Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 13 of 13
View John McKay Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, with the able assistance of our new clerk, Mark D'Amore, and after an intense two-hour debate among and between members, the minister and officials, and with a special notable contribution from the member for Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the following two reports of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.
The first report is entitled “Main Estimates, 2020-21”, and the second report is entitled “Supplementary Estimates (B), 2020-21”.
Monsieur le Président, avec l'aide compétente de notre nouveau greffier Mark D'Amore, et après deux heures de débats intenses entre les députés, le ministre et ses fonctionnaires, ainsi qu'une contribution remarquable du député de Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, j'ai l'honneur de présenter, dans les deux langues officielles, les deux rapports suivants du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale.
Le premier rapport est intitulé « Budget principal des dépenses 2020-2021 », et le titre du deuxième rapport est « Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) 2020-2021 ».
View Anthony Rota Profile
Lib. (ON)

Question No. 1--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to the fleet of Airbus A310-300s operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force and designated CC-150 Polaris: (a) how many flights has the fleet flown since January 1, 2020; (b) for each flight since January 1, 2020, what was the departure location and destination location of each flight, including city name and airport code or identifier; (c) for each flight listed in (b), what was the aircraft identifier of the aircraft used in each flight; (d) for each flight listed in (b), what were the names of all passengers who travelled on each flight; (e) of all the flights listed in (b), which flights carried the Prime Minister as a passenger; (f) of all the flights listed in (e), what was the total distance flown in kilometres; (g) for the flights listed in (b), what was the total cost to the government for operating these flights; and (h) for the flights listed in (e), what was the total cost to the government for operating these flights?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 3--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to undertakings to prepare government offices for safe reopening following the COVID-19 pandemic since March 1, 2020: (a) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on plexiglass for use in government offices or centres, broken down by purchase order and by department; (b) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on cough and sneeze guards for use in government offices or centres, broken down by purchase order and by department; (c) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on protection partitions for use in government offices or centres, broken down by purchase order and by department; and (d) what is the total amount of money the government has spent on custom glass (for health protection) for use in government offices or centres, broken down by purchase order and by department?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 4--
Mr. Tom Kmiec:
With regard to requests filed for access to information with each government institution under the Access to Information Act since October 1, 2019: (a) how many access to information requests were made with each government institution, broken down alphabetically by institution and by month; (b) of the requests listed in (a), how many requests were completed and responded to by each government institution, broken down alphabetically by institution, within the statutory deadline of 30 calendar days; (c) of the requests listed in (a), how many of the requests required the department to apply an extension of fewer than 91 days to respond, broken down by each government institution; (d) of the requests listed in (a), how many of the requests required the department to apply an extension greater than 91 days but fewer than 151 days to respond, broken down by each government institution; (e) of the requests listed in (a), how many of the requests required the department to apply an extension greater than 151 days but fewer than 251 days to respond, broken down by each government institution; (f) of the requests listed in (a), how many of the requests required the department to apply an extension greater than 251 days but fewer than 365 days to respond, broken down by each government institution; (g) of the requests listed in (a), how many of the requests required the department to apply an extension greater than 366 days to respond, broken down by each government institution; (h) for each government institution, broken down alphabetically by institution, how many full-time equivalent employees were staffing the access to information and privacy directorate or sector; and (i) for each government institution, broken down alphabetically by institution, how many individuals are listed on the delegation orders under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 6--
Mr. Marty Morantz:
With regard to loans made under the Canada Emergency Business Account: (a) what is the total number of loans made through the program; (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by (i) sector, (ii) province, (iii) size of business; (c) what is the total amount of loans provided through the program; and (d) what is the breakdown of (c) by (i) sector, (ii) province, (iii) size of business?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 7--
Mr. Marty Morantz:
With regard to the Interim Order Respecting Drugs, Medical Devices and Foods for a Special Dietary Purpose in Relation to COVID-19: (a) how many applications for the importation or sale of products were received by the government in relation to the order; (b) what is the breakdown of the number of applications by product or type of product; (c) what is the government’s standard or goal for time between when an application is received and when a permit is issued; (d) what is the average time between when an application is received and a permit is issued; and (e) what is the breakdown of (d) by type of product?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 8--
Mrs. Rosemarie Falk:
With regard to converting government workplaces to accommodate those employees returning to work: (a) what are the final dollar amounts incurred by each department to prepare physical workplaces in government buildings; (b) what resources are being converted by each department to accommodate employees returning to work; (c) what are the additional funds being provided to each department for custodial services; (d) are employees working in physical distancing zones; (e) broken down by department, what percentage of employees will be allowed to work from their desks or physical government office spaces; and (f) will the government be providing hazard pay to those employees who must work from their physical government office?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 9--
Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:
With regard to the use of security notifications, also known as security (staff safety) threat flags, applied to users of Veterans Affairs Canada’s (VAC) Client Service Delivery Network (CSDN) from November 4, 2015, to present: (a) how many security threat flags existed at the beginning of the time frame; (b) how many new security threat flags have been added during this time frame; (c) how many security threat flags have been removed during the time frame; (d) what is the total number of VAC clients who are currently subject to a security threat flag; (e) of the new security threat flags added since November 4, 2015, how many users of VAC’s CSDN were informed of a security threat flag placed on their file, and of these, how many users of VAC’s CSDN were provided with an explanation as to why a security threat flag was placed on their file; (f) what directives exist within VAC on permissible reasons for a security threat flag to be placed on the file of a CSDN user; (g) what directives exist within VAC pertaining to specific services that can be denied to a CSDN user with a security threat flag placed on their file; and (h) how many veterans have been subject to (i) denied, (ii) delayed, VAC services or financial aid as a result of a security threat flag being placed on their file during this time frame?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 10--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to government programs and services temporarily suspended, delayed or shut down during the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) what is the complete list of programs and services impacted, broken down by department of agency; (b) how was each program or service in (a) impacted; and (c) what is the start and end dates for each of these changes?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 11--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to recruitment and hiring at Global Affairs Canada (GAC), for the last 10 years: (a) what is the total number of individuals who have (i) applied for GAC seconded positions through CANADEM, (ii) been accepted as candidates, (iii) been successfully recruited; (b) how many individuals who identify themselves as a member of a visible minority have (i) applied for GAC seconded positions through CANADEM, (ii) been accepted as candidates, (iii) been successfully recruited; (c) how many candidates were successfully recruited within GAC itself; and (d) how many candidates, who identify themselves as members of a visible minority were successfully recruited within GAC itself?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 12--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to the government projections of the impacts of the COVID-19 on the viability of small and medium-sized businesses: (a) how many small and medium-sized businesses does the government project will either go bankrupt or otherwise permanently cease operations by the end of (i) 2020, (ii) 2021; (b) what percentage of small and medium-sized businesses does the numbers in (a) represent; and (c) what is the breakdown of (a) and (b) by industry, sector and province?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 13--
Mr. Tim Uppal:
With regard to government contracts for services and construction valued between $39,000.00 and $39,999.99, signed since January 1, 2016, and broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity: (a) what is the total value of all such contracts; and (b) what are the details of all such contracts, including (i) vendor, (il) amount, (iii) date, (iv) description of services or construction contracts, (v) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 14--
Mr. Tim Uppal:
With regard to government contracts for architectural, engineering and other services required in respect of the planning, design, preparation or supervision of the construction, repair, renovation or restoration of a work valued between $98,000.00 and $99,999.99, signed since January 1, 2016, and broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity: (a) what is the total value of all such contracts; and (b) what are the details of all such contracts, including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date, (iv) description of services or construction contracts, (v) file number?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 18--
Mr. Kelly McCauley:
With regard to public service employees between March 15, 2020, and September 21, 2020, broken down by department and by week: (a) how many public servants worked from home; (b) how much has been paid out in overtime to employees; (c) how many vacation days have been used; and (d) how many vacation days were used during this same period in 2019?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 20--
Mr. Alex Ruff:
With regard to Order in Council SOR/2020-96 published on May 1, 2020, which prohibited a number of previously non-restricted and restricted firearms, and the Canadian Firearms Safety Course: (a) what is the government’s formal technical definition of “assault-style firearms”; (b) when did the government come up with the definition, and in what government publication was the definition first used; and (c) which current members of cabinet have successfully completed the Canadian Firearms Safety Course?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 21--
Mr. Alex Ruff:
With regard to defaulted student loans owing for the 2018 and 2019 fiscal years, broken down by year: (a) how many student loans were in default; (b) what is the average age of the loans; (c) how many loans are in default because the loan holder has left the country; (d) what is the average reported T4 income for each of 2018 and 2019 defaulted loan holder; (e) how much was spent on collections agencies either in fees or their commissioned portion of collected loans; and (f) how much has been recouped by collection agencies?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 22--
Mr. Alex Ruff:
With regard to recipients of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit: what is the number of recipients based on 2019 income, broken down by federal income tax bracket?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 23--
Mr. Pat Kelly:
With regard to accommodating the work from home environment for government employees since March 13, 2020: (a) what is the total amount spent on furniture, equipment, including IT equipment, and services, including home Internet reimbursement; (b) of the purchases in (a) what is the breakdown per department by (i) date of purchase, (ii) object code it was purchased under, (iii) type of furniture, equipment or services, (iv) final cost of furniture, equipment or services; (d) what were the costs incurred for delivery of items in (a); and (d) were subscriptions purchased during this period, and if so (i) what were the subscriptions for, (ii) what were the costs associated for these subscriptions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 24--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to the responses to questions on the Order Paper earlier this year during the first session of the 43rd Parliament by the Minister of National Defence, which stated that “At this time, National Defence is unable to prepare and validate a comprehensive response” due to the COVID-19 situation: what is the Minister of National Defence’s comprehensive response to each question on the Order Paper where such a response was provided, broken down by question?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 25--
Mrs. Tamara Jansen:
With regard to the transfer of Ebola and Henipah viruses from the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) to persons, laboratories, and institutions in China: (a) who in China requested the transfer; (b) other than the Wuhan Institute of Virology (WIV), which laboratories in China requested the transfer; (c) for the answers in (a) and (b) which are affiliated with the military of China; (d) on what date was the WIV’s request for the transfer received by the NML; (e) what scientific research was proposed, or what other scientific rationale was put forth, by the WIV or the NML scientists to justify the transfer of Ebola and Henipah viruses; (f) what materials were authorized for transfer pursuant to Transfer Authorization NML-TA-18-0480, dated October 29, 2018; (g) did the NML receive payment of $75, per its commercial invoice of March 27, 2019, for the transfer, and on what date was payment received; (h) what consideration or compensation was received from China in exchange for providing this material, broken down by amount or details of the consideration or compensation received by each recipient organization; (i) has the government requested China to destroy or return the viruses and, if not, why; (j) did Canada include, as a term of the transfer, a prohibition on the WIV further transferring the viruses with others inside or outside China, except with Canada’s consent; (k) what due diligence did the NML perform to ensure that the WIF and other institutions referred to in (b) would not make use of the transferred viruses for military research or uses; (l) what inspections or audits did the NML perform of the WIV and other institutions referred to in (b) to ensure that they were able to handle the transferred viruses safely and without diversion to military research or uses; (m) what were the findings of the inspections or audits referred to in (l), in summary; (n) after the transfer, what follow-up has Canada conducted with the institutions referred to in (b) to ensure that the only research being performed with the transferred viruses is that which was disclosed at the time of the request for the transfer; (o) what intellectual property protections did Canada set in place before sending the transferred viruses to the persons and institutions referred to in (a) and (b); (p) of the Ebola virus strains sent to the WIV, what percentages of the NML’s total Ebola collection and Ebola collection authorized for sharing is represented by the material transferred; (q) other than the study entitled “Equine-Origin Immunoglobulin Fragments Protect Nonhuman Primates from Ebola Virus Disease”, which other published or unpublished studies did the NML scientists perform with scientists affiliated with the military of China; (r) which other studies are the NML scientists currently performing with scientists affiliated with the WIV, China’s Academy of Military Medical Sciences, or other parts of China’s military establishment; (s) what is the reason that Anders Leung of the NML attempted to send the transferred viruses in incorrect packaging (type PI650), and only changed its packaging to the correct standard (type PI620) after being questioned by the Chinese on February 20, 2019; (t) has the NML conducted an audit of the error of using unsafe packaging to transfer the viruses, and what in summary were its conclusions; (u) what is the reason that Allan Lau and Heidi Wood of the NML wrote on March 28, 2019, that they were “really hoping that this [the transferred viruses] goes through Vancouver” instead of Toronto on Air Canada, and “Fingers crossed!” for this specific routing; (v) what is the complete flight itinerary, including airlines and connecting airports, for the transfer; (w) were all airlines and airports on the flight itinerary informed by the NML that Ebola and Henipah viruses would be in their custody; (x) with reference to the email of Marie Gharib of the NML on March 27, 2019, other than Ebola and Henipah viruses, which other pathogens were requested by the WIV; (y) since the date of the request for transfer, other than Ebola and Henipah viruses, which other pathogens has the NML transferred or sought to transfer to the WIV; (z) did the NML inform Canada’s security establishment, including the RCMP, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Communications Security Establishment, or other such entity, of the transfer before it occurred, and, if not, why not; (aa) what is the reason that the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) redacted the name of the transfer recipient from documents disclosed to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) under the Access to Information Act, when the PHAC later willingly disclosed that information to the CBC; (bb) does Canada have any policy prohibiting the export of risk group 3 and 4 pathogens to countries, such as China, that conduct gain-of-function experiments, and in summary what is that policy; (cc) if Canada does not have any policy referred to in (bb), why not; (dd) what is the reason that did the NML or individual employees sought and obtained no permits or authorizations under the Human Pathogens and Toxins Act, the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, the Export Control Act, or related legislation prior to the transfer; (ee) what legal controls prevent the NML or other government laboratories sending group 3 or 4 pathogens to laboratories associated with foreign militaries or laboratories that conduct gain-of-function experiments; (ff) with respect to the September 14, 2018, email of Matthew Gilmour, in which he writes that “no certifications [were] provided [by the WIV], they simply cite they have them”, why did the NML proceed to transfer Ebola and Henipah viruses without proof of certification to handle them safely; and (gg) with respect to the September 14, 2018, email of Matthew Gilmour, in which he asked “Are there materials that [WIV] have that we would benefit from receiving? Other VHF? High path flu?”, did the NML request these or any other materials in exchange for the transfer, and did the NML receive them?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 26--
Mrs. Tamara Jansen:
With regard to both the administrative and RCMP investigations of the National Microbiology Lab (NML), Xiangguo Qiu, and Keding Cheng: (a) with respect to the decision of the NML and the RCMP to remove Dr. Qiu and Dr. Cheng from the NML facilities on July 5, 2019, what is the cause of delay that has prevented that the NML and the RCMP investigations concluding; (b) in light of a statement by the Public Health Agency of Canada to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation which was reported on June 14, 2020, and which stated, “the administrative investigation of [Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng] is not related to the shipment of virus samples to China”, what are these two scientists being investigated for; (c) did Canada receive information from foreign law enforcement or intelligence agencies which led to the investigations against Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng, and, in summary, what was alleged; (d) which other individuals apart from Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng are implicated in the investigations; (e) are Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng still in Canada; (f) are Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng cooperating with law enforcement in the investigations; (g) are Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng on paid leave, unpaid leave, or terminated from the NML; (h) what connection is there between the investigations of Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng and the investigation by the United States National Institutes of Health which has resulted in 54 scientists losing their jobs mainly due to receiving foreign funding from China, as reported by the journal Science on June 12, 2020; (i) does the government possess information that Dr. Qiu or Dr. Cheng solicited or received funding from a Chinese institution, and, in summary what is that information; and (j) when are the investigations expected to conclude, and will their findings be made public?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 27--
Ms. Heather McPherson:
With regard to Canada’s commitment to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: (a) what is the role or mandate of each department, agency, Crown corporation and any programs thereof in advancing Canada’s implementation of the 2030 Agenda; (b) what has the government, as a whole, committed to achieving and in what timeline; (c) what projects are currently in place to achieve these goals; (d) has the government liaised with sub-national governments, groups and organizations to achieve these goals; (e) if the answer to (d) is affirmative, what governments, groups and organizations; (f) if the answer to (d) is negative, why not; (g) how much money has the government allocated to funding initiatives in each fiscal year since 2010-11, broken down by program and sub-program; (h) in each year, how much allocated funding was lapsed for each program and subprogram; (i) in each case where funding was lapsed, what was the reason; (j) have any additional funds been allocated to this initiative; (k) for each fiscal year since 2010-2011, what organizations, governments, groups and companies, have received funding connected to Canada’s implementation of the 2030 Agenda; and (l) how much did organizations, governments, groups and companies in (k) (i) request, (ii) receive, including if the received funding was in the form of grants, contributions, loans or other spending?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 28--
Ms. Heather McPherson:
With regard to the government’s campaign for a United Nations Security Council seat: (a) how much funding has been allocated, spent and lapsed in each fiscal year since 2014-15 on the campaign; and (b) broken down by month since November 2015, what meetings and phone calls did government officials at the executive level hold to advance the goal of winning a seat on the United Nations Security Council?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 29--
Ms. Heather McPherson:
With respect to the government’s response to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, broken down by month since June 2019: (a) what meetings and phone calls did government officials at the executive level hold to craft the national action plan in response to the final report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls; and (b) what external stakeholders were consulted?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 30--
Ms. Heather McPherson:
With regard to Canada Revenue Agency activities, agreements guaranteeing non-referral to the criminal investigation sector and cases referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, between 2011-12 and 2019-20, broken down by fiscal year: (a) how many audits resulting in reassessments were concluded; (b) of the agreements concluded in (a), what was the total amount recovered; (c) of the agreements concluded in (a), how many resulted in penalties for gross negligence; (d) of the agreements concluded in (c), what was the total amount of penalties; (e) of the agreements concluded in (a), how many related to bank accounts held outside Canada; and (f) how many audits resulting in assessments were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 31--
Mr. Michael Kram:
With regard to the Wataynikaneyap Transmission Project: (a) is it the government’s policy to choose foreign companies over Canadian companies for this or similar projects; (b) which company or companies supplied transformers to the project; (c) were transformers rated above 60MVA supplied to the project subject to the applicable 35% or more import tariff, and, if so, was this tariff actually collected; and (d) broken down by transformer, what was the price charged to the project of any transformers rated (i) above 60MVA, (ii) below 60MVA?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 32--
Mr. Philip Lawrence:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency’s approach to workspace-in-the-home expense deductions in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic’s stay-at-home guidelines: are individuals who had to use areas of their homes not normally used for work, such as dining or living rooms, as a temporary office during the pandemic entitled to the deductions, and, if so, how should individuals calculate which portions of their mortgage, rent, or other expenses are deductible?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 34--
Mr. Kerry Diotte:
With regard to the status of government employees since March, 1, 2020: (a) how many employees have been placed on "Other Leave With Pay" (Treasury Board Code 699) at some point since March 1, 2020; (b) how many employees have been placed on other types of leave, excluding vacation, maternity or paternity leave, at some point since March 1, 2020, broken down by type of leave and Treasury Board code; (c) of the employees in (a), how many are still currently on leave; and (d) of the employees in (b), how many are still currently on leave, broken down by type of leave?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 36--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regard to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, since 2005: how many meat and poultry processing plants have had their licences cancelled, broken down by year and province?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 37--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regard to instances where retiring Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Members were negatively financially impacted as a result of having their official release date scheduled for a weekend or holiday, as opposed to a regular business day, since January 1, 2016, and broken down by year: (a) how many times has a release administrator recommended a CAF Member’s release date occur on a weekend or holiday; (b) how many times did a CAF Member’s release date occur on a holiday; (c) how many Members have had payments or coverage from (i) SISIP Financial, (ii) other entities, cancelled or reduced as a result of the official release date occurring on a weekend or holiday; (d) were any instructions, directives, or advice issued to any release administrator asking them not to schedule release dates on a weekend or holiday in order to preserve CAF Member’s benefits, and, if so, what are the details; (e) were any instructions, directives, or advice issued to any release administrator asking them to schedule certain release dates on a weekend or holiday, and, if so, what are the details; and (f) what action, if any, has the Minister of National Defense taken to restore any payments or benefits lost as a result of the scheduling of a CAF Member’s release date?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 38--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regard to federal grants, contributions, non-repayable loans, or similar type of funding provided to telecommunications companies since 2009: what are the details of all such funding, including the (i) date, (ii) recipient, (iii) type of funding, (iv) department providing the funding, (v) name of program through which funding was provided, (vi) project description, (vii) start and completion, (viii) project location, (ix) amount of federal funding?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 39--
Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:
With regard to Canadian Armed Forces personnel deployed to long-term care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) what personal protective equipment (PPE) was issued to Canadian Armed Forces members deployed to long-term care homes in Ontario and Quebec; and (b) for each type of PPE in (a), what was the (i) model, (ii) purchase date, (iii) purchase order number, (iv) number ordered, (v) number delivered, (vi) supplier company, (vii) expiration date of the product, (viii) location where the stockpile was stored?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 40--
Ms. Jenny Kwan:
With regard to the National Housing Strategy, broken down by name of applicant, type of applicant (e.g. non-profit, for-profit, coop), stream (e.g. new construction, revitalization), date of submission, province, number of units, and dollar amount for each finalized application: (a) how many applications have been received for the National Housing Co-Investment Fund (NHCF) since 2018; (b) how many NHCF applications have a letter of intent, excluding those with loan agreements or finalized agreements; (c) how many NHCF applications are at the loan agreement stage; (d) how many NHCF applications have had funding agreements finalized; (e) how many NHCF applications have had NHCF funding received by applicants; (f) for NHCF applications that resulted in finalized funding agreements, what is the (i) length of time in days between their initial submission and the finalization of their funding agreement, (ii) average and median rent of the project, (iii) percentage of units meeting NHCF affordability criteria, (iv) average and median rent of units meeting affordability criteria; (g) how many applications have been received for the Rental Construction Financing initiative (RCFi) since 2017; (h) how many RCFi applications are at (i) the approval and letter of intent stage of the application process, (ii) the loan agreement and funding stage, (iii) the servicing stage; (h) how many RCFi applications have had RCFi loans received by applicants; (i) for RCFi applications that resulted in loan agreements, what is the (i) length of time in days between their initial submission and the finalization of their loan agreement, (ii) average and median rent of the project, (iii) percentage of units meeting RCFi affordability criteria, (iv) average and median rent of units meeting affordability criteria?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 41--
Ms. Jenny Kwan:
With regard to the National Housing Strategy: (a) what provinces and territories have reached an agreement with the federal government regarding the Canada Housing Benefit; (b) broken down by number of years on a waitlist for housing, gender, province, year of submission, amount requested and amount paid out, (i) how many applications have been received, (ii) how many applications are currently being assessed, (iii) how many applications have been approved, (iv) how many applications have been declined; and (c) if the Canada housing benefit is transferred as lump sums to the provinces, what are the dollar amount of transfers to the provinces, broken down by amount, year and province?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 42--
Ms. Jenny Kwan:
With regard to immigration, refugee and citizenship processing levels: (a) how many applications have been received since 2016, broken down by year and stream (e.g. outland spousal sponsorship, home childcare provider, open work permit, privately sponsored refugee, etc.); (b) how many applications have been fully approved since 2015, broken down by year and stream; (c) how many applications have been received since (i) March 15, 2020, (ii) September 21, 2020; (d) how many applications have been approved since (i) March 15, 2020, (ii) September 21, 2020; (e) how many applications are in backlog since January 2020, broken down by month and stream; (f) what is the number of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) visa officers and other IRCC employees, in whole or in part (i.e. FTEs), who have been processing applications since January 1, 2020, broken down by month, immigration office and application stream being processed; (g) since March 15, 2020, how many employees referred to in (f) have been placed on paid leave broken down by month, immigration office and application stream being processed; and (h) what are the details of any briefing notes or correspondence since January 2020 related to (i) staffing levels, (ii) IRCC office closures, (iii) the operation levels of IRCC mail rooms, (iv) plans to return to increased operation?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 43--
Ms. Jenny Kwan:
With regard to asylum seekers: (a) broken down by year, how many people have been turned away due to the Safe Third Country Agreement since (i) 2016, (ii) January 1, 2020, broken by month, (iii) since July 22, 2020; (b) how many asylum claims have been found ineligible under paragraph 101(1)(c.1) of the Immigration, Refugee and Protection Act since (i) January 1st 2020, broken by month, (ii) July 22, 2020; and (c) what are the details of any briefing notes or correspondence since January 1, 2020, on the Safe Third Country Agreement?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 44--
Mr. Kenny Chiu:
With regard to government involvement in the negotiations with Vertex Pharmaceuticals for a Price Listing Agreement with the Pan Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance, in relation to cystic fibrosis treatments: (a) what is the current status of the negotiations; (b) what specific measures, if any, has the government taken to ensure that Kalydeco and Orkambi are available to all Canadians that require the medication; (c) has the government taken any specific measures to make Trikafta available to Canadians; and (d) how many months, or years, will it be before the government finishes the regulatory and review process related to the approval of Trikafta?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 45--
Mr. Kenny Chiu:
With regard to the government’s position regarding visitors coming to Canada for the sole purpose of giving birth on Canadian soil and subsequently obtaining Canadian citizenship for their child: (a) what is the government’s position in relation to this practice; (b) has the government condemned or taken any action to prevent this practice, and if so, what are the details of any such action; and (c) has the government taken any action to ban or discourage Canadian companies from soliciting or advertising services promoting this type of activity, and if so, what are details?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 47--
Mr. Alex Ruff:
With regard to the government’s response to Q-268 concerning the government failing to raise Canada’s bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk status from “Controlled Risk to BSE” to “Negligible Risk to BSE” with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) in the summer of 2019: (a) what is the government’s justification for missing the deadline with the OIE in the summer of 2019; (b) has the government conducted consultations with beef farmers to discuss the damage to the industry caused by missing this deadline, and, if so, what are the details of these consultations; (c) when did the government begin collating data from provincial governments, industry partners and stakeholders in order to ensure that a high-quality submission was produced and submitted in July 2020; (d) what measures were put in place to ensure that the July 2020 deadline, as well as other future deadlines, will not be missed; and (e) on what exact date was the application submitted to the OIE in July 2020?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 49--
Mr. Brad Vis:
With regard to the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive (FTHBI) announced by the government in 2019, between February 1, 2020, and September 1, 2020: (a) how many applicants have applied for mortgages through the FTHBI, broken down by province and municipality; (b) of those applicants, how many have been approved and have accepted mortgages through the FTHBI, broken down by province and municipality; (c) of those applicants listed in (b), how many approved applicants have been issued the incentive in the form of a shared equity mortgage; (d) what is the total value of incentives (shared equity mortgages) under the FTHBI that have been issued, in dollars; (e) for those applicants who have been issued mortgages through the FTHBI, what is that value of each of the mortgage loans; (f) for those applicants who have been issued mortgages through the FTHBI, what is the mean value of the mortgage loan; (g) what is the total aggregate amount of money lent to homebuyers through the FTHBI to date; (h) for mortgages approved through the FTHBI, what is the breakdown of the percentage of loans originated with each lender comprising more than 5% of total loans issued; and (i) for mortgages approved through the FTHBI, what is the breakdown of the value of outstanding loans insured by each Canadian mortgage insurance company as a percentage of total loans in force?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 50--
Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:
With regard to the air quality and air flow in buildings owned or operated by the government: (a) what specific measures were taken to improve the air flow or circulation in government buildings since March 1, 2020, broken down by individual building; (b) on what date did each measure in (a) come into force; (c) which government buildings have new air filters, HVAC filters, or other equipment designed to clean or improve the air quality or air flow installed since March 1, 2020; (d) for each building in (c), what new equipment was installed and on what date was it installed; and (e) what are the details of all expenditures or contracts related to any of the new measures or equipment, including (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) description of goods or services provided, (iv) date contract was signed, (v) date goods or services were delivered?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 51--
Ms. Marilyn Gladu:
What was the amount of FedDev funding, in dollars, given by year since 2016 to every riding in Ontario, broken down by riding?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 52--
Ms. Rachel Blaney:
With regards to Veterans Affairs Canada, broken down by year for the most recent 10 fiscal years for which data is available: (a) what was the number of disability benefit applications received; (b) of the applications in (a), how many were (i) rejected, (ii) approved, (iii) appealed, (iv) rejected upon appeal, (v) approved upon appeal; (c) what was the average wait time for a decision; (d) what was the median wait time for a decision; (e) what was the ratio of veteran to case manager at the end of each fiscal year; (f) what was the number of applications awaiting a decision at the end of each fiscal year; and (g) what was the number of veterans awaiting a decision at the end of each fiscal year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 53--
Ms. Rachel Blaney:
With regard to Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC): (a) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, what was the total number of overtime hours worked, further broken down by job title, including National First Level Appeals Officer, National Second Level Appeals Officer, case manager, veterans service agent and disability adjudicator; (b) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, what was the average number of overtime hours worked, further broken down by (i) job title, including National First Level Appeals Officer, National Second Level Appeals Officer, case manager, veterans service agent and disability adjudicator, (ii) directorate; (c) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, what was the total cost of overtime, further broken down by (i) job title, including National First Level Appeals Officer, National Second Level Appeals Officer, case manager, veterans service agent and disability adjudicator, (ii) directorate; (d) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, what was the total number of disability benefit claims, further broken down by (i) new claims, (ii) claims awaiting a decision, (iii) approved claims, (iv) denied claims, (v) appealed claims; (e) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, how many new disability benefit claims were transferred to a different VAC office than that which conducted the intake; (f) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, what was the number of (i) case managers, (ii) veterans service agents; (g) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, excluding standard vacation and paid sick leave, how many case managers took a leave of absence, and what was the average length of a leave of absence; (h) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, accounting for all leaves of absence, excluding standard vacation and paid sick leave, how many full-time equivalent case managers were present and working, and what was the case manager to veteran ratio; (i) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, how many veterans were disengaged from their case manager; (j) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, what was the highest number of cases assigned to an individual case manager; (k) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, how many veterans were on a waitlist for a case manager; (l) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month and by VAC office, including nationally, for work usually done by regularly employed case managers and veterans service agents, (i) how many contracts were awarded, (ii) what was the duration of each contract, (iii) what was the value of each contract; (m) during the most recent fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by VAC office, what were the service standard results; (n) what is the mechanism for tracking the transfer of cases between case managers when a case manager takes a leave of absence, excluding standard vacation and paid sick leave; (o) what is the department’s current method for calculating the case manager to veteran ratio; (p) what are the department’s quality assurance measures for case managers and how do they change based on the number of cases a case manager has at that time; (q) during the last five fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month, how many individuals were hired by the department; (r) how many of the individuals in (q) remained employed after their 12-month probation period came to an end;
(s) of the individuals in (q), who did not remain employed beyond the probation period, how many did not have their contracts extended by the department; (t) does the department track the reasons for which employees are not kept beyond the probation period, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual employees, what are the reasons for which employees were not kept beyond the probation period; (u) for the individuals in (q) who chose not to remain at any time throughout the 12 months, were exit interviews conducted, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual employees, what were the reasons, broken down by VAC office; (v) during the last five fiscal years for which data is available, broken down by month, how many Canadian Armed Forces service veterans were hired by the department; (w) of the veterans in (v), how many remained employed after their 12-month probation period came to an end; (x) of the veterans in (v), who are no longer employed by the department, (i) how many did not have their employment contracts extended by the department, (ii) how many were rejected on probation; (y) if the department track the reasons for which employees are not kept beyond the probation period, respecting the privacy of individual veteran employees, what are the reasons for which veteran employees are not kept beyond the probation period; (z) for the veterans in (v), who chose not to remain at any time throughout the 12 months, were exit interviews conducted, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual veteran employees, what were the reasons for their leaving, broken down by VAC office; (aa) during the last five fiscal year for which data is available, broken down by month, how many employees have quit their jobs at VAC; and (bb) for the employees in (aa) who quit their job, were exit interviews conducted, and, if so, respecting the privacy of individual employees, what were the reasons, broken down by VAC office?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 54--
Mr. Todd Doherty:
With regard to the 2020 United Nations Security Council election and costs associated with Canada’s bid for a Security Council Seat: (a) what is the final total of all costs associated with the bid; (b) if the final total is not yet known, what is the projected final cost and what is the total of all expenditures made to date in relation to the bid; (c) what is the breakdown of all costs by type of expense (gifts, travel, hospitality, etc.); and (d) what are the details of all contracts over $5,000 in relation to the bid, including (i) date, (ii) amount, (iii) vendor, (iv) summary of goods or services provided, (v) location goods or services were provided?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 55--
Mr. Chris d'Entremont:
With regard to any exemptions or essential worker designations granted to ministers, ministerial exempt staff, including any staff in the Office of the Prime Minister, or senior level civil servants so that the individual can be exempt from a mandatory 14-day quarantine after travelling to the Atlantic bubble, since the quarantine orders were put into place: (a) how many such individuals received an exemption; (b) what are the names and titles of the individuals who received exemptions; (c) for each case, what was the reason or rationale why the individual was granted an exemption; and (d) what are the details of all instances where a minister or ministerial exempt staff member travelled from outside of the Atlantic provinces to one or more of the Atlantic provinces since the 14-day quarantine for travellers was instituted, including the (i) name and title of the traveller, (ii) date of departure, (iii) date of arrival, (iv) location of departure, (v) location of arrival, (vi) mode of transportation, (vii) locations visited on the trip, (viii) whether or not the minister or staff member received an exemption from the 14-day quarantine, (ix) whether or not the minister of staff member adhered to the 14-day quarantine, (x) purpose of the trip?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 56--
Mr. Chris d'Entremont:
With regard to expenditures on moving and relocation expenses for ministerial exempt staff since January 1, 2018, broken down by ministerial office: (a) what is the total amount spent on moving and relocation expenses for (i) incoming ministerial staff, (ii) departing or transferring ministerial staff; (b) how many exempt staff members or former exempt staff members’ expenses does the total in (a) cover; and (c) how many exempt staff members or former exempt staff members had more than $10,000 in moving and relocation expenses covered by the government, and what was the total for each individual?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 57--
Mr. Chris d'Entremont:
With regard to national interest exemptions issued by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration or the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness in relation to the mandatory quarantine required for individuals entering Canada during the pandemic: (a) how many individuals received national interest exemptions; and (b) what are the details of each exemption, including (i) the name of the individual granted exemption, (ii) which minister granted the exemption, (iii) the date the exemption was granted, (iv) the explanation regarding how the exemption was in Canada’s national interest, (v) the country the individual travelled to Canada from?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 58--
Mr. James Cumming:
With regard to electric vehicle charging stations funded or subsidized by the government: (a) how many chargers have been funded or subsidized since January 1, 2016; (b) what is the breakdown of (a) by province and municipality; (c) what was the total government expenditure on each charging station, broken down by location; (d) on what date was each station installed; (e) which charging stations are currently open to the public; and (f) what is the current cost of electricity for users of the public charging stations?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 59--
Mr. Gord Johns:
With regard to the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP (CRCC), since its establishment: (a) how many complaints and requests for review were filed by individuals identifying as First Nations, Metis, or Inuit, broken down by percentage and number; (b) how many of the complaints and requests for review in (a) were dismissed without being investigated; (c) how many complaints and requests for review were filed for incidents occurring on-reserve or in predominantly First Nations, Metis, and Inuit communities, broken down by percentage and number; (d) how many of those complaints and requests for review in (c) were dismissed without being investigated; and (e) for requests for review in which the CRCC is not satisfied with the RCMP’s report, how many interim reports have been provided to complainants for response and input on recommended actions?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 60--
Mr. Gord Johns:
With regard to active transportation in Canada: what federal actions and funding has been taken with or provided to provinces and municipalities, broken down by year since 2010, that (i) validates the use of roads by cyclists and articulates the safety-related responsibilities of cyclists and other vehicles in on-road situation, (ii) grants authority to various agencies to test and implement unique solutions to operational problems involving active transportation users, (iii) improves road safety for pedestrians, cyclists and other vulnerable road users, (iv) makes the purchase of bicycles and cycling equipment more affordable by reducing sales tax on their purchase?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 62--
Mr. Michael Cooper:
With regard to management consulting contracts signed by any department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity during the pandemic, since March 1, 2020: (a) what is the total value of all such contracts; and (b) what are the details of each contract, including the (i) vendor, (ii) amount, (iii) date the contract was signed, (iv) start and end date of consulting services, (v) description of the issue, advice, or goal that the consulting contract was intended to address or achieve, (vi) file number, (vii) Treasury Board object code used to classify the contract (e.g. 0491)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 66--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to the information collected by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) regarding electronic funds transfers of $10,000 and over and the statement by the Minister of National Revenue before the Standing Committee on Finance on May 19, 2016, indicating that using this information, the CRA will target up to four jurisdictions per year, without warning, broken down by fiscal year since 2016-17: (a) how many foreign jurisdictions were targeted; (b) what is the name of each foreign jurisdiction targeted; (c) how many audits were conducted by the CRA for each foreign jurisdiction targeted; (d) of the audits in (c), how many resulted in a notice of assessment; (e) of the audits in (c), how many were referred to the CRA's Criminal Investigations Program; (f) of the investigations in (e), how many were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; (g) how many prosecutions in (f) resulted in convictions; (h) what were the penalties imposed for each conviction in (g); and (i) what is the total amount recovered?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 67--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency's (CRA) activities under the General Anti-Avoidance Rule under section 245 of the Income Tax Act, and under section 274 of the Income Tax Act, broken down by section of the act: (a) how many audits have been completed, since the fiscal year 2011-12, broken down by fiscal year and by (i) individual, (ii) trust, (iii) corporation; (b) how many notices of assessment have been issued by the CRA since the fiscal year 2011-12, broken down by fiscal year and by (i) individual, (ii) trust, (iii) corporation; (c) what is the total amount recovered by the CRA to date; (d) how many legal proceedings are currently underway, broken down by (i) Tax Court of Canada, (ii) Federal Court of Appeal, (iii) Supreme Court of Canada; (e) how many times has the CRA lost in court, broken down by (i) name of taxpayer, (ii) Tax Court of Canada, (iii) Federal Court of Appeal, (iv) Supreme Court of Canada; (f) what was the total amount spent by the CRA, broken down by lawsuit; and (g) how many times has the CRA not exercised its right of appeal, broken down by lawsuit, and what is the justification for each case?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 68--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) interdepartmental committee that reviews files and makes recommendations on the application of the General Anti-Avoidance Rule (GAAR), broken down by fiscal year since 2010-11: (a) how many of the proposed GAAR assessments sent to the CRA’s headquarters for review were referred to the interdepartmental committee; and (b) of the assessments reviewed in (a) by the interdepartmental committee, for how many assessments did the interdepartmental committee (i) recommend the application of the GAAR, (ii) not recommend the application of the GAAR?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 69--
Mr. Taylor Bachrach:
With regard to the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program, since March 22, 2016: (a) what is the complete list of infrastructure projects that have undergone a Climate Lens assessment, broken down by stream; and (b) for each project in (a), what are the details, including (i) amount of federal financing, (ii) location of the project, (iii) a brief description of the project, (iv) whether the project included a Climate Change Resilience Assessment, (v) whether the project included a Climate Change Green House Gas Mitigation Assessment, (vi) if a project included a Climate Change Resilience Assessment, a summary of the risk management findings of the assessment, (vii) if a project included a Climate Change Green House Gas Mitigation Assessment, the increase or reduction in emissions calculated in the assessment?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 70--
Mr. Gord Johns:
With regard to the motion respecting the business of supply on service standards for Canada's veterans adopted by the House on November 6, 2018: (a) what was the amount and percentage of all lapsed spending in the Department of Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC), broken down by year from 2013-14 to the current fiscal year; (b) what steps has the government taken since then to automatically carry forward all unused annual expenditures of the VAC to the next fiscal year; and (c) is the carry forward in (b) for the sole purpose of improving services to Canada's veterans until the department meets or exceeds the 24 service standards it has set?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 71--
Mr. Matthew Green:
With respect to the tax fairness motion that the House adopted on March 8, 2017: what steps has the government taken since then to (i) cap the stock option loophole, (ii) tighten the rules for shell corporations, (iii) renegotiate tax treaties that allow corporations to repatriate profits from tax havens back to Canada without paying tax, (iv) end forgiveness agreements without penalty for individuals suspected of tax evasion?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 72--
Ms. Raquel Dancho:
