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Results: 1 - 60 of 374
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have the honour to inform the House that when the House went up to the Senate chamber Her Excellency the Governor General was pleased to give, in Her Majesty's name, the royal assent to Bill C-2, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020.
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-10 19:02 [p.248]
moved:
That the Supplementary Estimates (A) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020, be concurred in.
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-10 19:12 [p.250]
moved that Bill C-2, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020, be now read the first time.
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-10 19:12 [p.250]
moved that the bill be now read the second time and referred to committee of the whole.
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2019-12-10 19:13 [p.250]
Mr. Speaker, in my exuberance to stand, I really wanted to thank the very good and generous people of the riding of Ajax for the opportunity to serve them.
I thank the House for its indulgence in letting me slip that in as I do something that I think the House will appreciate, which is to ask you this: If you seek it, I believe you will find unanimous consent to apply the result of the previous vote to this vote, with Liberal members voting in favour.
View Claude DeBellefeuille Profile
BQ (QC)
View Paul Manly Profile
GP (BC)
View Paul Manly Profile
2019-12-10 19:14 [p.250]
Mr. Speaker, I am not a whip. I agree to apply, but as the member for Nanaimo—Ladysmith, I will be voting no.
View Jody Wilson-Raybould Profile
Ind. (BC)
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-10 19:16 [p.252]
Mr. Speaker, it is with great empathy that we acknowledge the concern and anxiety felt by the member across the way.
Accordingly, we want to reassure him and confirm that the bill, as submitted, is in the same form as all previous supply bills.
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2019-12-10 19:17 [p.252]
Shall clause 2 carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall clause 3 carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall clause 4 carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall clause 5 carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall clause 6 carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall schedule 1 carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall schedule 2 carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall clause 1, the short title, carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall the preamble carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall the title carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall the bill carry?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
The Chair: Shall I rise and report the bill?
Some hon. members: Agreed.
Some hon. members: On division.
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2019-12-10 19:19 [p.253]
Mr. Speaker, if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent to apply the results of the previous vote, held before the committee of the whole, to this vote, with Liberal members voting yes.
View Mark Strahl Profile
CPC (BC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-10 19:21 [p.254]
moved that Bill C-2, An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020, be read the third time and passed.
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2019-12-10 19:21 [p.254]
Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, I believe if you seek it you can apply the results of the previous vote to this vote with Liberal members voting for.
View Bruce Stanton Profile
CPC (ON)
View Bruce Stanton Profile
2019-12-09 18:18 [p.134]
Order. Today's debate is a general one on all votes tabled before the House on Thursday, December 5, 2019.
Pursuant to the provisions in the motion adopted on Thursday, December 5, 2019, the total length of time for debate will not exceed four hours. The first round will begin with the official opposition, followed by the government, the Bloc Québécois and the New Democratic Party. After that, we will follow the usual rotation.
Each member will be allocated 15 minutes at a time, which may be used both for debate and for posing questions. Members wishing to use this time to make a speech have a maximum of 10 minutes, leaving at least five minutes for questions to the minister.
When a member is recognized, he or she should indicate to the Chair how the 15-minute period will be used, meaning how much time will be spent on the speech and how much time will be used for questions and answers.
Members should also note that they will need unanimous consent if they wish to split their 15 minutes with other members.
When the time is to be used for questions and comments, the minister's response should reflect approximately the time taken to pose the question, as that time counts toward the member's allotted time.
I also wish to indicate that in committee of the whole, comments should be addressed to the Chair, much as in debate in the usual House. I ask for everyone's co-operation in holding all established standards of decorum, parliamentary language and behaviour.
Just as another note to hon. members, as we are in committee of the whole, members will in fact be recognized from the seat in the chamber they choose.
We will now begin tonight's session. The House is in committee of the whole, pursuant to the provisional Standing Order 81(5), consideration in committee of the whole of all votes in the supplementary estimates (A) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020.
Debate, the hon. member for Edmonton Mill Woods.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:21 [p.134]
Mr. Chair, I will be using my time for questions and answers.
The people of Alberta are going through an economic crisis right now. Over 150,000 jobs have been lost in the energy sector and billions of dollars of investment has left Alberta. While the supplementary estimates outline an additional $5 billion in spending, they only mention the province of Alberta once: the cost of implementing the carbon tax of $17 million, which will only make things worse for Alberta. Why is the government not addressing the job crisis in Alberta?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:22 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, I am delighted to be part of this committee of the whole and very pleased to hear this very important question on how we will grow the economy in Canada in the 21st century. That involves working with all Canadians and investing in middle-class Canadians, as we are doing again today, in order to grow the economy while protecting the environment. We will be extremely pleased to work with our colleagues on the other side to make sure this happens across Canada, including Alberta.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:22 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, again, there is no specific plan for Alberta. There is a plan to spend $265 million for wealthy Canadians to buy foreign-made cars, but there is nothing in it for Alberta. Why is the government giving subsidies to create jobs in other countries while Canadian communities suffer?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:22 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, as I said, I am delighted to be part of this evening's committee of the whole. I would like to take this opportunity to remind the House that, over the past four years, by investing in infrastructure, the middle class and environmental protection while growing the economy, we were able to deliver better results across the board.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:23 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, $99.7 million is allocated for electric vehicles in the government's contingency vote, vote 5. Why is the government using the contingency vote, which is supposed to be for emergencies, for electric vehicle subsidies? What is the emergency?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:23 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, this is a procedure that has been followed since the start of Confederation to protect the integrity of the government and its ability to invest in Canadians at a time when all information is not yet available. This is the usual practice of the government in the House of Commons.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:23 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, that is not usual practice. Contingency funds are for emergencies.
