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Results: 1 - 15 of 141
View Ben Lobb Profile
CPC (ON)
View Ben Lobb Profile
2020-06-17 13:41
Thank you very much.
My first question is for the agriculture minister. I know she has been asked this question many times. It's in regard to the carbon tax.
Nothing seems more unfair to Canadian farmers than the carbon tax—the carbon tax that is applied when we heat our barns for our hogs, our chickens, our laying hens. As well, in the fall, when we go to dry our crops, we are charged this carbon tax.
I wonder whether she has had a chance to think further about it and has an update for farmers across this country on how she plans to stand up and help them out a bit.
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
I just want to confirm that our pollution pricing policy is still designed to grow a clean economy and we are planning on doing a review in 2020 for the sectors most affected in terms of trade.
For more details, we can refer to my colleague, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you so much.
Madam Chair, on May 14 I asked the Minister of Agriculture when the Liberal government would put aside its usual campaign rhetoric and recognize the very detrimental impact the carbon tax is having on farmers across this country. Minister Bibeau proudly noted that according to their data, the average cost of the carbon tax per farm across Canada is $210 to $819.
We know that these numbers are completely unfounded and are not based on any factual evidence. The fact is that the Liberal government's own Parliamentary Budget Officer has estimated that at $25 per tonne, the cost for an 855-acre crop farm in Alberta is well over $6,000. The office came up with that using the government's statistics from the 2016 agricultural census.
Madam Chair, the evidence is right in front of the minister. When will this Liberal government come clean with Canadians and recognize the disastrous impact the carbon tax is having on Canada's critical agriculture and agri-food sector?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Chair, our pollution pricing policy is designed to grow a clean economy. To support this sector, we have put in place the following measures. Emissions from livestock and crop production are not priced. Farm fuels and fuels from cardlock facilities are exempt, and there is a partial rebate for propane and natural gas used in commercial greenhouses.
Our government has been very open and transparent about our pollution pricing plan. We will do a review of our pollution pricing system in 2020, focused on competitiveness issues in trade-exposed industries such as agriculture. It is also important to remember that this is about tackling climate change and that 100% of the revenues stay in the province.
We will continue to support our farmers and food processors as they provide an essential service across Canada.
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Madam Chair, Minister Bibeau keeps talking about wanting to protect Canadians' environment. Well, the truth is that Canada's farmers, ranchers and processors have for years demonstrated their ability to deliver meaningful reductions in emissions and to safeguard the environment through the adoption of new technologies, education and innovative management practices, but the government ignores these efforts.
Will the minister at the very least admit to Canadians that Canadian farmers are unable to pass on the cost of the carbon tax to consumers and instead have to absorb those extra costs out of their own pockets?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Chair, allow me to explain again our government's position on pollution pricing. The price and method were developed so we could build an increasingly clean economy.
We put a number of measures in place to help the agriculture sector. Emissions from animal and plant production aren't taxed. Farm fuels and fuels delivered to off-farm points-of-sale are also—
View Earl Dreeshen Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
Madam Chair, Minister Bibeau has repeatedly asked stakeholders to send her data about the impacts of the carbon tax on farmers, so this is exactly what they have been doing.
The Atlantic Grains Council, the Grain Farmers of Ontario, Producteurs de grains du Québec and the Western Canadian Wheat Growers Association issued a joint statement at the beginning of this year in which they estimated that the cumulative indirect inflation of carbon tax on farm costs will be $14.50 an acre this year, with that cost escalating by more than double by 2022 to almost $30 an acre.
These are huge numbers. Why does the Liberal government continue to ignore the facts presented to it and continue to misrepresent the truth to Canadians?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madame Chair, I can assure you that we have paid close attention to all the information that has been provided to us and that our calculation was also based on this information provided by provinces and different stakeholders.
Mr. Earl Dreeshen: Thank you—
Hon. Marie-Claude Bibeau: Our government has been very open and transparent about our pollution pricing plan. The department used data from stakeholders and provinces—
Mr. Earl Dreeshen: Thank you very much, Madam Chair—
Hon. Marie-Claude Bibeau:—as well as the 2019 agricultural tax data to estimate the average cost of pollution pricing associated with grain drying at up to 0.4% of overall operating costs.
It is important to remember that we have put in place many special provisions—
Mr. Earl Dreeshen: Madam Chair—
Hon. Marie-Claude Bibeau: —like exempting farm fuel and providing other financial supports for farmers.
View Philip Lawrence Profile
CPC (ON)
All right.
Now getting to inputs, you're saying that costs have increased. My colleague Ms. Rood, I believe, asked you a question specifically with respect to the carbon tax. Costs, including obviously the cost of the carbon tax, have increased the costs of inputs.
Markus Haerle
View Markus Haerle Profile
Markus Haerle
2020-06-12 14:47
Yes. We're not just getting the carbon tax downloaded to us on the corn-drying side or commodity-drying side; it's also on transport. On inputs that we buy, we have to absorb that within. We're basically saying it's $14 an acre of carbon tax cost that's downloaded to the farmer at the moment in Ontario. This just increased a month ago, and we're going to see another—
View Philip Lawrence Profile
CPC (ON)
The minister recently said that, on average, it was about $200 that grain farmers were paying for that. What do you think about that?
Markus Haerle
View Markus Haerle Profile
Markus Haerle
2020-06-12 14:48
I don't know where she gets her figures from, but it's a very simple calculation where they went wrong. They took the whole amount of tax that was collected through the fall season and divided it by all the farms that produce grains and oilseeds, but it's not all the tons that get dried, because wheat doesn't get dried, and some soybeans don't get dried, but corn has to be dried. It depends what your split on the farm is of the commodities you grow.
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2020-06-10 17:13
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Thanks to the minister for the reannouncement of other programs earlier this week.
I want to ask you about a comment that you made during your press conference that we've certainly had a lot of feedback on. It's your comment on the average cost of the carbon tax, that it costs farmers between $200 and $800 per year.
I put a call out to some of the stakeholder groups across the country yesterday, and I received dozens of comments and bills from producers. I have some ranging here from a couple of thousand dollars a month to one that's close to $10,000 a month. CFIB has said that the carbon tax is costing farmers, on average, $14,000.
Where did you get this data that says that the carbon tax is costing farmers between $200 and $800 dollars?
View Marie-Claude Bibeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
First, let me remind everyone that our pollution-pricing policy is designed to grow a clean economy, which is something that we really care about. What we have done at the beginning is to make sure that what is costing farmers the most is exempted. Emissions from livestock and crop production are not priced. Farm fuels and fuels from cardlock facilities are exempt, and there's a partial rebate for propane and natural gas used in commercial greenhouses.
Also, the department has prepared estimates reflecting the federal backstop, using a price of $50 per tonne. This shows an average increase of 0.2% to producers' net operating costs and a decrease of 1% to producers' net operating incomes due to carbon pollution pricing.
These are the levels, I would say, of data we have. I will just remind you that the Department of the Environment will proceed, has committed to proceed, in 2020 to a revision of—
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2020-06-10 17:15
I mean no offence, Minister. I appreciate that. You've tried to answer the question. I don't need the history lesson.
I know you've been trying to keep in touch with agricultural stakeholder groups through this pandemic, but how many of them you spoken with have supported the carbon tax and the increase on April 1? Have any, yes or no?
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