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Results: 1 - 60 of 5551
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister so badly wanted to win a seat on the United Nations Security Council, he made it a campaign promise in 2015, spent the last five years selling out Canadian principles, cozying up to dictators and despots, and even sent Canadian soldiers into harm's way to curry favour at the UN.
Last night must have been a devastating blow to the Prime Minister. Was it worth it?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, Canadians always expect their country to step up on the world stage, and that's exactly what we've done over the past five years with our engagement on fighting climate change, on peacekeeping, on advancing the cause of women's equality, on development assistance, and trade and economic growth.
Canada has continued to engage in the world, and we will continue to engage constructively and positively on the world stage.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Except, Mr. Chair, that's not what he did. He remained silent when standing beside leaders of countries with terrible human rights records because he was afraid of offending them and losing their votes. That is his legacy in chasing this vanity project.
The Prime Minister shook the hand of the Iranian foreign minister and even vowed just a month after that country's military shot down a plane with dozens of Canadians on it. Again, was it worth it?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, I will take no lessons on international engagement from a party that promised to cut foreign aid in the last election. Unfortunately, Canadians didn't agree with them and have returned to a government that continues to look at staying positive and engaged on the world stage. Yes, we have always stood up clearly and strongly for human rights, for our values, and we will continue to, even as we engage constructively around the world.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, the Prime Minister has sent billions of dollars of taxpayers' money to countries with economies more advanced than Canada's or led by dictators with terrible human rights records. That is his legacy. He's also turned his back on our friends and our allies, voting in favour of one-sided anti-Israel resolutions at the United Nations in order to curry favour from countries that do not acknowledge Israel's right to exist. Again, was it worth it?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, every step of the way, we've continued to stand up strongly for Canadians' values and for Canadians' interest on the world stage. It is in our interest to see a more peaceful and a more prosperous world in which everyone has a real and fair chance to succeed, and that's what we've been contributing to.
With regard to the question of Israel, we have stood strongly by Israel as a friend, but we have also expressed our concern about the annexation policy that it has put forward. These are issues that are complicated, but Canada will always stand true to its values and to our approach on the world stage.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Chair, this House voted to list the IRGC, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, as a terrorist entity. The Prime Minister refused to take action and do that. He's also refused to impose any Magnitsky act sanctions on human rights abusers around the world, all in an attempt to curry favour with those dictators and despots at the United Nations, selling out Canada's values in pursuit of a seat.
Now he has come back empty-handed, having come in last. Again, was it worth it?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, it is always worth it for Canada to step up on the world stage. It is always worth it for us to reach out and fight for things like fighting climate change, like women's equality, like protecting our oceans, like opportunities for Canadians around the world and like opportunities for the vulnerable around the world. Canadians expect their government to step up on the world stage, and that's exactly what we did.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
That's not what he did, Mr. Chair. You see, when he was in the same room as dictators and despots and leaders of countries with terrible records, he was silent. In fact, he stood right beside the president of Senegal when that president defended Senegal's laws making homosexuality a crime. The Prime Minister said nothing. He was silent. He's even using Canadian tax dollars to invest in oil and gas projects in other countries in order to win favour as well.
Again, when we look at this government's record, when we look at his personal record on the world stage, we see that our relationship with India has been damaged by his actions. We have a worse trade deal than he inherited. He has angered, with his erratic behaviour, our partners in the Pacific area, and at the end of it, he came home empty-handed. Was it worth it?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, Canada has continued to stand strong on the world stage to engage with countries around the world in need of support, in need of economic opportunity. We have consistently stood up for our values, unlike the Conservatives, who have slashed protection for the world's most vulnerable women by not funding reproductive rights and services around the world, who have not stood up for LGBTQ communities. Canada has always stood up for progressive values on the world stage, and we will continue to.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Since October 21, the Bloc Québécois has tried to be a constructive opposition. As the lieutenant for Quebec, the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons knows it. He knows that we have always been constructive in all our efforts.
I made a list, because I didn't want to forget anything. It's a list of measures that can be attributed to us or that we contributed to, measures that, above all else, were achieved. They are all improvements, no matter whose idea they were.
