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Results: 1 - 15 of 95
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
I want to talk about this one, too, because I'm concerned about what the broad implications might be of capping a legitimate business expense such as interest. For example, what might be the effect on our financial sector, on our banks, which might see demand for capital decline, on our capital markets and our stock markets, and on the value of the Canada pension plan or other pension plans that are invested in our capital markets?
I can't possibly think of everything while I'm sitting here, but it seems to me that a change like this would have fundamental and broad implications for every single aspect of our society.
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Yes, it's ubiquitous.
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Yes, and so is beer, I think. That's why I want to segue into beer for a second—
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you very much.
I want to take this opportunity to segue into beer, because I think this would affect the beer industry as well, which would be sacrilege.
Voices: Oh, oh!
Mr. Marty Morantz: I think Mr. Cumming stole my thunder a bit, because I was going to ask why you didn't bring samples.
I didn't realize, though, that the beer industry in Canada was in such dire straits, so this is very good information.
I don't know if I'm just missing it or if it's not here, Mr. Chapman, but would it be possible for you to get...? I'm curious as to what the tax cost of your proposal would be, just so we have a sense of what the impact on the treasury might be if these proposals were implemented.
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Yes. Thank you.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I'm glad to be here.
I want to start with a question for Mr. Lancastle from the Appraisal Institute of Canada.
In talking about climate change, we hear sometimes about people who feel that climate change is a hoax, that it's part of a UN conspiracy because presumably some people get funding.
Typically, folks in the financial industry are seen as pretty hard-nosed and not very sentimental when it comes to business decisions. I'm looking at your recommendation for better flood mapping, which I understand is supported as well by the Insurance Bureau of Canada.
Would you say that the financial sector recognizes that climate change is real, that it's happening, that beyond the environmental consequences, it will have a real economic impact, and that if we can mitigate the effects of climate change, we can not only help save the planet, but we can also help save a lot of money and economic distress in the meantime?
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Right on. Thank you very much.
Dr. Krahn, I am hoping that you might be able to expand a little on some of your remarks in terms of the fair amount of work that's been done in order to set up the infrastructure to collect data that could help us provide services more efficiently. There's some funding needed in order to be able to take what's already out there, bring it together and really help it to realize savings of tax dollars for Canadians.
I know that one of the big budget items this year is a $6-billion tax cut. We know it's going to disproportionately benefit people who are in the upper-income quintile. I'm wondering wether, if some of that money were invested instead in trying to do some of the things you were talking about, that might not only help us deliver better service but also help save money by offering those services more efficiently.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you very much.
I want to say thank you to all of our witnesses, including Ms. Daenzer and Mr. Farrant, for sharing their experiences. The point is well taken that it's an important role and that the support ought to be there for people on both the front end in terms of training and preparation for what they might see in the job they have to do and in the follow-up, as well, with respect to the impact that can have. Thank you for sharing your personal experiences on that point.
Thank you as well, Ms. Sullivan, for sharing your experience and the story of your son. I think that's important. The point is well taken on the disability tax credit. It's something that I know many members from many parties.... I know the NDP, as well, has raised this in the House and has done a lot of work on the disability tax credit. We do need to get that one figured out. Ultimately, of course, we would like to have a national pharmacare plan that would help people with the upfront costs, instead of having them just get a little bit back on their taxes at the end of the fiscal year, but we have to make sure that people will have a way to access it in the first place.
I want to turn to Helen Kennedy, from afar. I'm not familiar with all the details of the action plan, but I wonder.... When we talk about the blood ban, for instance, and some of the things you mentioned in your presentation, it seems to me those would have little or no financial impact on the government. Perhaps you could highlight a few of the things we could do that would make a meaningful difference. I appreciate there are other things that ought to be done and that there should be funding in place for those things as well, but if you want to take a moment to highlight some of the progress we could make on behalf of the community you represent, without having a significant financial impact, I'd appreciate that.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Thank you.
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Prowten, we had evidence the other day from the Disability Tax Fairness Alliance that the disability tax credit is used by less than 40% of Canadians who are eligible for it. It's well known that in the last Parliament, because of rules that were changed within CRA—I wasn't here then—there was a major battle, and the organization was right there fighting for clarification on the fact that successful applications for people with type 1 diabetes were substantially reduced because of the change in policy.
I understand that your organization has expressed concerns. It almost seems that the government is tripping over itself to make it more difficult for people to qualify for the tax credit. That one got clarified, but on the next one, I understand that your organization expressed concern in regard to the publication in the Canada Gazette last June in respect of the restriction of compensation for professionals who are providing services for people with disabilities who are trying to attain the credit. It would make it even more difficult for the 40% of the people who are already qualifying.
I see that as the next tsunami that your organization will probably be up to bat on, but I'm wondering if you could comment on that.
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Yes. You did put in a correspondence to CRA last June and expressed specific concern about the compensation to professionals in this area. You said:
The effect of limiting compensation for disability...professionals as proposed in the June 1st edition...would be to make it impossible for many of these businesses to operate, leaving thousands of Canadians with disabilities to navigate a process on their own which many find confusing and difficult.
I wonder if you could elaborate on that thought.
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Yes.
Just quickly, on this statistic of the 40% of Canadians who are eligible and are not applying, is that similar when it comes to type 1 diabetes, or is the percentage higher in the general population?
View Marty Morantz Profile
CPC (MB)
Fair enough. Thank you.
View Daniel Blaikie Profile
NDP (MB)
Regarding those same steel and aluminum content requirements, for cars produced in North America right now, what percentage of the steel and aluminum used in those cars is North American?
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