With regard to government assistance programs for individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) what has been the total amount of money expended through the (i) Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB), (ii) Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS), (iii) Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB), (iv) Canada Student Service Grant (CSSG); (b) what is the cumulative weekly breakdown of (a), starting on March 13, 2020, and further broken down by (i) province or territory, (ii) gender, (iii) age group; (c) what has been the cumulative number of applications, broken down by week, since March 13, 2020, for the (i) CERB, (ii) CEWS, (iii) CESB, (iv) CSSG; and (d) what has been the cumulative number of accepted applications, broken down by week, since March 13, 2020, for the (i) CERB, (ii) CEWS, (iii) CESB, (iv) CSSG?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 73--
Ms. Raquel Dancho:
With regard to government assistance programs for organizations and businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) what has been the total amount of money expended through the (i) Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA), (ii) Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF), (iii) Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA), (iv) Regional Relief and Recovery Fund (RRRF), (v) Industrial Research Assistance (IRAP) programs; (b) what is the cumulative weekly breakdown of (a), starting on March 13, 2020; (c) what has been the cumulative number of applications, broken down by week, since March 13, 2020, for the (i) CECRA, (ii) LEEFF, (iii) CEBA, (iv) RRRF, (v) IRAP; and (d) what has been the cumulative number of accepted applications, broken down by week, since March 13, 2020, for the (i) CECRA, (ii) LEEFF, (iii) CEBA, (iv) RRRF, (v) IRAP?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 74--
Mr. Peter Julian:
With regard to federal transfers to provinces and territories since March 1, 2020, excluding the Canada Health Transfer, Canada Social Transfer, Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing: (a) how much funding has been allocated to provincial and territorial transfers, broken down by province or territory; (b) how much has actually been transferred to each province and territory since March 1, 2020, broken down by transfer payment and by stated purpose; and (c) for each transfer payment identified in (b), what mechanisms exist for the federal government to ensure that the recipient allocates funding towards its stated purpose?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 75--
Mr. Scot Davidson:
With regard to construction, infrastructure, or renovation projects on properties or land owned, operated or used by Public Services and Procurement Canada: (a) how many projects have a projected completion date which has been delayed or pushed back since March 1, 2020; and (b) what are the details of each delayed project, including the (i) location, including street address, if applicable, (ii) project description, (iii) start date, (iv) original projected completion date, (v) revised projected completion date, (vi) reason for the delay, (vii) original budget, (viii) revised budget, if the delay resulted in a change?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 76--
Mr. Scot Davidson:
With regard to the ongoing construction work on what used to be the lawn in front of Centre Block: (a) what specific work was completed between July 1, 2020, and September 28, 2020; and (b) what is the projected schedule of work to be completed in each month between October 2020 and October 2021, broken down by month?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 77--
Mr. Gary Vidal:
With regard to infrastructure projects approved for funding by Infrastructure Canada since November 4, 2015, in Desnethe-Missinippi-Churchill River: what are the details of all such projects, including the (i) location, (ii) project title and description, (iii) amount of federal funding commitment, (iv) amount of federal funding delivered to date, (v) amount of provincial funding commitment, (vi) amount of local funding commitment, including the name of the municipality or of the local government, (vii) status of the project, (viii) start sate, (ix) completion date or expected completion date, broken down by fiscal year?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 79--
Mr. Doug Shipley:
With regard to ministers and exempt staff members flying on government aircraft, including helicopters, since January 1, 2019: what are the details of all such flights, including (i) date, (ii) origin, (iii) destination, (iv) type of aircraft, (v) which ministers and exempt staff members were on board?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 80--
Ms. Marilyn Gladu:
With regard to the Connect to Innovate program of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada as well as all CRTC programs that fund broadband Internet: how much was spent in Ontario and Quebec since 2016, broken down by riding?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 81--
Mr. Joël Godin:
With regard to the procurement of personal protective equipment (PPE) by the government from firms based in the province of Quebec: (a) what are the details of all contracts awarded to Quebec-based firms to provide PPE, including the (i) vendor, (ii) location, (iii) description of goods, including the volume, (iv) amount, (v) date the contract was signed, (vi) delivery date for goods, (vii) whether the contract was sole-sourced; and (b) what are the details of all applications or proposals received by the government from companies based in Quebec to provide PPE, but that were not accepted or entered into by the government, including the (i) vendor, (ii) summary of the proposal, (iii) reason why the proposal was not accepted?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 82--
Mr. John Nater:
With regard to the government’s Canada’s Connectivity Strategy published in 2019: (a) how many Canadians gained access to broadband speeds of at least 50 megabits per second (Mbps) for downloads and 10 Mbps for uploads under the strategy; (b) what is the detailed breakdown of (a), including the number of Canadians who have gained access, broken down by geographic region, municipality and date; and (c) for each instance in (b), did any federal program provide the funding, and if so, which program, and how much federal funding was provided?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 83--
Mr. Mario Beaulieu:
With regard to permanent residents who went through the Canadian citizenship process and citizenship ceremonies held between 2009 and 2019, broken down by province: (a) how many permanent residents demonstrated their language proficiency in (i) French, (ii) English; (b) how many permanent residents demonstrated an adequate knowledge of Canada and of the responsibilities and privileges of citizenship in (i) French, (ii) English; and (c) how many citizenship ceremonies took place in (i) French, (ii) English?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 84--
Mr. Damien C. Kurek:
With regard to Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) pension recipients who receive Regular Force Pension Plan: (a) how many current pension recipients married after the age of 60; (b) of the recipients in (a), how many had the option to apply for an Optional Survivor Benefit (OSB) for their spouse in exchange for a lower pension level; (c) how many recipients actually applied for an OSB for their spouse; (d) what is the current number of CAF pension recipients who are currently receiving a lower pension as a result of marrying after the age of 60 and applying for an OSB; and (e) what is the rationale for not providing full spousal benefits, without a reduced pension level, to CAF members who marry after the age of 60 as opposed to prior to the age of 60?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 86--
Mr. Dane Lloyd:
With regard to access to remote government networks for government employees working from home during the pandemic, broken down by department, agency, Crown corporation or other government entity: (a) how many employees have been advised that they have (i) full unlimited network access throughout the workday, (ii) limited network access, such as off-peak hours only or instructions to download files in the evening, (iii) no network access; (b) what was the remote network capacity in terms of the number of users that may be connected at any one time as of (i) March 1, 2020, (ii) July 1, 2020; and (c) what is the current remote network capacity in terms of the number of users that may be connected at any one time?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 89--
Mr. Bob Saroya:
With regard to the operation of Canadian visa offices located outside of Canada during the pandemic, since March 13, 2020: (a) which offices (i) have remained fully operational and open, (ii) have temporarily closed but have since reopened, (iii) remain closed; (b) of the offices which have since reopened, on what date (i) did they close, (ii) did they reopen; (c) for each of the offices that remain closed, what is the scheduled or projected reopening date; and (d) which offices have reduced the services available since March 13, 2020, and what specific services have been reduced or are no-longer offered?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 90--
Mr. Don Davies:
With regard to testing for SARS-CoV-2: (a) for each month since March, 2020, (i) what SARS-CoV-2 testing devices were approved, including the name, manufacturer, device type, whether the testing device is intended for laboratory or point-of-care use, and the date authorized, (ii) what was the length in days between the submission for authorization and the final authorization for each device; (b) for each month since March, how many Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2 have been (i) procured, (ii) deployed across Canada; (c) for what testing devices has the Minister of Health issued an authorization for importation and sale under the authority of the interim order respecting the importation and sale of medical devices for use in relation to COVID-19; (d) for each testing device so authorized, which ones, as outlined in section 4(3) of the interim order, provided the minister with information demonstrating that the sale of the COVID-19 medical device was authorized by a foreign regulatory authority; and (e) of the antigen point-of-care testing devices currently being reviewed by Health Canada, which are intended for direct purchase or use by a consumer at home?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 91--
Mr. Eric Melillo:
With regard to the government’s commitment to end all long-term drinking water advisories by March 2021: (a) does the government still commit to ending all long-term drinking water advisories by March 2021, and if not, what is the new target date; (b) which communities are currently subject to a long-term drinking water advisory; (c) of the communities in (b), which ones are expected to still have a drinking water advisory as of March 1, 2021; (d) for each community in (b), when are they expected to have safe drinking water; and (e) for each community in (b), what are the specific reasons why the construction or other measures to restore safe drinking water to the community have been delayed or not completed to date?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 92--
Mr. Eric Melillo:
With regard to Nutrition North Canada: (a) what specific criteria or formula is used to determine the level of subsidy rates provided to each community; (b) what is the specific criteria for determining when the (i) high, (ii) medium, (iii) low subsidy levels apply; (c) what were the subsidy rates, broken down by each eligible community, as of (i) January 1, 2016, (ii) September 29, 2020; and (d) for each instance where a community’s subsidy rate was changed between January 1, 2016, and September 29, 2020, what was the rationale and formula used to determine the revised rate?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 93--
Ms. Raquel Dancho:
With regard to the impact of the pandemic on processing times for temporary residence applications: (a) what was the average processing time for temporary residence applications on September 1, 2019, broken down by type of application and by country the applicant is applying from; and (b) what is the current average processing time for temporary residence applications, broken down by type of application and by country the application is made from?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 94--
Ms. Raquel Dancho:
With regard to the backlog of family sponsorship applications and processing times: (a) what is the current backlog of family sponsorship applications, broken down by type of relative (spouse, dependent child, parent, etc.) and country; (b) what was the backlog of family sponsorship applications, broken down by type of relative, as of September 1, 2019; (c) what is the current estimated processing time for family sponsorship applications, broken down by type of relative, and by country, if available; (d) how many family sponsorship applications have been received for relatives living in the United States since April 1, 2020; and (e) to date, what is the status of the applications in (d), including how many were (i) granted, (ii) denied, (iii) still awaiting a decision?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 95--
Mr. John Brassard:
With regard to government expenditures on hotels and other accommodations used to provide or enforce any orders under the Quarantine Act, since January 1, 2020: (a) what is the total amount of expenditures; and (b) what are the details of each contract or expenditure, including the (i) vendor, (ii) name of hotel or facility, (iii) amount, (iv) location, (v) number or rooms rented, (vi) start and end date of rental, (vii) description of the type of individuals using the facility (returning air travelers, high risk government employees, etc.), (viii) start and end date of the contract?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 96--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to the firearms regulations and prohibitions published in the Canada Gazette on May 1, 2020: (a) did the government conduct any formal analysis on the impact of the prohibitions; and (b) what are the details of any analysis conducted, including (i) who conducted the analysis, (ii) findings, (iii) date findings were provided to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 97--
Mr. Arnold Viersen:
With regard to flights on government aircraft for personal and non-governmental business by the Prime Minister and his family, and by ministers and their families, since January 1, 2016: (a) what are the details of all such flights, including the (i) date, (ii) origin, (iii) destination, (iv) names of passengers, excluding security detail; and (b) for each flight, what was the total amount reimbursed to the government by each passenger?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question no 1 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les Airbus A310-300 de la flotte de l’Aviation royale canadienne désignés CC-150 Polaris: a) combien de vols les avions de la flotte ont-ils effectués depuis le 1er janvier 2020; b) pour chacun des vols depuis le 1er janvier 2020, quels étaient le point de départ et la destination, y compris le nom de la ville et le code ou indicatif de l’aéroport; c) pour chacun des vols énumérés en b), quel était l’indicatif d’aéronef de l’avion utilisé; d) pour chacun des vols énumérés en b), quels sont les noms de tous les passagers transportés à bord; e) parmi tous les vols énumérés en b), lesquels ont transporté le premier ministre; f) parmi tous les vols énumérés en e), quelle est la distance totale parcourue en kilomètres; g) pour les vols en b), combien d’argent ont-ils coûté au gouvernement au total; h) pour les vols en e), combien d’argent ont-ils coûté au gouvernement au total?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 3 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les engagements pris pour préparer les bureaux gouvernementaux à rouvrir en toute sécurité après la pandémie de COVID-19, depuis le 1er mars 2020: a) quel est le montant total des dépenses gouvernementales pour les panneaux de plexiglas installés dans les bureaux ou centres du gouvernement, ventilé par bon de commande et par ministère; b) quel est le montant total des dépenses gouvernementales pour les vitres de protection contre la toux et les éternuements installées dans les bureaux ou centres du gouvernement, ventilé par bon de commande et par ministère; c) quel est le montant total des dépenses publiques consacrées aux cloisons de protection destinées aux bureaux ou centres du gouvernement, ventilé par bon de commande et par ministère; d) quel est le montant total des dépenses publiques consacrées aux vitrages sur mesure (pour la protection de la santé) destinés aux bureaux ou centres du gouvernement, ventilé par bon de commande et par ministère?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 4 --
M. Tom Kmiec:
En ce qui concerne les demandes d’accès à l’information présentées à toutes les institutions du gouvernement selon la Loi sur l’accès à l’information depuis le 1er octobre 2019; a) combien de demandes d’accès à l’information ont-elles été présentées à chacune des institutions gouvernementales, ventilé par ordre alphabétique et par mois; b) parmi les demandes indiquées en a), combien les institutions en ont-elles achevé et à combien ont-elles répondu, ventilé par institution gouvernementale et par ordre alphabétique, dans le délai de 30 jours civils prévu par la loi; c) parmi les demandes indiquées en a), pour combien d’entre elles le ministère a-t-il demandé une prolongation de moins de 91 jours afin d’y répondre, ventilé par institution gouvernementale; d) parmi les demandes indiquées en a), pour combien d’entre elles le ministère a-t-il demandé une prolongation de plus de 91 jours, mais moins de 151 jours afin d’y répondre, ventilé par institution gouvernementale; e) parmi les demandes indiquées en a), pour combien d’entre elles le ministère a-t-il demandé une prolongation de plus de 151 jours, mais moins de 251 jours afin d’y répondre, ventilé par institution gouvernementale; f) parmi les demandes indiquées en a), pour combien d’entre elles le ministère a-t-il demandé une prolongation de plus de 251 jours, mais moins de 365 jours afin d’y répondre, ventilé par institution gouvernementale; g) parmi les demandes indiquées en a), pour combien d’entre elles le ministère a-t-il demandé une prolongation de plus de 366 jours afin d’y répondre, ventilé par institution gouvernementale; h) pour chaque institution gouvernementale, classée en ordre alphabétique, combien d’employés équivalents temps plein font-ils partie des services ou directions générales de l’accès à l’information et à la protection des renseignements personnels; i) pour chaque institution gouvernementale, ventilée par ordre alphabétique, combien de personnes sont-elles inscrites sur le décret de délégation de pouvoirs en vertu de la Loi sur l’accès à l’information et de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 6 --
M. Marty Morantz:
En ce qui concerne les prêts accordés dans le cadre du Compte d’urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes: a) combien de prêts au total a-t-on accordés dans le cadre de ce programme; b) quelle est la ventilation des prêts en a) par (i) secteur, (ii) province, (iii) taille des entreprises; c) quel est le montant total des prêts accordés dans le cadre du programme; d) quelle est la ventilation des prêts en c) par (i) secteur, (ii) province, (iii) taille des entreprises?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 7 --
M. Marty Morantz:
En ce qui concerne l’Arrêté d’urgence concernant les drogues, les instruments médicaux et les aliments à des fins diététiques spéciales dans le cadre de la COVID-19: a) combien de demandes visant l’importation ou la vente de produits ont été reçues par le gouvernement relativement à l’arrêté; b) quelle est la ventilation du nombre de demandes par produit ou par type de produit; c) quelle est la norme ou quel est l’objectif du gouvernement en ce qui concerne le délai entre le moment où une demande est reçue et le moment où un permis est délivré; d) quel est le temps moyen entre le moment où une demande est reçue et le moment où un permis est délivré; e) quelle est la ventilation en d) par type de produit?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 8 --
Mme Rosemarie Falk:
En ce qui concerne le réaménagement des lieux de travail du gouvernement pour répondre aux besoins des employés qui retournent au travail: a) quel est le montant final des dépenses engagées par chaque ministère pour préparer les lieux de travail dans les immeubles du gouvernement; b) quelles ressources chaque ministère a-t-il modifiées pour répondre aux besoins des employés qui retournent au travail; c) quels sont les montants supplémentaires octroyés à chaque ministère pour les services d’entretien; d) les employés travaillent-ils dans des zones d’éloignement physique; e) ventilé par ministère, quel est le pourcentage d’employés qui seront autorisés à travailler directement à leur bureau ou dans des locaux du gouvernement; f) le gouvernement offrira-t-il une prime de risque aux employés qui doivent travailler dans les locaux du gouvernement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 9 --
Mme Cathay Wagantall:
En ce qui concerne l’application des avis de sécurité, aussi appelés indicateurs de menace à la sécurité (sécurité du personnel) aux utilisateurs du Réseau de prestation des services aux clients (RPSC) d’Anciens Combattants Canada (ACC), du 4 novembre 2015 à aujourd’hui: a) combien y avait-il d’indicateurs de menace à la sécurité au début de la période visée; b) combien de nouveaux indicateurs de menace à la sécurité ont été ajoutés au cours de la période visée; c) combien d’indicateurs de menace à la sécurité ont été supprimés au cours de la période visée; d) combien de clients d’ACC sont actuellement visés par un indicateur de menace à la sécurité; e) sur les indicateurs de menace à la sécurité ajoutés depuis le 4 novembre 2015, combien d’utilisateurs du RPSC d’ACC ont été informés qu’un indicateur de menace à la sécurité a été associé à leur dossier et, de ce nombre, combien d’utilisateurs du RPSC d’ACC ont été informés des raisons pour lesquelles un indicateur de menace à la sécurité a été associé à leur dossier; f) quelles directives sont en place à ACC quant aux motifs valables pour associer un indicateur de menace à la sécurité au dossier d’un utilisateur du RPSC; g) quelles directives sont en place à ACC quant aux services qui peuvent être refusés à un utilisateur du RPSC dont le dossier fait l’objet d’un indicateur de menace à la sécurité; h) combien d’anciens combattants ont fait l’objet d’un (i) refus, (ii) report, pour des services ou de l'aide financière d’ACC parce qu’un indicateur de menace à la sécurité avait été associé à leur dossier au cours de la période visée?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 10 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne les programmes et services gouvernementaux temporairement suspendus, reportés ou interrompus durant la pandémie de COVID-19: a) quelle est la liste complète des programmes et services touchés, ventilés par ministère ou organisme; b) comment chaque programme ou service mentionné en a) a-t-il été touché; c) quelles sont les dates de début et de fin de chacun de ces changements?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 11 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne le recrutement et l’embauche chez Affaires mondiales Canada (AMC) au cours des 10 dernières années: a) quel est le nombre total de personnes qui ont (i) présenté leur candidature pour des postes de détachement d’AMC par l’entremise de CANADEM, (ii) été retenues comme candidats, (iii) été recrutées; b) combien de personnes qui s’identifient en tant que membre d’une minorité visible ont (i) présenté leur candidature pour des postes de détachement d’AMC par l’entremise de CANADEM, (ii) été retenues comme candidats, (iii) été recrutées; c) combien de candidats ont été recrutés par AMC; d) combien de candidats qui s’identifient en tant que membre d’une minorité visible ont été recrutés par AMC?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 12 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne les projections du gouvernement relativement aux répercussions de la COVID-19 sur la viabilité des petites et moyennes entreprises: a) selon le gouvernement, combien de petites et moyennes entreprises feront faillite ou cesseront leurs activités de façon permanente d’ici la fin de l’année (i) 2020, (ii) 2021; b) à quel pourcentage des petites et moyennes entreprises correspondent les nombres énumérés en a); c) quelle est la ventilation de a) et b) par industrie, secteur et province?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 13 --
M. Tim Uppal:
En ce qui concerne les contrats du gouvernement pour des services et des travaux de construction d’une valeur entre 39 000,00 $ et 39 999,99 $, signés depuis le 1er janvier 2016, ventilés par ministère, agence, société d’État ou autres entités gouvernementales: a) quelle est la valeur totale de tous ces contrats; b) quels sont les détails de tous ces contrats, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la date, (iv) la description des contrats de services ou de travaux de construction, (v) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 14 --
M. Tim Uppal:
En ce qui concerne les contrats du gouvernement pour des services d’architecture, de génie et d’autres services requis pour la planification, la conception, la préparation ou la supervision de la construction, de la réparation, de la rénovation ou de la restauration d’une œuvre évaluée entre 98 000,00 $ et 99 999,99 $, qui ont été signés depuis le 1er janvier 2016, et ventilés par ministère, agence, société d’État ou autre entité gouvernementale: a) quelle est la valeur totale de ces contrats; b) quels sont les détails de tous ces contrats, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la date, (iv) une description des services ou des travaux de construction exécutés, (v) le numéro de dossier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 18 --
M. Kelly McCauley:
En ce qui concerne les employés de la fonction publique, entre le 15 mars 2020 et le 21 septembre 2020, ventilés par ministère et par semaine: a) combien de fonctionnaires ont travaillé à partir de leur domicile; b) quelle somme a été versée aux employés pour les heures supplémentaires; c) combien de journées de vacances ont été utilisées; d) combien de journées de vacances ont été utilisées pendant la même période en 2019?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 20 --
M. Alex Ruff:
En ce qui concerne le décret DORS/2020-96 publié le 1er mai 2020, qui interdit de nombreuses armes à feu qui étaient auparavant sans restriction ou à autorisation restreinte, et le Cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu: a) quelle est la définition technique officielle d’« arme à feu de style arme d’assaut » employée par le gouvernement; b) quand le gouvernement a-t-il mis au point cette définition et dans quelle publication gouvernementale l’a-t-on utilisée pour la première fois; c) qui sont les membres actuels du Cabinet qui ont réussi le Cours canadien de sécurité dans le maniement des armes à feu?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 21 --
M. Alex Ruff:
En ce qui concerne le non-remboursement de prêts étudiants en souffrance pendant les exercices 2018 et 2019, ventilé par année: a) combien d’étudiants ont été en défaut de paiement; b) de combien d’années les prêts datent-ils en moyenne; c) combien de prêts sont en souffrance parce que l’étudiant emprunteur a quitté le pays; d) quel est le revenu moyen déclaré sur le formulaire T4 des étudiants emprunteurs en défaut de paiement pendant les exercices 2018 et 2019; e) quelle somme a servi à payer les frais de service ou les commissions des agences de recouvrement engagées; f) quelle somme les agences de recouvrement ont-elles permis de recouvrer?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 22 --
M. Alex Ruff:
En ce qui concerne les bénéficiaires de la Prestation canadienne d’urgence: combien de personnes la reçoivent, ventilé par tranches d'imposition fédérales, selon leur revenu de 2019?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 23 --
M. Pat Kelly:
En ce qui concerne l’adaptation de l’environnement de travail à domicile pour les fonctionnaires depuis le 13 mars 2020: a) quel est le montant total dépensé en meubles, équipement, y compris l’équipement informatique, et services, ainsi que le remboursement de l’Internet résidentiel; b) des achats faits en a), quelle est la ventilation par ministère par (i) date d’achat, (ii) code d’objet, (iii) type de meubles, équipement ou services, (iv) coût final des meubles, équipement ou services; d) quels sont les coûts de la livraison des éléments en a); d) des abonnements ont-ils été achetés pendant cette période et, dans l’affirmative (i) quels sont les abonnements, (ii) quels ont été les coûts associés à ces abonnements?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 24 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne les réponses aux questions inscrites au Feuilleton plus tôt cette année durant la première session de la 43e législature, le ministre de la Défense nationale a déclaré « [qu'en raison de la pandémie de COVID-19], le ministère de la Défense nationale n’est pas en mesure, à l’heure actuelle, de préparer et de valider une réponse complète »: quelle est la réponse complète du ministre à toutes les questions inscrites au Feuilleton pour lesquelles cette réponse a été fournie, ventilée par question?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 25 --