Assistance for seniors, the ability for people to earn a bit of income without losing the Canada emergency response benefit, or CERB—that includes firefighters, dividends and councillors—CERB eligibility for self-employed and independent workers, enhancements to the emergency business account and wage subsidy, and commercial rent relief are all on that list. We would have liked to see more support for fixed costs. Unfortunately, it's been a rocky road. Dairy farmers received support through the increase in the Canadian Dairy Commission's borrowing limit. We were also the first ones to broach the idea of a virtual Parliament.
The problem, however, has to do with the CERB, clearly an integral part of the government's response to the pandemic. The CERB is supposed to provide income support to people who are struggling. That's understandable, but it should not be a disincentive to going back to work. On that front, it has failed.
Why did the government not adjust the CERB accordingly?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, to begin with, I want to recognize that, over the past few months, we have indeed seen parliamentarians of all stripes work together in a respectful and collaborative way to help Canadians during this pandemic. We have passed a number of bills, which were made better not just by our members, of course, but also by members of the opposition parties. That's a wonderful example of how strong Canada's democracy is. It also shows that we can continue to defend our institutions and make them work, even under extremely difficult circumstances.
Initially, the CERB was indeed meant to be a disincentive. We needed people to stay home. Now, we are encouraging people to make the transition to the wage subsidy, but we recognize that there isn't enough work to go around, unfortunately. Some three million people who would like to work still aren't able to.
That's why we need to maintain the CERB, but we are certainly exploring ways to incentivize people to work. As my fellow member mentioned, we want people to be supported, but we also want them to be able to work.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
On April 29, we talked to people in the government. Back then, it was clear that the Canada emergency student benefit, or CESB, needed to have incentives built in and that the CERB should as well. We asked a question about that. We wanted the government to pledge to do so. We didn't include it in the motion, but we asked the Deputy Prime Minister about it. She said that the CERB and the CESB were being offered in a manner that meets their objectives while encouraging employment in all circumstances.
Why didn't the government keep its word?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Once again, I'd like to thank the honourable member for his question.
It is true that we wanted to make adjustments to the CERB to incentivize, even require, people to look for work. That was part of the bill we introduced last week. We were trying to further incentivize work and, to some extent, eliminate any disincentive in the CERB.
Unfortunately, some people were more interested in playing political games, especially the Conservatives, so we weren't able to move forward with that measure or even to help people with disabilities. It was shameful on the part of—
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, the Bloc Québécois was told that it was impossible to build incentives into the CERB owing to a lack of resources. Last week, the Liberals proposed the use of coercive measures, which weren't easily enforceable. They had the resources to implement coercive measures, but not incentives.
The Quebec government is calling on you to do this. Why are you not adjusting the CERB, which is currently hindering the economic recovery?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
We appreciate that many business owners want to rebuild their workforces. We are actually delighted at that. We know the recovery is coming, but a great many people won't find jobs this summer, no matter how hard they look because the economic recovery is not in full swing. As we speak, three million people are looking for jobs.
View Alain Therrien Profile
BQ (QC)
I know it isn't easy to put incentives in place, but the Liberals have a responsibility to do the right thing in a difficult situation. We made that clear a month and a half ago. We warned them, because they needed it, and we told them that what they were doing was risky since certain people would refuse to work if they could make more money staying home. It's important to do things properly. We can't have people refusing to work when the economic recovery begins.
Everyone is asking for this. Are you going to adjust the CERB quickly?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
As the summer progresses, we are exploring ways to make sure the CERB and our other support measures do not serve as disincentives to work.
The underlying goal was and is to help people in need. That's the priority. Canadians' well-being was and remains our priority.
View Claude DeBellefeuille Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, the member for Burnaby South used unparliamentary language yesterday. He insulted the member for La Prairie, Alain Therrien, and the Bloc Québécois.
Four times, he called him racist, and I also think he challenged your authority. When you asked him to apologize, he refused to do so. You expelled him from the House.
I am again asking you not to recognize him today.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I listened very carefully to your ruling yesterday. It applied to yesterday's sitting, but not today's. As you know, it wasn't conditional. The fact that the Bloc Québécois whip is trying to alter your ruling, which was quite clear, doesn't seem right to me.
Chapter 13 of the House of Commons Procedure and Practice, by Marc Bosc and André Gagnon, states that the Speaker has the authority to name the member, that is, to address the member by name, and to order his or her withdrawal from the chamber for the remainder of the sitting day. That's what you did.