The government emphasizes making energy-efficient homes more affordable for the average Canadian, yet the government has $200 million for wealthy electric-vehicle owners and $300 million to fight climate change in foreign countries. Where are the benefits for the average Canadian homeowner?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:24 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, this is another example of the importance of investing in workers and middle-class families and helping more Canadians join the middle class. It is the best way in the 21st century to grow the economy. Unlike other philosophical foundations in economics, we have learned in the last years that this is the best way not only from an economic efficiency perspective but also from a fairness perspective.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:24 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, the tax cuts the Liberals announced today would mean a savings of only 38¢ a day for taxpayers and 76¢ a day for families. Meanwhile, the government is handing out $265 million for cars that the middle class cannot even afford. Why the hypocrisy?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:25 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, it is a perfect opportunity to remind members that the government did exactly the same thing in 2015. The first thing we did was reduce taxes for middle-class Canadians, which helped reduce the tax burden on nine million Canadians. Again this year, with the promises we made in the campaign, we are able to reduce taxes for middle-class Canadians and those aspiring to be members of the middle class, some 20 million Canadians. This is something we are proud of.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:25 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, I am not sure how spending $265 million on electric cars is going to bring people into the middle class.
However, does the President of the Treasury Board agree that parliamentarians must have all information before voting on important measures like spending plans?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:26 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, our colleague makes a very important point. It is not only the privilege but the responsibility of members to do all they can to support an open, transparent and accountable government. We have strived to do this in the last four years, but there is always more to do and we are counting on members of the other parties to help us do that.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:26 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, does the President of the Treasury Board agree that incomplete plans should not be put to a vote, as the parameters of the plans may change significantly?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:26 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, as I explained earlier, there are certain elements that, for reasons of transparency, as well as integrity and governmental prudence, have been appearing a certain way in the public accounts and estimates since the start of Confederation.
I would be very pleased to explain to the member in greater detail why this is.
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
View Kelly McCauley Profile
2019-12-09 18:27 [p.135]
Mr. Chair, on a point of order, it is the custom in committee of the whole that the government be given the same length of time to answer a question as given to a member asking one. I understand that when it is a difficult question, a member can have a bit more time, but regarding a member's time on a simple yes or no question, I would ask, Mr. Chair, that you follow the rules we generally follow in committee of the whole and allow the government the same time to answer a question as allowed when the question was asked.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:28 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, we are still seeing updates to the 2018 vote 40 slush fund. Will the President of the Treasury Board admit that this attempt at this alignment is a farce and commit to removing this unaccountable mechanism for future estimates?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:28 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, I will do my best to respond as clearly and concisely as possible to these important questions from the opposition members.
In response to the question I was just asked, I can use precise, technical language. The Treasury Board uses “Vote 5—Government Contingencies” to help organizations when the amounts initially approved for them in the main estimates are insufficient.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:29 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, I was asking about vote 40, not vote 5.
The pilot for the budget implementation vote, formally the vote 40 slush fund, has clearly failed. The government is not approving funding any faster than before. In fact, the current PBO and the two previous PBOs have said that it is a failure. Will he commit to transparency and end this failed practice?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:29 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, once again, I am very pleased to answer this important question.
As the member said himself, there was a pilot project in recent years that tried, with some success, to increase not only transparency in government spending, but also opposition members' ability to help the government do the important work of investing in people and infrastructure.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:29 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, three PBOs have said that it was not successful.
In the 2018-19 supplementary estimates, there was a central vote allocation for $90 million to LNG Canada, and no officials knew what it was for. Now, Industry and Western Economic Diversification have $72 million in central vote money for LNG Canada support measures in these supplementary estimates. The department has known about this project for over a year. Why are these funds circumventing the normal process?
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2019-12-09 18:30 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, once again, this is an important question about the need to invest in both people and infrastructure.
In Canada, we are fortunate to have considerable natural resources that we absolutely must be able to deliver to foreign markets. By working with opposition members, we will find even better measures that will allow us to benefit from these natural resources, grow the economy and grow the middle class.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:30 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, the question was not about the importance of LNG. Actually, it was about why the funding is circumventing the normal process.
In addition to the $99.7 million allocated through the Treasury Board central vote, the Department of Transport is asking for $165 million in additional funding for electrical vehicle subsidies. Why is the funding being split?
View Marc Garneau Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Chair, of course, transportation is responsible for a quarter of all greenhouse gases and out of that, 50% comes from motor vehicles, which is why we put in place an incentive for people to buy ZEVs. The take-up on this has been exceedingly good in the past five months, and we want to continue to make sure that those who decide to invest in electric vehicles are going to be able to get their rebate from the federal government.
View Tim Uppal Profile
CPC (AB)
View Tim Uppal Profile
2019-12-09 18:31 [p.136]
Mr. Chair, from the historical average of zero use, the current government has pumped hundreds of millions out through the Treasury Board central vote 10, which is subject to less transparency. Why are these programs subject to special treatment?
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