and just solution to the issue of title?
Madame la Présidente, l'interruption des services ferroviaires a des répercussions sur les emplois et les moyens de subsistance de la population. C'est certainement un sujet de conversation dans ma circonscription, London—Fanshawe, et les gens veulent une vraie solution.
Cependant, il faut une solution concrète et durable. Il ne faut pas se contenter de remettre les choses comme elles étaient avant la crise. Nous devons vraiment trouver des solutions positives.
J'aimerais savoir si le gouvernement va s'engager à trouver une solution durable, viable et juste pour résoudre la question des titres ancestraux.
View Bob Bratina Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I really appreciate the comments that are included in that question. The answer is absolutely.
That is why we cannot support the opposition day motion which condemns “the radical activists who are exploiting divisions.” We do not need this kind of language, this rhetoric and angry rebuttal to a situation that is being dealt with.
On the larger point, which my friend from Windsor West has noted, that is why we are continuing the way we are. This problem did not start two weeks ago, it started 200 years ago.
Madame la Présidente, j'aime beaucoup les observations rattachées à cette question. La réponse est: tout à fait.
C'est pour cette raison que nous ne pouvons pas appuyer la motion de l'opposition, qui vise à condamner « les activistes radicaux qui exploitent les divisions ». Il est inutile de tenir ce genre de propos et de discours hargneux en réponse à une situation dont on s'occupe déjà.
Pour ce qui est de la question plus générale, que mon collègue le député de Windsor-Ouest a déjà soulevée, je dirais que c'est en raison de ces circonstances que nous maintenons la même approche. Le problème date non pas d'il y a deux semaines, mais d'il y a 200 ans.
View Jamie Schmale Profile
CPC (ON)
Madam Speaker, I would like to start by saying I am going to split my time with my friend from Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan.
I made a statement in the House yesterday during Question Period that garnered a lot of heckling from the other side. I stated that I, along with my Conservative colleagues, support the Wet'suwet'en people.
I suppose to the Liberals and the NDP it was a funny thing for a Conservative to say, and a funny thing that we would support 20 out of 20 of the band councils that approved the Coastal GasLink pipeline, that we would support economic opportunity for first nations communities, that we would support law and order and that we would support indigenous communities raising themselves up.
Having said all that, the history of humanity is rife with situations where people do not actually understand each other all the time, their motivations, their values or desires. However, we have persevered and found ways to understand each other. We have built civilizations, we have co-operated and we have accomplished great things together.
The key to the complex process of understanding one another, to perceive their intentions and their motivations, is empathy. The neuroscience of empathy is quite fascinating. Humanity, meaning all of us without exception, is egocentric. We are inherently ugly people. We are narcissistic and at times preoccupied with fulfilling our own needs and desires. However, somewhere in our ancient past, we recognized the importance of caring for our children. We realized the benefits of co-operation, and our capacity for compassion and tolerance grew.
There is a part of the brain that recognizes our self-centredness. The right supramarginal gyrus recognizes the lack of empathy and it adjusts our thinking accordingly. Researchers actually found that, when we make rash decisions, this part of the cerebral cortex does not work properly. Our ability to understand others is reduced greatly when we do not take the time to hear the views of others.
Researchers made another interesting discovery. When we are in a state of comfort or in a pleasant situation, we are less able to empathize with another's pain and suffering. They seized upon and verified an important truth: In order for humanity to make effective and compassionate decisions, we must be able to connect to that part of the brain that allows us to recognize our selfish nature. We do that most effectively by taking the time to hear, see and put ourselves in uncomfortable situations, the same situations as those we are empathizing with.
Fortunately for our species, and perhaps a testament to the great accomplishments we have all made together, the human brain is adjustable. Our capacity for empathy and compassion is never fixed. If we put ourselves in someone else's shoes and do unto others as we would have them do unto us, we can reinforce those neural connections and we can move down the road of reconciliation together.
The road will not be easy. Thousands of years of history have taught us that, but they have also taught us that together we can achieve amazing things.
Here we are asking the House to stand in solidarity with the majority of the Wet'suwet'en people who support the Coastal GasLink project. However, there are two sides. Not everyone supports the decisions of the majority of the Wet'suwet'en people or the 20 democratically elected leaders of the indigenous communities along the proposed pipeline route. While we struggle to put ourselves in other's shoes, we empathize with their concerns.
I have to wonder if those activists have put themselves in the shoes of the majority of indigenous peoples who value self-reliance, communication and fiscal accountability, who believe that resources should be sustainable and equitable, and who believe that governance should be based on their collective heritage. The Wet'suwet'en do. Those values are listed in their mission statement along with a powerful vision and purpose declaration stating:
We are proud, progressive Wet’suwet’en dedicated to the preservation and enhancement of our culture, traditions and territories; working as one for the betterment of all.
“For the betterment of all” is a very empathetic statement to be sure, one that should hang from the very ceiling of this place. Is that not why we are here, for the betterment of Canada and Canadians, one and all?
We also need to take a step back. We need to hear each other. We need to see each other. We need time to sort out these issues and to address them, to reconcile our differences and make agreements. This is why we need to end those blockades. It is not in order to punish, but to ease tension and move forward. Let us demonstrate that here, so we can do it there. We have waited far too long to act.
As people in all parts of our country fear shortages of essential goods and as job losses mount, the number of people demanding resolution grows. The Council of the Federation, a group composed of all of Canada's premiers, is calling for an immediate and peaceful end to these protests. Temperatures are rising. Yesterday in Edmonton, counter protesters showed up and dismantled a barricade. Heated words were exchanged. Threats were made. Out of frustration and fear, people are not listening or looking at each other. We are all better than that.
During this upheaval the country is looking for leadership, yet despite calls from the hereditary chiefs for the Prime Minister to get involved, the Liberal government has done everything it could to distance itself from the ongoing conflict. The Prime Minister will now, I hope, start taking this matter very seriously. It is a national crisis that needs the utmost attention.
We ask the Prime Minister to act now, to stand with the majority of the Wet'suwet'en people who want to work as one for the betterment of all. Self-reliance fosters self-determination and this is at the heart of economic reconciliation.
The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board produced its 2016 report, “Reconciliation: Growing Canada's Economy by $27.7. Billion”.
The board found that:
If Indigenous peoples had the same education and training as non-Indigenous peoples, the resulting increase in productivity would mean an additional $8.5 billion in income earned annually by the Indigenous population.
It went on:
If Indigenous peoples were given the same access to economic opportunities available to other Canadians, the resulting increase in employment would result in an additional $6.9 billion per year in employment income and approximately 135,000 newly employed Indigenous people.
If the poverty rates among Indigenous Peoples were reduced, the fiscal costs associated with supporting people living in poverty, would decline by an estimated $8.4 billion annually.
Overall, if the gap in opportunities for Indigenous communities across Canada were closed, it would result in an increase in GDP of $27.7 billion annually or a boost of about 1.5% to Canada's economy.
If we want to have true reconciliation, we must have economic reconciliation. It is good for indigenous communities. It is good for local municipalities and it is good for the Canadian economy.
The $6 billion, 670-kilometre Coastal GasLink pipeline, which received approval from the province, the 20 first nations band councils, including five of the six band councils in the Wet'suwet'en nation, is about economic reconciliation. It is ultimately about a shared future, one where government-to-government co-operation benefits all Canadians, both indigenous and non-indigenous.
Bonnie George, a Wet'suwet'en woman, who has been ridiculed and called a traitor, maintains an enlightened view of the world. When asked about how the police and governments were handling this situation, she said:
The authorities, they're just like the rest of us. They have a job to fulfil. They have an injunction in front of them that they have to enforce and they did all possible, you know, to try to de-escalate.
She went on:
As a Wet'suwet'en person, it is really disheartening to see all of this unravel as it has, because our people—our hereditary chiefs and our elders in the past—they've always had discussions.
Let us allow Canadians to get back to work, allow the goods that Canadians need to ensure their health and safety flow and our railways are going, our borders are safe, then, with earnest and swift resolve, meet with the Wet'suwet'en people and take the time to hear and see and to put ourselves in their position.
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais d'abord préciser que je vais partager mon temps avec mon collègue de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan.
J'ai fait une déclaration à la Chambre hier pendant la période des questions qui a suscité de vives réactions chez les députés d'en face. J'ai déclaré que mes collègues conservateurs et moi soutenions la nation des Wet'suwet'en.
Je présume que les libéraux et les néo-démocrates ont trouvé que c'était étrange venant d'un conservateur, et qu'il était étrange que nous soutenions les 20 conseils de bande concernés qui ont tous approuvé le gazoduc Coastal GasLink, que nous soutenions les possibilités économiques qui s'offrent aux Premières Nations, que nous soutenions le principe de l'ordre public et que nous soutenions l'essor des communautés autochtones.
Cela dit, l'histoire de l'humanité regorge d'exemples où les gens ne se comprennent pas toujours, ne comprennent pas nécessairement leurs motivations, leurs valeurs ou leurs désirs. Cela ne les a toutefois pas empêchés de persévérer et de trouver des façons de se comprendre. Ensemble, ils ont créé des civilisations, ont collaboré et accompli de grandes choses.
La clé du processus complexe qui consiste à se comprendre mutuellement, à percevoir chez les autres leurs intentions et leurs motivations, c'est l'empathie. L'empathie est une neuroscience tout à fait fascinante. Tous les humains que nous sommes, sans exception, sont des êtres égocentriques. Nous sommes intrinsèquement détestables. Nous sommes narcissiques et souvent préoccupés avant tout par la satisfaction de nos besoins et la réalisation de nos désirs. Toutefois, nous avons déjà compris, dans un passé lointain, l'importance de prendre soin de nos enfants. Nous avons compris les avantages de la coopération, et notre aptitude à la compassion et la tolérance s'est développée.
Une partie de notre cerveau est consciente de notre égocentrisme. Le gyrus supramarginal droit est conscient de notre manque d'empathie et modifie notre pensée en conséquence. Les chercheurs ont même constaté que, lorsque nous prenons des décisions précipitées, cette partie de notre cortex cérébral ne fonctionne pas comme il faut. Notre capacité de comprendre les autres se trouve considérablement réduite lorsque nous ne prenons pas le temps d'entendre de ce que les autres ont à dire.
Les chercheurs ont fait une autre découverte intéressante. Lorsque nous sommes dans une situation confortable ou agréable, notre capacité de compassion à l'égard des souffrances des autres diminue. Ils ont examiné une vérité importante: pour prendre des décisions efficaces et compatissantes, nous devons pouvoir nous connecter avec cette partie du cerveau qui est consciente de notre égocentrisme. Nous y arrivons le mieux lorsque nous prenons le temps d'écouter ce que les autres ont à dire, de nous placer dans des situations inconfortables, soit les situations dans lesquelles se trouvent les gens pour qui nous avons de l'empathie.
Heureusement pour l'espèce humaine, et cela témoigne probablement des grandes réalisations que nous avons accomplies ensemble, le cerveau humain est capable d'adaptation. Notre capacité d'empathie n'est jamais fixe. Si nous nous mettons dans la peau d'une autre personne, et la traitons comme nous aimerions être traités, nous pouvons renforcer ces connexions neuronales et emprunter tous ensemble la voie de la réconciliation.
La route ne sera pas facile. Des milliers d'années nous l'ont appris, mais elles nous ont aussi appris qu'ensemble, nous pouvons accomplir de grandes choses.
Nous demandons à la Chambre de se montrer solidaire de la majorité des Wet'suwet'en qui appuie le projet Coastal GasLink. Rappelons toutefois qu'il y a deux camps. Ce n'est pas toute la communauté qui soutient les décisions prises par la majorité des Wet'suwet'en ou des 20 dirigeants démocratiquement élus des communautés autochtones situées le long du tracé proposé du gazoduc. Nous nous efforçons de comprendre d'autres perspectives et de nous montrer sensibles à leurs préoccupations.
Je me demande si ces militants ont essayé de se mettre à la place des peuples autochtones qui, en majorité, valorisent l'autonomie, la communication et la responsabilité financière, qui souhaitent un partage équitable et durable des ressources, et qui pensent que la gouvernance doit se fonder sur le respect du patrimoine collectif. Les Wet'suwet'en sont guidés par ces valeurs, qui figurent dans leur énoncé de mission aux côtés de la puissante déclaration suivante:
Nous sommes les Wet’suwet’en, un peuple fier et progressif. Notre mission est de promouvoir le maintien et la valorisation de notre culture, de nos traditions et de nos territoires; nous travaillons ensemble pour le bien de tous.
« Pour le bien de tous »: voilà certainement une déclaration très forte, une déclaration qui devrait être placée à la vue de tous dans cette enceinte. N'est-ce pas l'objectif qui nous réunit ici, c'est-à-dire travailler tous ensemble pour le plus grand bien du Canada et des Canadiens?
Nous devons également prendre du recul. Nous devons nous écouter et avoir de la considération les uns pour les autres. Nous devons prendre le temps de laisser nos querelles de côté et d'aborder ces questions pour arriver à s'entendre. C'est pourquoi nous devons lever ces barrages. Le but n'est pas de punir les gens, mais d'apaiser les tensions pour que les choses progressent. Montrons l'exemple ici pour que cela se produise là-bas. Nous avons attendu beaucoup trop longtemps pour agir.
Alors qu'un peu partout au Canada, la peur de manquer de produits essentiels se fait sentir et les pertes d'emploi s'accumulent, les gens veulent de plus en plus qu'on résolve le problème. Le Conseil de la fédération, un groupe composé de tous les premiers ministres du pays, demande qu'on mette immédiatement fin aux manifestations de manière pacifique. Les esprits s'échauffent. Hier, à Edmonton, des contre-manifestants sont allés démanteler une barricade. Des échanges acerbes ont eu lieu, et des menaces ont été proférées. Les gens refusent d'écouter ce que les autres ont à dire et les ignorent parce qu'ils ont peur et parce qu'ils sont frustrés. Nous sommes tous capables de faire mieux.
En ces temps de tourmente, nous devons faire preuve de leadership; pourtant, même après avoir reçu des appels à l'aide de chefs héréditaires, le premier ministre fait tout pour rester à l'écart de ce conflit. J'espère qu'à partir de maintenant, le premier ministre va commencer à prendre cette question très au sérieux. Il s'agit d'une crise nationale qui mérite toute notre attention.
Nous demandons au premier ministre d'agir maintenant, de se ranger aux côtés de la majorité des Wet'suwet'en qui veulent travailler ensemble pour le bien de tous. L'autonomie favorise l'autodétermination, et c'est au coeur de la réconciliation économique.
Le Conseil national de développement économique des Autochtones a publié son rapport de 2016 intitulé « Réconciliation : stimuler l'économie canadienne de 27,7 milliards ».
Le Conseil a conclu que:
Si les Autochtones avaient accès aux mêmes services en matière d’éducation et de formation que les non Autochtones, le revenu des Autochtones augmenterait annuellement de 8,5 milliards de dollars.
Il a poursuivi en ces termes:
Si les Autochtones avaient le même accès aux débouchés économiques dont bénéficient les autres Canadiens, la hausse en matière d’emploi qui en découlerait correspondrait à 6,9 milliards de dollars de plus en revenus d’emploi et à environ 135 000 Autochtones qui se joindraient à la population active.
Si les taux de pauvreté des Autochtones baissaient, les coûts budgétaires relatifs à l’aide accordée aux personnes qui vivent dans la pauvreté diminueraient approximativement de 8,4 milliards de dollars par année.
Dans l’ensemble, si l’écart relatif à l’accès aux opportunités des collectivités autochtones était éliminé partout au Canada, le PIB pourrait augmenter de 27,7 milliards de dollars par année, ce qui représente une croissance de 1,5 % de l’économie canadienne.
Pour qu'une véritable réconciliation ait lieu, il faut une réconciliation économique. C'est bien pour les communautés autochtones, c'est bien pour les villes et c'est bien pour l'économie canadienne.
Le gazoduc Coastal GasLink est un projet de réconciliation économique. Ce projet de 6 milliards de dollars qui s'étend sur 670 kilomètres a reçu l'approbation de la province, des 20 conseils de bande des Premières Nations, notamment de cinq des six conseils de bande de la nation Wet'suwet'en. C'est un projet d'avenir commun où la collaboration de gouvernement à gouvernement profite à tous les Canadiens, autant les Autochtones que les non-Autochtones.
Bonnie George, une Wet'suwet'en qui a été ridiculisée et qualifiée de traîtresse, a une vision très perspicace du monde. Quand on lui a demandé ce qu'elle pensait de la gestion de la situation menée par la police et par les gouvernements, voici ce qu'elle a répondu:
Les autorités sont comme tout le monde: elles ont un travail à faire. Elles ont une injonction en main et elles doivent la faire respecter. Vous savez, elles ont tout fait pour tenter de désamorcer la situation.
Elle a ajouté:
En tant que Wet'suwet'en, je trouve décourageant de voir où en est rendue la situation, parce que notre peuple — les chefs héréditaires et les anciens par le passé — a toujours employé le dialogue.
Permettons aux Canadiens d'aller travailler, aux marchandises dont ils ont besoin pour assurer leur santé et leur sécurité d'être acheminées, au service ferroviaire de reprendre et aux frontières d'être sécurisées, puis empressons-nous d'aller rencontrer les Wet'suwet'en en toute sincérité pour les écouter et tenter de nous mettre à leur place.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Madam Speaker, we face a national crisis and we need strong leadership to address it. We have a natural gas pipeline project that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by displacing coal with cleaner natural gas. It will create jobs and opportunity and it has the support of all elected indigenous leaders in the area and a majority of the local hereditary chiefs.
A small minority of hereditary chiefs oppose the designated route for this project and so radical activists, many of whom are not indigenous, are using this issue as an excuse to shut down critical infrastructure and paralyze our national economy. These activists are operating openly under the banner Shut Down Canada, and they are succeeding to some extent. This is our winter of discontent.
These illegal blockades have forced massive job losses already and risk creating shortages of vital commodities in certain regions. There has also been tampering with rail lines, putting many people at risk. How bizarre that activists who claim to care about the environment are shutting down rail transport?
As the government fails to act, escalation continues. Escalation is the result of the messages that the government is sending that this kind of lawlessness is permissible. We have some members of this House who are explicitly celebrating these violent, illegal and dangerous protests. The longer this goes on, the more likely that we will see a repeat of these illegal blockades every time anyone tries to build anything.
We need a strong response from the government. We need the government to give policy direction to enforce the law. The government says it cannot direct the police force. Certainly it cannot direct operational aspects of its response, but it is the responsibility of an elected government in a democracy to give broad policy direction to our police. We accept, in many cases, that this kind of policy direction is right and necessary already.
In fact, the government is saying explicitly in this House that the police should not enforce the law. As such, the government is already giving policy direction. From my perspective, it is the wrong policy direction, but either way, I do not think here there is any serious dispute of the idea that civilian authority giving policy direction to police is legitimate. Indeed it is already happening. Civilian oversight of police is part of how democracy works.
Also in a democracy, the principle that justifies the use of force by police is the idea that police are there to protect society and law-abiding citizens, people who want to work and take the train to buy the things they need. The police have a moral obligation to protect law-abiding citizens by enforcing the law. There is a reasonable margin of discretion in enforcement, but if the police fail to enforce the law on a grand scale in a way that is injurious to the rights of law-abiding citizens, then they bring the law into disrepute and reintroduce a state of nature in which people feel they have no choice but to take the law into their own hands.
Conservatives' contention is that it is the obligation of the government and the police to ensure that the law is enforced. A failure to enforce the law leads to escalation as more and more people feel they do not have to respect the law. It then leads to a response from citizens and further chaos with devastating social and economic implications.
This present escalation is a national crisis and it requires real leadership. The Prime Minister's response to this crisis has been to emphasize dialogue in isolation. He talks about the need to understand the experience of people with different perspectives. I will make two specific points about dialogue. The first is about the right time and place for dialogue and the second is about the question of with whom the government should be undertaking dialogue.
Therefore, when is the right time and place for dialogue? It is critically important for all of us to seek to understand the experience and perspectives of different people. This is something I personally take very seriously. Over the Christmas break, I read Love & Courage, the NDP leader's book, which is by the way very good and very worth reading. I also read Common Ground, by Jonathan Kay. I read them both because I decided that it was important for me to understand the ideas and experience that influence the leaders of other parties.
In addition to reading and listening, after the appropriate period of proportionate deliberation, leaders must also have the capacity to take decisions in the public interest. There is a time for talk and there is a time for action. We must dialogue with people with whom we disagree, but we must also insist that we do not stand in the middle of railroad tracks in the process.