Mme Tamara Jansen:
En ce qui concerne le transfert des virus Ebola et Henipah du Laboratoire national de microbiologie (LNM) à des personnes, laboratoires et institutions en Chine: a) quelles sont les personnes en Chine qui ont demandé le transfert; b) à part l’Institut de virologie de Wuhan (IVW), quels laboratoires en Chine ont demandé le transfert; c) pour les réponses en a) et b), lesquelles de ces personnes ou institutions sont affiliées avec l’appareil militaire chinois; d) à quelle date le LNM a-t-il reçu la demande de transfert de l’IVW; e) quels projets de recherche scientifique, ou quelles autres raisons scientifiques, les chercheurs de l’IVW ou du LNM ont-ils invoqués pour justifier le transfert des virus Ebola et Henipah; f) de quels matériaux le transfert a-t-il été autorisé au moyen de l’autorisation de transfert NML-TA-18-0480, daté du 29 octobre 2018; g) le LNM a-t-il reçu le paiement de 75 $ pour le transfert, conformément à sa facture commerciale du 27 mars 2019, et à quelle date l’a-t-il reçu; h) quelle contrepartie a été reçue de la Chine en échange de ces matériaux, ventilée par montant ou détails de la contrepartie reçue par chacun des organismes; i) le gouvernement a-t-il demandé à la Chine de détruire ou de retourner les virus et dans la négative, pourquoi pas; j) le Canada a-t-il assujetti le transfert à l’interdiction, pour l’IVW, de transférer les virus à d’autres entités ou personnes à l’intérieur ou à l’extérieur de la Chine, sans le consentement du Canada; k) quelle diligence raisonnable le LNM a-t-il exercée pour s’assurer que l’IVW et les autres institutions mentionnées en b) n’utiliseraient pas les virus transférés à des fins de recherche militaire ou à d’autres fins militaires; l) à quelles inspections ou vérifications le LNM a-t-il soumis l’IVW et les autres institutions mentionnées en b) pour s’assurer qu’ils pouvaient manipuler les virus transférés de manière sécuritaire et sans qu’ils soient détournés à des fins de recherche militaire ou à d’autres fins; m) quels ont été les résultats sommaires des inspections ou vérifications mentionnées en l); n) après le transfert, quels suivis le Canada a-t-il effectués auprès des institutions mentionnées en b) pour s’assurer que les seules recherches effectuées sur les virus transférés sont celles mentionnées au moment de la demande de transfert; o) quelles mesures de protection de la propriété intellectuelle le Canada a-t-il mises en place avant d’envoyer les virus transférés aux personnes et aux institutions mentionnées en a) et b); p) quels pourcentages les souches du virus Ebola envoyées à l’IVW représentent-elles de la collection totale d’Ebola du LNM et de la collection d’Ebola dont le partage est autorisé; q) à part l’étude intitulée « Equine-Origin Immunoglobulin Fragments Protect Nonhuman Primates from Ebola Virus Disease », quelles autres études publiées ou inédites les chercheurs du LNM ont-ils réalisées en collaboration avec des chercheurs scientifiques affiliés à l’appareil militaire chinois; r) quelles autres études les chercheurs du LNM mènent-ils à l’heure actuelle avec des chercheurs scientifiques affiliés à l’IVW, à l’Académie des sciences médicales militaires de Chine ou à d’autres entités de l’appareil militaire chinois; s) pour quelle raison Anders Leung, du LNM, a-t-il tenté d’expédier les virus transférés dans un emballage incorrect (de type PI650) et n’a-t-il utilisé plutôt l’emballage prescrit (de type PI620) qu’après avoir été questionné par les Chinois le 20 février 2019; t) le LNM a-t-il effectué une vérification à la suite de l’erreur consistant à transférer les virus dans un emballage non sécuritaire, et quelles en ont été les conclusions sommaires; u) pour quelle raison Allan Lau et Heidi Wood du LNM ont-ils écrit, le 28 mars 2019, qu’ils espéraient vraiment que les virus transférés passent par Vancouver et non Toronto à bord d’Air Canada, et « Fingers crossed! » (Croisons-nous les doigts!) pour cet itinéraire particulier; v) quel est l’itinéraire aérien complet du transfert, y compris les compagnies aériennes et aéroports de transit; w) est-ce que toutes les compagnies aériennes et tous les aéroports de transit de l’itinéraire aérien ont été avisés par le LNM qu’ils auraient sous leur garde des souches des virus Ebola et Henipah; x) en ce qui a trait au courriel de Marie Gharib du LNM daté du 27 mars 2019, à part les virus Ebola et Henipah, quels autres pathogènes l’IVW a-t-il demandés; y) depuis la demande de transfert, à part les virus Ebola et Henipah, quels autres pathogènes le LNM a-t-il transférés ou voulu transférer à l’IVW; z) le LNM a-t-il informé, avant le transfert, les services de sécurité du Canada, que ce soit la GRC, le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ou quelque autre entité du même type, et dans la négative, pourquoi pas; aa) pour quelle raison l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada a-t-elle caviardé le nom du destinataire du transfert dans les documents communiqués à la CBC aux termes de la Loi sur l’accès à l’information, alors qu’elle a bien voulu communiquer ce renseignement à la CBC par la suite; bb) le Canada a-t-il une politique interdisant l’exportation de pathogènes des groupes de risque 3 et 4 vers des pays, comme la Chine, qui mènent des expériences de gain de fonction, et quelle est, en résumé, cette politique; cc) si le Canada n’a pas de politique comme celle mentionnée au point bb), pourquoi pas; dd) pour quelle raison le LNM ou des employés individuels ont-ils demandé et obtenu des permis ou autorisations en vertu de la Loi sur les agents pathogènes humains et les toxines, de la Loi sur le transport des marchandises dangereuses, de la Loi sur les licences d’exportation et d’importation ou de lois connexes avant le transfert; (ee) quels contrôles juridiques empêchent le LNM ou d’autres laboratoires gouvernementaux d’envoyer des pathogènes des groupes 3 ou 4 à des laboratoires associés à des appareils militaires ou laboratoires étrangers qui mènent des expériences de gain de fonction; ff) en ce qui a trait au courriel du 14 septembre 2018 de Matthew Gilmour, dans lequel il écrit que l’IVW n’a fourni aucune certification, mais a simplement indiqué qu’il détenait les certifications nécessaires, pourquoi le LNM a-t-il procédé au transfert des virus Ebola Henipah sans avoir obtenu les preuves de certification des capacités de manipulation sécuritaire; gg) en ce qui a trait au courriel du 14 septembre 2018 de Matthew Gilmour, dans lequel il demande si l’IVW possède des matériaux qui nous seraient utiles, tels que des souches de fièvre hémorragique virale ou d’influenza hautement pathogène, le LNM a-t-il demandé ces matériaux, ou d’autres, en échange du transfert, et les a-t-il reçus?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 26 --
Mme Tamara Jansen:
En ce qui concerne l’enquête administrative et l’enquête de la GRC portant sur le Laboratoire national de microbiologie (LNM), Xiangguo Qiu et Keding Cheng: a) pour ce qui est de la décision qu’ont prise le LNM et la GRC de retirer Mme Qiu et M. Cheng des installations du LNM le 5 juillet 2019, quelle est la cause du retard ayant empêché les enquêtes du LNM et de la GRC de se conclure; b) selon la déclaration de l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada dont la CBC a parlé le 14 juin 2020, « l’enquête administrative sur Mme Qiu et M. Cheng ne se rapporte pas à l’envoi d’échantillons de virus en Chine », pour quel motif ces deux chercheurs font-ils alors l’objet d’enquêtes; c) les enquêtes sur Mme Qiu et M. Cheng découlent-elles de renseignements fournis au Canada par les forces de l’ordre ou les services du renseignements d’autres pays et, si oui, que disaient ces renseignements, en gros; d) en plus de Mme Qiu et de M. Cheng, sur quelles autres personnes portent les enquêtes; e) Mme Qiu et M. Cheng sont-ils toujours au Canada; f) Mme Qiu et M. Cheng coopèrent-ils avec les forces de l’ordre pendant les enquêtes; g) Mme Qiu et M. Cheng sont-ils en congé payé, en congé non payé ou ont-ils été licenciés du LNM; h) quels sont les liens entre les enquêtes dont font l’objet Mme Qiu et M. Cheng et l’enquête des National Institutes of Health des États-Unis à l’issue de laquelle 54 chercheurs ont perdu leur emploi, principalement pour avoir reçu du financement étranger de la Chine (revue Science, 12 juin 2020); i) le gouvernement détient-il des renseignements selon lesquels Mme Qiu et M. Cheng auraient sollicité ou obtenu des fonds d’une institution chinoise, et que disent ces renseignements, en gros; j) quand les enquêtes devraient-elles se terminer et les conclusions de ces enquêtes seront-elles rendues publiques?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 27 --
Mme Heather McPherson:
En ce qui concerne l’engagement du Canada à l’égard du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030: a) quel est le rôle ou le mandat de chacun des ministères, organismes gouvernementaux, sociétés d’État et de tout autres programmes dans la mise en œuvre du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030; b) qu’est-ce que l’ensemble du gouvernement s’est engagé à accomplir, et dans quel délai; c) quels projets visent actuellement à atteindre ces objectifs; d) le gouvernement entretient-il des rapports avec des gouvernements infranationaux, des groupes ou des organismes dans le but d’atteindre ces objectifs; e) si la réponse à d) est affirmative, avec quels gouvernements, groupes ou organismes collabore-t-il; f) si la réponse à d) est négative, pourquoi n’en entretient-il pas; g) quel montant le gouvernement a-t-il affecté au financement d’initiatives au cours de chaque exercice financier depuis 2010-2011, ventilé par programme et sous-programme; h) chaque année, quel montant des fonds consentis à chacun des programmes et des sous-programmes a été inutilisé; i) dans chaque cas, pour quelle raison les fonds n’ont-ils pas été utilisés; j) des fonds additionnels ont-ils été alloués à cette initiative; k) au cours de chaque exercice financier depuis 2010-2011, quels organismes, gouvernements, groupes et entreprises ont reçu un financement lié à la mise en œuvre par le Canada du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030; l) quels montants les organismes, les gouvernements, les groupes et les entreprises visés à l’alinéa k) (i) ont-ils demandé, (ii) reçu, y compris si les fonds ont été reçus sous la forme de subventions, de contributions, de prêts ou de toute autre dépense?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 28 --
Mme Heather McPherson:
En ce qui concerne la campagne du gouvernement pour obtenir un siège au Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies: a) combien de fonds ont-ils été affectés, dépensés et inutilisés pour cette campagne pour chaque exercice depuis 2014-2015; b) ventilés par mois depuis novembre 2015, quels appels téléphoniques et réunions les responsables du gouvernement ont-ils eus au niveau exécutif dans le but d’obtenir un siège au Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 29 --
Mme Heather McPherson:
En ce qui concerne la réponse du gouvernement à l’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées, ventilé par mois depuis juin 2019: a) quelles réunions et conversations téléphoniques les hauts fonctionnaires ont-ils tenues pour concevoir le plan d’action en réponse au rapport final de l’Enquête nationale; b) quels intervenants externes ont été consultés?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 30 --
Mme Heather McPherson:
En ce qui concerne les activités de l’Agence du revenu du Canada, les ententes garantissant le non-renvoi au secteur des enquêtes criminelles et les dossiers renvoyés au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada, entre 2011-2012 et 2019-2020, ventilé par exercice: a) combien de vérifications ayant donné lieu à une nouvelle cotisation ont été effectuées; b) des ententes conclues en a), quel est le montant total recouvré; c) des ententes conclues en a), combien de dossiers ont donné lieu à des pénalités pour faute lourde; d) des ententes conclues en c), quel est le montant total des pénalités imposées; e) des ententes conclues en a), combien visaient des comptes bancaires détenus à l’extérieur du Canada; f) combien de dossiers ayant fait l’objet d’une vérification et ayant donné lieu à une nouvelle cotisation ont été renvoyés au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 31 --
M. Michael Kram:
En ce qui concerne le projet de transport Wataynikaneyap: a) est-ce la politique du gouvernement de préférer des entreprises étrangères aux entreprises canadiennes pour ce projet ou d’autres projets similaires; b) quelles entreprises fourniront les transformateurs dans le cadre du projet; c) les transformateurs de cote supérieure à 60 MVA fournis pour le projet sont-ils assujettis aux droits de douane d’au moins 35 % applicables, et, le cas échéant, ces droits de douane ont-ils été bel et bien perçus; d) ventilé par transformateur, quel a été le prix facturé au projet des transformateurs de cote (i) supérieure à 60 MVA, (ii) inférieure à 60 MVA?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 32 --
M. Philip Lawrence:
En ce qui concerne l’approche de l’Agence du revenu du Canada en matière de déductions pour les frais de bureau à domicile, compte tenu des lignes directrices qui préconisent de rester à la maison durant la pandémie de la COVID-19: les personnes ayant dû utiliser des parties de leur domicile qui ne sont pas habituellement consacrées au travail, telles que la salle à manger ou le salon, comme bureau temporaire pendant la pandémie ont-elles droit aux déductions et, le cas échéant, comment ces personnes doivent-elles calculer les portions de leur hypothèque, de leur loyer ou de leurs autres dépenses qui sont déductibles?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 34 --
M. Kerry Diotte:
En ce qui concerne le statut des fonctionnaires depuis le 1er mars 2020: a) combien d’employés ont été mis en congé sous le code « Autre congé payé » (code 699 du Conseil du Trésor) à un moment ou à un autre depuis le 1er mars 2020; b) combien d’employés ont été mis en congé sous tout autre type de congé, à l’exclusion des vacances et des congés de maternité ou de paternité, à tout moment depuis le 1er mars 2020, ventilés par type de congé et par code du Conseil du Trésor; c) des employés en a), combien sont encore en congé; d) des employés en b), combien sont encore en congé, ventilés par type de congé?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 36 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne l’Agence canadienne d’inspection des aliments, depuis 2005: combien d’usines de transformation de la viande et de la volaille se sont vu retirer leur permis, ventilé par année et par province?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 37 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne les cas, depuis le 1er janvier 2016, où des membres des Forces armées canadiennes (FAC) à la retraite ont subi des conséquences financières parce que la date officielle de leur libération avait été fixée un jour de fin de semaine ou un jour férié, par opposition à un simple jour ouvrable, et ventilés par année: a) combien de fois un administrateur des libérations a-t-il recommandé à un membres des FAC que sa date de libération soit fixée un jour de fin de semaine ou un jour férié; b) dans combien de cas la libération des membres des FAC s’est-elle produite un jour férié; c) pour combien de membres des FAC des versements ou des protections de (i) la Financière SISIP, (ii) d’une autre entité ont-ils été annulés ou réduits parce que la date officielle de libération tombait un jour de fin de semaine ou un jour férié; d) les administrateurs des libérations ont-ils déjà donné des instructions, des directives ou des conseils aux membres des FAC pour leur demander de prévoir leur date de libération un jour de fin de semaine ou un jour férié afin de conserver des avantages sociaux et, le cas échéant, quelles en sont les détails; e) les administrateurs des libérations ont-ils déjà reçu des instructions, des directives ou des conseils leur demandant de prévoir certaines dates de libération un jour de fin de semaine ou un jour férié et, le cas échéant, quelles en sont les détails; f) quelles mesures, le cas échéant, le ministre de la Défense nationale a-t-il prises pour rétablir les versements ou les avantages sociaux perdus en raison du jour auquel a été fixée la date de libération des membres des FAC?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 38 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne les subventions, les contributions, les prêts non remboursables ou tout autre financement semblable que le gouvernement fédéral a accordé aux entreprises de télécommunications depuis 2009: quelles sont les modalités de ces financements, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le destinataire, (iii) le type de financement, (iv) le ministère accordant le financement, (v) le nom du programme dans le cadre duquel le financement a été accordé, (vi) la description du projet, (vii) la date de début et la date de fin du projet, (viii) l’emplacement du projet, (ix) le montant du financement fédéral?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 39 --
Mme Cheryl Gallant:
En ce qui concerne le personnel des Forces armées canadiennes déployé dans les établissements de soins de longue durée pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19: a) quel équipement de protection individuelle (EPI) a été fourni aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes déployés dans des établissements de soins de longue durée en Ontario et au Québec; b) pour chaque type d’EPI énuméré en a), quel était (i) le modèle, (ii) la date de l’achat, (iii) le numéro du bon de commande, (iv) la quantité commandée, (v) la quantité livrée, (vi) le nom du fournisseur, (vii) la date d’expiration du produit, (viii) l’endroit où le matériel a été entreposé?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 40 --
Mme Jenny Kwan:
En ce qui concerne la Stratégie nationale sur le logement, ventilé par nom du demandeur, type de demandeur (sans but lucratif, à but lucratif, coopérative), volet (p. ex., nouvelle construction, revitalisation), date de la demande, province, nombre d’unités, et montant en argent pour chaque demande traitée: a) combien de demandes ont été reçues à l’égard du Fonds national de co-investissement pour le logement (FNCL) depuis 2018; b) combien de demandes présentées au titre du FNCL sont accompagnées d’une lettre d’intention, outre celles accompagnées d’un contrat de prêt ou d’un accord de financement; c) combien de demandes présentées au titre du FNCL en sont à l’étape du contrat de prêt; d) combien de demandes présentées au titre du FNCL ont fait l’objet d’un accord de financement; e) pour combien de demandes présentées au titre du FNCL des fonds ont-ils été versés au demandeur; f) dans le cas des demandes présentées au titre du FNCL ayant fait l’objet d’un accord de financement, quel est le (i) délai en jours entre la demande initiale et la conclusion de l’accord de financement, (ii) loyer moyen et médian du projet, (iii) pourcentage d’unités respectant le critère de l’abordabilité, (iv) loyer moyen et médian des unités respectant le critère de l’abordabilité; g) combien de demandes ont été reçues à l’égard de l’Initiative Financement de la construction de logements locatifs (IFCLL) depuis 2017; h) combien de demandes présentées au titre de l’IFCLL en sont (i) à l’étape de l’approbation et de la lettre d’intention, (ii) à l’étape du contrat de prêt et du financement, (iii) à l’étape du traitement; h) pour combien de demandes présentées au titre de l’IFCLL le demandeur a-t-il reçu un prêt de l’IFCLL; i) dans le cas des demandes présentées au titre de l’IFCLL ayant fait l’objet d’un contrat de prêt, quel est le (i) délai en jours entre la demande initiale et la conclusion de l’accord de financement, (ii) loyer moyen et médian du projet, (iii) pourcentage d’unités respectant le critère de l’abordabilité de l’IFCLL, (iv) loyer moyen et médian des unités respectant le critère de l’abordabilité?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 41 --
Mme Jenny Kwan:
En ce qui a trait à la Stratégie nationale sur le logement: a) quelles provinces et quels territoires ont conclu une entente avec le gouvernement fédéral concernant l’Allocation canadienne pour le logement; b) ventilé par le nombre d’années passées sur une liste d’attente pour obtenir un logement, le sexe, la province, l’année où la demande a été soumise, le montant demandé et le montant versé, (i) combien de demandes ont été soumises, (ii) combien de demandes sont en cours d’évaluation, (iii) combien de demandes ont été approuvées, (iv) combien de demandes ont été rejetées; c) si l’Allocation canadienne pour le logement est transférée aux provinces sous la forme de montants forfaitaires, quel est le montant des transferts aux provinces, ventilé par montant, année et province?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 42 --
Mme Jenny Kwan:
En ce qui concerne le traitement des demandes reçues par le ministère de l’Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté: a) combien de demandes ont été reçues depuis 2016, ventilé par année et par catégorie (demandes de parrainage d’un conjoint présentées à l’extérieur du Canada, gardiens d’enfants en milieu familial, permis de travail ouvert, réfugiés parrainés par le secteur privé, etc.); b) combien de demandes ont été entièrement approuvées depuis 2015, ventilé par année et par catégorie; c) combien de demandes ont été reçues depuis (i) le 15 mars 2020, (ii) le 21 septembre 2020; d) combien de demandes ont été approuvées depuis (i) le 15 mars 2020, (ii) le 21 septembre 2020; e) combien de demandes sont demeurées en attente depuis janvier 2020, ventilé par mois et par catégorie; f) combien d’agents des visas ou d’employés d’Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada (IRCC) ont consacré la totalité ou une partie de leur temps (combien d’équivalents temps plein cela représente-t-il, par exemple) au traitement des demandes depuis le 1er janvier 2020, ventilé par mois, par bureau d’immigration et par catégorie de demande; g) depuis le 15 mars 2020, combien d’employés visés en f) ont été placés en congé payé, ventilé par mois, par bureau d’immigration et par type d’affectation (catégories de demandes); h) quels sont les détails de toutes notes d’information diffusées ou de la correspondance envoyée et reçue depuis janvier 2020 au sujet (i) des niveaux de dotation, (ii) de fermeture de bureaux d’IRCC, (iii) du niveau d’activité des salles de courrier d’IRCC, (iv) des plans de reprise des activités?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 43 --
Mme Jenny Kwan:
En ce qui concerne les demandeurs d’asile: a) ventilé par année, combien de personnes ont été refusées en raison de l’Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs depuis (i) 2016, (ii) le 1er janvier 2020, ventilé par mois, (iii) depuis le 22 juillet 2020; b) combien de demandes d’asile ont été jugées irrecevables en vertu de l’alinéa 101(1)c.1) de la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés depuis (i) le 1er janvier 2020, ventilé par mois, (ii) le 22 juillet 2020; c) quels sont les détails de toutes notes d’information ou correspondances depuis le 1er janvier 2020, au sujet de l’Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 44 --
M. Kenny Chiu:
En ce qui concerne la participation du gouvernement aux négociations avec Vertex Pharmaceuticals en vue de conclure une entente avec l’Alliance pancanadienne pharmaceutique sur la liste des prix des médicaments pour le traitement de la fibrose kystique: a) quel est l’état actuel des négociations; b) quelles mesures particulières, le cas échéant, ont été prises par le gouvernement pour veiller à ce que les médicaments Kalydeco et Orkambi soient mis à la disposition de tous les Canadiens qui en ont besoin; c) le gouvernement a-t-il pris des mesures particulières pour mettre le Trikafta à la disposition des Canadiens; d) dans combien de mois ou d’années le gouvernement terminera-t-il le processus?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 45 --
M. Kenny Chiu:
En ce qui concerne la position du gouvernement sur les gens qui viennent au Canada dans l’unique but de donner naissance en sol canadien et, par la suite, obtenir la citoyenneté canadienne pour leur enfant: a) quelle est la position du gouvernement concernant cette pratique; b) le gouvernement a-t-il condamné cette pratique ou a-t-il pris des mesures pour l’empêcher et, dans l’affirmative, quels sont les détails; c) le gouvernement a-t-il pris des mesures pour interdire ou décourager les entreprises canadiennes de solliciter ou de faire de la publicité faisant la promotion de ce type d’activités et, dans l’affirmative, quels sont les détails?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 47 --
M. Alex Ruff:
En ce qui concerne la réponse du gouvernement à la question Q-268 portant sur l’omission du gouvernement de faire passer le statut de risque du Canada à l’égard de l’encéphalopathie spongiforme bovine (ESB) de « risque maîtrisé à l’égard de l’ESB » à « risque négligeable à l’égard de l’ESB » auprès de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé animale (OIE) à l’été 2019: a) pour quelle raison le gouvernement a-t-il raté le délai de l’été 2019 fixé par l’OIE; b) le gouvernement a-t-il consulté les éleveurs de bovins pour discuter des dommages dont a souffert l’industrie en raison du délai non respecté et, dans l’affirmative, quels sont les détails de ces consultations; c) quand le gouvernement a-t-il commencé à colliger des données auprès des gouvernements provinciaux, de partenaires et des intervenants de l’industrie afin de s’assurer de pouvoir produire et soumettre un mémoire de qualité en juillet 2020; d) quelles mesures le gouvernement a-t-il adoptées pour s’assurer de ne pas rater le délai de juillet 2020 et tout autre délai subséquent; e) à quelle date précise le gouvernement a-t-il remis son mémoire à l’OIE en juillet 2020?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 49 --
M. Brad Vis:
En ce qui concerne l’Incitatif à l’achat d’une première propriété (lAPP) annoncé par le gouvernement en 2019, entre le 1er février 2020 et le 1er septembre 2020: a) combien de personnes ont demandé un prêt hypothécaire par le truchement de l’IAPP, ventilé par province et par municipalité; b) de ces personnes, combien ont vu leur demande approuvée et ont accepté le prêt hypothécaire par le truchement de l’IAPP, ventilé par province et par municipalité; c) des personnes énumérées en b), combien ayant vu leur demande approuvée ont reçu l’incitatif sous forme de prêt hypothécaire avec participation à la mise de fonds; d) quelle est la valeur totale des incitatifs (prêts hypothécaires avec participation à la mise de fonds) versés par le truchement de l'IAPP, en dollars; e) pour les personnes ayant obtenu un prêt hypothécaire par le truchement de l’IAPP, quelle est la valeur de chaque prêt hypothécaire; f) pour les personnes ayant obtenu un prêt hypothécaire par le truchement de l’IAPP, quelle est la valeur moyenne du prêt hypothécaire; g) quelle est la somme totale des prêts octroyés aux acheteurs d’une propriété par le truchement de l’IAPP à ce jour; h) pour les prêts hypothécaires approuvés par le truchement de l’IAPP, quelle est la répartition du pourcentage de prêts provenant de chaque prêteur englobant plus de cinq pour cent des prêts totaux consentis; i) pour les prêts hypothécaires approuvés par le truchement de l’IAPP, quelle est la ventilation de la valeur des prêts non remboursés assurés par chaque compagnie d’assurance d’hypothèques du Canada en proportion des prêts totaux en vigueur?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 50 --
M. Pierre Paul-Hus:
En ce qui concerne la qualité et la circulation de l’air dans les immeubles dont le gouvernement est le propriétaire ou l’exploitant: a) quelles mesures précises ont été mises en place pour améliorer la qualité ou la circulation de l’air dans les immeubles gouvernementaux depuis le 1er mars 2020, ventilées par immeuble; b) à quelle date chacune des mesures indiquées en a) est-elle entrée en vigueur; c) dans quels immeubles gouvernementaux a-t-on installé de nouveaux filtres à air, filtres de système CVCA ou tout autre équipement conçu pour assainir l’air ou améliorer la qualité ou la circulation de l’air depuis le 1er mars 2020; d) pour chaque immeuble désigné en c), quel nouvel équipement a été installé, et à quelle date a-t-il été installé; e) quels sont les détails concernant les dépenses ou les contrats liés à toute mesure prise ou à tout équipement installé, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la description des produits ou des services fournis, (iv) la date de signature du contrat, (v) la date de prestation des produits ou des services?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 51 --
Mme Marilyn Gladu:
Quel a été le montant du financement de FedDev, en dollars, versé chaque année depuis 2016 à chaque circonscription en Ontario, ventilé par circonscription?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 52 --
Mme Rachel Blaney:
En ce qui concerne Anciens Combattants Canada, ventilé par année pour les 10 exercices les plus récents pour lesquels des données existent: a) combien de demandes de prestations d’invalidité le ministère a-t-il reçues; b) parmi les demandes mentionnées en a), combien ont (i) été rejetées, (ii) été approuvées, (iii) fait l’objet d’un appel, (iv) été rejetées en appel, (v) été approuvées en appel; c) quel était le délai d’attente moyen pour une décision; d) quel était le délai d’attente médian pour une décision; e) quel était le nombre d’anciens combattants par rapport au nombre de gestionnaires de cas à la fin de chaque exercice; f) combien de demandes étaient toujours en attente d’une décision à la fin de l’exercice; g) combien d’anciens combattants étaient toujours en attente d’une décision à la fin de chaque exercice?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 53 --
Mme Rachel Blaney:
En ce qui concerne Anciens Combattants Canada (ACC): a) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, quel a été le nombre total d’heures supplémentaires travaillées, celui-ci étant à son tour ventilé par titre de poste, y compris ceux d’agent de l’Unité nationale des appels de premier palier, d’agent de l’Unité nationale des appels de deuxième palier, de gestionnaire de cas, d’agent des services aux vétérans et d’arbitre des prestations d’invalidité; b) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel des données sont disponibles, ventilé par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, quel a été le nombre moyen d’heures supplémentaires travaillées, celui-ci étant à son tour ventilé par (i) titre de poste, y compris ceux d’agent de l’Unité nationale des appels de premier palier, d’agent de l’Unité nationale des appels de deuxième palier, de gestionnaire de cas, d’agent des services aux vétérans et d’arbitre des prestations d’invalidité, (ii) direction; c) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, quel a été le coût total des heures supplémentaires, celui-ci étant à son tour ventilé par (i) titre de poste, y compris ceux d’agent de l’Unité nationale des appels de premier palier, d’agent de l’Unité nationale des appels de deuxième palier, de gestionnaire de cas, d’agent des services aux vétérans et d’arbitre des prestations d’invalidité, (ii) direction; d) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, quel a été le nombre total de demandes de prestations d’invalidité, celui-ci étant à son tour ventilé par (i) nouvelles demandes, (ii) demandes en attente de décision, (iii) demandes approuvées, (iv) demandes refusées, (v) demandes portées en appel; e) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, combien de nouvelles demandes de prestations d’invalidité ont été transférées à un bureau d’ACC différent de celui qui a effectué l’évaluation initiale; f) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, combien y avait-il (i) de gestionnaires de cas, (ii) d’agents des services aux vétérans; g) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale et en excluant les vacances annuelles et congés de maladie usuels, combien de gestionnaires de cas ont pris un congé, et quelle a été la durée moyenne des congés; h) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale et en tenant compte de tous les congés, sauf les vacances annuelles et congés de maladie usuels, combien de gestionnaires de cas étaient présents et au travail en équivalent temps plein, et quel était le ratio entre gestionnaire de cas et vétérans; i) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, combien de dossiers de vétéran ont été retirés du gestionnaire de cas responsable; j) au cours de l’exercice financier le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, quel a été le nombre maximal de cas attribués à un gestionnaire de cas; k) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, combien de vétérans étaient en attente d’un gestionnaire de cas; l) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois et par bureau d’ACC, y compris à l’échelle nationale, pour ce qui est du travail réalisé habituellement par les gestionnaires de cas et les agents des services aux vétérans à l’emploi régulier d’ACC, (i) combien de contrats ont été accordés, (ii) quelle a été la durée de chaque contrat, (iii) quelle a été la valeur de chaque contrat; m) au cours de l’exercice le plus récent pour lequel les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par bureau d’ACC, quels ont été les résultats concernant les normes de service; n) quel est le mécanisme de suivi du transfert des cas entre les gestionnaires de cas lorsque l’un d’eux prend congé, en excluant les vacances annuelles et congés de maladie usuels; o) quelle est la méthode employée par le ministère pour calculer le ratio entre gestionnaire de cas et vétérans; p) quelles sont les mesures d’assurance de la qualité que prend le ministère à l’égard des gestionnaires de cas, et quelles sont les adaptations prises lorsque le nombre de cas dont s’occupe un gestionnaire de cas change; q) durant les cinq derniers exercices pour lesquels les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois, combien de personnes ont-elles été embauchées par le ministère; r) combien parmi les personnes en q) ont conservé leur emploi à la fin de la période probatoire;
s) parmi les personnes en q) qui n’ont pas conservé leur emploi à la fin de la période probatoire, combien n’ont pas vu leur contrat prolongé par le ministère; t) le ministère fait-il le suivi des raisons pour lesquelles les employés ne conservent pas leur emploi à la fin de la période probatoire et, le cas échéant, tout en respectant la vie privée de ces anciens employés, quelles sont les raisons pour lesquelles ceux-ci n’ont pas conservé leur emploi; u) en ce qui concerne les personnes dont on parle en q) qui choisissent de quitter leur emploi à un moment ou à un autre durant la période de 12 mois, des entrevues de fin d’emploi ont-elles été menées et, le cas échéant, tout en respectant la vie privée de ces personnes, quelles ont été les raisons invoquées, celles-ci étant ventilées par bureau d’ACC; v) durant les cinq derniers exercices pour lesquels les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois, combien de vétérans des Forces armées canadiennes ont-ils été embauchés par le ministère; w) parmi les vétérans en v), combien d’entre eux ont conservé leur emploi au terme de la période probatoire de 12 mois; x) parmi les vétérans en v) qui ne travaillent plus pour le ministère, (i) combien n’ont pas vu leur contrat prolongé par le ministère, (ii) combien n’ont pas été retenus après la période probatoire; y) si le ministère fait le suivi des raisons pour lesquelles les employés ne conservent pas leur emploi à la fin de la période probatoire, tout en respectant la vie privée de ces anciens employés, quelles sont les raisons pour lesquelles ceux-ci ne conservent pas leur emploi à la fin de la période probatoire; z) parmi les vétérans en v) qui choisissent de quitter leur emploi à un moment ou à un autre durant la période de 12 mois, des entrevues de fin d’emploi ont-elles été menées et, le cas échéant, tout en respectant la vie privée de ces vétérans, quelles ont été les raisons invoquées, celles-ci étant ventilées par bureau d’ACC; aa) durant les cinq derniers exercices pour lesquels les données sont disponibles, celles-ci étant ventilées par mois, combien d’employés ont-ils quitté leur emploi à ACC; bb) en ce qui concerne les employés en aa) qui ont quitté leur emploi, des entrevues de fin d’emploi ont-elles été menées et, le cas échéant, tout en respectant la vie privée de ces anciens employés, quelles ont été les raisons invoquées, celles-ci étant ventilées par bureau d’ACC?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 54 --
M. Todd Doherty:
En ce qui concerne l’élection au Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies de 2020 et les coûts associés à la candidature du Canada à un siège au Conseil de sécurité: a) quel est le total final de tous les coûts associés à cette candidature; b) si le total final n’est pas encore connu, quel est le coût final prévu et quel est le total de toutes les dépenses effectuées à ce jour en rapport avec cette candidature; c) quelle est la ventilation de tous les coûts par type de dépense (cadeaux, voyages, accueil, etc.); d) quels sont les détails de tous les contrats de plus de 5 000 $ ayant un lien avec la candidature, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le montant, (iii) le fournisseur, (iv) le sommaire des biens ou services fournis, (v) l’endroit où les biens ou services ont été fournis?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 55 --
M. Chris d'Entremont:
En ce qui concerne les exemptions ou toutes désignations à titre de travailleur essentiel accordées aux ministres, au personnel exempté des ministres, y compris les employés du Cabinet du premier ministre, ou les hauts fonctionnaires de sorte qu’ils soient exemptés de se placer en quarantaine obligatoire pendant 14 jours après s’être rendus dans la bulle atlantique, depuis la mise en place des ordonnances de quarantaine: a) combien de personnes ont bénéficié d’une exemption; b) quels sont les noms et les titres des personnes exemptées; c) pour chaque cas, quelle est la raison ou le motif justifiant l’exemption; d) quels sont les détails de tous les cas où un ministre ou membre du personnel exempté a voyagé de l’extérieur des provinces atlantiques vers au moins une province atlantique depuis l’imposition de la quarantaine de 14 jours aux voyageurs, y compris (i) le nom et le titre du voyageur, (ii) la date du départ, (iii) la date d’arrivée, (iv) le lieu du départ, (v) le lieu d’arrivée, (vi) le moyen de transport, (vii) les endroits visités pendant le voyage, (viii) le fait que le ministre ou le membre du personnel a reçu ou non une exemption de se placer en quarantaine pendant 14 jours, (ix) le fait que le ministre ou le membre du personnel a accepté ou non de se placer en quarantaine pendant 14 jours, (x) le but du voyage?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 56 --
M. Chris d'Entremont:
En ce qui concerne les frais de déménagement et de réinstallation pour le personnel ministériel exonéré depuis le 1er janvier 2018, ventilés par cabinet ministériel: a) quel est le montant total des frais de déménagement et de réinstallation (i) des nouveaux membres du personnel ministériel, (ii) des membres du personnel ministériel qui partent ou qui sont mutés; b) combien de membres du personnel exonéré actuels ou anciens les dépenses totales en a) représentent-elles; c) combien de membres du personnel exonéré actuels ou anciens avaient plus de 10 000 $ en frais de déménagement et de réinstallation assumés par le gouvernement, et quel était le total de ces frais pour chacun d’eux?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 57 --
M. Chris d'Entremont:
En ce qui concerne les exemptions d’intérêt national délivrées par le ministre des Affaires étrangères, le ministre de la Citoyenneté et de l’Immigration ou le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile et liées à la mise en quarantaine obligatoire des personnes qui arrivent au Canada pendant la pandémie: a) combien de personnes ont bénéficié d’une exemption relative à l’intérêt national; b) quels sont les détails de chaque exemption, notamment (i) le nom de la personne dont la demande d’exemption a été acceptée, (ii) le ministre qui lui a accordé l’exemption, (iii) la date à laquelle l’exemption lui a été accordée, (iv) l’explication de la raison pour laquelle il était dans l’intérêt national du Canada de lui accorder l’exemption, (v) le pays à partir duquel la personne est venue au Canada?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 58 --
M. James Cumming:
En ce qui concerne les bornes de recharge pour véhicules électriques financées ou subventionnées par le gouvernement: a) combien de chargeurs ont été financés ou subventionnés depuis le 1er janvier 2016; b) quelle est la ventilation des données en a) par province et municipalité; c) quel est le montant total dépensé par le gouvernement sur chaque borne de recharge, ventilé par emplacement; d) à quelle date chacune des bornes a-t-elle été installée; e) quelles bornes de recharge sont actuellement ouvertes au public; f) quel est le coût actuel de l’électricité pour les utilisateurs des bornes de recharge publiques?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 59 --
M. Gord Johns:
En ce qui concerne la Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC (CCETP), depuis sa création: a) combien de plaintes et de demandes d’examen ont été déposées par des personnes s’identifiant comme membres des Premières Nations, métisses ou inuites, ventilées par pourcentage et nombre; b) parmi les plaintes et demandes d’examen en a), combien ont été rejetées sans avoir fait l’objet d’une enquête; c) combien de plaintes et de demandes d’examen ont été déposées pour des incidents qui se sont produits dans des réserves ou des communautés où vivent en majorité des Premières Nations, des Métis et des Inuits, ventilées par pourcentage et nombre; d) parmi les plaintes et demandes d’examen en c), combien ont été rejetées sans avoir fait l’objet d’une enquête; e) dans le cas des demandes d’examen pour lesquelles la CCETP se dit insatisfaite du rapport de la GRC, combien de rapports provisoires ont été remis aux plaignants pour qu’ils y répondent et donnent leur avis sur les mesures recommandées?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 60 --
M. Gord Johns:
En ce qui concerne le transport actif au Canada: quels sont les mesures ou les fonds que le gouvernement fédéral a engagés ou mis à la disposition des municipalités et des provinces, ventilés par année depuis 2010, et qui (i) appuient l’utilisation du réseau routier par les cyclistes et établissent les responsabilités des cyclistes et des autres véhicules en matière de sécurité routière, (ii) autorisent divers organismes à mettre à l’essai et à mettre en œuvre des solutions ciblées pour résoudre les problèmes opérationnels touchant les usagers du transport actif, (iii) améliorent la sécurité routière pour les piétons, les cyclistes et les autres usagers de la route vulnérables, (iv) rendent l’achat de vélos et d’équipement de cyclisme plus abordable en réduisant la taxe de vente applicable à ces produits?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 62 --
M. Michael Cooper:
En ce qui concerne la gestion des contrats d’experts-conseils signés par tout ministère, organisme, société d’État ou autre entité gouvernementale pendant la pandémie, depuis le 1er mars 2020: a) quelle est la valeur totale de tous ces contrats; b) quels sont les détails de chaque contrat, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le montant, (iii) la date de signature du contrat, (iv) la date de début et de fin de prestation des services de consultation, (v) la description du problème, du conseil, ou de l’objectif faisant l’objet du contrat, (vi) le numéro de dossier, (vii) le code objet du Conseil du Trésor utilisé pour classé le contrat (p. ex. 0491)?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 66 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne les renseignements recueillis par l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) au sujet des virements électroniques de 10 000 $ et plus et la déclaration de la ministre du Revenu national devant le Comité permanent des finances le 19 mai 2016 selon laquelle, à l’aide de ces renseignements, l’ARC ciblerait jusqu’à quatre pays par année, sans avertissement, ventilé par exercice depuis 2016-2017: a) combien de pays étrangers ont été ciblés; b) quel est le nom de chacun des pays étrangers ciblés; c) combien de vérifications l’ARC a-t-elle effectuées pour chacun des pays étrangers ciblés; d) combien des vérifications en c) ont donné lieu à un avis de cotisation; e) combien des dossiers en c) ont été renvoyés au Programme d’enquêtes criminelles de l’ARC; f) combien des enquêtes en e) ont donné lieu à un renvoi au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada; g) combien des poursuites en f) ont donné lieu à des condamnations; h) quelles ont été les pénalités imposées pour chacune des condamnations en g); i) quel est le montant total recouvré?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 67 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne les activités de l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) relativement à la disposition générale anti-évitement en vertu de l’article 245 de la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu et de l’article 274 de la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu, ventilées par article de la loi: a) combien de vérifications ont été effectuées depuis l’exercice 2011-2012, ventilées par exercice et par (i) particulier, (ii) fiducie, (iii) société; b) combien d’avis de cotisation ont été produits par l’ARC depuis l’exercice 2011-2012, ventilés par exercice et par (i) particulier, (ii) fiducie, (iii) société; c) quel est le montant total recouvré par l’ARC jusqu’à maintenant; d) combien de poursuites judiciaires sont en cours, ventilées par (i) Cour canadienne de l’impôt, (ii) Cour d’appel fédérale, (iii) Cour suprême du Canada; e) combien de procès l’ARC a-t-elle perdus, ventilés par (i) nom du contribuable, (ii) Cour canadienne de l’impôt, (iii) Cour d’appel fédérale, (iv) Cour suprême du Canada; f) quel est le montant total dépensé par l’ARC, ventilé par poursuite; g) combien de fois l’ARC a-t-elle choisi de ne pas exercer son droit d’appel, ventilées par poursuite, et pour quel motif dans chacun des cas?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 68 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne le comité interministériel de l’Agence du revenu du Canada (ARC) qui revoit les dossiers et formule des recommandations sur l’application de la règle générale anti-évitement, ventilé par exercice depuis 2010-2011: a) combien d’évaluations de l’application de la règle générale anti-évitement ayant été soumises à l’administration centrale de l’ARC ont été renvoyées au comité interministériel; b) parmi les évaluations en a) ayant été revues par le comité interministériel, pour combien d’évaluations le comité (i) a recommandé l’application de la règle générale anti-évitement, (ii) n’a pas recommandé l’application de la règle générale anti-évitement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 69 --
M. Taylor Bachrach:
En ce qui concerne le programme d'infrastructure Investir dans le Canada, depuis le 22 mars 2016: a) quelle est la liste complète des projets d’infrastructure ayant fait l’objet d’une évaluation dans l’Optique des changements climatiques, ventilée par volet; b) pour chacun des projets en a), quels sont les détails, y compris (i) le montant du financement fédéral, (ii) l’emplacement du projet, (iii) une brève description du projet, (iv) si le projet a fait l’objet d’une évaluation de la résilience aux changements climatiques, (v) si le projet a fait l’objet d’une évaluation de l’atténuation des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, (vi) si une évaluation de la résilience aux changements climatiques a été réalisée, un résumé des constatations liées à la gestion des risques, (vii) si une évaluation de l’atténuation des émissions de gaz à effet de serre a été réalisée, l’augmentation ou la réduction des émissions prévue selon l’évaluation?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 70 --
M. Gord Johns:
En ce qui concerne la motion adoptée pendant les travaux des subsides de la Chambre des communes le 6 novembre 2018 et portant sur les normes de service aux anciens combattants: a) quelle est la somme et quel est le pourcentage de toutes les dépenses inutilisées par le ministère des Anciens Combattants Canada (ACC), ventilés par année de 2013-2014 à l’exercice courant; b) quelles mesures le gouvernement a-t-il prises depuis pour automatiquement reporter toutes les dépenses annuelles inutilisées de ACC à l’exercice suivant; c) les dépenses reportées mentionnées à b) sont-elles utilisées uniquement pour améliorer les services aux anciens combattants du Canada, jusqu’à ce que le Ministère atteigne ou dépasse les 24 normes de service qu’il a lui-même déterminées?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 71 --
M. Matthew Green:
En ce qui concerne la motion sur l’équité fiscale adoptée par la Chambre le 8 mars 2017: quelles mesures ont été prises depuis par le gouvernement pour (i) plafonner l’échappatoire fiscale des options d’achat d’actions, (ii) resserrer les règles entourant les coquilles vides, (iii) renégocier les conventions fiscales qui permettent aux sociétés de rapatrier au Canada les profits des paradis fiscaux sans payer d’impôts, (iv) mettre fin aux ententes de pardon sans pénalité pour les individus soupçonnés d’évasion fiscale?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 72 --
Mme Raquel Dancho:
En ce qui concerne les programmes d’aide gouvernementaux à l’intention des particuliers pendant la pandémie de COVID-19: a) quel est le montant total déboursé au titre de (i) la Prestation canadienne d’urgence (PCU), (ii) la Subvention salariale d’urgence du Canada (SSUC), (iii) la Prestation canadienne d’urgence pour les étudiants (PCUE), (iv) la Bourse canadienne pour le bénévolat étudiant (BCBE); b) quelle est la ventilation hebdomadaire cumulative des montants en a), à compter du 13 mars 2020, ventilés également par (i) province ou territoire, (ii) sexe, (iii) groupe d’âge; c) quel est le nombre cumulatif des demandes, ventilées par semaine, depuis le 13 mars 2020, au titre de (i) la PCU, (ii) la SSUC, (iii) la PCUE, (iv) la BCBE; d) quel est le nombre cumulatif de demandes acceptées, ventilées par semaine, depuis le 13 mars 2020, au titre de (i) la PCU, (ii) la SSUC, (iii) la PCUE, (iv) la BCBE?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 73 --
Mme Raquel Dancho:
En ce qui concerne les programmes d’aide gouvernementaux à l’intention des organismes et des entreprises pendant la pandémie de COVID-19: a) quel est le montant total déboursé au titre (i) de l’Aide d’urgence du Canada pour le loyer commercial (AUCLC), (ii) du Crédit d’urgence pour les grands employeurs (CUGE), (iii) du Compte d’urgence pour les entreprises canadiennes (CUEA), (iv) du Fonds d’aide et de relance régionale (FARR), (v) du Programme d’aide à la recherche industrielle (PARI); b) quelle est la ventilation hebdomadaire cumulative des montants en a), à compter du 13 mars 2020; c) quel est le nombre cumulatif des demandes, ventilées par semaine, depuis le 13 mars 2020, au titre (i) de l’AUCLC, (ii) du CUGE, (iii) du CUEA, (iv) du FARR, (v) du PARI; d) quel est le nombre cumulatif des demandes acceptées, ventilées par semaine, depuis le 13 mars 2020, au titre (i) de l’AUCLC, (ii) du CUGE, (iii) du CUEA, (iv) du FARR, (v) du PARI?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 74 --
M. Peter Julian:
En ce qui concerne les transferts fédéraux aux provinces et aux territoires depuis le 1er mars 2020, exception faite du Transfert canadien en matière de santé, du Transfert social canadien, de la péréquation et de la formule de financement des territoires: a) quel montant a été affecté aux transferts provinciaux et territoriaux, ventilé par province et territoire; b) quel montant a effectivement été transféré à chaque province et territoire depuis le 1er mars 2020, ventilé par paiement de transfert et par fin convenue; c) pour chacun des paiements de transfert évoqués en b), par quels mécanismes le gouvernement fédéral veille-t-il à ce que le bénéficiaire affecte les fonds à la fin convenue?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 75 --
M. Scot Davidson:
En ce qui concerne les projets de construction, d’infrastructure ou de rénovation sur les propriétés ou les terres qui appartiennent, sont exploitées ou sont utilisées par Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada: a) combien de projets ont-ils vu leur échéance reportée ou retardée depuis le 1er mars 2020; et b) quels sont les détails de chaque projet retardé, y compris (i) le lieu, dont l’adresse municipale, le cas échéant, (ii) la description du projet, (iii) la date de début des travaux, (iv) la date de fin des travaux prévue initialement, (v) la date de fin des travaux révisée, (vi) la raison du retard, (vii) le budget de départ, (viii) le budget révisé, dans l’éventualité où le retard a amené un changement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 76 --
M. Scot Davidson:
En ce qui concerne les travaux de construction en cours sur l’ancienne pelouse située à l’avant de l’édifice du Centre: a) quels travaux précis ont été terminés du 1er juillet au 28 septembre 2020; b) quelle est la liste des travaux qui, selon le calendrier prévu, devraient se terminer d’octobre 2020 à octobre 2021, ventilés par mois?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 77 --
M. Gary Vidal:
En ce qui concerne les projets d’infrastructure dont le financement a été approuvé par Infrastructure Canada depuis le 4 novembre 2015 dans la circonscription de Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill: quels sont les détails de chacun de ces projets, y compris (i) le lieu, (ii) le titre et la description du projet, (iii) le montant de l’engagement financier du gouvernement fédéral, (iv) le montant du financement fédéral versé à ce jour, (v) le montant de l’engagement financier du gouvernement provincial, (vi) le montant de l’engagement financier de l’administration locale, y compris le nom de la municipalité ou de l’administration locale, (vii) le statut du projet, (viii) la date de début, (ix) la date d’achèvement ou la date d’achèvement prévue, ventilé par exercice financier?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 79 --
M. Doug Shipley:
En ce qui concerne les ministres et les membres du personnel exempté voyageant à bord d’aéronefs du gouvernement, y compris des hélicoptères, depuis le 1er janvier 2019: quels sont les détails pour chaque vol, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le lieu de départ, (iii) la destination, (iv) le type d’appareil utilisé, (v) les noms des ministres et des membres du personnel exempté à bord de l’appareil?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 80 --
Mme Marilyn Gladu:
En ce qui concerne le programme Brancher pour innover d’Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada, ainsi que tous les programmes du CRTC qui financent les services d’accès Internet à large bande: quelles sommes ont été dépensées en Ontario et au Québec depuis 2016, ventilées par circonscription?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 81 --
M. Joël Godin:
En ce qui concerne l’approvisionnement du gouvernement en équipement de protection individuelle (EPI) auprès d’entreprises basées au Québec: a) quels sont les détails de tous les contrats conclus avec des entreprises basées au Québec en vue de fournir de l’EPI, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) l’emplacement, (iii) la description des biens, y compris leur volume, (iv) le montant, (v) la date de signature des contrats, (vi) la date de livraison des biens, (vii) si le contrat était ou pas à fournisseur unique; b) quels sont les détails de toutes les demandes ou propositions envoyées au gouvernement par des entreprises québécoises en vue de fournir de l’EPI, mais qui n’ont pas été acceptées ou qui n’ont pas abouti à des contrats avec le gouvernement, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le résumé de la proposition, (iii) la raison pour laquelle la proposition n’a pas été acceptée?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 82 --
M. John Nater:
En ce qui concerne la Stratégie canadienne pour la connectivité publiée en 2019: a) combien de Canadiens ont maintenant accès, grâce à la stratégie, à un service à large bande d’un débit d'au moins 50 mégabits par seconde (Mbps) pour les téléchargements, et de 10 Mbps pour les téléchargements en amont; b) quelle est la ventilation détaillée du nombre donné en a), y compris le nombre de Canadiens connectés, ventilé par région géographique, municipalité et date; c) pour chaque cas donné en b), du financement fédéral a-t-il été fourni, et le cas échéant, dans le cadre de quel programme et quelle a été la somme versée?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 83 --
M. Mario Beaulieu:
En ce qui concerne les résidents permanents qui ont suivi le processus d’obtention de la citoyenneté canadienne et les cérémonies de citoyenneté tenues entre 2009 et 2019, ventilé par province: a) quel est le nombre de résidents permanents qui ont fait la démonstration de leurs compétences linguistiques en (i) français, (ii) anglais; b) quel est le nombre de résidents permanents qui ont démontré une connaissance suffisante du Canada et des responsabilités et avantages conférés par la citoyenneté en (i) français, (ii) anglais; c) combien de cérémonies de citoyenneté ont eu lieu en (i) français, (ii) anglais?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 84 --
M. Damien C. Kurek:
En ce qui concerne les bénéficiaires d’une pension des Forces armées canadiennes (FAC) au titre du Régime de pension de la Force régulière: a) combien de bénéficiaires actuels d’une pension se sont mariés après 60 ans; b) parmi les bénéficiaires en a), combien se sont fait proposer de présenter une demande de prestation facultative au survivant (PFS) en échange d’un niveau de pension moins élevé; c) combien de bénéficiaires ont véritablement présenté une demande de PFS pour leur conjoint; d) quel est le nombre actuel de bénéficiaires d’une pension des FAC qui reçoivent une pension à un niveau moins élevé parce qu’ils se sont mariés après 60 ans et ont demandé la PFS; e) pourquoi ne pas offrir des prestations de conjoint complètes sans réduire le niveau de pension aux membres des FAC qui se marient après 60 ans, comme c’est le cas pour ceux qui se marient avant 60 ans?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 86 --
