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Results: 1 - 30 of 1230
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you very much, Madam Chair.
I would like to begin with questions on party funding. An article published in La Presse on April 1, 2019, unless I am mistaken, talked about the possibility for a minor to fund a political party. The article reminded readers that the situation is different in Quebec, where only adults can donate to a party.
The Bloc Québécois has censured itself, in a way, by accepting only donations from people aged 16 and over, as that is the minimum age for acquiring a party membership card.
I would like to hear your comments on the possibility of amending the federal legislation to avoid minors being able to participate in the funding of a political party, as we can assume that this could lead to the practice of using other people's names in some cases.
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
To your knowledge, have there been cases where very young people were investigated? Do you have any statistics on that?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
My next question is also about public funding. We know that the public funding system that provided subsidies to parties in proportion to the number of votes they had received has been abolished. Do you occasionally conduct studies on the potential cost of reinstituting that public funding system for parties?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
I will keep to the issue of public funding for parties. I may then move on to another topic.
We see that the vote tends to be increasingly fragmented. We are currently in a context of a minority government, and the parties are splitting votes quite a bit.
As we know that a candidate must obtain 10% of the vote in their riding to be entitled to a reimbursement, would it be a good idea to carry out a study on voting trends—in order words, on the way the vote manifests and the consequences of that minimum threshold of 10% of votes on the party's funding? Should that be reviewed and those requirements adjusted based on the type of electorate?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
I will continue on the same topic.
Correct me if I am wrong, but, to obtain a reimbursement on a national level, a party must have secured at least 5%—it may be 2%, I'm not sure—of votes in all the ridings in which it ran a candidate.
In addition to the vote fragmentation, there seems to be some sort of vote regionalization, where regions like the prairies vote mostly Conservative. In those conditions, it seems to be more difficult for a party to reach that threshold in all ridings in which it runs candidates.
On the one hand, do you believe that could also be subject to review? On the other hand, do you have any figures related to that trend?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Perrault.
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
I have a general question on the possibility for a voter to vote without a piece of identification if someone vouches for them.
Do you have any statistics on that? Our wallets are getting thicker every year, and we have more and more pieces of identification. Do you have any statistics that would help establish a trend in terms of the number of people who use that method to establish their identity?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you very much.
Thank you for being here, Minister.
The first question I want to ask you has to do with francophone immigration. I know that this is one of the issues that you are addressing, as indicated on page 17 of your departmental plan.
I'll start my question by referring to an article in La Presse from March 2. This article mentions that between 70% and 90% of the applications of French-speaking international students from Cameroon, Guinea, Algeria and Senegal are refused, which means that half of the international students end up in Ontario, which corresponds to almost twice the weight of its population in Canada, and only 12% end up in Quebec, which is half the weight of its population in Canada.
Does the minister have an explanation for this situation? Why are there so many refusals and why are 51% of foreigners who want to study in Quebec denied their permits, compared to 38% in the rest of Canada?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
I'll continue in the same vein.
We note that many educational institutions admit students from, among others, French-speaking countries, mainly from Africa, and that these places are not filled because, even if Quebec accepts students, the federal government refuses them.
Can you explain to me why this is happening?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
My next questions are about the Municipal Nominee Program, another flagship project mentioned in your mandate letter.
Given the existence of the Canada-Quebec Accord and the possibility for Quebec to select its own candidates for economic immigration, does the minister agree that the application of this program in Quebec would be an intrusion into its jurisdiction, which would create a duplication of procedures and entry points for economic immigration?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Fine.
I'll clarify my question, Minister. Do you intend to implement the Municipal Nominee Program in Quebec?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
If the municipalities in Quebec tell you that they want the program and Minister Jolin-Barrette tells you that he doesn't want it, do you already have an idea of what your position will be?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you.
My next question is simple; it should elicit a yes or no answer. Has the department considered using subsection 10(3) of the Safe Third Country Agreement to suspend the Safe Third Country Agreement?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Unfortunately, this doesn't answer my question, which is simple: has this possibility been studied?
I'll allow myself, once again, a preamble. During the last election campaign, the Bloc expressed support for a suspension; the Conservatives expressed support for a suspension; the NDP expressed support for a suspension. There was very broad public support. My riding is a stone's throw from Roxham Road and that has been mentioned.
Is this possibility so frivolous to the government that it hasn't even been explored?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you very much, Madam Chair.
My question is specifically for Mr. Kochhar. It relates to my colleague's question and follows up on a question I asked last time. This is the preamble to my question.
Mr. Kochhar, at the last meeting, you explained to us that, before sending their files back to the clients, IRCC officers contact them if documents are missing from the file. I was a little surprised by your answer. I myself have worked as an immigration lawyer, and in that context, on several occasions files have been returned to me because documents were missing. I would send the files back. Then they were sent back to me. Sometimes there were up to three or four trips back and forth. I thought maybe the directive had changed since I was elected and no longer work as an immigration lawyer.
However, as my colleague mentioned, your response on social media has also provoked reactions. Several lawyers mentioned that this was still the case and that files were systematically returned to them when documents were missing.
My question is this. At present, what is the directive with regard to missing documents in a file?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Am I to understand, though, that this is at the discretion of the officers, since there is no formal directive?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
All right.
Does the departmental representative agree with me that it can be easy for an officer to simply return an application if the file is thick and complicated or if there is a missing document? Does he agree that this unduly lengthens delays, adds to the workload and prevents the proper processing of files, since they can be reviewed two, three or four times before they are finally opened?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Relying on the good judgment of officers has clearly not worked in the past, as processing times are very long and files are returned.
Is the department open to the idea of issuing a clear directive as to the handling of files where there are missing documents?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you.
Am I correct in saying that, in addition to health and security reasons, the main reason for refusing student visa applications is the fact that a student does not have sufficient financial guarantees that he or she will return to his or her country of origin at the end of his or her studies?
View Christine Normandin Profile
BQ (QC)
One of the wishes of the Government of Quebec is to ensure that students, on the contrary, stay in Quebec when they finish their studies.
In your opinion, isn't there a contradiction between the Canadian government's desire to ensure that they leave at the end of their studies and the Government of Quebec's desire to ensure that they stay when they finish their studies?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you.
I was looking at the estimates. I'm trying to understand all this. I saw that your goal was to transform and streamline IT services, modernize the 485 data centres by consolidating them into seven centres, to move from 50 networks to a single one and to consolidate the 63 email systems into one, all while providing cost-recovery technology services and so on.
I have a few questions and I would appreciate quick answers.
When were the 485 data centres created?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
That's it. When were they created?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
What does this consolidation into seven centres mean in terms of financial and real property investments? I gather that these data centres are somewhere in a building.
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
I'm not denying that's important. What I'm asking is how much that will end up costing. Will those investments translate into real savings?
At this time there are four centres, and we want at most seven. When will all this be completed and where are these centres located?
View Julie Vignola Profile
BQ (QC)
Okay.
I also saw that you are using a cost-recovery approach. When agencies or departments use SSC's services, they are billed and must pay SSC, as I understand it.
How effective is cost-recovery, given that the money is coming from the government? That money comes from a big pocket. For example, when Health Canada is billed for the services it uses, the money ultimately goes from the left pocket to the right pocket.
How can the cost-recovery approach save the government money?
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