If a violent assailant came into my home to attack my family, I might be very curious to know his ideological motivation, whether he is motivated by some particular kind of violent extremism or reacting to violence he has experienced in his own life or something else. These would be interesting and perhaps important questions, but my first response to the violent assailant would obviously be to protect myself and my family.
When our vital national infrastructure is being violently blocked in violation of the rule of law and when rail tampering is not only endangering the economy but people's lives, then we must act to end the violence. We must dialogue, yes, but from a strong position of commitment to law and order. Dialogue and enforcement can happen concurrently on separate tracks, and not on train tracks.
Of greater importance is the question about with whom we should be dialoguing. There are large and complex issues involved in indigenous reconciliation, but these protests and the debate today are about a very specific issue: the development of the Coastal GasLink project.
All of the band councils impacted, and a majority of the hereditary chiefs, support the project. All of us in the House want to have a respectful, collaborative, serious and functioning nation-to-nation relationship with indigenous peoples. In order for one nation to have a functioning relationship with another nation, each nation's representatives must know who the representatives of the other nation are and be able to talk to them.
When Canada and the U.S. negotiate on trade issues, for example, we need to know who speaks for the American people so that we can talk to them and negotiate with them. Of course, we recognize that a nation's decision-making structure can be complex, but to work together two nations need a process through which the right people can talk to each other about the right things.
In the case of our relationship with a nation like the United Kingdom, we understand that there is an elected leadership in the British House of Commons and a hereditary structure in the Royal Family.
Although we recognize the important role in the British constitution and in our own Constitution for this form of hereditary leadership, we still understand that any nation-to-nation dialogue involves the pursuit of agreement with the elected representatives of the British people. If Canada and the U.K. were to negotiate a free trade deal through their elected governments and Houses of Parliament and a member of the Royal Family decided that he or she did not like it, we would say that it is not necessarily for that person but it is rather for the elected representatives to speak on behalf of the nation.
Even if the present relationship of the Crown and Parliament was imposed through a Dutch colonial intervention in British affairs in 1688, it is still the law as it is.
This is what is required for a functioning nation-to-nation relationship. If we are to have a functioning nation-to-nation relationship with indigenous nations in Canada, then we must know who speaks for particular indigenous nations and who speaks for the Canadian government so that representatives for each side can dialogue and come to agreement. If we do not seek to identify who our dialogue partners are going to be, then we can never move forward together on anything.
I believe that while dialogue can happen between any groups of people, negotiation and a realization of agreements on behalf of a people are the responsibility of the elected representatives of that people. The idea that the elected representatives of a people speak for the people is not rooted in a particular cultural or intellectual tradition. Rather, it has come to be recognized as part of the body of universal human rights.
Article 21, subsection 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights says:
The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.
Similar UN declarations recognize the rights of indigenous peoples to maintain and strengthen their own institutions, cultures and traditions. Indeed, it is the right of indigenous peoples to maintain, develop or change their own models of government, but that is a right vested in the peoples of indigenous nations, not in their hereditary leaders.
I believe in the rights of indigenous peoples and all peoples to democratically elect their own leaders. It must be the decisions of elected indigenous leaders that carry the day.
There could certainly be a role for hereditary chiefs in a democratic system, just as our system has a role for hereditary leadership in the form of the Canadian Crown. However, it is the fundamental human right of people to choose to develop if they wish. Our dialogue about the development plans of particular nations needs to be with the elected representatives of those particular nations.
Members have rightly spoken about the horrific violations of fundamental human rights of indigenous peoples in the past, but those violations do not justify the violations today of the rights of indigenous people to democratic self-determination. Those who think that they can overrule the democratically expressed wishes of this indigenous nation are just as colonialist in their thinking as the colonizers of the past.
We cannot negotiate with people who do not speak for these communities about the future of these communities. We must dialogue with the right people. Solidarity with people who are vulnerable is important. Being in solidarity with someone, though, does not mean that we claim to speak for them. I have not spoken about whether this project should go ahead, simply that the will of the elected leadership must prevail.
One thing that I have heard often from other members that is quite offensive is the suggestion that indigenous people who support development are somehow only doing it because of the money.
That is ridiculous. Legislators of all backgrounds and at all levels generally support economic development in their communities because they want a bright and more prosperous future for their children and grandchildren. These are reasonable decisions for elected indigenous leaders to make, in view of the common good for the communities that they are elected to govern.
It is time that we clear the blockades and let the Wet’suwet’en people make their own choice.
Madame la Présidente, nous sommes aux prises avec une crise nationale, et nous avons besoin d'un solide leadership pour la régler. Le gazoduc dont il est question contribuera à réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, puisqu'il permettra d'éliminer du charbon et de le remplacer par du gaz naturel, un combustible plus propre. Ce projet créera de l'emploi et des débouchés, et il a l'appui de tous les dirigeants autochtones élus et de la majorité des chefs héréditaires de la région.
Une minorité de chefs héréditaires s'opposent au tracé prévu, ce qui sert d'excuse à des militants radicaux, dont plusieurs ne sont pas autochtones, pour bloquer des infrastructures essentielles et paralyser l'économie du pays. Ces militants affichent ouvertement le slogan « Shut Down Canada », c'est-à-dire « Fermons le Canada », un objectif qu'ils ont atteint en partie. C'est l'hiver du mécontentement.
Ces barrages illégaux ont déjà causé d'immenses pertes d'emplois. Ils risquent aussi d'entraîner des pénuries de denrées essentielles dans certaines régions. Des manifestants ont aussi trafiqué des voies ferrées, ce qui met de nombreuses vies en danger. N'est-il pas vraiment étrange que des militants supposément préoccupés par l'environnement bloquent le transport ferroviaire?
Comme le gouvernement n'agit toujours pas, la situation s'aggrave. L'escalade a lieu parce que le gouvernement laisse entendre que ce genre d'anarchie est acceptable. Certains députés célèbrent ouvertement les protestations violentes, illégales et dangereuses. Plus celles-ci dureront, plus il est probable que ce genre de blocages illégaux se reproduisent chaque fois que quelqu'un tentera de construire quelque chose.
Le gouvernement doit intervenir avec fermeté. Il doit dicter une politique pour qu'on fasse respecter la loi. Le gouvernement affirme qu'il ne peut pas donner des directives aux services policiers. S'il est vrai qu'un gouvernement élu démocratiquement ne peut pas diriger les aspects opérationnels d'une intervention, il lui incombe de donner à la police une orientation stratégique. Dans beaucoup de cas, nous acceptons ce genre de directives stratégiques comme justes et nécessaires.
En fait, le gouvernement affirme explicitement à la Chambre que la police ne devrait pas faire appliquer la loi. Ainsi, le gouvernement donne une orientation stratégique. Je suis d'avis qu'on s'engage dans la mauvaise direction, mais de toute façon, je ne crois pas que quiconque conteste sérieusement l'idée selon laquelle les autorités civiles peuvent légitimement donner une orientation stratégique à la police. En fait, les choses fonctionnent déjà ainsi. La surveillance civile de la police fait partie du fonctionnement d'une démocratie.
De plus, dans une démocratie, l'emploi de la force par la police est justifié parce qu'elle a pour rôle de protéger la société et les citoyens respectueux de la loi, par exemple les personnes qui veulent travailler et prendre le train pour acheter les choses dont elles ont besoin. La police a l'obligation morale de protéger les citoyens respectueux de la loi en appliquant la loi. Il y a une marge de discrétion raisonnable à cet égard. Cependant, si la police n'applique pas la loi à grande échelle et que cela porte atteinte aux droits des citoyens respectueux de la loi, cela jettera le discrédit sur la loi et nous ramènera à un stade où les gens se sentent obligés de se faire justice eux-mêmes.
Les conservateurs estiment que le gouvernement et la police ont l'obligation d'assurer l'application de la loi. S'ils ne le font pas, cela aggravera les choses parce qu'un nombre croissant de personnes croiront qu'elles ne sont pas obligées de respecter la loi. Une telle situation entraînera une réponse citoyenne, ce qui provoquera encore plus de chaos et aura des conséquences socioéconomiques dévastatrices.
La situation qui s'aggrave est une crise nationale qui nécessite un véritable leadership. Le premier ministre a réagi à cette crise en mettant l'accent sur le besoin d'entamer le dialogue, mais sans tenir compte du contexte. Il parle de la nécessité de comprendre la réalité de personnes qui ont des points de vue différents. J'aimerais dire deux choses bien précises au sujet du dialogue. La première, c'est qu'il y a un endroit et un moment pour le dialogue, et la deuxième, c'est que le gouvernement devrait se demander avec qui il doit engager un dialogue.
Par conséquent, quand est le bon moment et quel est le bon endroit pour entamer le dialogue? C'est très important que chacun d'entre nous essaye de comprendre l'expérience et la perspective des autres. C'est une chose que je prends très au sérieux. Pendant le temps des Fêtes, j'ai lu le livre du chef du NPD, Love & Courage, qui, en passant, est très bon et vaut vraiment la peine d'être lu. J'ai aussi lu Common Ground de Jonathan Kay. J'ai lu ces deux livres parce que c'est important pour moi de comprendre les idées et les expériences qui influencent les chefs des autres partis.
En plus de lire et d'écouter, les dirigeants doivent aussi être capables, au terme d'une période de délibérations juste et équilibrée, de prendre des décisions dans l'intérêt du public. Il y a un temps pour discuter et un temps pour agir. Nous devons dialoguer avec ceux qui ne partagent pas notre avis, mais nous devons aussi insister pour que les gens ne restent pas au milieu de la voie ferrée pendant ce dialogue.
Si un agresseur violent entrait chez moi pour s'en prendre à ma famille, je pourrais être très curieux de connaître ses motivations idéologiques et de savoir s'il est motivé par une forme de violence extrême ou s'il réagit à la violence qu'il a subie dans sa propre vie ou par autre chose. Ces questions seraient intéressantes, voire importantes, mais ma première réaction à la vue de cet agresseur violent serait évidemment de me protéger et de protéger ma famille.
Lorsque les infrastructures essentielles de notre pays sont bloquées d'une façon violente qui va à l'encontre de la primauté du droit, et lorsqu'on trafique des installations ferroviaires et qu'on menace ainsi non seulement l'économie, mais aussi la vie des gens, alors nous devons agir pour mettre fin à la violence. Il est vrai que nous devons dialoguer, mais nous devons le faire tout en maintenant avec vigueur l'ordre public. Le dialogue et le maintien de l'ordre sont deux voies que l'on peut emprunter en même temps et ailleurs que sur une voie ferrée.
La grande question est de savoir avec qui nous devons dialoguer. La réconciliation comporte des enjeux vastes et complexes, mais les manifestations et le débat d'aujourd'hui portent sur un enjeu très précis: le projet de Coastal GasLink.
Tous les conseils de bande touchés et la majorité des chefs héréditaires appuient le projet. Tous les députés de la Chambre veulent une relation de nation à nation respectueuse, sérieuse, coopérative et fonctionnelle avec les peuples autochtones. Or, pour qu'une nation ait une relation qui fonctionne bien avec une autre nation, il faut que les représentants de chaque nation sachent qui sont les représentants de l'autre nation et qu'ils puissent leur parler.
Par exemple, lorsque le Canada et les États-Unis négocient des questions commerciales, les représentants du Canada doivent savoir qui parle au nom des Américains, afin de pouvoir leur parler et négocier avec eux. Nous sommes conscients, bien sûr, que la structure décisionnelle d'une nation peut être complexe, mais pour travailler ensemble, deux nations doivent avoir une façon de procéder pour que les bonnes personnes discutent ensemble des bons enjeux.
En ce qui concerne notre relation avec une nation comme le Royaume-Uni, nous savons que les dirigeants sont élus à la Chambre des communes britannique, et qu'il existe également une structure héréditaire au sein de la famille royale.
Bien que nous reconnaissions le rôle important de ce type de leadership héréditaire dans la constitution britannique et dans notre propre constitution, nous comprenons que tout dialogue de nation à nation implique la recherche d'un accord avec les représentants élus du peuple britannique. Si le Canada et le Royaume-Uni devaient négocier un accord de libre-échange par l'intermédiaire de leurs gouvernements et chambres parlementaires élus, et qu'un membre de la famille royale s'y opposait, nous dirions que ce n'est pas forcément à cette personne, mais plutôt aux représentants élus de parler au nom de la nation.
Même si la relation actuelle entre la Couronne et le Parlement a été imposée lors d'une intervention coloniale néerlandaise dans les affaires britanniques en 1688, c'est cette loi qui prévaut.
C'est ce qu'exige le bon fonctionnement des relations de nation à nation. Pour assurer le bon fonctionnement de notre relation avec les peuples autochtones, nous devons savoir qui parle au nom de telle ou telle nation autochtone, et qui parle au nom du gouvernement canadien. Ainsi, les représentants de chaque partie pourront échanger et parvenir à un accord. Si nous ne cherchons pas à cerner nos interlocuteurs, nous ne pourrons jamais parvenir ensemble à faire avancer des dossiers.
J'estime que tout le monde peut participer au dialogue, mais qu'il incombe aux représentants élus de négocier et de conclure des accords au nom de la population qui les a élus. L'idée que les représentants élus d'un peuple parlent au nom de ce peuple n'est pas propre à une tradition culturelle ou intellectuelle en particulier. Plutôt, elle est reconnue comme un élément de l'ensemble des droits universels de la personne.
En effet, le point 3 de l'article 21 de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l'homme dit:
La volonté du peuple est le fondement de l'autorité des pouvoirs publics ; cette volonté doit s'exprimer par des élections honnêtes qui doivent avoir lieu périodiquement, au suffrage universel égal et au vote secret ou suivant une procédure équivalente assurant la liberté du vote.
D'autres déclarations semblables de l'ONU reconnaissent le droit des Autochtones de maintenir et de renforcer leurs propres institutions, cultures et traditions. Effectivement, les Autochtones ont le droit de maintenir, de développer ou de modifier leurs propres modèles de gouvernement. Cependant, ce droit appartient aux peuples autochtones, et non à leurs dirigeants héréditaires.
Je crois au droit des peuples autochtones — et de tous les peuples, d'ailleurs — d'élire démocratiquement leurs dirigeants. Ce sont les décisions des dirigeants autochtones élus qui doivent prévaloir.
Les chefs héréditaires pourraient certainement avoir un rôle à jouer dans un système démocratique, tout comme notre système a un rôle pour le leadership héréditaire que représente la Couronne canadienne. Cependant, c'est le droit fondamental des gens de choisir de se développer s'ils le souhaitent. Notre dialogue sur les plans de développement de nations particulières doit se faire avec les représentants élus de celles-ci.
Les députés ont parlé à juste titre des horribles violations des droits fondamentaux que les peuples autochtones ont subies dans le passé, mais ces violations ne justifient pas les violations actuelles de leurs droits par rapport à l'autodétermination démocratique. Ceux qui pensent qu'ils peuvent ignorer les souhaits exprimés démocratiquement par cette nation autochtone sont tout aussi colonialistes que les colonisateurs d'antan.
Nous ne pouvons pas négocier l'avenir de ces communautés avec des personnes qui ne parlent pas en leur nom. Nous devons dialoguer avec des interlocuteurs légitimes. La solidarité avec les personnes vulnérables est importante. Cette solidarité ne signifie pas pour autant que nous devrions parler en leur nom. Je n'ai pas parlé du bien-fondé de ce projet, mais simplement du fait que c'est la volonté des dirigeants élus qui doit prévaloir.
J'ai souvent entendu des députés dire que les peuples autochtones ne soutiennent le développement que pour l'argent, en quelque sorte. Je trouve cette déclaration offensante.
C'est ridicule. Les législateurs de tous horizons et de tous les ordres de gouvernement soutiennent généralement le développement économique de leur communauté parce qu'ils veulent un avenir brillant et prospère pour leurs enfants et petits-enfants. Il s'agit de décisions raisonnables que les dirigeants autochtones élus doivent prendre, en vue du bien commun des communautés qu'ils sont chargés de gouverner.
Il est temps de lever les barrages et de laisser les Wet'suwet'en faire leur propre choix.
View Patrick Weiler Profile
Lib. (BC)
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Mount Royal.
I would like to acknowledge that we are gathered here on the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin people.
The motion before us today addresses a pressing issue impacting communities across the country. The current situation is difficult for everyone: indigenous and non-indigenous peoples, impacted communities, businesses, workers and travellers. I believe there remains time for all parties to engage in open and respectful dialogue to ensure the situation is resolved peacefully.
For more than 150 years, indigenous peoples in Canada have faced systemic discrimination in every aspect of their lives. Canada has prevented a true equal partnership from developing with indigenous peoples, imposing instead a relationship based on colonial ways of thinking and doing, paternalism and control.
The relationship of the past has provided us with a legacy of devastation, pain and suffering. For decades, indigenous peoples have been calling on the Canadian government to respect their right to jurisdiction over their own affairs and to have control and agency over their land, housing, education, and child and family services.
This history and growing awareness was the genesis of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which enshrines the right of indigenous peoples to self-determination. Its 46 articles cover collective and individual rights on everything from cultural identity and education to language and health rights. It is a universal framework for the survival, dignity and well-being of indigenous people all over the world.
I am very proud this was endorsed by Canada without qualification in 2016 and I am proud our government has committed to developing legislation to fully and effectively implement this framework by the end of this year.
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's calls to action describe the declaration as the framework for reconciliation. That is because the declaration, fundamentally, is about advancing self-determination and rebalancing the relationship between states and indigenous peoples.
This is just one step on the long path toward reconciliation our government is taking. We are working to build a new relationship with indigenous peoples grounded in the affirmation of these rights, in respect, in co-operation, in partnership and in the aim for a new legacy built on a solid foundation of self-determination that we can be proud of.
As the Minister of Indigenous Services stated, it is clear that self-determination is the right path to take. We are making progress from coast to coast to coast. We are doing the work.
Indigenous self-government is important. Self-governing indigenous peoples have better socio-economic outcomes. More of their children finish high school. Fewer of their people are unemployed and health outcomes are better.
Self-determination improves the health, well-being and prosperity of indigenous communities, and it benefits all Canadians. Conversations about self-determination and self-governance have never been more urgent, and steps are being taken to bring our country toward a future where indigenous peoples are the drivers of their own destinies and where the federal government is there to support them in any way they see fit.
It is a privilege to represent a riding that encompasses the territories of three first nations. We know that indigenizing our education systems empowers first nations, which is why the Ts'zil Learning Centre was the right step to help Lil'wat Nation thrive. Their learning philosophy is based in Lil'wat cultural renewal, holistic learning and personal growth. The learning centre is a potent example of what indigenous self-government looks like in education.
On the Sunshine Coast, the shíshálh Nation is leading the way. In 1986 they became the first band in Canada to achieve self-governance after a dialogue and partnership with the government that resulted in legislation being passed. They now hold elections, have control over their lands, administer services and share their culture with the community. They are excited to be embarking on a new, affordable housing project for their people. They also recently had their first election after making their election process even more inclusive.
There are mechanisms within our power in order to help first nations partners. We are taking steps in the right direction. One of these mechanisms is to have regular meetings between the Prime Minister, key cabinet ministers and first nations, Inuit and Métis nations. These meetings are to identify each community's distinct priorities and help the government and indigenous peoples work together to develop solutions.
These permanent bilateral mechanisms were created to better serve indigenous peoples engaged in the important work of advancing greater self-determination. They also enable Crown-indigenous co-operation in identifying priorities and developing policies. This important national work will reflect the diversity and unique priorities of first nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada.
Another vehicle for advancing self-determination is through the negotiation of new treaties, self-government and other constructive arrangements. In the last four years, the government has created 90 new negotiation tables, including with the Wet'suwet'en, and there are now more than 150 active negotiation tables across the country to advance the relationship with indigenous peoples and support the spirit of self-determination.
We have taken steps to ensure that indigenous partners can fully participate in these discussions and advance conversations that promote the rebuilding of their nations.
We are also making changes to how we support indigenous participation in these negotiations. For example, we stopped requiring groups to take loans to sit down with us, and we are in the process of forgiving and reimbursing about $1.4 billion of comprehensive land claim loan debt. More than $100 million is provided annually to support indigenous participation in negotiations and to enhance capacity.
Progress is being made at these tables.
I have spoken of a number of successes in self-determination and self-governance. What many of these successes have in common is that they were achieved through co-operation. They are based on listening to indigenous partners as they led us to discuss and codevelop solutions to the issues that are most important to their communities.
We can learn from that and to do so we need to understand that recognizing and affirming rights is a first step in finding a way forward. We need to support our indigenous partners to identify our challenges, and then we need to rise to them. We need to recognize that the most important actions that we can take are to listen to the hard truths, embrace change and welcome creative ideas.