M. Dane Lloyd:
En ce qui concerne l’accès aux réseaux gouvernementaux à distance pour les employés du gouvernement travaillant à domicile durant la pandémie, ventilés par ministère, organisme, société d’État ou autre entité gouvernementale: a) combien d’employés ont été informés qu’ils disposent (i) d’un accès complet et illimité au réseau tout au long de leur journée de travail, (ii) d’un accès limité au réseau, par exemple seulement en dehors des heures de pointe, ou qui ont reçus comme instructions de télécharger les fichiers en soirée, (iii) d’aucun accès au réseau; b) quelle est la capacité des réseaux à distance quant au nombre d’utilisateurs pouvant être connectés en tout temps (i) au 1er mars 2020, (ii) au 1er juillet 2020; c) quelle est la capacité actuelle des réseaux à distance quant au nombre d’utilisateurs pouvant être connectés en tout temps?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 89 --
M. Bob Saroya:
En ce qui concerne les activités des bureaux des visas canadiens situés à l’extérieur du Canada pendant la pandémie, depuis le 13 mars 2020: a) parmi ces bureaux, lesquels (i) sont restés ouverts et entièrement opérationnels, (ii) ont fermé temporairement, mais ont depuis rouvert, (iii) demeurent fermés; b) pour chacun des bureaux qui ont depuis rouvert, à quelle date (i) ont-ils fermé, (ii) ont-ils rouvert; c) pour chacun des bureaux qui demeurent fermés, à quelle date devraient-ils rouvrir; d) quels bureaux ont réduit leurs services offerts depuis le 13 mars 2020 et quels services précis ont été réduits ou ne sont plus offerts?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 90 --
M. Don Davies:
En ce qui concerne le dépistage du SRAS-CoV-2: a) pour chaque mois depuis mars 2020, (i) quels instruments de dépistage du SRAS-CoV-2 ont été approuvés, y compris leur nom, leur fabricant, leur type, étaient-ils destinés à un usage en laboratoire ou hors laboratoire, et à quelle date ont-ils été autorisés, (ii) combien de jours se sont écoulés entre la demande d’autorisation et l’autorisation définitive de chaque instrument; b) pour chaque mois depuis mars, combien d’instruments Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2 ont été (i) achetés, (ii) déployés partout au Canada; c) pour quels instruments de dépistage la ministre de la Santé a-t-elle émis une autorisation en vue de leur importation et de leur vente en vertu de l’Arrêté d’urgence concernant l’importation et la vente d’instruments médicaux destinés à être utilisés à l’égard de la COVID-19; d) pour chaque instrument de dépistage autorisé, lesquels, comme il est stipulé au paragraphe 4(3) de l’Arrêté d’urgence, ont fourni à la ministre des renseignements permettant de démontrer que la vente de l’instrument médical destiné à être utilisé à l’égard de la COVID-19 avait été autorisée par une autorité de réglementation étrangère; e) parmi les instruments de dépistage des antigènes hors laboratoire qui font actuellement l’objet d’un examen par Santé Canada, lesquels sont destinés à être achetés ou utilisés directement par un consommateur chez lui?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 91 --
M. Eric Melillo:
En ce qui concerne l’engagement du gouvernement à lever tous les avis à long terme sur la qualité de l’eau potable d’ici mars 2021: a) le gouvernement a-t-il toujours l’intention de lever tous les avis à long terme sur la qualité de l’eau potable d’ici mars 2021, et, sinon, quelle est la nouvelle date butoir; b) quelles collectivités sont-elles actuellement sous le coup d’un avis à long terme sur la qualité de l’eau potable; c) parmi les collectivités énumérées en b), lesquelles devraient encore faire l’objet d’un avis sur la qualité de l’eau potable en date du 1er mars 2021; d) pour les collectivités énumérées en b), quand peuvent-elles s’attendre à avoir de l’eau potable salubre; e) pour chacune des collectivités énumérées en b), pour quelles raisons en particulier a-t-on retardé ou n’a-t-on pas encore terminé la construction ou l’instauration d’autres mesures pour leur redonner de l’eau potable salubre?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 92 --
M. Eric Melillo:
En ce qui concerne le programme Nutrition Nord Canada: a) quels sont la formule ou les critères précis utilisés pour déterminer le niveau des taux de contribution accordé à chaque collectivité; b) quels sont les critères précis utilisés pour déterminer les cas où les niveaux de contribution (i) élevé, (ii) moyen, (iii) faible s’appliquent; c) quels étaient les taux de contribution, ventilés par collectivité admissible, en date du (i) 1er janvier 2016, (ii) 29 septembre 2020; d) dans chaque cas où le taux de contribution d’une collectivité a été modifié entre le 1er janvier 2016 et le 29 septembre 2020, quelles étaient la justification et la formule retenues pour déterminer le nouveau taux?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 93 --
Mme Raquel Dancho:
En ce qui concerne les répercussions de la pandémie sur le temps de traitement des demandes de résidence temporaire: a) quel était le temps de traitement moyen des demandes de résidence temporaire le 1er septembre 2019, ventilé par type de demande et par pays d’où provient la demande; b) quel est actuellement le temps de traitement moyen des demandes de résidence temporaire, ventilé par type de demande et par pays d’où provient la demande?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 94 --
Mme Raquel Dancho:
En ce qui concerne l’arriéré de demandes de parrainage familial et les délais de traitement: a) à quel nombre s’élève, à l’heure actuelle, l’arriéré de demandes de parrainage familial, ventilé par type de membre de la parenté (conjoint, enfant à charge, père ou mère, etc.) et par pays; b) à quel nombre s’élevait l’arriéré de demandes de parrainage familial, ventilé par type de membre de la parenté, au 1er septembre 2019; c) à l’heure actuelle, quel est le délai de traitement estimatif des demandes de parrainage familial, ventilées par type de membre de la parenté et par pays, si ce renseignement est connu; d) combien de demandes de parrainage familial ont été reçues depuis le 1er avril 2020 pour des membres de la parenté vivant aux États-Unis; e) jusqu’à présent, quel est l’état des demandes en d), à savoir, combien d’entre elles (i) ont été acceptées, (ii) ont été rejetées, (iii) sont en attente de décision?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 95 --
M. John Brassard:
En ce qui concerne les dépenses du gouvernement en hôtels et en autres hébergements engagées dans le but de prendre ou d’appliquer des arrêtés en vertu de la Loi sur la mise en quarantaine, depuis le 1er janvier 2020: a) quelle est la valeur totale de ces dépenses; b) quelles sont les détails de chacun de ces contrats ou de ces dépenses, y compris (i) le fournisseur, (ii) le nom de l’hôtel ou des installations, (iii) les frais engagés, (iv) l’endroit, (v) le nombre de chambres louées, (vi) les dates de début et de fin de location, (vii) la description des catégories de personnes utilisant les installations (passagers aériens revenant au Canada, fonctionnaires exposés à des risques élevés, etc.), (viii) les dates de début et de fin du contrat?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 96 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne les règles et les interdictions visant les armes à feu publiées dans la Gazette du Canada le 1er mai 2020: a) le gouvernement a-t-il mené une analyse structurée de l’incidence des interdictions; b) quels sont les détails de toute analyse réalisée, y compris (i) l’auteur de l’analyse, (ii) les conclusions, (iii) la date à laquelle les conclusions ont été présentées au ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)

Question no 97 --
M. Arnold Viersen:
En ce qui concerne les vols à bord d’aéronefs du gouvernement effectués à des fins personnelles et autres que gouvernementales par le premier ministre et sa famille, et par les ministres et leur famille, depuis le 1er janvier 2016: a) quels sont les détails de chacun de ces vols, y compris (i) la date, (ii) le point de départ, (iii) la destination, (iv) le nom des passagers, à l’exclusion du personnel de sécurité; b) pour chaque vol, quel était le montant total que chacun des passagers a remboursé au gouvernement?
Response
(Le document est déposé.)
2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development8555-432-1 CC-150 Polaris8555-432-10 Government programs and services8555-432-11 Recruitment and hiring at Gl ...8555-432-12 Small and medium-sized businesses8555-432-13 Government contracts for ser ...8555-432-14 Government contracts for arc ...8555-432-18 Public service employees8555-432-20 Non-restricted and restricte ...8555-432-21 Defaulted student loans8555-432-22 Canada Emergency Response Benefit ...Show all topics
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Jean-Yves Duclos Profile
2020-02-26 15:35 [p.1615]
Mr. Speaker, on behalf of 87 departments and agencies, I have the honour and pleasure to present, in both official languages, the departmental results for 2018-19.
Monsieur le Président, j'ai l'honneur et le plaisir de déposer, dans les deux langues officielles et au nom de 87 ministères et agences, les résultats ministériels de 2018-2019.
8563-431-1 Performance Report of Adminis ...8563-431-10 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-11 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-12 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-13 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-14 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-15 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-16 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-17 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-18 Performance Report of Canadi ...8563-431-19 Performance Report of Canadi ... ...Show all topics
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Anita Vandenbeld Profile
2020-02-07 12:35 [p.1099]
Mr. Speaker, I am very grateful today to have the opportunity to debate Bill C-3, which would create an independent oversight body, the public review and complaints commission, to review CBSA officers' conduct and conditions and handle specific complaints. This body would be a welcome addition to the strong accountability and oversight bodies already in place.
As I have seen, the bill has broad support in the House. I welcome the previous speaker's support and also that of the hon. member for Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner. He said:
Public servants across the country must be held to the standards expected of Canadians, which is to uphold the integrity of people who are visiting or passing through our country, while ensuring our laws and international laws are upheld.
He went on to add, “This bill will align well with the values of many Canadians” and the values of his party's team.
I also welcome the comments from the member for Rivière-du-Nord, who expressed his gratitude for the bill being introduced. Likewise, the member for St. John's East provided supportive words, noting that his party would certainly be supporting the bill at second reading.
This multipartisan support is very encouraging, and I thank all members for helping to ensure the bill is as strong as it can be moving forward.
One thing that all members of the House agree on is the quality of the work that our border service officers do at the CBSA. The CBSA processes millions of travellers and shipments every year at multiple points across Canada and abroad.
Let us just look at some of the numbers. I know they have been mentioned in the chamber already in this debate, but it warrants repeating: 97 million travellers, 27 million cars, 34 million air passengers, 21 million commercial releases. Every day at 13 international airports, 117 land border crossings, 27 rail sites and beyond, CBSA officers provide consistent and fair treatment to travellers and traders.
This is particularly important because, as we know, travelling can be very stressful. For those who are more vulnerable, for asylum seekers, for those who do not speak either of our official languages, for those with disabilities, for those on the autism spectrum and for travellers who are travelling for the first time, it can be intimidating and even frightening to cross a border point.
As the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness has said, the CBSA officers' professionalism when dealing with people crossing our borders is of the utmost importance. He has said that they are the most public of public servants, and they truly are the face of Canada.
For visitors, newcomers or Canadians returning home, our border officers are their first encounter. However, much more than that, they are responsible for upholding the integrity of Canada's borders. That means their work is integral to Canada's well-being. We are at a junction where border management and enforcement are truly front and centre for the government and for Canadians.
Nearly one year ago, the government introduced a federal budget, proposing investments of $1.25 billion for the CBSA. That funding includes support to modernize some of our land ports of entry and border operations, with the goals of ensuring efficiency and enhancing security. Members will recall that budget 2019 provided funds to close this important gap.
The idea has been to expand the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, or the CRCC, to act as an independent review body for the RCMP and the CBSA. That is why the government introduced Bill C-98 last year, which received all-party support at third reading. It is why we are now introducing Bill C-3, with more time for debate and discussion. This bill aligns well with our commitment to accountability and transparency.
Under the proposals, the PCRC would handle reviews and complaints for both CBSA and the RCMP. Whether the complaints are about the quality of services or the conduct of officers, the PCRC would have the ability to review, on its own initiative or at the request of the minister, any non-national security activity of the CBSA. The PCRC would be available and accessible to anyone who interacts with the CBSA or RCMP employees and who seeks recourse. That includes Canadian citizens, permanent residents and foreign nationals, including immigrant detainees. The commission would investigate and offer its conclusions as to whether procedures at the border are appropriate or not.
These proposals would bring the CBSA in line with the rest of our security agencies, including CSIS and the RCMP, which are currently subject to independent review.
These accountability functions for border agencies are common in our peer countries and this bill would help us join that group. All of us would like to ensure that the public can continue to expect the world-class treatment the CBSA provides.
The CBSA has worked to ensure it has the resources and infrastructure in place to support this new review board. It already holds its employees to a high standard of conduct, and I am confident it will continue to uphold that standard.
As I have mentioned, this is coming at a time of renewed focus at our border. The agency is operating in a complex and dynamic environment. It must be responsive to evolving threats, adaptive to global economic trends and innovative in its use of technology to manage increasing cross-border volumes. Let us remember that some of those threats and trends are some of the greatest challenges facing parliamentarians and Canadians today.
The opioid crisis continues to pose a serious threat to the safety of Canadians, for example, and the CBSA plays a key role in detecting opioids at the border through new tools and methods. We have also seen rising rates of gun and gang violence in recent years. Again, the CBSA is front and centre here, remaining vigilant in combatting the illegal smuggling of firearms. It is keeping pace with rising volumes in the supply chain, including the growing prevalence of e-commerce. It is central to our economy and to our country's overall prosperity and competitiveness. It is undertaking all of this hugely important work in an environment where its clients demand a high level of accountability and transparency.
The professional men and women at our borders would be well served by an independent review function for the CBSA. Canadians deserve it as well. That is why I encourage all members to join me in supporting Bill C-3 today.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très reconnaissante d'avoir aujourd'hui l'occasion de débattre du projet de loi C-3, qui créerait un organe de surveillance indépendant, la commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, laquelle serait chargée d'examiner la conduite et les conditions des agents de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ainsi que de traiter certaines plaintes. Cet organe serait un ajout bienvenu aux solides mécanismes de reddition de comptes et de surveillance déjà en place.
Je constate que le projet de loi jouit d'un vaste appui à la Chambre. Je suis heureuse que le député qui avait la parole avant moi l'appuie, tout comme le député de Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner. Ce dernier a dit:
Tous les fonctionnaires du pays devraient respecter les normes auxquelles les Canadiens s'attendent, c'est-à-dire préserver l'intégrité des gens qui visitent notre pays ou qui y font escale tout en veillant au maintien des lois canadiennes et internationales.
Il a ajouté: « Ce projet de loi cadre bien avec les valeurs de nombreux Canadiens et celles du Parti conservateur. »
J'accueille également avec enthousiasme les observations du député de Rivière-du-Nord, qui s'est dit reconnaissant que le gouvernement ait présenté ce projet de loi. Le député de St. John's-Est a également tenu des propos encourageants, précisant que son parti appuierait certainement le projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture.
Cet appui multipartite est très encourageant. Je remercie tous les députés de contribuer à faire en sorte que le projet de loi soit aussi solide que possible.
Une chose dont tous les députés conviendront, c'est que les agents de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada font un travail de qualité. L'Agence traite des millions de voyageurs et de colis chaque année à différents endroits au pays et à l'étranger.
Regardons les chiffres. Je sais qu'on les a déjà mentionnés dans le cadre de ce débat à la Chambre, mais il vaut la peine de les répéter: 97 millions de voyageurs, 27 millions de voitures, 34 millions de passagers aériens, 21 millions de dédouanements commerciaux. Chaque jour dans les 13 aéroports internationaux, les 117 postes frontaliers terrestres, les 27 postes frontaliers ferroviaires, et j'en passe, les agents des services frontaliers traitent les voyageurs et les commerçants de façon juste et uniforme.
C'est extrêmement important, parce que, comme nous le savons, voyager est déjà stressant en soi. Ceux qui sont plus vulnérables, les demandeurs d'asile, les personnes qui ne parlent aucune des langues officielles, ceux qui ont des troubles du spectre de l'autisme et ceux qui voyagent pour la première fois peuvent être intimidés ou même effrayés à l'idée de passer les douanes.
Comme l'a indiqué le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, il est d'une importance capitale que les agents de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada fassent preuve de professionnalisme lorsqu'ils interagissent avec les personnes qui traversent nos frontières. Il a affirmé qu'ils sont les fonctionnaires les plus visibles au pays et qu'ils représentent le visage même du Canada.
Les agents frontaliers sont les premières personnes que rencontrent les visiteurs, les nouveaux arrivants et les Canadiens qui rentrent au pays. Toutefois, leur rôle ne se limite pas à l'accueil, loin de là, puisqu'il leur incombe d'assurer l'intégrité des frontières canadiennes. Cela signifie que leur travail est essentiel au bien-être du Canada. Nous sommes à un moment où la gestion frontalière et la surveillance aux frontières sont une priorité pour le gouvernement et les Canadiens.
Il y a près d'un an, le gouvernement a présenté un budget fédéral proposant une enveloppe budgétaire de 1,25 milliard de dollars pour l'ASFC. Ce financement est destiné, entre autres, à la modernisation de certains de nos points d'entrée terrestres et d'une partie de nos activités frontalières dans le but d'en assurer l'efficacité et d'accroître la sécurité. Les députés se souviendront que le budget de 2019 prévoyait des fonds pour combler cette lacune importante.
L'objectif, c'est d'élargir le mandat de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes, ou la CCETP, afin qu'elle agisse à titre d'organisme d'examen indépendant pour la GRC et l'ASFC. C'est pour cette raison que le gouvernement a présenté le projet de loi C-98 l'année dernière. Cette mesure législative a reçu l'appui de tous les partis à l'étape de la troisième lecture. C'est pourquoi nous présentons maintenant le projet de loi C-3, alors que nous avons plus de temps pour débattre et discuter. Ce projet de loi cadre bien avec notre engagement à rendre des comptes et à être transparents.
La nouvelle commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public proposée serait responsable de l'examen et du traitement des plaintes visant l'ASFC ou la GRC. Qu'il s'agisse de plaintes portant sur la qualité des services ou la conduite des agents, la commission aurait le pouvoir de se pencher, de sa propre initiative ou à la demande du ministre de la Sécurité publique, sur toute activité menée par l'ASFC, à l'exception des questions de sécurité nationale. Toute personne qui interagit avec des employés de l'ASFC ou de la GRC et qui a des plaintes à formuler pourrait s'adresser à la commission. Cela comprend les citoyens canadiens, les résidents permanents et les ressortissants étrangers, y compris les immigrants détenus. La commission effectuerait une enquête et formulerait ses conclusions quant à savoir si les procédures à la frontière sont appropriées ou non.
Grâce à ces mesures, l'ASFC se trouverait assujettie à un mécanisme d'examen indépendant, comme c'est le cas de nos autres organismes de sécurité aujourd'hui, notamment le SCRS et la GRC.
Les services frontaliers des pays comparables au nôtre sont assujettis à de telles mesures de reddition de comptes, et ce projet de loi nous permettrait de les imiter. Nous aimerions tous que le public continue à recevoir de la part de l'ASFC le traitement de classe mondiale auquel il s'attend.
L'ASFC s'est assurée qu'elle a les ressources et les infrastructures en place pour appuyer cette nouvelle commission d'examen. Elle impose déjà à ses employés une norme de conduite stricte, et je suis certaine qu'elle continuera de le faire.
Comme je l'ai dit, cette mesure arrive à un moment où nos frontières font l'objet d'un redoublement d'attention. L'ASFC opère dans un environnement complexe et dynamique. Elle doit répondre à des menaces en constante évolution, s'adapter aux tendances économiques mondiales et faire preuve d'innovation dans son utilisation de la technologie afin de gérer la croissance des flux transfrontaliers. N'oublions pas que certaines de ces menaces et tendances constituent certains des plus grands défis que les parlementaires et les Canadiens doivent relever aujourd'hui.
La crise des opioïdes continue de menacer grandement la sécurité des Canadiens, par exemple, et l'ASFC joue un rôle essentiel dans la détection des opioïdes à la frontière grâce à de nouveaux outils et de nouvelles méthodes. La violence liée aux armes à feu et aux gangs a aussi augmenté ces dernières années. L'ASFC joue un rôle central à cet égard, en surveillant de près la contrebande d'armes à feu. Elle s'adapte aussi aux volumes croissants de la chaîne d'approvisionnement, notamment à la popularité accrue du commerce en ligne. Elle est essentielle à l'économie, à la prospérité et à la compétitivité du pays. Elle accomplit cet énorme travail dans un cadre où les attentes de la clientèle en matière de reddition de comptes et de transparence sont élevées.
Il serait à l'avantage des professionnels, hommes et femmes, qui protègent nos frontières d'avoir un processus d'examen indépendant à l'ASFC. Les Canadiens le méritent aussi. C'est pourquoi j'encourage tous les députés à se joindre à moi pour appuyer le projet de loi C-3 aujourd'hui.
View Patricia Lattanzio Profile
Lib. (QC)
Madam Speaker, I appreciate this opportunity to add my voice to the debate of Bill C-3 at second reading. This important piece of legislation would amend the Canada Border Services Agency Act and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act to establish a new public complaints and review commission for both organizations. This would give the CBSA its own independent review body for the first time.
Transparency and accountability are extremely important in any context. That certainly includes the public safety and national security sphere. Canadians need to have trust and confidence in the people and agencies that work so hard to protect them. Right now, among the family of organizations that make up the public safety portfolio, only the CBSA lacks a full-fledged independent review body dedicated to it.
The RCMP has had such a body since 1988, the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP. The CRCC reviews complaints from the public about conduct of RCMP members and conducts reviews when complainants are not satisfied with the RCMP's handling of their complaints. This process ensures public complaints are examined fairly and impartially.
Canada also has an office of the correctional investigator, which provides independent oversight of Correctional Service Canada. The correctional investigator essentially serves as an ombudsman for federal offenders. The main responsibility of the office is to investigate and try to resolve offender complaints. The office is also responsible for reviewing and making recommendations on CSC policies and procedures related to those complaints, the goal being to ensure areas of concern are identified and appropriately addressed.
The CBSA really stands out in this context.
Before I go any further, it is important to point out that a fair number of CBSA's activities are already subject to independent oversight through existing bodies. Customs-related matters, for example, are handled by the Canadian International Trade Tribunal. With the passage of Bill C-59, the CBSA's national security-related activities are now being overseen by Canada's new National Security and Intelligence Review Agency. This agency is an independent, external body that can report on any national security or intelligence-related activity carried out by federal departments and agencies. It has the legal mandate and expertise to review national security activities and serves an important accountability function in our democracy.
However, a major piece is missing in the architecture of public safety and national security oversight and accountability. There is currently no mechanism for public complaints about the CBSA to be heard and considered. That is a significant oversight, given the scope of the agency's mandate and the sheer volume of its interactions with the public.
CBSA employees deal with thousands of people each day and tens of millions each year. They do so at approximately 1,200 service points across Canada and at 39 international airports and locations. In the last fiscal year alone, border officers interacted with 96 million travellers, both Canadians and foreign nationals, and that is just one aspect of its business. It is a massive, complex and impressive operation. We can all be proud of having such a professional, world-class border services agency.
In the vast majority of cases, the CBSA's interactions with the public happen without incident. Our employees work with the utmost professionalism in delivering border services to those entering the country. However, on rare occasions, and for whatever reason, things go less than smoothly. That is not unusual. People are human and we cannot expect everything they do will be perfect all the time. However, that does not mean there should not be a fair and appropriate way for people to air their grievances. If people are unhappy with the way they were treated at the border, or the level of service they received, they need to know that someone will hear their complaint in an independent manner. Needless to say, that is currently not the case.
The way things currently work is that if a member of the public makes a complaint about the CBSA, it is handled internally. In other words, the CBSA investigates itself. In recent years, a number of parliamentarians, commentators and observers have raised concerns about this problematic accountability gap. To rectify the situation, they have called for an independent review body specific to the CBSA. Bill C-3 would answer that call.
Under Bill C-3, the existing Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP would be given new powers and remain the public complaints and review commission, or PCRC. The newly established PCRC would consider complaints related to conduct or service issues involving either CBSA or RCMP employees. Those who believe they have had a negative interaction with a CBSA employee would have the option of turning to the PCRC for remedy and would have one year to do so.