I'd like to move on to question period.
View Claude DeBellefeuille Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, I understood your response. I am grateful to you for considering our request, given how serious the matter in question is.
If a member or a party leader is allowed to insult another member, what happens? We can insult a fellow member and simply be tossed out of the House for a day. That's not a serious consequence.
Today, I am deeply disappointed to hear the leader of the NDP speak. I thought he was a great democrat. Honestly, what kind of example are we setting today?
Mr. Chair, I am again asking you not to recognize the member for Burnaby South.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
I want to begin by acknowledging the words of the Prime Minister today and to thank the Prime Minister for those kind words.
I also acknowledge that the Prime Minister has again committed to change, but we need that change right away. Will the Prime Minister commit immediately to putting in place concrete policy changes to address the systemic racism in the RCMP?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Yes, Mr. Chair, we need to take concrete action right away to address systemic racism in this country. We have much work to do. We will do it with partners. We will do it with everyone in this House who wants to work with us on this.
I thank the leader of the NDP for his commitment to this. We will work together in short order on making this happen.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much for that response.
I want to go into some details. Will the Prime Minister commit to what was in the motion, which was supported, it seemed like, by most of the members of this House, to do a full review of the nearly $10-million-a-day RCMP budget to see where we can allocate funds to a health care response instead of a police response?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, I've talked about this over the past weeks. This is important for us to do. We need to make sure we are spending every dollar of taxpayers' money in the right way, to keep people safe and not to perpetuate unjust systems. It is not, however, either/or—either the police or community services. Obviously, we need both, but we need them done right.
We will work with everyone to make sure we are getting that balance right and we are getting the money spent in the right ways.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Chair, we certainly, though, need more investments in non-policing interventions. That is where we have seen some serious problems. Families have raised the concern that we need to have more investments in non-police interventions, non-violent interventions, and health care responses to health care crises.
Will the Prime Minister commit to that course of action?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, we have heard those calls as well, and we agree that this is something we have to work on. We need to make sure that we are encouraging de-escalation programs and that we are encouraging front-line interventions around mental health and around care that isn't necessarily done by the police. These are things that we need to do together.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Chair, today, a report of RCMP use of force incidents was released. I'm glad to see that. We'll review that.
Will the Prime Minister also encourage a release of the associated costs of the settlement of cases that flowed from those uses of force?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, we will of course be taking a very careful look at this report. It highlights a real challenge that we've seen around systemic discrimination in our country and our institutions, including in the RCMP.
There are many concrete actions we need to take. As I've said many times, I'm committed to taking those actions. We need to make a significant change in our country for the better.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Chair, one specific element of the motion that was nearly passed yesterday was to commit to a full review, specifically of the use of force. Given the release of that report, will the Prime Minister commit clearly to a review of the use of force by the RCMP?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, these are important conversations that have to be had within the RCMP, between the government and the RCMP, and between Canadians and their police forces. These are some things that we will certainly move forward on together.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Chair, the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council and the mother of Chantel Moore, who was killed by the RCMP, have requested a meeting with the Prime Minister to discuss and determine immediate actions to implement in order to prevent more indigenous people from being killed by the police.
Will the Prime Minister meet with Chantel Moore's mother and the tribal council of Nuu-chah-nulth?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, our government has continued to meet with Canadians who face extreme difficulties. Obviously, our hearts go out to Chantel's family and to the entire community. I will ensure that members of our government engage directly with her mother and the rest of the family and with the community. We need to work together on changing things for the better in Chantel's memory and in the memory of all Canadians who have fallen in this situation.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
Yesterday, the House recognized that systemic racism existed within the RCMP and that action was necessary.
Will the Prime Minister commit here and now to taking action swiftly? We need concrete action quickly.
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Yes, we recognize that systemic racism exists in our country. We are committed to taking concrete action quickly to address the issue in partnership with others.
View Leona Alleslev Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Chair, the outcome of Canada's bid for the UN Security Council must be a wake-up call. Canada lost quickly and decisively on the first ballot. This was a report card on how the world views this Liberal government and this Prime Minister.
Can the Prime Minister answer for Canadians, if the world needs more Canada, why at the UN did the world say, “No thanks”?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I would once again like to begin by thanking the incredible diplomats and everyone in team Canada who worked so hard on what was a truly excellent campaign.