We have all seen what happens when we do not come together to get the conversation going. It results in mistrust and confusion, which can be the root of conflicts. It is a barrier to moving forward together. We have seen that in the past. We must learn from those mistakes and make sure it does not happen again.
The Prime Minister noted that the issues we are facing were not created overnight. They were not created because we embarked upon a path of reconciliation recently in our history. It is because for too long and for too many years we failed to take this path. After all this time, finding a solution will not be simple.
It is up to the rights holders to determine who speaks on their behalf regarding their aboriginal rights and title. Our government is committed to dedicating effort to continue those conversations.
We here in the House do not speak for our indigenous partners, but I hope we can take part in speaking with them. Standing up for the empowerment of first nations peoples and for their freedom of speech and self-governance is a vital role of the government in this instance. Acknowledging all of these challenges, the hard work ahead of us is worth the effort.
It is worth it for the youth of the next generation and for the ones after that, who will grow up seeing the crown and indigenous peoples putting in the hard work, together, to invest in their future, improve their quality of life and heal.
It will take determination, persistence, patience and truth-telling. It will mean listening to and learning from indigenous partners, communities and youth, and acting decisively on what we have heard, building trust and healing. It will mean doing everything we can to support the inherent right to self-determination of indigenous peoples.
We are at a critical juncture in Canada. Canadians want to see indigenous rights honoured, and they are impatient for meaningful progress. They are counting on us to engage with indigenous leaders, communities and peoples to achieve lasting, long-term results. This is what our government is committed to.
We can, and we will, build a better Canada together, one in which healthy, prosperous, self-determining and self-governing indigenous nations are key partners.
Madame la Présidente, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Mont-Royal.
J'aimerais souligner que nous sommes réunis sur les terres ancestrales non cédées des Algonquins.
La motion à l'étude aujourd'hui porte sur un enjeu pressant, qui touche des localités partout au pays. La situation actuelle est difficile pour tout le monde: les Autochtones comme les non-Autochtones, les collectivités touchées, les entreprises, les travailleurs et les voyageurs. À mon avis, il reste assez de temps pour que toutes les parties engagent un dialogue ouvert et respectueux, qui permettra de dénouer la situation de façon pacifique.
Depuis plus de 150 ans, les Autochtones du Canada font face à une discrimination systémique dans tous les aspects de leur vie. Le Canada a empêché le développement d'un véritable partenariat égalitaire avec les Autochtones, leur imposant plutôt une relation fondée sur des modes de pensée et d'action coloniaux, le paternalisme et le contrôle.
La relation du passé nous a laissé un héritage marqué par la dévastation, la douleur et la souffrance. Depuis des décennies, les Autochtones demandent au gouvernement du Canada de respecter leur droit de gérer leurs propres affaires et de contrôler leurs propres terres, logements, systèmes d'éducation et services à l'enfance et à la famille.
Cette histoire et cette prise de conscience croissante ont été à l'origine de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, qui consacre les droits des peuples autochtones à l'autodétermination. Les 46 articles de cette déclaration couvrent les droits collectifs et individuels en ce qui concerne tous les aspects, de l'identité culturelle à l'éducation en passant par la langue et la santé. Il s'agit d'un cadre universel pour la survie, la dignité et le bien-être des peuples autochtones du monde entier.
Je suis très fier que le Canada l'ait appuyée sans réserve en 2016 et je suis fier que le gouvernement se soit engagé à élaborer un projet de loi pour mettre en œuvre pleinement et efficacement ce cadre d'ici la fin de l'année.
Les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada décrivent cette déclaration comme le cadre de la réconciliation. En effet, elle vise essentiellement à faire progresser l'autodétermination et à rééquilibrer les relations entre les États et les peuples autochtones.
C'est une des mesures prises par le gouvernement pour avancer sur le long chemin vers la réconciliation. Nous nous efforçons de nouer une nouvelle relation avec les peuples autochtones qui repose sur l'affirmation de ces droits, le respect, la coopération, un partenariat et l'objectif d'un nouvel héritage fondé sur une base solide d'autodétermination dont nous pouvons être fiers.
Comme l'a indiqué le ministre des Services aux Autochtones, il est clair que l'autodétermination est la bonne voie à suivre. Nous faisons des progrès d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Nous faisons le travail.
L'autonomie gouvernementale des Autochtones est importante. Les peuples autochtones qui ont cette autonomie s'en sortent mieux sur le plan socioéconomique. Leurs enfants sont plus nombreux à finir leurs études secondaires. Ils ont moins de chômage et ils sont en meilleure santé.
L'autodétermination améliore la santé, le bien-être et la prospérité des communautés autochtones, ce qui est bon pour toute la population canadienne. Il n'a jamais été aussi urgent d'avoir des discussions sur l'autodétermination et l'autonomie gouvernementale et des mesures sont prises pour en arriver à une situation où les peuples autochtones du Canada sont maîtres de leur destin et où le gouvernement fédéral leur offre le soutien dont ils ont besoin.
C'est un privilège de représenter une circonscription qui comprend les territoires de trois Premières Nations. Nous savons que l'autochtonisation de nos systèmes d'éducation donne des outils aux Premières Nations. Le Ts'zil Learning Centre a permis à la nation Lil'wat de s'épanouir. Sa philosophie d'apprentissage est fondée sur les principes de renouvellement culturel, d'apprentissage global et de croissance personnelle de cette nation. Ce centre d'apprentissage est un exemple convaincant de ce que l'autonomie gouvernementale permet de faire dans le domaine de l'éducation.
Dans la région de Sunshine Coast, la nation shishalh est un chef de file. En 1986, elle est devenue la première bande au pays à accéder à l'autonomie gouvernementale à l'issue d'un dialogue et d'un partenariat avec le gouvernement qui a abouti à l'adoption d'une mesure législative. Aujourd'hui, elle tient des élections, est maître de ses terres, administre ses services et partage sa culture avec la communauté. Elle est heureuse de se lancer dans un nouveau projet de logement abordable pour ses membres. Elle a tenu ses premières élections récemment après avoir pris des mesures pour rendre le processus électoral plus inclusif.
Nous avons des mécanismes à notre disposition pour aider nos partenaires des Premières Nations. Nous faisons des pas dans la bonne direction. Les rencontres périodiques entre le premier ministre, les principaux ministres et les Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis sont un exemple de ces mécanismes. Ces rencontres ont pour but de cerner les priorités distinctes de chaque communauté et d'aider le gouvernement et les peuples autochtones à trouver des solutions ensemble.
Ces mécanismes bilatéraux permanents ont été créés pour mieux servir les peuples autochtones qui s'attellent à la tâche importante de promouvoir une plus grande autodétermination. Ils permettent également à la Couronne et aux Autochtones de collaborer à la détermination des priorités et à l'élaboration des politiques. Ce travail national important tiendra compte de la diversité et des priorités particulières des Premières Nations, des Inuits et des Métis du Canada.
La négociation de nouveaux traités, de nouvelles ententes d'autonomie gouvernementale et d'autres accords constructifs représente un autre moyen de favoriser l'autodétermination. Au cours des quatre dernières années, le gouvernement a créé 90 nouvelles tables de négociation, notamment avec les Wet'suwet'en. Il y a maintenant plus de 150 tables de négociation actives dans l'ensemble du Canada et elles ont toutes pour mandat d'améliorer les relations avec les peuples autochtones et de respecter l'esprit d'autodétermination.
Nous avons pris des mesures pour que les partenaires autochtones puissent participer pleinement à ces discussions et tenir des discussions qui favorisent la reconstruction de leurs nations.
Nous modifions également la manière dont nous aidons les Autochtones à participer aux négociations. À titre d'exemple, nous avons cessé d'exiger que les groupes contractent des emprunts pour s'asseoir avec nous et nous sommes en train d'effacer et de rembourser environ 1,4 milliard de dollars de dettes liées aux emprunts contractés pour les revendications territoriales globales. Plus de 100 millions de dollars sont versés chaque année pour faciliter la participation des Autochtones aux négociations et pour renforcer leurs capacités.
Nous réalisons des progrès à ces tables.
J'ai mentionné un certain nombre de réussites dans les domaines de l'autodétermination et de l'autonomie gouvernementale. Ce que bon nombre de ces réussites ont en commun, c'est qu'elles reposent sur la coopération. Nous avons écouté nos partenaires autochtones, qui nous ont amenés à discuter des enjeux les plus importants pour leur communauté et à élaborer ensemble des solutions pour y répondre.
Nous pouvons nous en inspirer et, pour ce faire, nous devons comprendre que reconnaître et affirmer les droits des Autochtones est une première étape pour aller de l'avant. Nous devons aider nos partenaires autochtones pour mieux cibler nos lacunes, puis nous devons nous montrer à la hauteur de la situation. Nous devons reconnaître que les mesures les plus importantes que nous pouvons prendre sont écouter les dures vérités, accepter le changement et accueillir les idées novatrices.
Nous avons tous constaté ce qui arrive quand on ne se concerte pas afin que le dialogue se poursuive. Il en résulte de la méfiance et de la confusion, qui peuvent être une source de conflit. Il s'agit d'un obstacle qui nous empêche de progresser ensemble. Nous l'avons vu auparavant. Nous devons tirer des leçons de ces erreurs et faire en sorte qu'elles ne se reproduisent plus.
Le premier ministre a souligné que les problèmes actuels ne sont pas survenus du jour au lendemain. Ils ne sont pas survenus parce que nous nous sommes engagés sur la voie de la réconciliation récemment. Ils sont survenus parce que, pendant trop longtemps, nous avons refusé de nous engager sur cette voie. Après tout ce temps, il ne sera pas simple de trouver une solution.
Il appartient aux titulaires des droits de déterminer qui parle en leur nom au sujet de leur titre et de leurs droits ancestraux. Le gouvernement entend s'efforcer de poursuivre les discussions.
Ici, à la Chambre, nous ne parlons pas au nom de nos partenaires autochtones, mais j'espère que nous pourrons participer aux discussions avec eux. Dans ce cas-ci, le gouvernement joue un rôle capital dans la défense de l'autonomisation des peuples des Premières Nations, de leur liberté de parole et de leur autonomie gouvernementale. Nous sommes conscients que c'est un défi, mais la lourde tâche qui nous attend en vaut la peine.
Elle en vaut la peine pour les jeunes de la prochaine génération et des suivantes, qui grandiront en voyant la Couronne et les peuples autochtones redoubler d'efforts, ensemble, pour investir dans leur avenir, améliorer leur qualité de vie et guérir.
Il faudra de la détermination, de la persévérance, de la patience et de la franchise. Nous devrons écouter nos partenaires, les communautés et les jeunes autochtones et apprendre d'eux, agir avec décision à partir de ce que nous aurons entendu et favoriser la confiance et la guérison. Cela signifie faire tout ce que nous pourrons pour appuyer le droit inhérent à l'autodétermination des peuples autochtones.
Nous sommes à la croisée des chemins au Canada. Les Canadiens veulent que les droits des Autochtones soient respectés et ils sont impatients de voir de véritables progrès. Ils comptent sur nous pour dialoguer avec les dirigeants, les communautés et les peuples autochtones pour obtenir des résultats durables. Voilà ce à quoi s'engage le gouvernement.
Nous pouvons bâtir et nous bâtirons ensemble un Canada meilleur dans lequel des nations autochtones vigoureuses, prospères et autonomes qui s'autodéterminent sont des partenaires clés.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I know the member has a background in indigenous and environmental law and I agree with much of what he said.
I want to pick up on his point about the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We passed Bill C-262 two years ago. The government had an opportunity to act on and implement that bill and others since then, but it did not.
I wonder if the member can comment on how it might have changed the situation we are in now if the government were actually living up to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Madame la Présidente, je sais que le député a une formation en droit autochtone et en droit environnemental, et je suis d'accord avec lui sur beaucoup de choses.
J'aimerais revenir sur la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Nous avons adopté le projet de loi C-262 il y a deux ans. Le gouvernement a amplement eu l'occasion de le mettre en application, celui-là et d'autres semblables, mais il ne l'a pas fait.
Le député pourrait-il nous dire en quoi la situation actuelle serait différente si le gouvernement respectait la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones?
View Patrick Weiler Profile
Lib. (BC)
Madam Speaker, it is absolutely critical that we bring the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into Canadian law. We have committed to do it this year. We supported that in the last Parliament, but it died in the Senate.
When we look at environmental assessments of industrial projects as we are implementing the articles of UNDRIP, it creates new opportunities to work with first nations and give them an opportunity to participate in the decision-making in their territories. Those ideas have already been instilled in the new Impact Assessment Act. As we move forward and implement this, it will cause major changes in a lot of our federal laws. It is something that is long overdue.
Madame la Présidente, nous devons absolument intégrer la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones aux lois canadiennes. Nous voulions que le projet de loi soit adopté, mais il est mort au Feuilleton avant d'être adopté par le Sénat lors de la dernière législature. Nous nous sommes engagés à le faire adopter cette année.
Lorsque nous appliquons les principes de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones aux évaluations environnementales des projets industriels, nous nous donnons de nouvelles occasions de collaborer avec les Premières Nations et nous leur permettons de participer aux décisions concernant leur territoire. Ces principes font déjà partie de la nouvelle Loi sur l'évaluation d'impact. En généralisant leur application, nous apporterons de profonds changements à de nombreuses lois fédérales. Il est grand temps que cela se fasse.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2020-02-20 16:35 [p.1346]
Madam Speaker, I share my colleague's perspective that this situation could have been avoided if the government had decided to not think that it could pick and choose when to support and recognize indigenous rights in this country. We cannot pick and choose when it comes recognizing inherent rights and respecting them.
Dr. Judith Sayers, whom I respect greatly, is the president of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. She would like this question answered:
Do you really consider that dealing with rights and title should be based on a score card or how many First Nations say yes against those who say no? How can you lawfully override the Hereditary Chiefs title that was evidenced in the Supreme court of Canada Delgamuukw decision?
This is a question that she has, and I hope the parliamentary secretary can answer that question.
Madame la Présidente, je suis de l'avis de mon collègue: cette situation aurait pu être évitée si le gouvernement n'avait pas décidé de soutenir et de reconnaître les droits des Autochtones de ce pays à sa convenance. Les droits inhérents doivent toujours être reconnus et respectés.
Mme Judith Sayers, pour qui j'ai le plus grand respect, préside le Conseil tribal de la nation Nuu-chah-Nulth. Elle aimerait qu'on réponde à sa question:
Croyez-vous vraiment que les questions de droits et de titres devraient être fondées sur une matrice d'évaluation ou encore sur le nombre de Premières Nations qui sont en faveur d'un projet ou contre celui-ci? Comment pouvez-vous faire légalement fi du titre de chef héréditaire tel qu'établi dans l'arrêt Delgamuukw c. Colombie-Britannique de la Cour suprême du Canada?
C'est la question qu'elle se pose, et j'espère que le secrétaire parlementaire pourra y répondre.
View Anthony Housefather Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Anthony Housefather Profile
2020-02-20 16:36 [p.1346]
Madam Speaker, that question is too complex to answer.
Madame la Présidente, cette question est trop complexe.
View Anthony Housefather Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Anthony Housefather Profile
2020-02-20 16:37 [p.1346]
Madam Speaker, there is an elected council. The majority of the elected council supports the project. With respect to the hereditary chiefs, I acknowledge that outside the limited territory that the band council controls, there is power of the hereditary chiefs that has been recognized, and again there has to be negotiation with them. I am hoping that over the next couple of days that this negotiation will happen and that there will be a fortuitously good outcome.
Madame la Présidente, il y a un conseil élu. La majorité des conseils élus appuient le projet. En ce qui a trait aux chefs héréditaires, je comprends que leur autorité à l'extérieur du territoire qui relève du conseil de bande a été reconnue, et je répète qu'il faut négocier avec eux. J'espère que, d'ici quelques jours, ces négociations auront lieu et que leur résultat sera fructueux.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Madam Speaker, it is an honour for me to speak today about the relationship our country has with our first nations peoples.
As a teacher for over 34 years, for 32 of those years, I proudly displayed a commemorative plaque from the Treaty Six Centennial celebrations that I attended at the Saddle Lake Reserve with Peter Lougheed, Bob Clark, the leader of the opposition, and Grant Notley. It was a very poignant opportunity for me to get a chance to see what was important to indigenous people. Engraved on the plaque are the words “For as long as the Sun shines, the Rivers flow and the Grass grows”, a reminder that is still proudly displayed in my office in Ottawa.
Additionally, I was proud to sit at the aboriginal affairs and northern development committee when we were in government and to pursue initiatives like matrimonial property rights and transparency legislation that was asked for by our first nations groups. These initiatives did not always sit well with some of the band leaders, but it did resonate with members.
When our government sought to improve the first nations education system, which would have included some of the recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report, I asked to once again sit at this committee. Sadly, that initiative, spearheaded by former grand chief Shawn Atleo, in conjunction with Prime Minister Harper, was shut down before it could take off. As a former teacher, I was truly disappointed.
From my experience as a teacher, I have seen the inequity, the gaps in learning and the unacceptable dropout rates. I shared the frustration that existed with our first nation parents who wanted more for their children. For, as Ts'im-shian author, Calvin Helin, had alluded to in his book, Dances with Dependency, the cycle of dependency was only broken when the bonds of colonialism were cut. He argued that the ancestors would not have accepted their children to live without hope and purpose, that they would have wanted their children to know of their culture and their heritage and that the ancestors would expect them to look after their community and ensure they lived proudly.
This is why I proudly stand in solidarity with every elected band council on the Coastal GasLink route and with every band council that chooses this land's natural wealth as its path forward for its people. The band councils understand that using Canadian oil and gas is not only more economically sensible for their membership, but also a humanitarian and environmentally friendly solution for the globe. This is also why I stand with the majority of the hereditary chiefs and the vast majority of the Wet'suwet'en people and why I condemn the radical activists that use issues like this to undermine opportunities for all Canadians.
Now we are faced with an interesting challenge, given the political climate in our country right now. Some people in Ottawa have a narrow focus on what it means to be good stewards of the environment. They think that the sum of a society's commitment to the environment is the amount of carbon they produce in Canada and what that source of carbon is. Very real and important conservation initiatives have been going on throughout Canada in the oil and gas sector that have simply been glossed over to fulfill their narrative.
Similarly, these activists' rationale for holding Canada's economy hostage is as varied as the foreign interests that fund them, whether it be investors in renewable energy or oil and gas interests that simply know they can buy up our resources cheaply in the future, reaping the benefits when the rest of the world's energy dries up. Believe me, none of this is in our nation's best interest.
Where are we now? For the past 15 days, the country has been held hostage and the government has done nothing. Our economy, our people and our security as Canadians are being held up by a protest movement that is disrespectful to the majority of our indigenous peoples' desire to give their children and grandchildren the opportunities they never had, and the Liberal government has done nothing.
The protests have temporarily stopped VIA Rail passenger trains as well as CN trains, cutting off routes between Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Kingston, and the Liberal government has done nothing.
A variety of shipments, whether it be food, construction materials, lumber, aluminum, coal, propane, things that people need to survive, have been affected by the rail blockades and the Liberal government, once again, has done nothing.
CN rail announced the laying off of 450 workers in its operation in eastern Canada as a result of the blockades. What has the Liberal government done? Nothing. The government's inaction has led to a national crisis in Canada and it still will not act.
Canada's retailers and manufacturers are braced for shutdowns and face dwindling supplies as blockades at ports and on rail lines bring much of the country's rail freight network to a halt. CN rail's coast to coast system is at risk of shutting down.
As reported by CBC this morning, some of the members of the Wet'suwet'en people want the protesters to stop. Currently, the protests are not helping their communities, which they say already have fractured governance. These protests have amplified the conflict in the community and distracted Wet'suwet'en people from resolving their differences.
As I said before, the vast majority of these people support the Coastal GasLink project. Every elected band council on the Coastal GasLink route supports the project. Even the majority of hereditary chiefs support this project. The vast majority of first nations community members support the project because it will create jobs, opportunities, investments in communities and in the end, it will help reduce global greenhouse emissions.
Democracy and the rule of law are fundamental pillars of our country and it is time they are enforced. Our democratic values ensure that every person has the right to freedom of speech and freedom to protest, but people do not have the right to harm the security and livelihood of other Canadians.
The Prime Minister needs to denounce the illegal actions of the radical activists and formulate an action plan that will put an end to the blockages, ensure that the support for this project expressed by the vast majority of the Wet'suwet'en people is upheld and get our economy back on track. If he does not, the Liberal government will be setting a dangerous precedent that the civil unrest of a few can have a devastating impact on the lives of countless Canadians and that the government is not willing to enforce the law to protect Canadians.