The same would continue to be the case with respect to the RCMP. This would apply to Canadian citizens, permanent residents and foreign nationals. That includes people detained in CBSA's immigration holding centres, who would be able to submit complaints related to their conditions of detention or treatment while in detention.
The complaints function is just one part of the proposed new PCRC. The commission would also have an important review function. It would conduct reviews related to non-national security activities involving CBSA and the RCMP, since national security, as I noted earlier, is now in the purview of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency. The findings and recommendations of the PCRC would be non-binding. However, the CBSA would be required to provide a response to those findings and recommendations for all the complaints. I believe that combining these functions into one agency is the best way forward.
The existing CRCC already performs these functions for the RCMP, and the proposals in the bill would build on the success and expertise it has developed. Combining efforts may also generate efficiencies of scale and allow for resources to be allocated to priority areas. On that note, I certainly recognize that additional resources would be required for the PCRC, given its proposed new responsibilities and what that would mean in terms of workload.
That is why I am pleased that budget 2019 included nearly $25 million over five years, starting this fiscal year, and an additional $6.83 million per year ongoing to expand the mandate of the CRCC. That funding commitment has also been positively received by stakeholders. With Bill C-3, the government is taking a major step toward enhancing CBSA independent review and accountability in a big way.
I was encouraged to see an apparent consensus of support for this bill in our debate so far. As we know, just eight months ago, the previous form of this bill, Bill C-98, received all-party support during third reading in the House during the last Parliament. In reintroducing this bill, we have taken into consideration points that were previously raised by the opposition parties, and we hope to rely on their continued support.
The changes proposed in Bill C-3 are appropriate and long overdue. They would give Canadians greater confidence in the border agencies that serve them and they would bring Canada in line with international norms in democratic countries. That includes the systems already in place with some of our closest allies, such as the U.K., Australia and New Zealand.
I am proud to be supporting this important piece of legislation. I will be voting in favour of this bill at second reading and I urge all of my hon. colleagues to do the same when the time comes.
Madame la Présidente, je suis heureuse d'avoir l'occasion d'ajouter ma voix à celles des députés qui débattent le projet de loi C-3 à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Cette importante mesure législative modifiera la Loi sur l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada afin d'établir une nouvelle commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public pour les deux organismes. Grâce à ce changement, l'ASFC aura pour la première fois son propre organisme d'examen indépendant.
La transparence et la responsabilité sont extrêmement importantes dans tous les contextes et certainement dans le contexte de la sécurité publique et de la sécurité nationale. Les Canadiens doivent avoir confiance dans les gens et les organismes qui travaillent d'arrache-pied pour les protéger. À l'heure actuelle, parmi tous les organismes qui font partie du portefeuille de la Sécurité publique, seule l'ASFC n'a pas de véritable organisme d'examen indépendant qui lui soit consacré.
La GRC dispose d'un tel organisme depuis 1988: la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC. La Commission traite les plaintes du public concernant la conduite d'agents de la GRC et revoit les dossiers dans les cas où le plaignant n'est pas satisfait de la manière dont la GRC a traité sa plainte. Ce processus permet un examen juste et impartial des plaintes du public.
Le Canada dispose également d'un bureau de l'enquêteur correctionnel, qui assure une surveillance indépendante du Service correctionnel du Canada. L'enquêteur correctionnel sert essentiellement d'ombudsman pour les délinquants sous responsabilité fédérale. La principale responsabilité de ce bureau est de mener des enquêtes et d'essayer de résoudre les plaintes des délinquants. Le bureau est également chargé d'examiner les politiques et les procédures du Service correctionnel du Canada qui sont visées par ces plaintes et de formuler des recommandations à ce sujet. L'objectif est de cerner les sujets de préoccupation et de s'en occuper de manière appropriée.
L'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada se distingue vraiment dans ce contexte.
Avant d'aller plus loin, il est important de souligner qu'un bon nombre d'activités de l'Agence sont déjà soumises à une surveillance indépendante par l'entremise d'organismes qui existent déjà. Les questions liées aux douanes, par exemple, sont traitées par le Tribunal canadien du commerce extérieur. Avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-59, les activités de l'Agence liées à la sécurité nationale sont désormais surveillées par le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Cet office est un organisme indépendant et externe pouvant rendre compte de toute activité liée à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement menée par les ministères et organismes fédéraux. Il a le mandat légal et l'expertise nécessaire pour mener un examen des activités liées à la sécurité nationale et il remplit une fonction importante de reddition de comptes dans notre régime démocratique.
Cependant, il manque un élément majeur à l'architecture de la surveillance et de la reddition de comptes en matière de sécurité publique et nationale. En effet, il n'existe actuellement aucun mécanisme permettant d'entendre et d'étudier les plaintes du public concernant l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Il s'agit là d'un oubli considérable compte tenu de la portée du mandat de l'Agence et du volume élevé de ses interactions avec le public.
Les employés de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada interagissent avec des milliers de personnes chaque jour — des dizaines de millions de personnes chaque année. Ils le font dans environ 1 200 points de service au Canada et à 39 aéroports et emplacements internationaux. Au cours de la dernière année financière seulement, les agents frontaliers ont interagi avec 96 millions de voyageurs — des Canadiens comme des étrangers —, et ce n'est qu'un aspect de leurs tâches. L'Agence est une entité massive, complexe et impressionnante. Nous pouvons être fiers d'avoir une agence des services frontaliers de calibre mondial aussi professionnelle.
Dans la grande majorité des cas, les interactions des agents avec le public se passent sans incident. Les employés font preuve d'un très grand professionnalisme lorsqu'ils fournissent des services frontaliers à ceux qui entrent au Canada. Cependant, en de rares occasions, pour une raison quelconque, les choses se passent moins bien. Ce n'est pas inhabituel. Les personnes sont des êtres humains. Nous ne pouvons pas nous attendre à ce qu'ils se comportent toujours parfaitement. Cependant, cela implique qu'il devrait y avoir un moyen équitable et approprié pour les gens de présenter leurs doléances. Si les gens sont insatisfaits du traitement qu'ils reçoivent à la frontière, ou du niveau de service qu'ils ont reçu, ils doivent savoir que quelqu'un écoutera leur plainte, de façon indépendante. Il va sans dire que ce n'est pas le cas actuellement.
Actuellement, si un membre du public porte plainte contre l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, la plainte est traitée à l'interne. En d'autres termes, l'Agence enquête sur elle-même. Ces dernières années, un certain nombre de parlementaires, de commentateurs et d'observateurs ont soulevé des préoccupations concernant ce manque problématique de reddition de comptes. Pour corriger la situation, ils ont demandé d'avoir un organisme d'examen indépendant propre à l'Agence. Le projet de loi C-3 répondra à cet appel.
Le projet de loi C-3 prévoit que l'actuelle Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC se verrait attribuer de nouveaux pouvoirs et qu'elle serait désormais connue sous le nom de commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. La nouvelle commission examinerait les plaintes liées à la conduite et au service des employés de l'ASFC et de la GRC. Les personnes qui pensent avoir eu un échange négatif avec un employé de l'ASFC pourraient se tourner vers la commission; elles auraient un an pour le faire.
Pour ce qui est de la GRC, le processus demeurerait le même. Les citoyens canadiens, les résidents permanents et les ressortissants étrangers pourront se prévaloir d'un tel recours, notamment les personnes détenues dans des centres de surveillance de l'Immigration de l'ASFC. Pendant leur détention, elles pourront déposer des plaintes liées à leurs conditions de détention ou au traitement qu'elles reçoivent pendant la détention.
La fonction relative aux plaintes n'est qu'un élément de la nouvelle commission, qui aurait également une importante fonction d'examen. Elle procéderait à l'examen des activités de l'ASFC et de la GRC qui ne sont pas liées à la sécurité nationale, car comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, c'est un aspect qui est maintenant du ressort de l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Les conclusions et les recommandations de la commission concernant les plaintes ne seraient pas exécutoires, mais l'ASFC serait tenue d'y répondre. Je pense que le fait de combiner ces fonctions en un seul organisme est la meilleure façon d'aller de l'avant.
La Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes actuelle remplit déjà ces fonctions au sein de la GRC, et les mesures proposées dans le projet de loi mettraient à profit les succès et l'expérience de celle-ci. Combiner les efforts pourrait peut-être aussi générer des économies d'échelle et débloquer des ressources pour qu'elles soient allouées à des dossiers prioritaires. À ce sujet, je suis tout à fait consciente que la Commission aura besoin de ressources supplémentaires vu les nouvelles responsabilités — et donc, la nouvelle charge de travail — qui sont proposées la concernant.
C'est pourquoi je suis contente que le budget 2019 prévoie une enveloppe de près de 25 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, à partir de l'exercice actuel, et 6,83 millions de dollars supplémentaires par an ensuite pour élargir le mandat de la Commission. Cette promesse de financement a aussi été accueillie favorablement par les parties prenantes. Le projet de loi C-3 permet au gouvernement de se doter de moyens essentiels pour perfectionner l'examen indépendant et la responsabilisation au sein de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada d'une manière importante.
Cela m'a encouragée de voir que tous les partis semblent vouloir, jusqu'à présent, appuyer ce projet de loi. Nous le savons, la version antérieure de ce projet de loi, le projet de loi C-98, a reçu, il y a juste huit mois, le soutien de tous les partis à l'étape de la troisième lecture à la Chambre, pendant la dernière législature. Dans la nouvelle mouture que nous avons proposée, nous avons pris en compte les points soulevés précédemment par les partis de l'opposition, et nous espérons pouvoir continuer à compter sur leur appui.
Cela fait longtemps que les changements proposés dans le projet de loi C-3, qui sont tout à fait appropriés, auraient dû être faits. Ils donneraient aux Canadiens une confiance accrue dans les agences frontalières qui les servent et contribueraient à aligner le Canada sur des systèmes respectant les normes internationales déjà en place dans les pays démocratiques, notamment chez certains de nos plus proches alliés comme le Royaume-Uni, l'Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande.
C'est avec fierté que j'appuie cet important projet de loi. Je voterai en faveur de ce projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture et j'invite tous mes collègues à faire de même le moment venu.
View Jeremy Patzer Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time today with the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands.
We are considering Bill C-3, which would reorganize the RCMP's Civilian Review and Complaints Commission while extending independent oversight to the Canada Border Services Agency and the RCMP.
This past Monday was the RCMP's 100th anniversary, and part of the celebration includes a campaign to designate February 1 nationwide as RCMP appreciation day. I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank RCMP officers for the tireless and important work they do. I also want to thank our Canadian border agents for everything they are doing to protect our country. There are four official crossings in my riding: Rockglen, Monchy, Climax and Willow Creek.
Conservatives believe in checks and balances, parliamentary ethics and the rule of law. To better promote these values, we support increased transparency, accessibility and accountability for government agencies. It is the right thing to do and it shows proper respect to citizens and taxpayers.
As a Conservative, I support the fundamental idea behind this bill, and I hope that expanded oversight will start to make a real difference. It is in line with our party's principles and vision for our country's future. It is one thing to have good ideas and intentions; we must also do our due diligence and make sure that this will be implemented and applied properly.
After the House votes on this, we will be waiting as the opposition to see how this new public complaints and review commission will work out in practice and whether it results in real improvements.
Responsibility means more than receiving people's complaints. We cannot be responsible without offering a response. We need to make sure that there is an effective response made in a reasonable amount of time whenever someone raises concerns related to law enforcement, such as with the RCMP or CBSA.
The main change proposed by this bill involves recreating and transitioning a government agency, and that is what raises the very practical point of timeliness and effectiveness as part of its operations. The RCMP has already had independent oversight since 1988, and it was established as the current Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP, or the CRCC, back in 2013.
I have spent some time reading further into the CRCC's more recent work. I could not help but notice that there appears to be a pattern with its investigations since 2007, at least for those posted on the CRCC's website. It takes anywhere from three to seven years to get a final report on the findings of an investigation and the recommendations following from it. It is good to know that it is conducting a thorough review of the complaint, but the fact remains that it is taking a long time in the process.
Presumably, if the RCMP decides to implement any changes into its organization or policies, this will not be an overnight process either. It could take a long time to draft new policy or prepare for any changes addressing the areas that have been reviewed and criticized by the commission. All of this means that from start to finish we might realistically expect the process will go on for years and years, possibly even up to a decade in some cases. These kinds of timelines would likely dissuade too many people from even bothering to file a complaint at all. If people do not have the confidence to report an issue, it will defeat the original purpose of having a review process.
That is exactly what we want to avoid. We want Canadians to call attention to the real problems they are experiencing so there can be an investigation and fair treatment for anyone who is involved. Most importantly, we want to make sure problems get corrected as quickly as possible to prevent similar incidents from occurring.
For the final reports that were available for me to look through, the number of findings ranged anywhere from five to over 55 per incident and the recommendations ranged anywhere from one to 31. Further, I could not help but notice that there is one additional point that is missing after looking at these reports, and that is which and how many of the recommendations have been accepted and specifically implemented into RCMP policy moving forward.
I would like to see a review and report on the results of these final recommendations. It would be a valuable piece of information for the general public to be aware of whenever we are talking about all the different cases being studied. Again, I believe that a civilian oversight is the right approach. This all has to do with providing transparency and maintaining trust in the RCMP and CBSA, whom we entrusted with the public safety of our rural areas in Canada and our border crossings.
Respecting and maintaining public trust is extremely important. That is why it only makes sense to have a similar commission in place for the CBSA. If we are going to be broadening this oversight to the CBSA, then this would be the right time to also ensure that there are accurate reporting mechanisms on whether changes are implemented or not. The CBSA is another organization that the public has a great deal of respect for, based on the scope of the important job we have entrusted to it.
CBSA workers are routinely put in the uncomfortable spot of searching vehicles, belongings and persons, whether it be at an airport or a port of entry along the Canada-U.S.A. border. In the course of carrying out these searches and interviews as part of their duties, I would think that having oversight and review in place would help everyone involved feel more secure in these situations.
There is something else I noticed about the CRCC's current review process. At every stage of the review process, when initiated by the chairman, it goes to the Minister of Public Safety. At face value, it makes sense for the agency to work with the appropriate minister. The fact that there are provisions for this to happen in this bill, as well as before, is not an issue by itself. It goes back to an old question in politics: Who will watch the watchmen?
This is not an empty political cheap shot either. Our real problem is that we still have a Prime Minister and a government that have shown disregard for how our processes are supposed to work. We repeatedly saw their interference in the SNC-Lavalin affair, hiding behind cabinet confidentiality and insisting on limitations for witness testimony and the RCMP's investigation. Will they be able to resist the temptation to interfere in other areas? These are the kinds of real questions that people have across Canada.
In this past campaign I heard repeatedly that Liberal interference in the justice system was a big concern and, at the time, Liberals rallied with their leadership instead of with their former colleagues who were speaking out with integrity. Canadians have seen examples of the Liberals over the last year showing that they cannot trust them with staying out of business that is not theirs to dabble in.
I need to make it absolutely clear by saying again that we have the greatest respect and admiration for active members in both the RCMP and the CBSA. We are proud of their service, and this bill should be one of the ways in which we work with them to best serve the public good. Members in both of these organizations need to be included in our close consideration of this bill. For that reason, my colleagues and I are concerned on this side of the House about the reported lack of consultation with representatives for police officers and border agents. This concern was expressed during the rushed debate on this same bill at the end of the last Parliament, and it was raised again by the member for Kootenay—Columbia, who previously had a long career with the RCMP himself.
Supporting the idea of oversight in this bill does not mean we will not call for proper consultation and otherwise carefully consider it during committee. There are some unanswered questions about how the new commission will operate and we need to make sure that the bill is strong and well balanced for succeeding with its intended goal.
Since we are taking the time to discuss the RCMP as it relates to this legislation, I need to say something about its work in my riding and across Canada. Back home, I have attended five town halls around my riding regarding the RCMP's operations. There are huge concerns related to the number of officers in different places and the response times to emergency calls. This has left too many people feeling unsafe in their own homes. We are dealing with many terrible cases of violent crime. We are seeing an increase in the illicit drug trade with fentanyl and methamphetamine becoming a big problem.
The people in rural communities committing crimes are no longer just the local bad boys. They are large, coordinated crime groups and gangs coming out from the cities and from other provinces to commit organized and targeted crime. In a specific example recently in my riding, an off-duty RCMP officer saw three vehicles speeding in excess of 150 kilometres an hour. These three vehicles were headed to British Columbia with two young girls, who were being taken to be victimized by human traffickers. Thankfully, this story has a happy ending with the suspects being apprehended and the girls returned home safely.
This is the larger problem we have to deal with whenever we are considering public safety and how we can best support our law enforcement. I am looking for a solution that will significantly reduce rural crime and I am not sure that this bill really has much to say for that type of issue. Even though rural Canadians on the ground, provinces and some of my colleagues have been repeatedly raising this issue for a while, we have not seen or heard much about it from the government. We are still waiting for a response.
That being said, I look forward to further studying Bill C-3. We can only hope the government will respect and learn from this bill's spirit and principles of accountability.
Monsieur le Président, je vais partager le temps dont je dispose aujourd'hui avec la députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands.
Nous examinons le projet de loi C-3, qui entraînerait un remaniement de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et étendrait la surveillance indépendante à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, en plus de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada.
Lundi dernier, on célébrait le 100e anniversaire de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et, dans le cadre des célébrations, une campagne avait lieu pour désigner le 1er février journée nationale de reconnaissance de la GRC. Je profite de l'occasion pour saluer et remercier les agents de la GRC du travail important qu'ils accomplissent sans relâche. Je veux aussi remercier nos agents des services frontaliers de tout ce qu'ils font pour protéger notre pays. Dans ma circonscription, il y a quatre passages frontaliers officiels: Rockglen, Monchy, Climax et Willow Creek.
Les conservateurs attachent beaucoup d'importance au principe des freins et contrepoids, à l'éthique parlementaire et à la primauté du droit. Afin de mieux promouvoir ces valeurs, nous préconisons un degré accru de transparence, d'accessibilité et de responsabilisation des organismes gouvernementaux. C'est la chose à faire, et ce, en tout respect pour les citoyens et les contribuables.
En tant que député conservateur, j'appuie le principe fondamental qui sous-tend le projet de loi et j'espère que l'élargissement de la surveillance améliorera vraiment les choses. Cela rejoint les principes de notre parti et notre vision de l'avenir pour notre pays. C'est bien d'avoir de bonnes idées et de bonnes intentions, mais il nous faut aussi faire preuve de diligence raisonnable et veiller à ce que les mesures soient bien mises en œuvre et appliquées.
Lorsque la Chambre se sera prononcée sur le projet de loi, l'opposition attendra de voir comment la nouvelle Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public fonctionnera dans la pratique et si elle améliorera vraiment les choses.
Les responsabilités ne se limitent pas à la réception des plaintes. Il faut aussi répondre à ces plaintes. Chaque fois que des préoccupations sont soulevées à propos d'organismes d'application de la loi, comme la GRC ou l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, nous devons nous assurer qu'on y donne suite de manière efficace et dans un délai raisonnable.
La principale modification proposée dans le projet de loi est le changement du nom et de la vocation d'un organisme gouvernemental, ce qui soulève des questions bien concrètes sur la rapidité et l'efficacité de ce dernier. Depuis 1988, la GRC fait l'objet d'une surveillance par un organisme indépendant qui, en 2013, est devenu la Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada.
Je me suis penché davantage sur le récent travail effectué par cette commission. J'ai constaté qu'une tendance semblait se dessiner dans les enquêtes qu'elle mène depuis 2007, du moins celles publiées sur son site Web. Il faut de trois à sept ans pour obtenir le rapport final sur les résultats d'une enquête et les recommandations qui en découlent. Il est bon de savoir que la Commission examine la plainte en profondeur, mais il n'en demeure pas moins que les délais de traitement sont longs.
Je suppose que si la GRC décide d'apporter des changements à son organisation ou à ses politiques, cela ne se fera pas non plus du jour au lendemain. L'élaboration d'une nouvelle politique ou la préparation de tout changement concernant les secteurs qui ont été examinés et critiqués par la commission pourrait prendre beaucoup de temps. Bref, on peut raisonnablement s'attendre à ce que, du début à la fin, le processus dure de nombreuses années, voire une décennie dans certains cas. Ce genre de délais risque de dissuader bien des gens de se donner la peine de déposer une plainte. Si les gens n'ont pas suffisamment confiance pour signaler un problème, cette mesure ira à l'encontre de l'objectif initial d'un processus d'examen.
Or, c'est exactement ce que nous voulons éviter. Nous souhaitons que les Canadiens nous signalent les problèmes réels qu'ils rencontrent pour que toute personne concernée ait droit à un traitement équitable et à une enquête. Chose plus importante encore, nous voulons nous assurer que les problèmes sont résolus le plus rapidement possible afin d'éviter que des incidents semblables se reproduisent.
En ce qui a trait aux rapports définitifs que j'ai pu consulter, le nombre de constatations va de 5 à plus de 55 par incident, et le nombre de recommandations va de 1 à 31. Je n'ai pu m'empêcher également de remarquer l'absence d'un élément. En effet, nous ne savons pas quelles recommandations — et combien —, ont été acceptées et mises en œuvre dans la nouvelle politique de la GRC.
J'aimerais voir un rapport portant sur les résultats de ces recommandations finales. Le fait d'être constamment au courant des différents cas qui font l'objet d'un examen constituerait de l'information précieuse pour le grand public. Je le répète, selon moi, un mécanisme de surveillance civile est la bonne approche à adopter. Il s'agit essentiellement de faire preuve de transparence et de maintenir la confiance à l'égard de la GRC et de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, à qui nous avons confié la sécurité publique des régions rurales et des postes frontaliers du Canada.
Il est extrêmement important de respecter et de maintenir la confiance du public. C'est pourquoi il est tout à fait logique de mettre en place une commission semblable pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Si on élargit la portée de la surveillance à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, ce serait aussi le bon moment de veiller à ce qu'il y ait des mécanismes de reddition de comptes appropriés pour déterminer si les changements ont été apportés ou non. Compte tenu de la portée de l'important travail qu'on lui a confié, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada est un autre organisme que le public respecte profondément.
Les travailleurs de l'ASFC sont régulièrement placés dans l'inconfortable position de fouiller des véhicules, des biens et des personnes, que ce soit dans un aéroport ou à un point d'entrée le long de la frontière canado-américaine. Un encadrement des fouilles et des entrevues sous forme de surveillance ou d'examen devrait, à mon avis, aider toutes les personnes concernées à se sentir plus en sécurité.
Je remarque autre chose au sujet du processus actuellement utilisé par la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes. Chaque étape du processus d'examen, quand elle est lancée par le président, est soumise au ministre de la Sécurité publique. À première vue, il est logique que la Commission collabore avec le ministre compétent. Le fait que ce soit prévu dans le projet de loi, tout comme précédemment, n'est pas un problème en soi. Cela nous renvoie néanmoins à l'éternelle question que l'on se pose en politique: qui va surveiller les gardiens?
Il ne s'agit pas non plus d'un coup bas gratuit. Le véritable problème tient au fait que nous avons toujours un premier ministre et un gouvernement qui méprisent nos modes de fonctionnement. Nous les avons vus à plusieurs reprises s'immiscer dans l'affaire SNC-Lavalin, invoquer la confidentialité du Cabinet pour se protéger et insister pour imposer des limites aux témoignages et à l'enquête de la GRC. Seront-ils capables de résister à la tentation de s'ingérer dans d'autres domaines? Voilà le genre de vraies questions que les gens se posent partout au Canada.