Of course we are disappointed by the outcome, but Canada will continue to be engaged, will continue to believe in multilateralism, and will be a constructive partner in the United Nations, working with all those who are elected to be—
View Leona Alleslev Profile
CPC (ON)
Canadians value our commitment to preserving freedom and democracy. We've been known for punching above our weight, but under this government the number of Canadian peacekeepers has fallen to its lowest level in 60 years. Canada is among the lowest NATO defence contributors, and our allies have threatened to stop sharing critical intelligence since this Prime Minister has failed to ban Huawei.
Did our allies vote against us for the UN Security Council seat because they have no confidence that this Prime Minister will be a trusted ally and security partner?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, as I reiterated yesterday, Canada has continued to lead with its values. We have been continuously a constructive partner on the world stage and will continue to do that. With regard to peacekeeping, we were very proud to participate in the mission in Mali, as well as lead on the Elsie initiative. We have been a tremendous partner when it comes to women, peace and security, and we will continue to lean in, to engage and to work constructively for peace and security around the world.
View Leona Alleslev Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Chair, Canadians are proud to be a nation that defends human rights. However, to win the UN security seat, the Prime Minister compromised Canadian values and failed to condemn anti-gay laws in Senegal and Uganda or to challenge authoritarian regimes for their blatant disregard for the rule of law.
Actions speak louder than words. Did the world vote against Canada because they couldn't trust the Prime Minister to stand and defend Canadian principles?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, Canada has always stood for human rights, and we have continuously stood up for LGBTQ2+ rights and women's rights on the world stage. It's a bit rich coming from the official opposition, who can't even stand for LGBTQ or women's rights here at home, let alone abroad. This government does. We have put our money where our mouth is, and we are supporting local organizations fighting for these rights everywhere around the world.
View Leona Alleslev Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Chair, the Conservative Party is not afraid to stand for LGBTQ rights, and we stand proudly in defence of them.
Canada is a trading nation, and relationships matter. Countries trade with people they trust and respect, but the Prime Minister embarrassed Canada when he snubbed our Asia-Pacific partners by failing to show up at a critical trade negotiation meeting. He embarrassed Canada with a failed trip to India. Did the world vote against us because they didn't have the confidence that the Prime Minister would act with the decorum and diplomacy that a UN Security Council seat requires?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, I have to say that, as someone who has been engaged in representing Canada over the past six months as the Minister of International Development, I have had wonderful conversations with partners on every single continent who truly value what Canada brings to the table. I would also say that Canada is the only G7 nation to have free trade agreements with all the other G7 partners. This Prime Minister has brought in CETA, CPTPP and a renegotiated NAFTA. That is important for Canadians, and we are leading on the world stage when it comes—
View Leona Alleslev Profile
CPC (ON)
Mr. Chair, the loss of the UN Security Council seat is a sad day for Canada. Canadians must be clear-eyed about how the world actually views us.
If Canada is to be a reliable and dependable partner, the world must know what we stand for. By abandoning our allies and cozying up to dictators, the Prime Minister has eroded Canada's reputation and jeopardized our future security and prosperity. If Canada is back, then can the Prime Minister explain to Canadians why we are so alone on the world stage?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, I have to respectfully disagree with my colleague. Canada has played a constructive and engaged role on the world stage. It has been a privilege to engage with counterparts around the world who truly recognize Canada's leadership.
We have stood for our values. We have stood for human rights. We have stood for women's rights. We have stood for a free, open and transparent trading system. We promote democracy. We promote LGBTQ rights. We fight for climate change, and we will continue to do that, Mr. Chair. We look forward to continuing to play a constructive and engaged—
View Leona Alleslev Profile
CPC (ON)
If Canada were playing a leadership role, the world would have wanted us in a leadership position on the UN Security Council. Instead, the Prime Minister has abandoned Canada's long-held principled foreign policy. Again, if Canada is standing up on the world stage, why did the world say, “No, thanks”?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, we will take no lessons from the Conservatives. In the 10 years of their governance, they disengaged from the world stage. They stood back from Africa. They stood back when it came to women's rights. They stood back when it came to fighting climate change.
We have done the exact—
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Chair, Canada experienced a major failure at the UN yesterday by not winning a seat on the Security Council.