Additionally, counter-protesters have started rising up to voice their dissatisfaction with the current situation. With these heightened tensions, leaving things as they are now is irresponsible.
The impact is also being felt beyond Canada's borders and is harming the country's reputation as a stable and viable supply chain partner.
These groups are emboldened and will continue to create havoc as the inaction tells all activists they can have a devastating impact on the lives of countless Canadians and the government is not willing to enforce the law to protect those Canadians.
As was evident in the Vice-Admiral Mark Norman case, the shameful treatment of the former attorney general, ethics violations and so many other transgressions, the government's opinion of right and wrong is truly suspect.
I urge the government to work night and day to resolve this issue, because to give opportunities for indigenous people to share in our world-class resource development is the right thing. Now is the time to act.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un honneur pour moi de prendre la parole au sujet des relations que notre pays entretient avec les Premières Nations.
J'ai été enseignant pendant 34 ans, et pendant 32 de ces années, j'avais coutume d'exposer fièrement une plaque commémorative des célébrations du centenaire du Traité no 6 auxquelles j'ai assisté à la réserve de Saddle Lake avec Peter Lougheed, Bob Clark — alors chef de l'opposition — et Grant Notley. Ce fut pour moi une occasion très émouvante de constater ce qui était important pour les peuples autochtones. Sur la plaque sont gravés les mots suivants: « tant que le soleil brillera, que les rivières couleront et que l'herbe poussera ». Cette plaque est toujours fièrement accrochée dans mon bureau d'Ottawa.
J'ai aussi eu le bonheur de siéger au comité des affaires autochtones et du développement du Grand Nord lorsque nous formions le gouvernement. Nous avons poursuivi des initiatives portant par exemple sur les droits relatifs aux biens matrimoniaux, et nous avons présenté des mesures législatives demandées par des groupes des Premières Nations. Ces initiatives n'ont pas toujours été bien accueillies par certains chefs de bande, mais elles ont trouvé écho auprès de plusieurs membres des Premières Nations.
Lorsque le gouvernement cherchait à améliorer le système d'éducation des Premières Nations, notamment en donnant suite aux recommandations du rapport de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, on m'a aussi demandé de siéger à ce comité. Malheureusement, cette initiative, lancée par l'ancien grand chef Shawn Atleo, de concert avec le premier ministre Harper, a été coupée court avant même qu'elle puisse prendre son envol. En tant qu'ancien enseignant, j'ai été vraiment déçu.
Pendant mes années d'enseignement, j'ai été témoin de l'iniquité, des lacunes dans l'apprentissage et des taux de décrochage inacceptables. J'ai partagé la frustration des parents autochtones qui veulent un meilleur avenir pour leurs enfants. Car enfin, comme le dit l'auteur ts'im-shian Calvin Helin dans son livre Dances with Dependency, le cycle de dépendance ne peut être brisé qu'une fois les servitudes du colonialisme abolies. Il soutient que ses ancêtres n'auraient jamais accepté que leurs enfants aient à vivre une vie dénuée d'espoir ou de sens, qu'ils auraient voulu que leurs enfants connaissent leur culture et leur patrimoine, et qu'ils s'attendraient à ce que leurs descendants s'occupent de leur communauté et qu'ils veillent à ce que les enfants vivent fièrement.
Voilà pourquoi je me montre fièrement solidaire de tous les conseils de bande élus dont le territoire est sur le tracé du projet Coastal GasLink et des conseils de bande qui choisissent les richesses naturelles de la terre comme la voie de l'avenir pour leur peuple. Les conseils de bande comprennent que l'exploitation du pétrole et du gaz canadiens n'est pas seulement l'option la plus sensée sur le plan économique pour leurs membres, mais aussi l'option la plus humanitaire et la plus écologique pour la planète. C'est aussi pourquoi je suis solidaire de la majorité des chefs héréditaires et des Wet'suwet'en et que je condamne les activistes radicaux qui profitent de l'occasion pour priver les Canadiens de possibilités qui s'offrent à eux.
Le pays fait face à un défi intéressant, étant donné le climat politique actuel. Certaines personnes à Ottawa ont une conception restreinte de ce qu'est un bon gardien de l'environnement. Selon elles, l'engagement de la société envers l'environnement ne tient compte que des sources de carbone au Canada et de la quantité de carbone produite au pays. De grands projets de conservation véritable ont été lancés par le secteur pétrolier et gazier un peu partout au Canada, mais ces personnes les passent sous silence parce qu'ils ne cadrent pas avec leur version des faits.
D'ailleurs, les raisons des activistes pour tenir l'économie canadienne en otage sont aussi variées que les intérêts étrangers qui les financent. Il y a des investisseurs dans les énergies renouvelables ainsi que des intérêts pétroliers et gaziers qui sont tout simplement conscients qu'ils pourront acheter les ressources canadiennes à faible prix, profitant de cet avantage quand les sources d'énergie seront épuisées ailleurs dans le monde. Il faut me croire: rien de tout cela n'est dans l'intérêt de la nation.
Où en sommes-nous maintenant? Depuis 15 jours, le pays est tenu en otage, et le gouvernement ne fait rien. L'économie, les gens et la sécurité du Canada sont menacés par un mouvement de protestation qui bafoue le désir de la majorité des Autochtones: offrir à leurs enfants et à leurs petits-enfants les débouchés qu'ils n'ont jamais eus. Pourtant, le gouvernement libéral ne fait rien.
Les manifestations ont mené à la suspension temporaire d'une partie des départs des trains de passagers de VIA Rail et des trains du CN en bloquant les trajets entre Toronto, Ottawa, Montréal et Kingston. Le gouvernement libéral n'a rien fait.
L'expédition de toutes sortes de marchandises, qu'il s'agisse d'aliments, de matériaux de construction, de bois d'œuvre, d'aluminium, de charbon, de propane et d'autres choses de première nécessité, a été perturbée par les barrages sur les voies ferrées. Encore une fois, le gouvernement libéral n'a rien fait.
Le CN a annoncé la mise à pied de 450 travailleurs dans l'Est du Canada à cause des barrages. Qu'a fait le gouvernement libéral? Rien. L'inaction du gouvernement a entraîné une crise nationale au Canada, mais il refuse toujours d'agir.
Les détaillants et les fabricants du Canada s'attendent à des fermetures. Ils voient leurs stocks diminuer alors que les barrages aux ports et sur les voies ferrées paralysent une grande partie du transport ferroviaire des marchandises au pays. C'est tout le réseau du CN, d'un océan à l'autre, qui risque la fermeture.
Comme on l'a appris sur les ondes de CBC ce matin, certains membres de la nation des Wet'suwet'en veulent que les manifestants se retirent. En ce moment, les manifestations n'aident pas leur communauté qui doit déjà composer avec une gouvernance éclatée selon eux. Ces barrages ont amplifié le conflit dans la communauté et ont détourné l'attention des Wet'suwet'en alors que ceux-ci doivent résoudre leurs différends.
Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, la grande majorité des membres de la nation des Wet'suwet'en appuient le projet Coastal GasLink. Chaque conseil de bande élu dont le territoire est sur le tracé du projet Coastal GasLink appuie ce projet. Il a même l'appui de la majorité des chefs héréditaires. La grande majorité des membres des Premières Nations appuient ce projet, car il créera des emplois et des débouchés. Il se traduira par des investissements dans leurs collectivités et, au bout du compte, il contribuera à réduire les émissions mondiales de gaz à effet de serre.
La démocratie et la primauté du droit sont des piliers essentiels de la société canadienne et il est temps de les faire respecter. Selon nos valeurs démocratiques, tous les Canadiens ont le droit de s'exprimer librement et de manifester, mais ils n'ont pas le droit de menacer la sécurité et les moyens de subsistance de leurs concitoyens.
Le premier ministre doit dénoncer les gestes illégaux des militants radicaux et concevoir un plan d'action pour mettre fin aux barrages, assurer la mise en œuvre de ce projet appuyé par la grande majorité des Wet'suwet'en et relancer l'économie. Autrement, le gouvernement libéral établira un dangereux précédent s'il n'est pas prêt à faire respecter la loi pour protéger les Canadiens même lorsque les troubles civils provoqués par une minorité ont des effets désastreux sur la vie d'innombrables Canadiens.
En outre, des contre-manifestants ont commencé à exprimer leur mécontentement face à l'état actuel des choses. Compte tenu de ces tensions accrues, maintenir le statu quo est irresponsable.
Les répercussions se font sentir au-delà des frontières canadiennes, et elles nuisent à la réputation du Canada comme partenaire stable et viable de la chaîne d'approvisionnement.
Ces groupes sont enhardis. Ils continueront de causer des ravages, car l'inaction face à ce conflit envoie le message à tous les activistes que leurs gestes peuvent avoir des effets dévastateurs sur la vie d'innombrables Canadiens et que le gouvernement n'est pas disposé à appliquer la loi pour protéger ces personnes.
Le gouvernement a une perception bien douteuse du bien et du mal, comme l'ont montré clairement l'affaire du vice-amiral Mark Norman, son traitement honteux de l'ancienne procureure générale, ses manquements à l'éthique et ses très nombreuses transgressions.
J'exhorte le gouvernement à travailler jour et nuit pour régler la situation parce que permettre aux peuples autochtones de tirer parti eux aussi du développement mondial de nos ressources est ce qu'il convient de faire. Il est maintenant temps d'agir.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2020-02-20 17:18 [p.1352]
Mr. Speaker, earlier I mentioned indigenous people in our country and I think of the indigenous people in my riding where they won a Supreme Court decision for the right to catch and sell fish, which reaffirmed their right, which as we know is protected in our Constitution.
I find it interesting when we see a motion like this. We keep hearing about law and order, and the Conservatives say that we have to take a law-and-order approach. We have seen over 170 court cases in this country side with indigenous people. What does the government do? It appeals or ignores the decisions made in the courts and leaves people suffering.
Indigenous children are not able to access the same services as non-indigenous children. People like the Nuu-chah-nulth are blocked from self-determination and ways that they can support their own communities. We talk about the economic impact of the Conservative and Liberal approaches to this.
Could the member speak about how, when we stand up for indigenous rights, we need to be standing up for law and order, standing up for the courts in this country and respecting the inherent rights of the indigenous people of this land?
Monsieur le Président, j'ai parlé plus tôt des Autochtones du pays. Je pense aussi aux Autochtones de ma circonscription, qui ont gagné en Cour suprême une cause portant sur le droit de pêcher et de vendre leur pêche. Cette décision est venue confirmer un droit qui, comme on le sait, est protégé par la Constitution.
Je trouve très intéressant de voir une motion comme celle-ci. Il est souvent question de faire régner la loi et l'ordre; les conservateurs affirment qu'il faut mettre l'accent sur la loi et l'ordre. Dans plus de 170 procès, les tribunaux ont tranché en faveur des peuples autochtones. Qu'a fait le gouvernement à la suite de ces décisions? Il les a portées en appel ou n'en a aucunement tenu compte et a choisi de laisser les gens souffrir.
Les enfants autochtones n'ont pas accès aux mêmes services que les enfants non autochtones. Des peuples comme les Nuu-chah-nulths ne peuvent pas prendre leur destinée en main ni subvenir à leurs propres besoins. Nous avons des discussions sur les conséquences économiques des approches adoptées par les conservateurs et les libéraux.
Le député pourrait-il parler du fait que, lorsqu'on défend les droits des Autochtones, il faut aussi défendre la loi et l'ordre, défendre les tribunaux du pays et respecter les droits inhérents des peuples autochtones?
View Sylvie Bérubé Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I agree with my colleague. The important thing is to respect indigenous rights. I think they are in the best position to show us the way and resolve this crisis. We need to initiate talks and negotiations.
Monsieur le Président, je suis bien d’accord avec mon collègue. Ce qui est important, c’est de respecter les droits autochtones. Je pense qu’ils sont les mieux placés pour nous donner des indices et régler la situation de crise actuelle. Il faut entamer des pourparlers et des négociations.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2020-02-20 17:49 [p.1357]
Mr. Speaker, my colleague commented a lot about the rule of law and order and the costs of not taking action. I think about the over 170 court cases that have sided with indigenous communities in this country, including the Nuu-chah-nulth's right to catch and sell fish.
What are the consequences of the government not honouring those court cases? For example, in Ahousat on Flores Island, they road blocked the pathway to self-determination. They cannot even access the fish swimming right by their villages.
When it comes to the Human Rights Tribunal, children do not have access to the same benefits every other Canadian enjoys. What are the consequences? They are suicide and systemic poverty. The costs are enormous.
Where are the Conservatives when it comes to these injustices? Why are they not standing up with respect to these injustices? Why are they not standing up for the application of law and order when it comes to these files?
Monsieur le Président, ma collègue a beaucoup parlé de la primauté du droit, du maintien de l'ordre et des coûts de l'inaction. Je pense aux 170 décisions judiciaires et plus qui ont donné raison aux communautés autochtones du pays, notamment le droit de pêcher et de vendre du poisson des Nuu-chah-nulth.
Quelles sont les conséquences quand le gouvernement ne respecte pas ces décisions? Par exemple, à Ahousat, sur l'île Flores, le gouvernement a bloqué la voie de l'autodétermination. Les Autochtones ne peuvent même pas pêcher le poisson qui se trouve à côté de leur village.
En ce qui concerne le Tribunal des droits de la personne, les enfants n'ont pas accès aux mêmes services que tous les autres Canadiens. Quelles en sont les conséquences? Il s'agit du suicide et de la pauvreté systémique. Les conséquences sont désastreuses.
Où sont les conservateurs lorsqu'il est question de ces injustices? Pourquoi ne les dénoncent-ils pas? Pourquoi ne réclament-ils pas que l'on fasse appliquer la loi lorsqu'il est question de ces dossiers?
View Randy Hoback Profile
CPC (SK)
View Randy Hoback Profile
2020-02-20 17:50 [p.1357]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the member that we are not the government. It is not for us to stand up for them. We agree that the rule of law is the rule of law. We have to exercise the rule of law and it has to be enforced. If they are not going to do that, there is not much I can do about it, other than speak in this chamber and say, “Do it”.
The reality is that we are not in government. We do not have control. If we were in government, we would have control and we would deal with this in an appropriate fashion. We treat people fairly and with respect. That is what Prime Minister Harper always did. That is why we have never seen interruptions like this. Did they like us all the time? No, but we never lied to them.
I come from the riding of Prince Albert, the riding of John Diefenbaker. John Diefenbaker was the first prime minister to allow first nations people to vote. He was a Conservative leader, so the member should not say that we do not respect indigenous rights, because we do.
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais rappeler au député que nous ne sommes pas au pouvoir. Ce n'est pas à nous de le faire. Nous convenons que la primauté du droit est la primauté du droit. Nous devons la respecter et la faire respecter. Si les libéraux ne le font pas, je ne peux rien y faire, à part prendre la parole dans cette enceinte et leur demander d'agir.
Le fait est que nous ne sommes pas au pouvoir. Nous n'avons pas le contrôle. Si nous étions au pouvoir, nous aurions le contrôle et nous nous occuperions de ce dossier comme il se doit. Nous traitons les gens de manière équitable et avec respect. C'est ce que le premier ministre Harper a toujours fait. Voilà pourquoi nous n'avons jamais vu de telles interruptions de service. Nous n'étions pas toujours d'accord, mais nous ne leur avons jamais menti.
Je viens de la circonscription de Prince Albert, la circonscription de John Diefenbaker. John Diefenbaker a été le premier premier ministre à permettre aux membres des Premières Nations de voter. C'était un chef conservateur, donc le député ne devrait pas dire que nous ne respectons pas les droits des Autochtones, car c'est faux.
View Gary Anandasangaree Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time with my friend from Hull—Aylmer.
I rise to speak to the motion and respectfully acknowledge that I do so while standing on the traditional territory of the Algonquin people.
I would like to begin by assuring the House that our government is working hard to find a peaceful solution so that travellers can take VIA Rail again, workers can return to their jobs, consumers can be assured supplies of essential goods will be in stock and businesses can again count on the logistics systems that keep our economy moving. I also want to acknowledge and welcome the letter from the RCMP in British Columbia that says they intend to withdraw from the outpost.
We are well aware that these protests are having a significant impact on Canadians, and my thoughts are with all those who are affected, including those who are protesting. The right to protest is enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. All people have the right to protest in a peaceful manner.
Prior to being elected as a member of Parliament, I took part in many protests. In fact, my first time coming to Ottawa was to protest, and I have on many occasions in my professional life defended people's right to protest.
When we take away people's right to protest, we deprive them of a space where they can express themselves peacefully.
I therefore stand in solidarity with all indigenous people, both those who are opposing the Coastal GasLink and those who support it. The Wet'suwet'en people have an inherent right to self-determination and have a right to decide who speaks for them. The matter of leadership with the Wet'suwet'en people is for their nation to decide, not for us to dictate.
Reconciliation is a journey and takes a great deal of effort and will by all those who are involved. Reconciliation does not take place overnight. It is an accumulation of years, decades, generations of incidents, actions and attitudes. For 500 years, indigenous peoples in this land have faced discrimination in every aspect of their lives. It is only through meaningful engagement that those who have been ignored and disrespected for far too long can find a path forward.
Canada's long and painful history of colonialism, the legacy of residential schools, the immeasurable loss of language and culture and the displacement of lands and ways of life for 153 years have rendered indigenous people in Canada second-class citizens on their own lands.
For these people, the result is a loss of governance and control over their lives and their way of life.
Our Prime Minister and our government are absolutely determined to move forward with reconciliation, but this journey will have challenges and obstacles. The subject of the debate today is one such example. We will face moments in this path to reconciliation when our collective and historical failures are highlighted. This is one such moment. The challenge for us is to address these moments peacefully without further harm, learn from them and work to move forward toward the self-determination that will enable indigenous peoples to control their destiny.
Each day we make choices that either help to reconcile or help contribute to division. The motion presents us with such a choice today. Now is not the time for action that would divide and inflame. Now is the time, as the Prime Minister has said, for “creating a space for peaceful, honest dialogue with willing partners.” We believe that in addressing this issue we are given an opportunity to close the gap and heal long-standing wounds. We believe it is essential to address the crisis in a constructive and peaceful way.
In this debate we need to acknowledge the importance of dialogue based on respect, co-operation and the recognition of rights. Perhaps most importantly, in this dialogue we must also learn to listen. We need to look beyond simply getting the trains running and see this for what it is: an opportunity to make progress and a journey toward transformative change. As the Minister of Indigenous Services said last night:
One of the steps necessary to achieve peaceful progress in an unreconciled country is to continue that open dialogue at the very highest levels of government based on a nation-to-nation and government-to-government relationship.
This is what has guided the actions of our government over the past few days.
I would like to remind the House of the views brought forward by National Chief Perry Bellegarde, who said:
I think we need to be patient and see what dialogue will bring.
Our people are taking action because they want to see action. And when they see positive action by the key players, when they see a commitment to real dialogue to address this difficult situation, people will respond in a positive way.
I believe that his words underscore the upside potential of this crisis. If we can resolve this situation peacefully and with mutual respect, we help build trust, and that trust can help shape a stronger Canada for tomorrow. I would suggest to the House that resolving this situation in a peaceful and respectful way will help provide a foundation for continued dialogue and mutual respect, and be in Canada's long-term interests for our society and our economy.
In the final analysis, it is in Canada's best interests, in the short term and the long term, to keep the discussions going in search of a peaceful and long-lasting solution, a solution that may put us further down the true road of reconciliation. I urge all hon. member to vote against the motion before us.
Monsieur le Président, je partagerai le temps qui m'est accordé avec mon collègue de Hull—Aylmer.
Je prends la parole au sujet de la motion d'aujourd'hui, et c'est avec respect que je souligne que nous nous trouvons sur les terres ancestrales du peuple algonquin.
Je tiens d'abord à assurer à la Chambre que le gouvernement travaille fort pour trouver une solution pacifique qui permettra aux voyageurs de recommencer à utiliser VIA Rail, aux travailleurs de récupérer leur emploi, aux consommateurs de ne pas craindre les pénuries de produits essentiels et aux entreprises de retrouver les systèmes de logistique nécessaires au bon fonctionnement de notre économie. Je veux également saluer la lettre de la GRC en Colombie-Britannique qui annonce son intention de se retirer du territoire en cause.
Nous sommes pleinement conscients que ces manifestations ont des répercussions importantes pour les Canadiens. Mes pensées accompagnent tous ceux qui sont touchés, y compris ceux qui participent aux manifestations. Le droit de manifester est enchâssé dans la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Tous ont le droit de manifester de façon pacifique.
Avant d'être élu député, j'ai participé à de nombreuses manifestations. En fait, c'est pour cette raison que je suis venu à Ottawa pour la première fois. Au cours de ma carrière, j'ai défendu à maintes reprises le droit de manifester qu'ont les gens.
Quand nous enlevons le droit des gens de protester, nous enlevons l'espace pour que les gens s'expriment de manière pacifique.
Je suis donc solidaire de tous les Autochtones, qu'ils s'opposent au projet Coastal GasLink ou qu'ils l'appuient. Les Wet'suwet'en ont un droit inhérent à l'autodétermination et ils ont le droit de décider qui peut parler en leur nom. Il revient aux Wet'suwet'en de régler la question de leur leadership. Ce n'est pas à nous de leur dicter la voie à suivre.
Le chemin de la réconciliation exige beaucoup de volonté et d'efforts de la part de tous les participants. La réconciliation n'arrive pas du jour au lendemain. Elle se bâtit plutôt sur de nombreuses années et décennies, sur une accumulation d'incidents, d'actions et d'attitudes pendant plusieurs générations. Pendant 500 ans, les peuples autochtones d'ici ont subi de la discrimination dans toutes les facettes de leur vie. Il est essentiel de passer par une réelle participation pour que les peuples négligés et bafoués pendant trop longtemps puissent trouver une nouvelle voie.
En raison de la longue et douloureuse histoire coloniale du Canada, des séquelles laissées par les pensionnats, des pertes immenses qui se sont accumulées depuis 153 ans en matière de langues, de culture, de terres et de modes de vie, les peuples autochtones sont devenus des citoyens de deuxième classe chez eux.
Cela entraîne pour les gens une perte de gouvernance et de contrôle sur leur vie et sur leur mode de vie.
Le premier ministre et le gouvernement ont la ferme intention de poursuivre les efforts de réconciliation, mais ce chemin en est un qui ne sera pas exempt de difficultés et d'embuches. Le sujet du débat d'aujourd'hui en est un bon exemple. En cours de route, il y aura des moments où nos échecs collectifs et historiques seront mis en évidence. C'est le cas ici. Notre défi est de réagir de façon pacifique sans aggraver la situation, d'en tirer des leçons et d'œuvrer à l'autodétermination des Autochtones afin qu'ils puissent prendre leur destin en main.
Chaque jour, nous faisons des choix qui favorisent la réconciliation ou la division. Cette motion nous met devant un tel choix. Dans les circonstances, il faut éviter toute mesure qui nourrirait la division et mettrait le feu aux poudres. Comme l'a dit le premier ministre, nous devons aujourd'hui « créer les conditions pour que s'entame un dialogue pacifique et franc avec tous les partenaires qui souhaitent faire de même ». Nous croyons que remédier à cette situation nous donnera l'occasion de resserrer nos liens et de guérir de vieilles blessures. Nous croyons qu'il est essentiel de résoudre cette crise de façon constructive et pacifique.
Dans ce débat, nous devons reconnaître l'importance d'un dialogue fondé sur le respect, la collaboration et la reconnaissance des droits. Mais, ce qui est probablement le plus important, c'est que nous devons aussi apprendre à écouter. Nous devons voir au-delà de la reprise du service ferroviaire et constater l'évidence: c'est une invitation à progresser, un pas de plus vers un changement profond. Comme l'a déclaré le ministre des Services aux Autochtones hier soir:
Une des étapes nécessaires pour progresser pacifiquement dans un pays où la réconciliation n'est pas encore réalisée, c'est de continuer de mener un dialogue ouvert aux plus hauts niveaux du gouvernement, qui est basé sur une relation de nation à nation, de gouvernement à gouvernement.
Voilà ce qui a guidé les actions du gouvernement ces derniers jours.
J'aimerais rappeler à la Chambre l'opinion exprimée par le chef national Perry Bellegarde. Celui-ci a dit:
Je crois que nous devons faire preuve de patience et voir ce qui ressortira du dialogue.
Les membres de notre communauté prennent des mesures parce qu'ils veulent que l'on intervienne. Lorsqu'elles verront que les principaux responsables prennent des mesures positives et s'engagent à tenir un véritable dialogue pour régler cette situation difficile, ces personnes réagiront de manière positive.
À mon avis, ces paroles mettent en évidence le potentiel positif de cette crise. Si nous pouvons régler la présente situation pacifiquement dans le respect mutuel, nous aidons à bâtir la confiance, et cette confiance peut aider à façonner un Canada plus fort à l'avenir. Je crois qu'en réglant la situation d'une manière pacifique et respectueuse, nous jetterons les bases d'un dialogue continu et d'un respect mutuel qui seront avantageux, à long terme, pour la société et l'économie canadiennes.
Enfin, il est dans l'intérêt du Canada, à court et à long terme, de poursuivre la discussion en quête d'une solution pacifique et durable, une solution qui nous fera progresser sur la voie de la réconciliation véritable. J'exhorte tous les députés à rejeter la motion à l'étude aujourd'hui.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2020-02-18 13:58 [p.1151]
Mr. Speaker, I rise again today to speak to the Wet'suwet'en situation, and the crisis that is gripping the country and about which this evening we will have an emergency debate.
The most useful thing that I can do in 60 seconds is quote from a letter that appeared in the national newspapers from one of my constituents, whom members will know. Ron Wright, Massey lecturer and author of A Short History of Progress, notes in this letter that in writing his book, Stolen Continents, he spoke of the Oka crisis and he sees parallels. He stated that:
...[like] the Mohawks, the Wet'suwet'en have never [lost] their ancient sovereignty as an independent people.
Under international law, he added, there are only two ways to lose sovereignty: by armed conquest or by signing it away in treaty. Neither is the case here. He continued:
Like the Mohawks, the Wet'suwet'en have an ancient system of self-government that predates European occupation and is still alive.
Finally, he concluded that the elected band councils set up under the Indian Act merely administer the small territories defined as reserves.
It is clear that the rule of law in this case is not muddied and only on one side. The Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs also stand with the rule of law.
Monsieur le Président, j'interviens de nouveau aujourd'hui pour parler de la situation des Wet'suwet'en et de la crise que connaît le pays et qui fera l'objet d'un débat d'urgence ce soir.
Ce que je peux faire de plus utile en 60 secondes est de citer des passages d'une lettre publiée dans les journaux nationaux par un résidant de ma circonscription dont le nom ne sera pas étranger aux députés. Ron Wright, qui a participé aux conférences Massey et est l'auteur de l'essai Brève histoire du progrès, souligne dans sa lettre que, dans son livre Stolen Continents, il parle de la crise d'Oka et qu'il voit des parallèles. Il dit ceci:
[...] [comme] les Mohawks, les Wet'suwet'en n'ont jamais [perdu] leur souveraineté ancestrale en tant que peuple indépendant.
Selon le droit international, ajoute-t-il, il n'existe que deux façons pour un peuple de perdre sa souveraineté: une conquête armée ou la signature d'un traité dans lequel il y renonce. Nous ne sommes devant aucun de ces deux cas. Il poursuit en ajoutant:
Comme les Mohawks, les Wet'suwet'en ont un système d'autonomie gouvernementale très ancien antérieur à l'occupation européenne et toujours en vigueur aujourd'hui.
Enfin, il conclut en indiquant que les conseils de bande élus mis sur pied aux termes de la Loi sur les Indiens administrent seulement les petits territoires définis comme des réserves.
Il est clair que la primauté du droit dans ce cas-ci n'a rien de flou et n'est pas appliquée d'un seul côté. Les chefs héréditaires de la nation Wet'suwet'en respectent aussi la primauté du droit.
View Leah Gazan Profile
NDP (MB)
Madam Speaker, I want to reiterate the words of our leader from earlier today. He expressed how inspired we all are by the young people across this country who are rising and the people from all walks of life who are standing in support of human rights and climate justice.
I also want to acknowledge the uncertainty of the times we are facing across the country. People are worried about getting to work. VIA and CN workers are worried about their jobs. People are worried about getting the supplies and products they need to keep themselves safe. Our thoughts are with those workers.
My thoughts are also with those who are standing on the front lines of the blockade, where I, myself, as an indigenous person, have had to go to fight for my own basic human rights in this country. I understand the reasons for this. These people are defending what they know to be right. They are standing up, saying clearly that they support human rights for all people. They are hoping that this time, maybe this time, things might actually change.
It is a terrible crisis we are facing, but it is a repetitive crisis. Even though the Prime Minister callously indicated that it is a crisis of infrastructure disruptions, it is not. It is a human rights crisis that is rooted in the wrongful dispossession of lands from indigenous people. It is a crisis being faced by people right across the country.
Canadians are now looking for leadership from all of us, and they are looking for leadership from the Prime Minister. So far what we have seen from the Prime Minister and the government is a huge gap between what has been promised and what has been delivered.
This crisis did not start overnight. It is rooted in the wrongful dispossession of lands from indigenous peoples and the human rights violations and violent colonialism that have become so normalized that indigenous people are not afforded the minimum human rights standard that any person needs, indigenous or not, to live a life of joy. This minimum human rights standard is contained in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights laws and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, declarations and laws Canada has agreed to follow but often fails to do so in practice. It is a continuation.
These human rights violations have impacted my own family and nation. Residential schools, the sixties scoop and the dispossession of our lands have left a lasting impact on our community that continues to impact us even today. Residential schools disrupted our families. They were about the forced incarceration of children for no other reason than their ancestry, an ancestry of great leaders who taught the values of respect, love, courage, humility, truth, wisdom and kindness, the seven sacred laws that guided a beautiful way of life.
The Prime Minister promised to do things differently. He made commitments to working toward a path to support reconciliation. Once again indigenous people throughout this country are left disappointed. Once again they have been afforded nothing but broken promises that have resulted in many indigenous people throughout this country being homeless on their own lands.
There have been generations of promising one thing but doing another. Instead of learning lessons from the past, the Prime Minister has doubled down. He promised to be different. He promised to make change. He promised to take the genuine steps toward reconciliation. He has a list of things he has done, but let us look at what he and his government have done.
He broke those promises. They have ignored the courts, ignored this place and ignored their own promises. They have continued to drag first nations kids to court who are fighting for their right to have equal access to programs and services and to have the same human rights as other children who live on the lands that we now call Canada. They have broken their commitment to close the funding gap for kids living on reserve to go to school, and they have underfunded the programs set up to help women reclaim their status and those seeking compensation for day schools. Despite promise after promise, they have dragged their feet on meeting their obligations to ensure that clean drinking water is available in indigenous people's communities across the country. These are basic human rights.
The Prime Minister has done all of this while undermining and laughing at indigenous people, including Young Water and Land Protector from Grassy Narrows, who attended a fundraising event and raised the issue of clean drinking water. This is not a joke. We are not a joke.
I have fasted on those blockade lines at Grassy Narrows, the beautiful lands that have been impacted by development. Once again Grassy Narrows is being denied the human right to a healthy environment, and the government is taking its sweet time in providing a treatment centre for those suffering from mercury poisoning.
In the House, weeks ago, when the NDP called on the Prime Minister to accept an invitation from the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, the Prime Minister laughed and said that it was not his problem and that it was “entirely under provincial jurisdiction.” I can say one thing. I am glad that the Prime Minister is not calling on the police to be sent in. We have seen the consequences of that before. However, how, just a couple of weeks ago, could he have been so blind to the reality on the ground, ignoring the voices of indigenous people, of young people across this country? Just a couple of weeks ago, how could have been so blind? It says so much about why and how we got to where we are right now.
There is a fundamental misunderstanding, willful or not, about the facts of the situation we are currently faced with. Most Canadians have learned a history that ignores the real history of the violent colonialism upon which this place was built that continues under our very own watch today. The concept of the rule of law has been used in this country to steal children away from their families. We cannot pick and choose to only use the rule of law when it suits our economic interests. We must enforce the rule of law to ensure that all people in this country can be afforded human rights, including the rights that indigenous people have to their aboriginal rights and title.
We have a path forward that was provided by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. However, it is one thing to enact it; we must also respect it. We must respect minimum human rights standards and use the rule of law not to punish but to ensure a good quality of life for all peoples in this place we now call Canada.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à reprendre ce qu'a dit notre chef ce matin. Comme il l'a dit, nous sommes tous inspirés par les jeunes de partout au pays et les gens de tous les horizons qui se battent pour les droits de la personne et la justice climatique.
Je souhaite aussi reconnaître l'incertitude qui plane dans l'ensemble du pays. Les gens craignent d'avoir du mal à se rendre au travail. Les employés de VIA Rail et du CN ont peur de perdre leur emploi. Les gens ont peur de ne pas recevoir les produits dont ils ont besoin pour assurer leur sécurité. Nos pensées accompagnent ces travailleurs.
Mes pensées accompagnent aussi ceux qui se trouvent en première ligne dans les barrages, comme j'ai moi-même dû le faire, en tant que personne autochtone, pour défendre mes droits fondamentaux ici, au Canada. Je comprends la situation. Ces gens défendent ce qu'ils savent être la vérité. Ils tiennent tête et ils affirment clairement défendre les droits de toutes les personnes. Ils espèrent que cette fois-ci, peut-être, les choses changeront enfin.
C'est une crise terrible que nous vivons, mais elle se reproduit constamment. Le premier ministre a froidement parlé d'une crise qui perturbe les infrastructures, mais ce n'est pas de cela qu'il s'agit. C'est une crise qui touche les droits de la personne et qui découle du fait que les Autochtones ont été injustement dépossédés de leurs terres. C'est une crise qui touche des gens de partout au pays.
Les Canadiens s'attendent maintenant à ce que nous fassions tous preuve de leadership, y compris le premier ministre. Pour l'instant, il y a un fossé énorme entre ce que le premier ministre et le gouvernement ont promis et ce qui a été fait.
Cette crise n'est pas arrivée du jour au lendemain. Elle découle de la dépossession injuste ayant privé les Autochtones de leurs terres ainsi que des violations des droits de la personne et du colonialisme violent qui ont été tellement normalisés que les Autochtones ne jouissent pas des normes minimales en matière de droits de la personne dont tout le monde, autochtone ou non, doit pouvoir bénéficier pour mener une vie heureuse. Ces normes minimales sont établies dans la Charte des Nations unies, la Déclaration universelle des droits de l'homme, les lois internationales en matière de droits de la personne et la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, autant de déclarations et de lois que le Canada a accepté de suivre, mais qu'il viole souvent, dans les faits. C'est une situation qui se perpétue.
Ces violations des droits de la personne ont eu des répercussions sur ma propre famille et ma propre nation. Les pensionnats, la rafle des années 1960 et la dépossession de nos terres ont eu des effets sur nos communautés qui perdurent encore aujourd'hui. Les pensionnats ont déstabilisé nos familles. On a procédé à l'incarcération forcée de nos enfants pour nulle autre raison que l'origine de nos ancêtres, une lignée de grands chefs qui nous enseignaient le respect, l'amour, le courage, l'humilité, la vérité, la sagesse et la gentillesse, les sept lois sacrées qui guidaient un merveilleux mode de vie.
Le premier ministre avait promis de faire les choses différemment. Il s'était engagé à travailler à la réconciliation. Les peuples autochtones sont, encore une fois, déçus. On a trahi, encore une fois, les promesses qu'on leur avait faites ce qui a laissé nombre de leurs membres sans abri sur leurs propres terres.
Depuis des générations, on promet une chose et on fait le contraire. Au lieu de tirer des leçons du passé, le premier ministre a aggravé la situation. Il avait promis d'être différent. Il avait promis d'apporter des changements. Il avait promis de prendre des mesures concrètes pour appuyer la réconciliation. Il a dressé une liste des choses qu'il a faites, mais regardons ses réalisations et celles de son gouvernement.
Il a trahi ces promesses. Lui et son gouvernement ont fait fi des décisions des tribunaux, du Parlement et de leurs propres promesses. Ils ont continué de traîner devant les tribunaux les enfants des Premières Nations qui se battent pour avoir un accès équitable aux programmes et aux services et pour jouir des mêmes droits de la personne que les autres enfants sur les terres que nous appelons maintenant Canada. Ils ont trahi leur engagement de combler l'écart dans le financement de l'éducation des enfants dans les réserves et ils ont sous-financé les programmes destinés à aider les femmes autochtones à retrouver leur statut et à aider celles ayant fréquenté les écoles de jour à obtenir une indemnisation. Malgré toutes leurs promesses, ils se sont traîné les pieds pour ne pas avoir à s'acquitter de leur obligation de fournir de l'eau potable dans les communautés autochtones partout au pays. Or, il s'agit de droits de la personne fondamentaux.
Tout cela, le premier ministre l’a fait en mettant à mal les peuples autochtones et en se moquant d’eux, notamment de la jeune protectrice de l’eau et des terres de Grassy Narrows, qui a participé à une activité de financement et a attiré l’attention sur la question de l’eau potable. Ce n’est pas une plaisanterie. Nous ne sommes pas une plaisanterie.
J’ai jeûné le long des barrages érigés à Grassy Narrows, sur ces magnifiques terres qui ont subi les contrecoups de l’activité humaine. Une fois de plus, Grassy Narrows se voit refuser le droit à un environnement sain, et le gouvernement tarde désespérément à y installer un centre de traitement pour les personnes souffrant d’un empoisonnement au mercure.
À la Chambre, il y a quelques semaines, lorsque le NPD a exhorté le premier ministre à accepter l’invitation des chefs héréditaires de Wet'suwet'en, le premier ministre a ri et déclaré que ce n’était pas son problème, puisque cela relevait « entièrement de la compétence provinciale ». Je peux dire une chose. Je suis heureuse que le premier ministre ne réclame pas l’intervention de la police. Nous avons déjà vu les conséquences qu’une telle intervention peut avoir. Cependant, comment a-t-il pu, il y a à peine quelques semaines, être aussi inconscient de la réalité sur le terrain, et faire fi des voix des Autochtones et des jeunes de partout au pays? Comment a-t-il pu être aussi aveugle, il y a à peine quelques semaines? Cela en dit long sur le pourquoi et le comment de la situation actuelle.
Il existe un malentendu fondamental, volontaire ou non, concernant les faits qui entourent la situation à laquelle nous faisons face. La plupart des Canadiens ont appris une version de l’histoire qui fait fi du colonialisme violent sur lequel notre pays est fondé et qui se perpétue aujourd’hui sous nos yeux. Dans ce pays, le concept de la primauté du droit a été utilisé pour arracher des enfants à leur famille. Nous ne pouvons pas choisir de recourir à la primauté du droit uniquement lorsque cela sert nos intérêts économiques. Nous devons faire respecter la primauté du droit de sorte que tous les habitants de ce pays puissent jouir des droits de la personne et que les Autochtones puissent également se prévaloir de leurs droits et titres ancestraux.
La Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada et la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones nous ont montré la voie à suivre. Cependant, il ne suffit pas d’adopter une déclaration: il faut aussi la respecter. Nous devons respecter des normes minimales en matière de droit de la personne et utiliser la primauté du droit non pas pour punir, mais pour offrir une bonne qualité de vie à tous les peuples qui vivent en ce lieu que nous appelons aujourd’hui le Canada.
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, it is an honour to stand here this evening on the unceded territory of the Algonquin people.
First I want to thank the member for New Westminster—Burnaby for calling for this important debate this evening.
It is important for us to be able to discuss the issues and possible solutions here in this place no matter what our party lines are.
Canadians are upset. As the Prime Minister expressed so eloquently this morning, Canadians expect us to work together to get through this together. Young people have tearfully expressed to me how upsetting it has been for them to see the images and hear from their friends of being arrested for standing for what they believe in. This happened a year ago and then again earlier this month.
As we heard in the heartfelt words of the Minister of Indigenous Services, we believe we have learned from the crisis at Oka, but also Ipperwash, Caledonia and Gustafsen Lake. Last year, we said that we never wanted to see again the images of police having to use force in an indigenous community in order to keep the peace.
Canada is counting on us to work together to create the space for respectful dialogue with the Wet'suwet'en peoples. We all want this dispute resolved in a peaceful manner. We want the Wet'suwet'en peoples to come together and resolve their differences of opinion.
We want absolute clarity and a shared understanding of the Wet'suwet'en laws.
We are inspired by the courageous Wet'suwet'en people who took the recognition of their rights to the Supreme Court of Canada in the Delgamuukw case in 1997. Since 2018, we have been able and proud to invest in their research on specific claim negotiations, negotiation preparedness, nation rebuilding and the recognition of rights tables, as well as their contributions to the B.C. Treaty Commission processes.
Two years ago, I was proud to sign an agreement with hereditary chiefs of the Office of the Wet'suwet'en on asserting their rights on child and family services. Since then, our government has passed Bill C-92 so that all first nations would be able to pass their own child well-being laws and no longer be subject to section 88 of the Indian Act, which gave provinces laws of general application for things other than where Canada was explicit about the rights of first nations on health and education.