After five years, the Prime Minister, who made a promise, used all his resources and put his reputation on the line, failed to win the seat. Even worse, we've lost face in the eyes of the world. This is all the result of the Prime Minister's escapades around the world. We need only think of his trip to India to see that the Prime Minister's main concern is his image.
My question for the Prime Minister is simple. What was the cost of this campaign to try to win a seat at the United Nations, which has set us back in the eyes of the world?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, as the Prime Minister has stated clearly on many occasions, the UN Security Council seat was not an end in itself; it was a means to an end.
Canada will continue to engage on the values that we care about. We will continue to lean in and to step forward when it comes to promoting women's rights. We will continue to step forward and to lean in when it comes to promoting all genders and all sexualities. We will continue to lean in on the fight against climate change.
These are important endeavours. These are important pillars of our foreign policy that we will continue to pursue and would have pursued whether or not we were seeking a seat on the UN Security Council.
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
I'll repeat my question for the minister. I hope that she'll provide a shorter answer.
What was the cost of this campaign, which has set us back in the eyes of the public as a result of the failure of the Prime Minister, who wants to promote his image instead of Canadian values?
View Karina Gould Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, Canada has continued to engage in diplomacy throughout. Our government has been strong on the world stage. We have made important investments in supporting a woman's right to choose, unlike the previous government. We have made important investments in climate financing, something the previous government decided to pull back on and pull out of.
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
As usual, we won't get an answer. This seems to be the custom with these Liberals. We'll move on to another subject.
Let's talk about the CERB and its impact, while the economy is recovering and the lockdown is being lifted everywhere. We learned today that the very popular Cosmos restaurant in the Quebec City area will be closing its doors.
The owner says that the factor that influenced his decision to close the Cosmos on Grande Allée is the difficulty in finding staff. He thinks that the CERB is really competition. He says that few employees showed interest in returning to work when he put out feelers.
When will this government change the CERB to enable people to return to the labour market?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
I'm very pleased to be asked this question, since this is happening in my constituency.
I know that, in my constituency and across Canada, millions of Canadians are still having a hard time dealing with the crisis. We want a safe recovery that will allow for a gradual return to work. We also want a recovery that will ensure that everyone can make ends meet.
This is the case in Quebec City and across the country.
View Alain Rayes Profile
CPC (QC)
I hope that Minister Duclos will visit the owner and explain this. Right now, businesses and stores are closing their doors because the government is implementing measures that hamper economic recovery.
A movie theatre owner, who was quite happy to receive the government's permission to reopen, told us that 35 of his 40 employees are refusing to return to work for the reopening because they have access to the CERB and they don't want to work.
The minister even sent a directive to public servants telling them that, if employees don't want to return to work voluntarily, even though the health conditions are fine and everything is safe, they have the right to stay home and they'll be sent a cheque for $2,000 a month.
Why isn't the CERB suited to the economic recovery?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
Once again, I appreciate this question, which gives me the opportunity to say three things.
First, in my colleague's constituency, between 15,000 and 20,000 people have received the Canada emergency response benefit in recent weeks. Without that benefit, many families in his constituency would have been unable to put food on the table.
Second, an attestation will be issued soon that clearly states that people are expected to accept a job when it's reasonable to do so.
Third, for the economic recovery to take place, everyone must have the opportunity—
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
There won't be a budget, there won't be an update, but there will be a snapshot. I think that the French word is “égoportrait.” There will be a snapshot of our financial system.
Will the Liberal snapshot show that our debt for this fiscal year is now $1 trillion?
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, since the start of the COVID-19 crisis, the government's top priority has been to protect the health and safety of Canadians.
As a result of our strong fiscal position, particularly the lowest net debt-to-GDP ratio in the G7, the government was able to quickly address the situation by providing over $150 billion in direct support to individuals, workers and businesses that need help getting through these difficult times.
That's why, on July 8, the—
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
I was asking whether the snapshot would show Canada's $1-trillion debt.
View Mona Fortier Profile
Lib. (ON)
Madam Chair, as I was saying, on July 8, the government will provide an economic and budget overview outlining what the national economy and—
View Pierre Poilievre Profile
CPC (ON)
For the third time, will the government's financial snapshot show a $1-trillion debt for this year, yes or no?
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