Across Canada, over half of the Indian Act bands are now sitting down at tables to work on their priorities as they assert their jurisdiction. From education to fisheries to child and family services to policing or to their own court systems, we have made important strides forward in the hard work of, as Lee Crowchild describes it, deconstructing the effects of colonization.
In British Columbia, we have been inspired by the work of the B.C. Summit, as they have been able to articulate and sign with us and the B.C. government a new policy that will once and for all eliminate the concepts of extinguishment, cede and surrender for future treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
We have together agreed that no longer would loans be necessary for first nations to fund their negotiations with Canada. We are also forgiving outstanding past loans, and in some cases paying back nations that had already repaid those loans.
We have worked with the already self-governing nations on a collaborative fiscal arrangement that will provide stable, predictable funding that will properly fund the running of their governments.
This new funding arrangement will provide them with much more money than they would have received under the Indian Act.
The conditions are right to move the relationship with first nations, Inuit and Métis to one based on the affirmation of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership as written in the mandate letters of all ministers of this government.
It has been so exciting to watch the creativity and innovation presented by the Ktunaxa and Sto:lo nations in their negotiations of modern treaties.
We were inspired to see the hereditary chiefs and the elected chief and council of the Heiltsuk nation work together to be able to sign an agreement with Canada on their path to self-government. Many nations have been successful when elected and hereditary chiefs have worked together, and I look forward to having these conversations with the Wet'suwet'en nation.
It is now time to build on the historic Delgamuukw decision. It is time to show that issues of rights and title can be solved in meaningful dialogue.
My job is to ensure that Canada finds out-of-court solutions and to fast-track negotiations and agreements that make real change possible.
After the Tsilhqot'in decision, we have been inspired by the hard work of the Tsilhqot'in national government to build its capacity as a government, to write its constitution and its laws, and establish its government.
I look forward to hopefully finding out-of-court processes to determine title, as we hope for Haida Gwaii. There are many parts of Canada where title is very difficult to determine. Many nations have occupied the land for varying generations. I will never forget that feeling on the Tsilhqot'in title land at the signing with the Prime Minister, looking around, the land surrounded by mountains, where the Tsilhqot'in people have lived for millennia. It seemed obvious that anyone who stood there would understand why they had won their case at the Supreme Court of Canada.
We are at a critical time in Canada. We need to deal effectively with the uncertainty. Canadians want to see indigenous rights honoured, and they are impatient for meaningful progress.
Canadians are counting on us to implement a set of rules and processes in which section 35 of our Constitution can be honourably implemented. We are often reminded that inherent rights did not start with section 35: They are indeed inherent rights, as well as treaty rights.
The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is an important first step in getting there. We need to properly explain, as have many of the academics and so many of the courts, that free, prior and informed consent is not scary. Consent is not a veto. Bill C-69 means that indigenous peoples and indigenous knowledge will be mandatory at the very beginning of a proposal for any major project.
Section 19 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples has really been described as a process for land use planning in which the rights of indigenous people are respected.
As we have learned from the experience in Nunavut, where the land claims have been settled, good projects receive a green light, bad projects a red light, and mediocre projects are sent back to the drawing board to improve their environmental stewardship or cultural protection or employment for the Inuit beneficiaries. Nunavummiut accept the decisions of this process wherein the federal, territorial, and Inuit rights holders have taken the decision together.
Canadians acknowledge that there has been a difference of opinion among the Wet'suwet'en peoples. We have heard often in the House that 20 elected chiefs and council agreed to the project in consultation with their people. Women leaders have expressed an opinion that the project can eliminate poverty or provide meaningful work for young men and reduce domestic violence and incarceration. Some have expressed that in an indigenous world view, providing an energy source that will reduce China's reliance on coal is good for Mother Earth.
However, it is only the Wet'suwet'en people that can decide. We are hoping the Wet'suwet'en people will be able to come together to take these decisions together, decisions that are in the best interests of their children and their children for generations to come.
We applaud the thousands of young Canadians fighting for climate justice.
We know that those young people need hope, that they want to see a real plan to deal with the climate emergency. We do believe that we have an effective plan in place, from clean tech to renewable energy, public transit, and protection of the land and the water.
We want the young people of Canada and all those who have been warning about climate change for decades to feel heard.
They need hope, and they need to feel involved in coming up with real solutions.
Tonight there is an emergency debate because our country is hurting. It is for indigenous peoples and all those who are being affected coast to coast to coast.
Yesterday I met in Victoria with British Columbia minister Scott Fraser, and this afternoon had a call with hereditary chiefs and conveyed that we are ready to meet with the hereditary leadership of Wet'suwet'en at a time and place of their choosing.
Together with the Prime Minister and the premier, we want to support the solutions going forward. We want to address their short- and long-term goals. We want to see the hope and hard work that resulted in the Delgamuukw decision of 1997, to be able to chart a new path with the Wet'suwet'en nation in which there is unity and prosperity and a long-term plan for protecting their law, and as Eugene Arcand says, LAW: land, air, water. We also want to see a thriving Wet'suwet'en nation with its own constitution and laws based on its traditional legal customs and practices.
We want to thank Premier Horgan for his efforts to resolve this problem and Murray Rankin for the work that he has undertaken since April of last year to work with the elected chiefs and council as well as the hereditary chiefs on their rights and title. We want to thank Nathan Cullen for his efforts to try and de-escalate this situation.
I am very proud to work with the Province of British Columbia, and I think all in this House congratulate it on the passage of Bill 41, where in Canada the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is now legislated.
Our government is invested in and inspired by the work of Val Napoleon and John Borrows at the Indigenous Legal Lodge at the University of Victoria. They will be able to do the research on the laws of many nations so that they can create a governance structure and constitutions in keeping with those laws. It is important to understand the damage done by colonization and residential schools that has led to sometimes different interpretations of traditional legal practices and customs.
We think that, one day, Canada will be able to integrate indigenous law into Canada's legislative process, just as it did with common law and droit civil.
We are striving to implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action and to increase awareness of our shared history. We all need the indigenous leadership to know that we are serious. We are serious about rebuilding trust and working with respect, as the Minister of Indigenous Services and the Prime Minister have expressed today in such heartfelt ways.
We hope that the Wet'suwet'en will be able to express to those in solidarity with them that it is now time to stand down to create that space for a peaceful dialogue, and to let us get back to work towards a Wet'suwet'en nation with its own laws and governance that can work nation-to-nation with the Crown.
Although I returned to Ottawa for this debate tonight, I am hoping to be able to return to B.C. as soon as possible to continue that work.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un honneur pour moi de prendre la parole ce soir sur le territoire non cédé du peuple algonquin.
J'aimerais d'abord remercier le député de New Westminster—Burnaby d'avoir demandé la tenue de cet important débat ce soir.
Il est important que nous puissions discuter des enjeux et des solutions possibles au sein de cette assemblée, quelle que soit la ligne de parti.
Les Canadiens sont inquiets. Comme l'a exprimé avec tant d'éloquence ce matin le premier ministre, les Canadiens s'attendent à nous voir travailler tous ensemble pour traverser cette épreuve. Des jeunes en larmes m'ont dit combien il leur a été pénible de visionner ces images et de voir leurs amis se faire arrêter pour avoir défendu leurs convictions. Cette situation s'est produite il y a un an, puis à nouveau au début du mois.
Comme l'a expliqué avec sincérité le ministre des Services aux Autochtones, nous pensons avoir tiré les leçons de la crise d'Oka, mais aussi des incidents d'Ipperwash, de Caledonia et du lac Gustafsen. L'année dernière, nous avons déclaré que nous ne voulions plus jamais revoir d'images de policiers devant recourir à la force dans une communauté autochtone pour maintenir la paix.
La population canadienne compte sur nous pour collaborer à la création d'un espace de dialogue respectueux avec les Wet'suwet'en. Nous souhaitons tous que ce conflit soit résolu de manière pacifique. Nous voulons que les Wet'suwet'en se réunissent et résolvent leurs différences d'opinions.
Nous voulons qu'il y ait une clarté totale et une compréhension commune des lois de Wet'suwet'en.
Nous sommes inspirés par le courageux peuple Wet’suwet’en qui a porté la reconnaissance de ses droits devant la Cour suprême du Canada dans l'affaire Delgamuukw en 1997. Depuis 2018, nous avons pu investir dans leurs recherches sur des négociations dans le cadre de revendications précises, la préparation des négociations, la reconstruction des nations et les tables de reconnaissance des droits ainsi que leurs contributions au processus de la Commission des traités de la Colombie-Britannique et nous en sommes fiers.
Il y a deux ans, c'est avec fierté que j'ai signé, avec les chefs héréditaires de l'Office of the Wet'suwet'en, un accord affirmant leurs droits sur les services à l'enfance et à la famille. Depuis, le gouvernement a adopté le projet de loi C-92 pour que les Premières Nations puissent adopter leurs propres mesures législatives sur le bien-être des enfants et ne soient plus assujetties à l'article 88 de la Loi sur les Indiens, qui donnait aux provinces des principes d'application générale dans les cas autres que ceux où le Canada était explicite au sujet des droits des Premières Nations en matière de santé et d'éducation.
Partout au Canada, plus de la moitié des bandes assujetties à la Loi sur les Indiens siègent maintenant à des tables pour faire avancer leurs priorités en exerçant leur compétence. Qu'on parle de l'éducation, des pêches, des services à l'enfance et à la famille, des services de police ou de leurs propres systèmes de tribunaux, nous avons fait de grands pas dans l'entreprise difficile consistant, selon la description qu'en donne Lee Crowchild, à déconstruire les effets de la colonisation.
Sur la côte Ouest, nous avons par exemple été inspirés par le Sommet de la Colombie-Britannique, qui a permis de conclure une entente avec le fédéral et la province de la Colombie-Britannique en vertu de laquelle les notions d'aliénation, de cession et d'abandon seront à jamais absentes des traités, accords et autres ententes constructives.
Nous avons tous convenu que les Premières Nations n'auront plus besoin d'emprunter de l'argent pour financer leurs négociations avec l'État canadien. Nous avons aussi décidé de radier les prêts existants et nous avons même, dans certains cas, redonné leur argent aux nations qui avaient fini de rembourser leurs prêts.
Nous avons élaboré une nouvelle politique financière collaborative en partenariat avec les Premières Nations déjà autonomes afin qu'elles aient accès à du financement stable, prévisible et adéquat pour voir à leurs affaires.
Ce nouveau mode de financement leur offre beaucoup plus d'argent qu'ils n'en auraient reçu en vertu de la Loi sur les Indiens.
Les conditions sont réunies pour que la relation avec les Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis soit désormais axée sur la reconnaissance des droits, le respect, la collaboration et le partenariat, comme l'indiquaient d'ailleurs les lettres de mandat de tous les ministres.
Quel plaisir ce fut de voir la manière créative et innovatrice dont les Ktunaxas et les Sto:los ont abordé la négociation des traités modernes.
Nous avons été inspirés de voir les chefs héréditaires, le chef élu et le conseil de bande des Heiltsuks unir leurs efforts pour conclure un accord sur l'accession à l'autonomie gouvernementale avec le Canada. De nombreuses nations ont connu le succès dès que leurs chefs héréditaires et chefs élus ont accepté de travailler main dans la main, et je suis impatiente de pouvoir en discuter avec les Wet'suwet'en.
Le temps est maintenant venu d'appliquer l'arrêt Delgamuukw. Le temps est venu de montrer que la solution à la question des droits et des titres ancestraux passe par le dialogue.
Mon travail consiste à assurer que le Canada trouve des solutions hors tribunaux, ainsi qu'à accélérer les négociations et les ententes aux tables où un véritable changement peut avoir lieu.
Après la décision rendue dans l'affaire Tsilhqot'in, nous avons été inspirés par le travail inlassable qu'a accompli le gouvernement national tsilhqot'in en vue de développer sa capacité à gouverner, de rédiger une constitution et des lois, et d'établir son gouvernement.
J'espère qu'il y aura des processus non judiciaires pour définir les titres; c'est ce que nous espérons pour Haida Gwaii. Il est très difficile de définir les titres dans plusieurs régions du Canada. De nombreuses nations occupent un territoire depuis des générations. Je n'oublierai jamais ce que j'ai ressenti, sur le territoire tsilhqot'in, lors de la cérémonie de signature avec le premier ministre. Je regardais cette terre entourée de montagnes où les Tsilhqot'ins vivent depuis des millénaires. Il m'apparaissait évident que tous ceux qui se tiendraient à cet endroit comprendraient pourquoi ils avaient remporté leur cause devant la Cour suprême du Canada.
Le Canada vit un moment décisif. Nous devons composer efficacement avec l'incertitude. Les Canadiens souhaitent que le Canada respecte les droits des Autochtones et ils veulent que ce dossier avance rondement.
Les Canadiens comptent sur nous pour mettre en œuvre des règles et des processus qui permettront de concrétiser de façon honorable l'article 35 de la Constitution du Canada. On nous rappelle souvent que les droits inhérents existaient avant l'article 35: ils sont bel et bien inhérents, après tout, tout comme les droits issus de traités.
La Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones est une première étape importante pour nous aider à atteindre cet objectif. Nous devons bien expliquer, comme nombre d'universitaires et de tribunaux l'ont fait, que la notion de consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause n'a rien d'effrayant. Le principe du consentement ne constitue pas un droit de veto. Selon le projet de loi C‑69, il faudra obligatoirement tenir compte des peuples autochtones et du savoir autochtone dès qu'un grand projet sera présenté.
L'article 19 de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones a véritablement été décrit comme un processus à appliquer à l'aménagement du territoire afin de respecter les droits des peuples autochtones.
L'expérience du Nunavut nous a enseigné que, lorsque les revendications territoriales sont réglées, les bons projets reçoivent le feu vert, les mauvais projets sont stoppés et les projets médiocres doivent être révisés de manière à les rendre meilleurs sur le plan de la gestion de l'environnement, de la protection culturelle ou des emplois pour les bénéficiaires inuits. Les Nunavummiuts acceptent les décisions qui sont prises dans le cadre de ce processus lorsque les intervenants fédéraux et territoriaux ainsi que les détenteurs de droits inuits prennent la décision ensemble.
Les Canadiens sont conscients qu'il y a des opinions divergentes parmi les Wet'suwet'en. Nous avons souvent entendu dire à la Chambre que 20 chefs élus et leurs conseils ont approuvé le projet en consultation avec leur communauté. Des dirigeantes ont exprimé leur avis en disant que le projet peut éliminer la pauvreté ou créer des emplois intéressants pour les jeunes hommes tout en contribuant à réduire la violence familiale et le taux d'incarcération. Certains ont affirmé que, selon la vision du monde des Autochtones, le fait d'offrir une source d'énergie qui aidera la Chine à moins recourir aux centrales au charbon est une bonne chose pour la Terre mère.
Cependant, seuls les Wet'suwet'en peuvent prendre la décision. Nous espérons que les Wet'suwet'en pourront s'entendre et prendre ensemble des décisions qui seront dans l'intérêt supérieur de leurs enfants, de leurs petits-enfants et des générations suivantes.
Nous saluons les milliers de jeunes Canadiens qui luttent pour la justice climatique.
Nous savons que ces jeunes gens ont besoin d'espoir et qu'ils veulent un véritable plan d'attaque contre la crise climatique. Nous sommes d'avis que nous avons un plan efficace, qui traite de technologie propre, d'énergie renouvelable, de transports en commun et de protection des terres et des eaux.
Nous voulons que les jeunes du Canada, de même que tous ceux qui sonnent l'alarme au sujet des changements climatiques depuis des décennies, se sentent entendus.
Ils doivent avoir de l'espoir et se sentir partie prenante de l'élaboration de véritables solution.
Ce soir, nous tenons un débat d'urgence parce que notre pays souffre. Nous le tenons pour les peuples autochtones et pour tous ceux qui sont touchés un peu partout au pays.
Hier, j'ai assisté à une réunion avec le ministre britanno-colombien Scott Fraser. Cet après-midi, j'ai eu un appel avec les chefs héréditaires, à qui j'ai dit que nous étions prêts à rencontrer les chefs héréditaires des Wet'suwet'en au moment et à l'endroit de leur choix.
Avec le premier ministre et le premier ministre provincial, nous voulons appuyer des solutions et l'atteinte de leurs buts à court et à long terme. Nous voulons voir l'espoir et le travail acharné qui a mené à la décision Delgamuukw en 1997. Nous voulons tracer une nouvelle voie avec la nation des Wet'suwet'en où il y a unité et prospérité ainsi qu'un plan à long terme pour protéger leurs lois, leurs terres, leur eau et leur air. Nous voulons aussi voir la nation des Wet'suwet'en s'épanouir avec sa propre constitution et ses propres lois fondées sur ses coutumes et ses pratiques juridiques traditionnelles.
Nous remercions le premier ministre Horgan de ses efforts pour résoudre le problème. Merci aussi à Murray Rankin pour le travail qu'il a entrepris en avril dernier avec les chefs et leur conseil élus et les chefs héréditaires, relativement à leurs droits et à leur titre. Nous remercions Nathan Cullen, qui a tenté de désamorcer le conflit.
Je suis très fière de travailler avec la province de la Colombie‑Britannique. Je crois que tous les députés félicitent celle-ci de l'adoption du projet de loi 41, qui inscrit dans la loi de cette province la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.
Le gouvernement investit dans le travail de Val Napoleon et John Borrows au pavillon en droit autochtone de l'Université de Victoria, et il s'en inspire. On pourra ensuite mener des recherches sur les lois de nombreuses nations afin de créer une structure de gouvernance et des constitutions qui les respectent. Il est important de comprendre les dommages causés par la colonisation et les pensionnats, ce qui a parfois entraîné des interprétations différentes des pratiques et usages juridiques traditionnels.
Nous pensons qu’il sera un jour possible que le Canada intègre le droit autochtone, comme nous l’avons fait dans le cas de la common law et des droits civils dans le processus législatif canadien.
Nous visons à mettre en œuvre les appels à l'action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation ainsi qu'à faire mieux connaître notre histoire commune. Il est nécessaire, pour nous tous, que les chefs autochtones sachent que nous sommes sérieux. Nous voulons vraiment rebâtir la confiance et collaborer avec respect, comme le ministre des Services aux Autochtones et le premier ministre l'ont dit aujourd'hui en toute sincérité.
Nous espérons que les Wet'suwet'en pourront dire à ceux qui leur ont montré leur solidarité que le temps est venu de se retirer afin de créer un espace pour un dialogue pacifique. Nous pourrons ainsi nous remettre au travail afin que la nation des Wet'suwet'en puisse disposer de ses propres lois et pratiques de gouvernance et collaborer de nation à nation avec la Couronne.
Même si je suis à Ottawa pour le débat de ce soir, j'espère pouvoir retourner dès que possible en Colombie-Britannique pour poursuivre le travail.
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, the Conservatives talk about the rule of law, yet they fail to recognize that section 35 of our Constitution clearly recognizes the rights of indigenous peoples; they fail to recognize that in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, section 10 recognizes the issue of free, prior and informed consent; and they fail to recognize that with the Delgamuukw case the highest court of this land, the Supreme Court of Canada, also recognizes indigenous peoples and their rights.
If the Liberal government truly is committed to a new nation-to-nation relationship, will it bring these principles that are enshrined in section 35, in UNDRIP and in Delgamuukw to the table and begin the negotiations? To show a gesture of goodwill, will the Liberals be willing to call the RCMP to stand down, take the guns out of the land and allow for negotiations to take place in a peaceful manner?
Madame la Présidente, les conservateurs aiment parler de la primauté du droit, mais ils refusent d'admettre que l'article 35 de la Constitution reconnaît clairement les droits des peuples autochtones. Ils refusent d'admettre que l'article 10 de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones reconnaît la notion de consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. Ils refusent également d'admettre que la Cour suprême, le plus haut tribunal du pays, a reconnu les peuples autochtones et leurs droits dans la décision qu'elle a rendue dans l'affaire Delgamuukw.
Si le gouvernement libéral est vraiment résolu à établir une nouvelle relation de nation à nation, tiendra-t-il compte, lorsque débuteront les négociations, des principes consacrés dans l'article 35 de la Constitution et dans l'article 10 de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, ainsi que de la décision prise dans l'affaire Delgamuukw? Les libéraux seraient-ils prêts, dans un geste de bonne volonté, à demander à la GRC de faire marche arrière, à confisquer les armes sur le terrain et à permettre la tenue de négociations pacifiques?
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, I thank the member and her former colleague, Romeo Saganash, for the very important work that he provided in terms of our providing his Bill C-262 as a baseline as we go forward, as a floor, to be able to legislate the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples here in Canada, as an example for the world.
This is an important time where all of these things come together. It is important that Delgamuukw ascertained the rights of the people whom we have to move on in their search to have clarity on title. Those are conversations that we need to have together.
The member knows, as we have explained in this House many times, the Government of Canada cannot direct the RCMP. Our job is that we can explain, as we are in this House tonight and as your members have done, that the presence of the RCMP has been articulated as a problem for the hereditary chiefs and many of the members of that community. We have articulated that, and we want to work in any way to remove the obstacles, to be able to go forward as a country.
Madame la Présidente, je remercie la députée et je remercie aussi son ancien collègue et ex-député, Romeo Saganash, de l'important travail qu'il a accompli et qui nous permet de nous servir de son projet de loi C‑262 comme fondement pour avancer et réussir à consigner dans la législation canadienne l'adoption de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones et ainsi donner l'exemple au reste du monde.
Nous sommes à un tournant important où tous les éléments se mettent en place. Il est important que la décision Delgamuukw ait affirmé les droits de personnes que nous devons épauler dans leur recherche de plus de clarté concernant la propriété du territoire. Ce sont des discussions auxquelles nous devons participer ensemble.
La députée le sait, car nous l'avons expliqué à de nombreuses reprises à la Chambre, le gouvernement du Canada ne peut donner directement des ordres à la GRC. Notre travail est d'expliquer — comme nous le faisons ce soir et comme l'ont fait les députés de votre parti — que la présence de la GRC est perçue comme un problème par les chefs héréditaires et par de nombreux membres de cette communauté. Nous l'avons expliqué et nous voulons contribuer à faire lever les barrages afin que nous puissions continuer d'avancer en tant que pays.
View Jody Wilson-Raybould Profile
Ind. (BC)
Madam Speaker, I would like to applaud the government for ensuring that there will be an introduction of UNDRIP legislation to bring the United Nations declaration into Canadian law.
Beyond that necessary first step, will the government commit to changing its laws, policies and operational practices to ensure that indigenous peoples in this country can be self-determining, including self-governing, at their own pace and based on their own priorities? Can the government ensure that it will go beyond the UNDRIP legislation, and actually change laws and policies?
Madame la Présidente, je félicite le gouvernement de faire le nécessaire pour présenter une loi relative à la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, qui permettra d'intégrer cette déclaration dans le droit canadien.
Au-delà de cette première étape nécessaire, le gouvernement s'engagera-t-il à modifier les lois, les politiques et les pratiques opérationnelles afin que les peuples autochtones du pays aient accès à l'autodétermination et à l'autonomie gouvernementale à leur propre rythme et en fonction des priorités qui sont les leurs? Le gouvernement peut-il garantir qu'il ira au-delà de la loi sur la Déclaration des Nations unies et qu'il modifiera les lois et les politiques connexes?
View Carolyn Bennett Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Speaker, the member's leadership in this has been extraordinarily important. As we have seen with the signing of the B.C. policy, it is very clear that Canada has gone beyond what was expected. We were able to articulate with the Government of British Columbia and at the B.C. summit of indigenous leaderships that there is a way forward that can be a model for the rest of the country. All ministers in this House believe we have to go beyond what is the base and make sure that we get the obstacles to self-government and self-determination out of the way.
Madame la Présidente, la députée a fait preuve d'un leadership extraordinaire dans ce dossier. Comme l'a montré la signature de la politique en Colombie-Britannique, le Canada a clairement dépassé les attentes. Notre travail avec le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique et le Sommet des Premières Nations de cette province a permis de tracer la voie à suivre, une voie qui peut servir de modèle à l'ensemble du pays. Tous les ministres fédéraux sont convaincus qu'il faut aller au-delà du minimum et éliminer les obstacles à l'autodétermination et à l'autonomie gouvernementale.
View Jenny Kwan Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, it is a bit much to take when I hear the Conservative members. On the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, former Prime Minister Harper actually said that it was an Indian issue. This is how the Conservative treat indigenous people. On this issue, they have perpetuated the situation which we are in today.
There is no question that the Liberals did not act, and they should have long ago. They have not made good on their promise on the new nation-to-nation relationship. However, the Conservatives have perpetuated this in their tenure as well.
On the question around the rule of law, do Conservative members not recognize section 35 of the Constitution that enshrines the rights of indigenous people, and also the Supreme Court decision with respect to Delgamuukw?
Madame la Présidente, il est un peu dur d'avaler ce que disent les députés conservateurs. En parlant des femmes et filles autochtones assassinées ou portées disparues, l'ancien premier ministre Harper a dit que c'était une question indienne. Oui, il a bel et bien dit cela. C'est de cette façon que les conservateurs traitent les Autochtones. Ils ont perpétué la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons aujourd'hui.
Il est indéniable que les libéraux n'ont pas agi, alors qu'ils auraient dû le faire il y a longtemps. Ils n'ont pas respecté leur promesse d'établir une nouvelle relation de nation à nation. Toutefois, les conservateurs n'ont eux aussi rien fait dans ce dossier durant leur mandat.
Pour ce qui est de la primauté du droit, les députés conservateurs ne reconnaissent-ils pas l'article 35 de la Constitution, qui enchâsse les droits des peuples autochtones, de même que la décision rendue par la Cour suprême dans l'arrêt Delgamuukw?
View Cathy McLeod Profile
CPC (BC)
Madam Speaker, absolutely we respect section 35. However, what is very ironic is the member for Vancouver East sat in the B.C. legislature. She is part of the party that is supporting this pipeline. It is absolutely strange, absolutely ironic to hear the way she is arguing in the House today, knowing the position her party is taking in her province of British Columbia, which supports this project and wants to see it go through. The current premier is of the same mind.
Madame la Présidente, nous respectons absolument l'article 35. Il est cependant très paradoxal que la députée de Vancouver-Est faisait partie de l'Assemblée législative de la Colombie-Britannique. Elle est membre du parti qui appuie ce pipeline. Il est tout à fait étrange et paradoxal d'entendre les arguments qu'elle fait valoir à la Chambre aujourd'hui, sachant la position adoptée par son parti dans sa province, la Colombie-Britannique, qui est en faveur de ce projet et souhaite qu'il aille de l'avant. C'est aussi ce que désire l'actuel premier ministre de la province.
View Patrick Weiler Profile
Lib. (BC)
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with my hon. colleague for Sydney—Victoria.
I will start today by acknowledging that we are standing here on the traditional territory of the Algonquin people. It is also a privilege to serve as a member of Parliament for a riding that includes the unceded traditional territory of the Squamish, Lil'Wat and Sechelt nations.
Our government is committed to advancing reconciliation with indigenous peoples through a renewed nation-to-nation, government-to-government relationship based on recognitions of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership. Indeed, this is our most important relationship, and a relationship we have neglected for far too much of our nation's history.
We know that building this important relationship is not a quick fix. We never pretended that the road to reconciliation will be quick or easy, but we vow to begin the journey towards a renewed relationship.
While we work toward this aim, first nations are understandably frustrated by a lack of progress in recognition of their fundamental and constitutional rights. The result is that we are now at a boiling point.
Today, this is particularly true for the Wet'suwet'en, who have spent many decades working to have their rights and title recognized. The Wet'suwet'en have been leaders across this country in advancing reconciliation. This is evident in the landmark Supreme Court of Canada Delgamuukw case where, for the first time, aboriginal title was recognized as an ancestral right protected by our Constitution. In spite of this landmark case in 1997, not enough progress has been made on this critical relationship.
While indigenous peoples have inherent rights and treaty rights that have been affirmed by section 35 of the Constitution, too often they still have to go to court, first to prove that their rights exist, and then to force the government of the day to implement them.
Our government has taken some of the essential and overdue steps required to renew and build upon Canada's relationship with indigenous peoples to ensure that they have control over their destiny. We have made unprecedented investments to repair and upgrade water and wastewater systems in first nations communities. We are investing in families and children. Through the oceans protection plan, indigenous peoples have new opportunities to protect, preserve and restore Canada's oceans.
We have also made fundamental changes in our approach to negotiating modern treaties. This is critical for B.C., where already our province is home to many unsettled land claims, but we have examples of reconciliation being successful in some of our modern treaties, especially up north.
I want to raise two examples from my riding that are poignant examples of how reconciliation can work in practice.
First and foremost, this month we celebrate the 10-year anniversary of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games. This event was a source of immense pride for all Canadians, as we were able to show the world our rich cultural diversity.
This event also allowed us to highlight the incredible history and culture of our indigenous peoples. We did this by partnering with the four host first nations. In this process we allowed first nations to share their languages and to share their culture in celebrations and through new economic partnerships, including through the development of new tourism infrastructure, such as the Squamish Lil'Wat Cultural Centre.
Second, and perhaps because we are speaking about a crisis that was ignited by a natural gas pipeline, I want to mention the Woodfibre LNG project in my riding. This pipeline and export terminal is situated in the middle of Squamish nation lands. The Squamish were concerned that the existing regulatory processes would not adequately engage with and respond to their concerns, so the nation proposed leading their own environmental assessment process and, lo and behold, the company agreed to be bound by this.
This process went ahead and identified additional conditions for the project. The proposal went back to the nation, which put it to a vote, and the nation ended up approving it. The nation subsequently negotiated an impact benefit agreement with this project. This project will now be monitored by the Squamish to ensure compliance with the conditions.
I raise this example because adding first nations voices to the table for resource projects does not mean that these projects will not be approved. Rather, these voices help produce projects that are better for the environment, better for the community and better for Canada.
In fact, this is why we introduced and passed the Impact Assessment Act in the last session. Reforms under the previous Conservative government failed to honour indigenous rights and partnerships, eroded public trust and put our communities at risk. Under the Impact Assessment Act, we create the space for indigenous peoples to run their own environmental assessment process to give first nations a role in the decisions that affect their rights. In addition, early public engagement will ensure reviews happen in partnership with indigenous peoples, communities will have their voices heard and companies know what is required of them, including on issues related to climate change, conservation and environmental protection.
Having meaningful engagement and consultation with indigenous peoples aims to secure their free, prior and informed consent, and this is not optional. Canada has a legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, accommodate indigenous groups if there could be potential adverse impacts on potential or established aboriginal rights and title. Section 35 of the Constitution makes our fiduciary relationship toward first nations very clear. We cannot continue in the situation we are in today, and it is going to take all of us at all levels of government to find a way forward. What we find ourselves in now is the outcome of reconciliation not making progress and Canadians letting each other down, so we must be utterly committed to repair and improve the systems to keep our country functional and capable of providing the services that we all rely on.
The impacts to our transportation systems cannot continue. The transportation sector allows for social linkages. Canadians are feeling the effects of diminished access to family members, community events, education and health services. Railways are a mainstay of rural life in Canada. They offer service, access and connection to more rural and remote places in our country. Rail offers first- and last-mile service, and we cannot fail to connect these Canadians to the services they need.
I know my colleagues share my concern for Canadians in industries right across the country who are facing layoffs and disruptions to their ability to support themselves and their families. Communities rely on the materials transported by those rail lines, not least among them the families in Atlantic Canada, who rely on propane to heat their homes and are facing rations. We move our food staples by rail from fields to homes. Tens of millions of tonnes of food are transported by rail every year. We need to do better for our communities. An economically healthy Canada is able to uplift, empower and constantly strive to do better for all Canadians. The rail transportation losses our country is facing are in the billions every day, and the need for action has never been more urgent.
We have seen the devastating effects of unwarranted force used against our indigenous peoples in Canada. I state in no uncertain terms that force cannot and will not be the resolution to this conflict, nor will our solution be found in endless drawn-out court cases. Together we and our partners need to get out of the courtroom and gather together around the negotiating table. We can find more than resolution; I believe we can find success. We can do better.
We can find processes that work for indigenous peoples, but there is nothing that we can achieve if we do not have a conversation. The divides in this country require dialogue. We need to show that we have a process that will lead us down the path to reconciliation. Where we can show that, we can provide an off-ramp to de-escalate the crisis we are in and get our people, goods and economy rolling again.
Reconciliation happens when we are able to work together. Reconciliation happens in learning, in redress and in dialogue, and I call upon all parties involved to be part of that solution.
Monsieur le Président, je vais partager le temps dont je dispose avec mon collègue le député de Sydney—Victoria.
Premièrement, je voudrais souligner que nous nous trouvons sur le territoire non cédé du peuple algonquin et que j'ai le privilège de représenter au Parlement une circonscription qui englobe le territoire traditionnel non cédé des nations Squamish, Lil'Wat et Sechelt.
Le gouvernement a la ferme intention de promouvoir la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones en nouant avec elles une relation nouvelle, de nation à nation et de gouvernement à gouvernement, qui sera fondée sur la reconnaissance des droits, le respect, la coopération et le partenariat. C'est notre relation la plus importante, et nous l'avons négligée beaucoup trop longtemps, au cours de l'histoire de notre pays.
Nous savons que ce n'est pas une relation qui peut se construire du jour au lendemain. Nous n'avons jamais prétendu que le chemin menant à la réconciliation serait facile, mais nous avons donné notre parole et nous entreprenons résolument notre longue marche vers le renouvellement de cette relation.
Tandis que nous nous efforçons d'avancer vers l'objectif, certaines nations autochtones ressentent une frustration bien compréhensible en voyant qu'ils ne se rapprochent pas assez vite de la reconnaissance de leurs droits constitutionnels. Le résultat de cette frustration est une situation où le couvercle de la marmite s'apprête à sauter.
C'est d'autant plus le cas aujourd'hui pour les Wet'suwet'en, qui luttent depuis plusieurs décennies pour faire reconnaître leurs droits et leurs titres ancestraux. Les Wet'suwet'en sont à l'avant-garde des efforts pour faire avancer la réconciliation au Canada, comme en témoigne la décision historique de la Cour suprême du Canada dans l'affaire Delgamuukw, où, pour la toute première fois, un titre ancestral a été reconnu en tant que droit ancestral protégé par la Constitution. Malgré cette décision historique rendue en 1997, les progrès réalisés dans cette relation déterminante restent insuffisants.
Même si les peuples autochtones ont des droits fondamentaux et des droits issus de traités que reconnaît l'article 35 de la Constitution, trop souvent, ils doivent tout de même s'adresser aux tribunaux, d'abord pour prouver que leurs droits existent, ensuite pour forcer le gouvernement en place à les appliquer.
Le gouvernement a pris certaines des mesures essentielles et attendues depuis longtemps pour renouveler et renforcer les relations entre le Canada et les peuples autochtones afin que ces derniers soient maîtres de leur destin. Nous avons fait des investissements sans précédent pour réparer et moderniser les réseaux d'alimentation en eau et d'élimination des eaux usées dans les collectivités autochtones. Nous investissons dans les familles et dans les enfants. Grâce au Plan de protection des océans, les peuples autochtones disposent de nouvelles occasions de protéger, de préserver et d'assainir les océans du Canada.
Nous avons également apporté des changements fondamentaux à notre approche de négociation des traités modernes. C'est essentiel pour la Colombie-Britannique, car il y a déjà de nombreuses revendications territoriales non réglées dans la province, mais il y a des exemples de traités modernes qui ont permis la réconciliation, notamment dans le Nord.
Je voudrais donner deux exemples poignants de ma circonscription qui montrent que la réconciliation est possible dans la pratique.
D'abord et avant tout, ce mois-ci, nous célébrons le 10e anniversaire de la tenue des Jeux olympiques et des Jeux paralympiques de 2010 à Vancouver. Cet événement a été source d'une immense fierté pour tous les Canadiens, car nous avons réussi à montrer à toute la planète la richesse de notre diversité culturelle.
Les Jeux ont également été l'occasion de mettre en valeur le patrimoine et la culture incroyables des peuples autochtones. Nous avons pu le faire grâce à notre collaboration avec les quatre Premières Nations hôtes. Dans le cadre de ce processus, nous avons donné l'occasion aux Premières Nations de faire connaître leurs langues et leur culture dans les célébrations et par l'entremise de nouveaux partenariats économiques, notamment le développement de nouvelles infrastructures touristiques comme le centre culturel Squamish Lil'Wat.
Ensuite, peut-être parce que nous parlons d'une crise générée par un gazoduc, je voudrais mentionner le projet de gaz naturel liquéfié Woodfibre, dans ma circonscription. Ce gazoduc et le terminal d'exportation connexe sont situés en plein cœur du territoire de la nation Squamish. Les Squamish s'inquiétaient de la possibilité que le processus réglementaire en place ne permette pas de consultations adéquates et ne réponde pas à leurs préoccupations, alors la nation a proposé de mener sa propre évaluation environnementale et, quelle surprise, l'entreprise a accepté de s'y conformer.
Le processus a eu lieu et il a permis d'établir de nouvelles conditions pour le projet. La proposition a été de nouveau soumise à la nation, qui l'a mise aux voix et, ultimement, l'a approuvée. La nation a par la suite négocié une entente sur les répercussions et les avantages liés au projet. Ce sont maintenant les Squamish qui surveilleront le projet pour s'assurer du respect des conditions.
Si je donne cet exemple, c'est pour montrer que d'impliquer les Premières Nations dans les projets de valorisation des ressources ne signifie pas que les projets seront rejetés. La contribution des Premières Nations signifie plutôt que les projets seront plus écologiques et qu'ils profiteront davantage à la communauté et au Canada.
C'est d'ailleurs pour cette raison que nous avons fait adopter la Loi sur l’évaluation d’impact lors de la dernière législature. Les réformes adoptées sous le gouvernement conservateur précédent ne respectaient pas les droits des autochtones et les partenariats établis avec eux, elles avaient érodé la confiance de la population et elles avaient compromis la sécurité publique. La Loi sur l’évaluation d’impact crée l'espace nécessaire pour que les Autochtones mènent leur propre processus d'évaluation environnementale, de manière à donner aux Premières Nations un rôle dans les décisions qui concernent leurs droits. En outre, une consultation publique précoce garantira que les évaluations se feront en partenariat avec les Autochtones, que les communautés feront entendre leur voix et que les entreprises sauront ce qu'on attend d'elles, notamment sur les questions liées aux changements climatiques, à la conservation et à la protection de l'environnement.
Le fait de mobiliser et de consulter concrètement les Autochtones vise à obtenir leur consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, ce qui n'est pas facultatif. Le Canada a l'obligation légale de consulter et, le cas échéant, d'accommoder les groupes autochtones s'il peut y avoir une incidence négative sur leurs droits et titres ancestraux établis. L'article 35 de la Constitution indique très clairement quelle est notre relation fiduciaire avec les Premières Nations. Nous ne pouvons pas continuer dans la situation actuelle et nous devrons tous mettre la main à la pâte, tous ordres de gouvernement confondus, pour trouver comment aller de l'avant. La situation actuelle est attribuable au fait que le processus de réconciliation stagne et que les Canadiens se déçoivent les uns les autres. Nous devons donc être totalement résolus à réparer et à améliorer les systèmes pour que le pays demeure fonctionnel et à même de fournir les services sur lesquels nous comptons tous.
Les réseaux de transport ne peuvent pas continuer à subir de telles répercussions. Le secteur des transports permet d'établir des liens sociaux. Les Canadiens ont moins accès aux membres de leur famille, aux activités communautaires, à l'éducation et aux services de santé, et ils en ressentent les effets. Les chemins de fer sont un pilier de la vie rurale au Canada. Ils offrent un service, un accès et une connexion aux régions les plus rurales et les plus éloignées du pays. Les chemins de fer offrent un service du premier au dernier kilomètre, et nous ne pouvons pas priver les Canadiens des services dont ils ont besoin.
Je sais que mes collègues partagent mes inquiétudes pour les gens qui travaillent dans certaines industries partout au pays et qui risquent d'être mis à pied et d'avoir plus de difficulté à subvenir à leurs besoins et à ceux de leur famille. Les collectivités ont besoin des biens transportés par ces sociétés ferroviaires; c'est particulièrement vrai pour les familles du Canada atlantique, qui ont besoin de propane pour chauffer leurs maisons et qui doivent faire face au rationnement. Les aliments de base sont transportés par train de la ferme aux foyers. Des dizaines de millions de tonnes d'aliments sont transportées par train chaque année. Nous devons faire mieux pour nos concitoyens. La prospérité économique du Canada peut améliorer la situation des Canadiens et leur donner les moyens d'améliorer constamment leur sort. La perturbation du transport ferroviaire entraîne, chaque jour, des pertes de plusieurs milliards de dollars pour le pays, et il est plus que jamais urgent d'agir.
Nous avons vu les effets désastreux du recours injustifié à la force contre les peuples autochtones du pays. Je tiens à dire clairement que la force ne peut pas être et ne sera pas une solution à ce conflit, et nous ne trouverons pas non plus de solution dans d'interminables procédures judiciaires. Nous devons travailler avec nos partenaires pour éviter les procédures judiciaires et trouver ensemble une solution à la table de négociations. Nous pouvons trouver plus qu'une solution; je pense que nous pouvons trouver le moyen d'assurer notre prospérité. Nous pouvons faire mieux.
Nous pouvons trouver des processus qui conviennent aux peuples autochtones, mais nous n'arriverons à rien sans dialogue. Pour remédier aux divisions au sein de notre pays, il faut dialoguer. Nous devons montrer que nous avons un processus à proposer pour promouvoir la réconciliation. Si nous y arrivons, nous pourrons commencer à désamorcer la crise actuelle et relancer l'économie et le transport des personnes et des biens.
Quand nous arrivons à travailler ensemble, la réconciliation est possible. La réconciliation passe par l'apprentissage, la réparation et le dialogue. J'exhorte toutes les parties concernées à contribuer à la solution.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, the member talked about meaningful dialogue. He represents a riding on the other side of the north shore, the other side of Burrard Inlet. The indigenous peoples of the north shore, the Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh people, have spoken out against the imposition by the government with respect to the Trans Mountain pipeline. I am not talking about the $17 billion or $18 billion in public funds the government wants to splurge on this pipeline, I am not talking about the environmental destruction that will come with having tankers going out through the Burrard Inlet and the Salish Sea, I am talking about indigenous peoples in his area, in the north shore, who have spoken out actively against this. I ask the member this: How can we consider the government to be credible in any way on this issue when it is willing to run roughshod over indigenous rights in the case of the Trans Mountain pipeline?
Monsieur le Président, le député a parlé d'un dialogue constructif. Il représente une circonscription située de l'autre côté de la rive nord, de l'autre côté de la baie Burrard. Les peuples autochtones de la rive nord, les Squamish et les Tsleil-Waututh, se sont prononcés contre l'imposition de l'oléoduc Trans Mountain par le gouvernement. Je ne parle pas des 17 ou 18 milliards de dollars de fonds publics que le gouvernement veut engloutir dans cet oléoduc ni des dommages environnementaux qui seront causés par le passage des pétroliers dans la baie Burrard et la mer des Salish, je parle des peuples autochtones dans sa région, sur la rive nord, qui s'opposent activement au projet. Je pose la question suivante au député: comment pouvons-nous juger que le gouvernement est digne de foi dans ce dossier lorsqu'il est prêt à bafouer les droits des Autochtones dans le cas de l'oléoduc Trans Mountain?
View Patrick Weiler Profile
Lib. (BC)
Mr. Speaker, the Trans Mountain pipeline review process dragged on for many years. The level of indigenous consultation that happened throughout this process is unheard of in this country. The high level of engagement from officials at the most senior levels would be hard to replicate in any other process. This is the type of example we need to show when we want to improve our nation-to-nation relationship, to have high-level buy-in engagement from our leaders. That is precisely what we need to pursue when we are talking about the Coastal GasLink project. I was encouraged to see our Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations present in B.C. a couple of days ago to meet with the Wet'suwet'en leaders and address the concerns that were raised.
Monsieur le Président, le processus d'examen de l'oléoduc Trans Mountain a traîné pendant de nombreuses années. Le nombre de consultations menées auprès des Autochtones tout au long du processus est sans précédent au Canada. Il serait difficile de reproduire le taux élevé de participation des fonctionnaires aux plus hauts niveaux dans le cadre d'un autre processus. C'est le type d'exemple que nous devons donner lorsque nous voulons améliorer notre relation de nation à nation afin d'obtenir une participation de haut niveau de la part de nos dirigeants. C'est précisément ce que nous devons faire dans le cadre du projet Coastal GasLink. J'ai trouvé encourageant de voir que la ministre des Relations Couronne-Autochtones était en Colombie-Britannique il y a quelques jours pour rencontrer les dirigeants wet'suwet'en et répondre à leurs préoccupations.
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
[Member spoke in Mi'kmaq]
[English]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to acknowledge the Algonquin territory which we meet on today. Many of us have acknowledged the traditional territories of indigenous nations on whose land we meet. Some of us go as far as to say we are on unceded land. How many of us give a thought to what that acknowledgement means?
To me, as a Mi'kmaq person, as an indigenous person, it means that we recognize that another group of humans cared for the land, protected the land and maintained it for future generations. We do so out of respect. Maybe we do so out of part of a journey of reconciliation too. While it is an easy thing to say, it is much harder to practise reconciliation.
Growing up Mi'kmaq, we are raised and taught that we are born with responsibilities to our family, to our community and to our nation, but also responsibilities to the ecosystem. We call it netukulimk in my language. When I think about that responsibility, I think about what actions I am willing to take to ensure the quality of life for future generations.
I was a protester, or a land protector, as my colleagues have reminded me. I too was out there on the streets frustrated during the Idle No More era of protests under the Stephen Harper government that saw environmental cuts and indigenous cuts. I was out there with them.
It was only when a new government was elected that I believed that Canada had reached a turning point, where Canada could look to a new relationship with indigenous people. It was with this in mind that I entered politics.
Because of the work that this government has done to advance reconciliation, I believed that a Mi'kmaq advocate would be welcomed into government. I still believe this today. I believe that reconciliation is possible.
I believe that reconciliation is not a destination; it is a journey. Just like any relationship we hope to improve and foster, it is only possible when we listen. It is only possible with respect. It is only possible when we find common ground. We have reached a moment in Canada like we have many times before. This will not be the first time that Canadians have called for police action, even military action, in the face of civil disobedience and protest.
If the civil rights movement in the U.S. has taught us anything, it is that violence, police or the army will not stop a political movement. It will only lead to more political action, escalation and turmoil.
Communication is the only way forward. Good faith negotiation is what the Wet'suwet'en are asking for. I will not go into the comments that my colleague just made about the Wet'suwet'en people in their determination and their fight at the Supreme Court of Canada for recognition of aboriginal title, but they believed it was a victory for them. Many indigenous nations across Canada believed it was a victory.
As many have stated today, section 35 of our Constitution, the supreme law of Canada, recognizes aboriginal and treaty rights. Further to that, section 52 states that the Constitution is the supreme law of Canada, and that any other laws that are inconsistent with them are of no force and effect. Therefore, the rule of law is important, but we must ensure that the rule of law is applied equitably among all peoples.
We have a crisis, but this crisis did not unfold in 12 days. This crisis did not unfold in 12 years. It has been unfolding for more than 150 years.
For more than a decade, I worked for the hereditary chiefs of the Mi'kmaq, as my father did for 30 years before me. They were called the Sante' Mawio'mi. The difference was that they were at the table with elected chiefs while they talked about negotiations moving forward. While it was not always easy, they always found ways to work together.
It is important that both Indian Act governments and traditional governments work together just the same as we in a minority government must attempt to work together.
I ask today for leaders in Canada, leaders of both indigenous and non-indigenous people, to commit to making our relationship work. Political action, not police action, has the ability to decrease tensions. It is the only way. Political discussion and negotiation is what is needed, not inflammatory rhetoric. We need to inspire hope. If nothing else during this speech, I want to make sure to say that there is still hope. The politician in me believes that and the protester in me believes that too.
We are still here. We have been debating all night, but more importantly, we have been listening all week. We are still listening. I promise we will not stop listening. Reach out to us and let us get back to negotiating and let our families from coast to coast to coast get back to work.
Like any relationship between families, between partners, when we sit down and talk about the issues rather than taking extreme positions that is when we have the ability to grow. We have a chance for growth in our country. We have the ability to take strides and take actions that have only been dreamt about by indigenous leaders in this country in the past. When we say that we are focused on reconciliation, let us show it in all of our actions.
[Le député s'exprime en micmac]
[Traduction]
Monsieur le président, je souligne que nous nous trouvons sur un territoire algonquin. Beaucoup d'entre nous ont reconnu les territoires traditionnels des Premières Nations sur lesquelles nous nous réunissons. Certains vont jusqu'à dire qu'il s’agit de territoires non cédés. Combien d'entre nous ont réfléchi au sens de cette affirmation?
Pour moi, en tant que personne micmaque, en tant qu'Autochtone, cela signifie que nous reconnaissons qu'un autre groupe d'êtres humains s'est occupé de la terre et l'a entretenu pour les générations subséquentes. Nous le faisons par respect. Peut-être le faisons-nous aussi par souci de réconciliation. C'est facile de parler de réconciliation, mais il est beaucoup plus difficile de la mettre en pratique.
On élève les enfants micmacs en leur enseignant qu'ils ont des responsabilités innées envers leur famille, leur communauté et leur nation, de même qu'envers l'écosystème. Dans ma langue, on appelle celui-ci netukulimk. Lorsque je réfléchis à cette responsabilité, je pense aux actions que je suis prêt à faire pour assurer la qualité de vie des générations futures.
J'ai été un manifestant ou un protecteur du territoire, comme mes collègues me l'ont rappelé. Je suis moi aussi descendu dans la rue pour exprimer ma frustration pendant le mouvement Idle No More alors que le gouvernement de Stephen Harper faisait des compressions dans le domaine de l'environnement et dans les services aux autochtones. J'étais aux côtés des contestataires.
C'est seulement lorsqu'un nouveau gouvernement a été élu que j'ai cru que le Canada était arrivé à un tournant. Le pays pouvait envisager une nouvelle relation avec les peuples autochtones. C'est dans cet esprit que je suis entré en politique.
Étant donné le travail que le gouvernement avait fait pour favoriser la réconciliation, j'ai pensé qu'un militant micmac serait le bienvenu. Je le pense encore aujourd'hui. Je suis convaincu que la réconciliation est possible.
À mon avis, la réconciliation n'est pas une destination, mais plutôt un parcours. Comme pour toute relation que nous voulons améliorer et nourrir, ce n'est possible qu'en étant à l'écoute. Ce n'est possible que si nous faisons preuve de respect et si nous trouvons un terrain d'entente. Le Canada, comme il l'a fait maintes fois, arrive à une étape. Ce n'est pas la première fois que les Canadiens demandent une intervention policière, voire militaire, pour mettre fin à la désobéissance civile et à des manifestations.
S'il y a une leçon à tirer du mouvement pour la défense des droits civiques aux États-Unis, c'est que la violence, la police ou l'armée ne met pas fin à un mouvement politique. Une telle approche ne fait qu'entraîner une intensification des actions politiques, une escalade des tensions et d'autres bouleversements.
La communication est la seule solution possible. Les Wet’suwet’en réclament des négociations de bonne foi. Je ne reviendrai pas sur ce que mon collègue vient de dire sur la détermination dont ont fait preuve les Wet’suwet’en dans leur combat devant la Cour suprême du Canada pour faire reconnaître leurs titres ancestraux. Je dirai toutefois qu'ils ont considéré cette reconnaissance comme une victoire. Bon nombre de nations autochtones au pays étaient du même avis.
Comme beaucoup de députés l'ont déclaré aujourd'hui, l'article 35 de notre Constitution, la loi suprême du Canada, reconnaît les droits ancestraux ou issus de traités. Par ailleurs, l'article 52 indique que la Constitution est la loi suprême du Canada et que toute autre loi qui y est contraire est inopérante. Par conséquent, même si la primauté du droit est importante, nous devons nous assurer qu'elle s'applique équitablement à tous.
Nous sommes en pleine crise, mais cette crise ne sévit pas depuis 12 jours, ni même 12 ans. Elle sévit depuis plus de 150 ans.
J'ai travaillé pendant plus d'une décennie pour les chefs héréditaires des Micmacs, comme mon père l'avait fait pendant 30 ans avant moi. Ils formaient le Santé Mawiómi. La différence, c'est qu'ils étaient à la table de négociation avec les chefs élus. Même si ce n'était pas toujours facile, ils trouvaient toujours des moyens de travailler ensemble.
Il est important que les gouvernements en vertu de la Loi sur les Indiens et les gouvernements ancestraux collaborent au même titre que nous, en situation de gouvernement minoritaire, devons tenter de collaborer.
J'invite aujourd'hui les dirigeants autochtones et non autochtones du Canada à s'engager à ce que notre relation fonctionne. L'intervention politique, et non policière, peut réduire les tensions. C'est la seule solution. Ce qu'il faut, c'est une discussion politique et de la négociation, et non des propos incendiaires. Nous devons inspirer l'espoir. Si je n'ai qu'un message à véhiculer dans ce discours, c'est qu'il y a toujours de l'espoir. Le politicien en moi le croit et le manifestant en moi le croit aussi.
Nous sommes toujours ici. Nous avons débattu toute la soirée, mais surtout, nous avons écouté toute la semaine. Nous sommes toujours à l'écoute. Je promets que nous ne cesserons pas d'écouter. J'invite les parties intéressées à communiquer avec nous. Reprenons les négociations et laissons nos familles partout au pays retourner au travail.
Comme dans toute relation entre les membres d'une famille ou entre partenaires, c'est en discutant de nos problèmes que nous pourrons grandir et non en adoptant des positions extrêmes. Notre pays a l'occasion de grandir. Nous avons la capacité d'avancer et de prendre des mesures dont pouvaient uniquement rêver les dirigeants autochtones de ce pays par le passé. Nous disons que la réconciliation est notre priorité. Montrons-le dans chacune de nos actions.
View Jody Wilson-Raybould Profile
Ind. (BC)
Mr. Speaker, it is a privilege to stand to speak in this emergency debate. I would like to thank the member for Foothills for sharing his time with me.
I want to acknowledge the comments of the Prime Minister earlier today, and certainly acknowledge comments or other remarks from individuals in this place, looking to try to find solutions to this important question and consideration. I agree that good faith, partnership and a non-partisan approach have to take place when it comes to indigenous issues and pursuing true reconciliation.
I think about two basic questions that need to be asked. First, why are we in this situation? Second, what should be done?
Why are we in this situation? Why are we seeing blockades and protests and economic disruption?
The answer is pretty straightforward. It is because Canada, through successive governments, including the current government, has not done the basic work of resetting the foundations for relations with indigenous peoples, despite the rhetoric. We all know what needs to be done. We have known for decades, but we are here, yet again, in a moment of crisis, because this hard work has been punted.
The history of Canada saw indigenous peoples divided into smaller administrative groupings, with systems of government imposed upon them. For Indians, this was through the Indian Act and the creation of the band councils system.
The work of decolonization, of reconciliation, requires supporting nations to rebuild, to come back together and revitalize their own systems of government, to self-determine. Until they do, we will never know who truly speaks for the nations, irrespective of the good work and good intentions of the hundreds of Indian Act chiefs and councils and traditional leaders, who, in many cases, are one and the same.
However, we have not done this work. We have maintained the same legislation and policies for decades that keeps first nations under colonial statute, keeps nations divided, renders negotiations long and nearly impossible and does not support first nations nearly enough in doing the rebuilding work they must inevitably do. There are lots of reasons for this: the historical denial of rights to self-government and the denial to one's land and, so too, paternalism. The result of the perpetual inaction are situations like we see in Wet'suwet'en territory.
The Prime Minister did say today that these problems had roots in a long history. That is true. However, let us be honest, and with respect, the Prime Minister has to learn to take responsibility. Canadians over many years have come to learn our true history and the need for fundamental change. He has been speaking for five years about this most important relationship. He stood in the House of Commons over two years ago and pledged to make transformative, legislative and policy reforms, reforms that would be directly relevant to the situation in Wet'suwet'en territory today, that would have supported the internal governance work of the nation, shifted the consultation processes that took place and provided a framework for better relations.
What have we have seen as a result of this speech, and its transformative words? Honestly, almost nothing. The promise of legislation has not come. I know it is hard, but we cannot keep punting the hard work because of political expediency. If we do, we will have another situation like we have today in five years from now or quite likely sooner.
Therefore, here we are. What should be done? In the spirit of good faith and in the spirit of working together, may I be so bold as to offer four suggestions?
One, governments have to lead. They need to lead. Weeks have passed. If the Prime Minister wants to have dialogue to resolve matters peacefully, de-escalate the situation and show real leadership, in my view he should have gotten on a plane, flown to British Columbia, picked the premier up on his way up to Wet'suwet'en territory and met with the leadership of the Wet'suwet'en and some of the broader indigenous leaders in British Columbia.
The Prime Minister could still do this, having regard for and respect for the wishes and preconditions perhaps of the Wet'suwet'en leaders and recognizing some of the challenges that exist in their community. Honestly, there is a practice of leaders not wanting, in my opinion, to be in meetings where the outcomes and structures are not basically predetermined. We have had enough of that. One cannot script dealing with real issues and challenges. Let us just deal with them.
Two, the government should act now on making the fundamental changes that are long overdue. Long ago the government should have tabled comprehensive legislation that implements the minimum standards of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and upholds the recognition and implementation of indigenous rights, a recognition and implementation of rights framework. Such legislation would include supports, without interfering, for indigenous nations to rebuild their governments. It also would include pathways for moving out beyond the Indian Act. Indian Act chiefs have an important role to play in this process. Once truly self-governing, we will know with certainty who speaks for the indigenous title and rights holders. This is important not only for indigenous peoples to have faith in the legitimacy of their own democratic institutions but ultimately the people will choose and vote on their system of good governance. It is now also important for all Canadians to know.
I will be frank. The government uses language like “co-development” and the need to do it “in partnership” with indigenous peoples a lot, but a lot of the time it uses that language simply as an excuse to delay or justify inaction. For decades, at least since the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples 25 years ago, we have known the foundational legislative change that is needed. UNDRIP is a decade old. The government is five years old and it has been two years since the Prime Minister announced legislation would be tabled within 10 months. Enough is enough. The time for action is now. No more half measures, no more lofty rhetoric, no more setting up interminable negotiations that get nowhere very slowly over years and years.
Three, I believe the government should consider a cooling-off period when construction activity does not take place. That would allow everyone to step back and assess where things are, clear the space for dialogue and de-escalate current tensions. Whether this period is for one month or for a few months, it can be of benefit to all.
In this time, dialogue between the Wet'suwet'en and the government can take place. As well, the Wet'suwet'en, in my respectful view, need to take responsibility in such a period of time to have, in a very inclusive manner, the internal dialogue needed to bring clarity about how they will approach the future of this project collectively. Also, such a period of time may allow for explorations, as there have been in the past, of alternative routing for small portions of the line that can address some concerns, including, if necessary, government roles in accommodating the costs of such changes, should they be adopted with broad support.
Four, as a proud indigenous person in this country, I know that indigenous governments also need to lead. The main request I have heard, including meetings with the Prime Minister and premier, is that the RCMP leave the area where it conducted enforcement activity. My understanding as of today is that the company and the Wet'suwet'en are both in the area and things remain currently peaceful. If the RCMP decides it is appropriate to leave, perhaps as part of a cooling-off period, then I would expect indigenous governments, including the Wet'suwet'en leadership, to take action, to look at reconciliation and to look at how they can move forward collectively.
I want to make one last observation about reconciliation and the things that we have heard about reconciliation being dead.
Reconciliation in its true meaning always involves a reckoning. With our past, we are taking responsibility with changing course in real ways, with making the hard choices for our future. These are the choices that every parliamentarian in this place representing their constituents has to make for the benefit of all Canadians. This is our opportunity to finally finish the unfinished business of Confederation and enable indigenous peoples to be self-determining, embrace the minimum standards of the United Nations declaration and finally ensure that indigenous peoples have their rightful place in this amazing country.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2020-02-06 10:08 [p.994]
Mr. Speaker, a petition is often timely, as news reaches us that the RCMP have begun arresting Wet'suwet'en elders. The petitioners call for the respect for Canadian constitutional law and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. They call on the government to halt all existing and planned construction of the Coastal GasLink project on Wet'suwet'en territory, ask the RCMP to dismantle the exclusion zone and stand down and move expeditiously to nation-to-nation talks between the Wet'suwet'en nation and federal and provincial governments.
The matter is urgent.
Monsieur le Président, les pétitions arrivent souvent à point nommé. Dans ce cas-ci, elle est présentée au moment où nous apprenons que la GRC a commencé à arrêter des aînés de la Première Nation des Wet'suwet'en. Les pétitionnaires demandent le respect du droit constitutionnel canadien et de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Ils demandent au gouvernement d'interrompre tous les travaux en cours et prévus dans le cadre du projet Coastal GasLink sur le territoire de la Première Nation des Wet’suwet’en; d'ordonner à la GRC de démanteler sa zone d’exclusion et de mettre fin à l’opération; et d'organiser rapidement des discussions de nation à nation entre les membres de la Première Nation des Wet’suwet’en et les gouvernements fédéral et provincial.
Cette question est urgente.
Results: 1 - 40 of 40

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data