Pendant la dernière campagne électorale, j'ai entendu dire à maintes reprises que l'ingérence des libéraux dans le système judiciaire était un grave problème. À ce moment-là, les libéraux se sont ralliés à leurs dirigeants plutôt qu'à leurs anciennes collègues qui ont fait preuve d'intégrité en dénonçant la situation. Au cours de la dernière année, les Canadiens ont vu plusieurs exemples qui montrent qu'on ne peut pas compter sur les libéraux pour ne pas se mêler de ce qui ne les regarde pas.
Je tiens à être tout à fait clair. Les membres actifs de la GRC et de l'ASFC ont tout notre respect et toute notre admiration. Nous sommes fiers des services qu'ils nous rendent, et ce projet de loi devrait faire partie des mesures que nous pouvons prendre pour les aider à mieux servir l'intérêt public. Les membres de ces deux organismes doivent être pris en considération lorsque nous allons nous pencher de près sur ce projet de loi. C'est pour cette raison que mes collègues de ce côté-ci de la Chambre et moi sommes préoccupés par ce qui a été révélé au sujet de l'absence de consultation auprès des représentants des agents de police et des agents frontaliers. Ce problème a été soulevé lors du débat précipité que nous avons tenu sur le même projet de loi, à la fin de la dernière législature. Il a été souligné de nouveau par le député de Kootenay—Columbia, qui a lui-même mené une longue carrière à la GRC.
Nous appuyons les dispositions de ce projet de loi en ce qui concerne la surveillance, mais cela ne veut pas dire que nous n'allons pas réclamer une consultation en bonne et due forme et que nous n'allons pas étudier attentivement les propositions au comité. Des questions demeurent sans réponse au sujet de la façon dont la nouvelle commission mènera ses activités, et nous devons nous assurer que le projet de loi est suffisamment rigoureux et équilibré pour que l'on puisse atteindre l'objectif énoncé.
Tandis que nous prenons le temps de discuter des éléments de ce projet de loi qui touchent la GRC, je tiens à parler du travail qu'elle fait dans ma circonscription et partout au pays. Dans ma circonscription, j'ai participé à cinq assemblées publiques au sujet des activités de la GRC. Il y a de vives inquiétudes par rapport au nombre d'agents affectés aux différents postes et aux délais d'intervention après un appel d'urgence. La situation est telle que nombre de personnes ne se sentent pas en sécurité dans leur propre maison. Nous devons composer avec un grand nombre de crimes violents épouvantables. Nous avons observé une hausse du commerce de drogues illicites, et le trafic de fentanyl et de méthamphétamines devient extrêmement problématique.
Les criminels des collectivités rurales ne sont plus seulement les petits voyous du coin. Ce sont maintenant des groupes criminels et des gangs importants et coordonnés qui viennent des villes et des autres provinces pour commettre des crimes organisés et ciblés. À titre d'exemple, récemment, dans ma circonscription, un agent de la GRC qui n'était pas en service a vu trois véhicules qui roulaient à plus de 150 kilomètres à l'heure. Les criminels se dirigeaient vers la Colombie-Britannique avec deux jeunes filles qu'ils comptaient amener à des trafiquants de personnes. Heureusement, cette histoire s'est bien terminée. Les suspects ont été arrêtés, et les filles ont pu rentrer chez elles en toute sécurité.
C'est le problème plus vaste auquel nous devons nous attaquer lorsqu'il est question de la sécurité publique et de la meilleure façon de soutenir les organismes d'application de la loi. Je cherche une solution qui va permettre de réduire considérablement la criminalité en milieu rural, et je ne suis pas certain que ce projet de loi en dit long sur ce genre de problème. Bien que des Canadiens des régions rurales, des provinces et certains de mes collègues soulèvent constamment cette question depuis quelque temps, nous n'avons pas vu ni entendu grand-chose à ce sujet de la part du gouvernement. Nous attendons toujours une réponse.
Cela étant dit, je suis impatient d'étudier plus en profondeur le projet de loi C-3. Il ne reste qu'à espérer que le gouvernement respectera l'esprit et les principes de responsabilité de cette mesure législative et qu'il en tirera des enseignements.
View Bill Blair Profile
Lib. (ON)
moved that Bill C-3, An Act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and the Canada Border Services Agency Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, be read the second time and referred to a committee.
He said: Madam Speaker, I am honoured to rise in this House to begin the debate on Bill C-3, concerning an independent review for the Canada Border Services Agency.
The Canada Border Services Agency ensures Canada's security and prosperity by facilitating and overseeing international travel and trade across Canada's borders. On a daily basis, CBSA officers interact with thousands of Canadians and visitors to Canada at airports, land border crossings, ports and other locations. Ensuring the free flow of people and legitimate goods across our border while protecting Canadians requires CBSA officers to have the power to arrest, detain, search and seize, as well as the authority to use reasonable force when it is required.
Currently, complaints about the service provided by the CBSA officers and about the conduct of those officers are handled internally. If an individual is dissatisfied with the results of an internal CBSA investigation, there is no mechanism for the public to request an independent review of these complaints.
The Government of Canada recognizes that a robust accountability mechanism can help ensure public trust that Canada's public safety institutions are responsive to the law and to Canadians. That is why I am honoured today to initiate debate on Bill C-3.
I want to take the opportunity to acknowledge the excellent and extraordinary work of two former parliamentarians: former senator Wilfred Moore and my predecessor, former public safety minister Ralph Goodale, who worked tirelessly to advocate for effective CBSA oversight.
This important piece of legislation that is before us today would establish an independent review and complaints mechanism for the Canada Border Services Agency. This will address the significant accountability and transparency gap among our public safety agencies and departments here in Canada.
Among our allies, Canada is alone in not having a dedicated review body for complaints regarding its border agency. The CBSA is also the only organization within the public safety portfolio without its own independent review body.
The resolution of conduct complaints is critically important to maintaining public trust. We already know that many CBSA activities, such as customs and immigration decisions, are subject to independent review. Unfortunately, as of yet, there is no such mechanism for public complaints related to CBSA employee conduct and service.
I will provide some context for my colleagues and for Canadians. The agency deals with an extraordinary and staggering number of people and a huge volume of transactions each and every year. For example, in 2018-19, CBSA employees interacted with over 96 million travellers to and from Canada and collected on behalf of Canadians $32 billion in taxes and duties. Behind these extraordinary numbers is the story of all of us, Canadians in all walks of life and in all parts of our country who rely on the services of our border services agencies. Together, we expect that in the majority of cases we will receive, and do receive, a high degree of professionalism when travelling abroad for work and for leisure. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the many members of the Canada Border Services Agency for their service to Canadians and for their professionalism they give their duties.
It is a fact that when dealing with that many travellers it is inevitable that some complaints may arise. That is why, in order to maintain the public trust in our system and to strengthen accountability for the important role that the border service officers perform for us, it is imperative that we have an independent review body to ensure that any negative experience is thoroughly investigated and quickly and transparently resolved.
Currently, if there are complaints from the public regarding the level of service provided by CBSA or the conduct of CBSA officials, they are handled through an internal process within the agency. Our government has taken action in recent years to rectify gaps with respect to the independent review of national security activities.
We have passed legislation to create the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians which recently published its first annual report. With the passage of Bill C-59, our government has also established the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency. With these two initiatives under way, now is the time to close a significant gap in Canada's public safety and national security accountability framework. This is exactly where Bill C-3 comes in.
The existing Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, or CRCC as it is commonly known, is at the heart of this proposed legislation. The CRCC currently functions as the independent review and complaints body for the RCMP. Under Bill C-3, its responsibilities would be strengthened and it would be renamed the public complaints and review commission, or PCRC. The new PCRC would be responsible for the handling of complaints and conducting reviews for the CBSA in addition to its current responsibilities with respect to the RCMP.
When the PCRC receives a complaint from the public, it would notify the CBSA immediately which would undertake the initial investigation. This is an efficient approach that has proven to lead to a resolution of the overwhelming majority of complaints. In fact, in the case of the RCMP, some 90% of complaints against the conduct or service of the RCMP are resolved in this way.
The PCRC would also be able to conduct its own investigation to the complaint if, in the opinion of the chairperson, it is in the public interest to do so. In those cases, the CBSA would not initiate an investigation into the complaint. In other cases where the complainant may not be satisfied with the CBSA's initial handling of the complaint, the complainant could ask the PCRC directly to begin a review of it. When the PCRC receives such a request for review over a CBSA complaint decision, the commission could review the complaint and all relevant information, sharing its conclusions regarding the CBSA's initial decision. It could conclude that the CBSA decision was appropriate. It may instead ask that the CBSA investigate further or it can initiate its own independent investigation of the complaint.
The commission also would have the authority to hold a public hearing as part of its work. At the conclusion of a PCRC investigation, the review body would be able to report on its findings and make such recommendations as it sees fit. The CBSA would be required to provide a response in writing to the PCRC's findings and its recommendations.
In addition to the complaints function, the PCRC would be able to review on its own initiative or at the request of me or any minister any activity of the CBSA except for national security activities. These, of course, are reviewed by the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency which is now in force.
PCRC reports would include findings and recommendations on the adequacy, appropriateness and clarity of CBSA policies, procedures and guidelines; the CBSA's compliance with the law and all ministerial directions; and finally, the reasonableness and necessity of CBSA's use of its authorities and powers.
With respect to both its complaint and review functions, the PCRC would have the power to summon and enforce the appearance of persons before it. It would have the authority to compel them to give oral or written evidence under oath. It would have the commensurate authority to administer oaths, to receive and accept oral and written evidence, whether or not that evidence would be admissible in a court of law.
The PCRC would also have the power to examine any records or make any inquiries that it considers necessary. It would have access to the same information that the CBSA possesses when a chairman's complaint is initiated.
Beyond its review and complaint functions, Bill C-3 would also create an obligation to the CBSA to notify local police and the PCRC of any serious incident involving CBSA employees or its officers. That includes giving the PCRC the responsibility to track and publicly report on all serious incidents such as death, serious injury, or Criminal Code violations involving members of the CBSA.
Operationally, the bill is worded in such a way as to give the PCRC flexibility to organize its internal structure as it sees fit to carry out its mandate under both the CBSA Act and the RCMP Act. The PCRC could designate members of its staff as belonging either to an RCMP unit or a CBSA unit. Common services such as corporate support could be shared between both units which would make them more efficient, but there are also several benefits to be realized by separating staff in the fashion that I have described.
For example, staff could develop a certain expertise on matters involving these two agencies, their operational procedures and other matters. Clearly identifying which staff members are responsible for which agency may also help with the clear management of information.
Bill C-3 would also make mandatory the appointment of a vice-chair for the PCRC. This would ensure that there would always be two individuals at the top, a chairperson and a vice-chair, capable of exercising key decision-making powers. Under Bill C-3, the PCRC would publish an annual report covering each of its business lines, the CBSA and the RCMP, and the resources that it has devoted to each.
The report would summarize its operations throughout the year and would include such things as the number and type of complaints, and any review activities providing information on the number, type and outcome of all serious incidents. To further promote transparency and accountability, the annual report would be tabled in Parliament.
The new public complaints and review commission proposed in Bill C-3 would close a significant gap in Canada's public safety accountability regime.
Parliamentarians, non-government organizations and stakeholders have all been calling upon successive governments to initiate such a reform for many years. For example, in June 2015, in the other place, the committee on national security and defence tabled a report which advocated for the establishment of an independent civilian review and complaints body with a mandate to conduct investigations for all CBSA activities. More recently, Amnesty International, in Canada's 2018 report card, noted that the CBSA remains the most notable agency with law enforcement and detention powers in Canada that is not subject to independent review and oversight.
National security expert and law professor Craig Forcese is quoted as saying that CBSA oversight is “the right decision”. Government expert Mel Cappe said that it is “filling the gap”. I would importantly note that the proposed legislation before the House benefited from invaluable advice proposed to the government by Mr. Cappe.
To support this legislation, we have allocated $24 million to expand the CRCC to become an independent review body for the CBSA. With the introduction of Bill C-3, proper oversight is on track to becoming a reality.
In the last Parliament, this bill received all-party support in the House in recognition of its practical contents that seek to maintain the integrity of our border services and to instill confidence in Canadians that their complaints will be heard independently and transparently. Though the bill was supported unanimously at third reading, it unfortunately did not receive royal assent by the time the last Parliament ended.
We have heard concerns from many members in this House about the date of tabling, and we are now reintroducing this bill at our very first opportunity as part of the 43rd Parliament. This will be the third consecutive Parliament to consider legislation to create an oversight body for the CBSA. It is overdue.
For all of these reasons, I proudly introduce Bill C-3. I am happy to take any questions my colleagues may have.
propose que le projet de loi C-3, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et la Loi sur l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres lois, soit lu pour la deuxième fois et renvoyé à un comité.
— Madame la Présidente, j'ai l'honneur d'intervenir à la Chambre pour amorcer le débat sur le projet de loi C-3, concernant un examen indépendant de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.
L'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada assure la sécurité et la prospérité du Canada en facilitant et en surveillant les voyages internationaux et le commerce aux frontières du Canada. Chaque jour, les agents de l'ASFC sont en contact avec des milliers de Canadiens et de visiteurs dans les aéroports, les postes frontaliers terrestres, les ports et d'autres lieux. Pour assurer la libre circulation des personnes et des biens légitimes à notre frontière tout en protégeant les Canadiens, les agents de l'ASFC doivent avoir le pouvoir d'arrêter et de détenir des personnes, de procéder à des fouilles et à des saisies et d'utiliser une force raisonnable lorsque cela est nécessaire.
Actuellement, les plaintes formulées au sujet du service fourni par les agents de l'ASFC et de la conduite de ces agents sont traitées en interne. Si une personne est insatisfaite des résultats d'une enquête interne de l'ASFC, elle ne peut pas demander un examen indépendant de ces plaintes.
Le gouvernement du Canada reconnaît qu'un bon mécanisme de reddition de comptes peut rassurer la population quant au fait que les organismes de sécurité publique du pays respectent les lois et répondent aux besoins des Canadiens. C'est donc un honneur pour moi d'entamer le débat du projet de loi C-3.
J'aimerais profiter de l'occasion pour souligner le travail remarquable de deux anciens parlementaires: l'ancien sénateur Wilfred Moore et mon prédécesseur, l'ancien ministre de la Sécurité publique Ralph Goodale, qui a travaillé sans relâche pour faire mettre en place un mécanisme de surveillance efficace de l'ASFC.
L'importante mesure législative dont nous sommes saisis permettrait d'instaurer un mécanisme indépendant d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour l'ASFC. Cela remédierait à l'important écart qui existe entre les organismes de sécurité publique et les ministères du Canada en matière de reddition de comptes et de transparence.
Contrairement à nous, tous nos alliés ont un organisme spécial de traitement des plaintes touchant leur agence de services frontaliers. L'ASFC est en outre le seul organisme du portefeuille de la Sécurité publique à ne pas avoir son propre organisme d'examen indépendant.
Il est essentiel de régler les plaintes liées à la conduite de ses agents si on veut garder la confiance de la population. Un grand nombre des activités de l'ASFC, comme les décisions relatives aux douanes et à l'immigration, font déjà l'objet d'un examen indépendant. Il n'y a malheureusement pas encore de mécanisme de ce genre pour les plaintes du public touchant la conduite et les services des employés de l'ASFC.
Voici un peu de contexte pour mes collègues et pour les Canadiens. Chaque année, l'Agence doit composer avec un nombre extraordinaire et renversant de personnes et un volume énorme de transactions. Par exemple, en 2018-2019, les employés de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ont été en contact avec plus de 96 millions de voyageurs en partance ou à destination du Canada, et ils ont perçu, au nom des Canadiens, 32 milliards de dollars sous forme de taxes et de droits. Ces chiffres extraordinaires révèlent à quel point nous comptons tous — et j'entends par là les Canadiens de tous les milieux et de toutes les régions du pays — sur les services frontaliers. Ensemble, nous nous attendons à recevoir, la plupart du temps, des services empreints d'un haut degré de professionnalisme lorsque nous voyageons à l'étranger pour le travail ou pour le plaisir, et c'est effectivement ce qui passe. Je profite d'ailleurs de l'occasion pour remercier les nombreux membres de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada pour le service qu'ils rendent aux Canadiens et le professionnalisme dont ils font preuve dans le cadre de leurs fonctions.
Certes, lorsqu'on a affaire à un si grand nombre de voyageurs, il y aura inévitablement des plaintes. C'est pourquoi, dans le but de maintenir la confiance de la population à l'égard de notre système et de renforcer l'obligation de rendre des comptes relativement au rôle important que jouent les agents des services frontaliers, il est impératif que nous ayons un organisme d'examen indépendant pour veiller à ce que toute expérience négative fasse l'objet d'une enquête approfondie et qu'elle soit réglée de manière rapide et transparente.
Actuellement, les plaintes du public concernant le niveau de service fourni par l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ou la conduite de ses agents sont traitées au moyen d'un processus interne. Ces dernières années, le gouvernement a pris des mesures pour corriger les lacunes relatives à l'examen indépendant des activités de sécurité nationale.
Nous avons adopté une loi pour créer le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, qui a publié récemment son premier rapport annuel. Avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-59, le gouvernement a également créé l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Maintenant que ces deux initiatives ont vu le jour, le moment est venu de combler une importante lacune dans le cadre de reddition de comptes du Canada en matière de sécurité publique et nationale. C'est exactement là qu'intervient le projet de loi C-3.
L'actuelle Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes est au cœur de cette mesure législative. À l'heure actuelle, la Commission joue le rôle d'organisme indépendant d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour la GRC. Au titre du projet de loi C-3, elle aura davantage de responsabilités et sera rebaptisée Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. La nouvelle commission aura pour tâche d'effectuer les examens et de traiter les plaintes pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada en plus d'assumer ses responsabilités actuelles à l'égard de la GRC.
À la réception d'une plainte du public, la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public en avisera immédiatement l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, qui mènera une première enquête. C'est une approche qui s'est révélée efficace pour régler la grande majorité des plaintes. En fait, dans le cas de la GRC, quelque 90 % des plaintes concernant la conduite d'un agent ou le service de la GRC ont été résolues de cette façon.
La commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public pourra aussi mener sa propre enquête si, selon son président, c'est dans l'intérêt public de le faire. Dans ces cas, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne lancerait pas d'enquête concernant la plainte. Dans les cas où le plaignant serait insatisfait du traitement de la plainte par l'Agence, il pourrait demander directement à la commission de l'examiner. Quand la commission reçoit ainsi une demande d'examen concernant une décision prise relativement à une plainte contre l'Agence, elle pourra examiner la plainte et tous les faits pertinents, puis faire connaître sa conclusion concernant la décision initiale de l'Agence. Elle pourra conclure que la décision était appropriée. Elle pourra aussi demander à l'Agence d'enquêter davantage, ou elle pourra lancer sa propre enquête indépendante concernant la plainte.
La commission aura également le pouvoir de convoquer des audiences publiques dans le cadre de ses activités. À la conclusion de son enquête, la commission peut faire rapport de ses constatations et émettre des recommandations si elle le juge approprié. L'ASFC devra alors présenter une réponse écrite concernant les constatations et les recommandations de la commission.
Outre sa fonction relative aux plaintes, la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public sera habilitée à examiner, de sa propre initiative, à ma demande ou à celle d'un ministre, toute activité de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, à l'exception des questions touchant la sécurité nationale. Évidemment, l'examen de ces dernières relève de l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement qui est maintenant officiellement en activité.
Les rapports de la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public comprendront des conclusions et des recommandations sur le bien-fondé, la pertinence, le caractère adéquat ou la clarté de toute politique, procédure ou ligne directrice régissant les activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, sur la conformité de cette dernière à la loi et aux instructions ministérielles, ainsi que sur le caractère raisonnable et la nécessité du recours par l'Agence à ses pouvoirs.
Qu'il s'agisse des examens ou du traitement des plaintes, la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public pourra contraindre des témoins à comparaître sous serment, que ce soit en personne ou par écrit. Elle aura le pouvoir de faire prêter serment et de recevoir des éléments de preuve oraux ou écrits, que ces éléments de preuve soient ou non autrement recevables devant un tribunal.
La commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public pourra en outre examiner tous les documents et mener toutes les enquêtes qu'elle jugera nécessaires. Elle aura également accès aux mêmes renseignements que ceux que possède l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada lorsque le président dépose une plainte.
Cela dit, le projet de loi C-3 ne porte pas seulement sur les examens et les plaintes; il obligera aussi l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada à informer les policiers et la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public de tout incident grave mettant en cause un de ses employés ou dirigeants. La commission aura ainsi la responsabilité d'enquêter sur tous les incidents graves — mort, blessure grave, violation du Code criminel — et d'en faire publiquement rapport.
Pour ce qui est du fonctionnement, le projet de loi est libellé de façon à donner à la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public la marge de manœuvre dont elle a besoin pour mettre en place sa structure comme elle l'entend pour exécuter son mandat aux termes de la Loi sur l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et de la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada. La commission pourrait faire relever les membres de son personnel soit de l'unité de la GRC, soit de celle de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Les services d'appui à l'organisation, par exemple, pourraient être partagés par les deux unités, ce qui les rendrait plus efficients. Il pourrait aussi être avantageux de répartir le personnel de la manière que j'ai décrite.
Par exemple, le personnel pourrait développer une certaine expertise sur les dossiers concernant les deux organismes, leurs procédures opérationnelles et d'autres questions. Le fait de désigner précisément les membres du personnel qui sont responsables de chaque organisme pourrait aussi contribuer à l'établissement d'un cadre clair de gestion de l'information.
Le projet de loi C-3 exigerait aussi la nomination d'un vice-président de la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. Il y aurait donc toujours deux personnes à la tête de l'organisation, un président et un vice-président, qui seraient habilitées à prendre des décisions. Selon le projet de loi C-3, la commission publierait un rapport annuel portant sur chacun de ses secteurs d'activité, celui de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et celui de la GRC, ainsi que sur les ressources consacrées à chacun d'entre eux.
Le rapport résumerait les opérations menées tout au long de l'année, y compris le nombre et le type de plaintes et les activités d'examen, et fournirait de l'information sur le nombre, le genre et l'issue des incidents graves. Pour favoriser encore plus la transparence et la reddition de comptes, le rapport annuel serait déposé au Parlement.
La nouvelle commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public proposée dans le projet de loi C-3 comblerait une importante lacune dans le régime canadien de reddition de comptes en matière de sécurité publique.
Pendant des années, des parlementaires, des organismes non gouvernementaux et des intervenants ont demandé aux gouvernements successifs d'amorcer une telle réforme. Par exemple, en juin 2015, à l'autre endroit, le comité de la sécurité nationale et de la défense a déposé un rapport qui préconisait la création d'un organisme indépendant d'examen et de traitement des plaintes qui aurait pour mandat d'enquêter sur toutes les activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Plus récemment, Amnistie internationale, dans son bilan de 2018 à l'intention du Canada, a mentionné que l'Agence demeure l'organisme le plus en vue détenant des pouvoirs de coercition et de détention au Canada à ne pas être soumis à des examens et à une surveillance.
Le spécialiste de la sécurité nationale et professeur de droit Craig Forcese aurait déclaré que la décision de soumettre l'Agence des services frontaliers à une surveillance était une bonne décision. Le spécialiste des affaires gouvernementales Mel Cappe a dit que cette mesure comblait une lacune. Je tiens à mentionner que la mesure législative proposée dont la Chambre est saisie a bénéficié des précieux conseils offerts au gouvernement par M. Cappe.
Afin de pouvoir mettre en oeuvre cette mesure législative, nous avons accordé 24 millions de dollars à la Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes, ce qui lui permettra de s'acquitter de son mandat d'organisme indépendant d'examen de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Grâce au projet de loi C-3, la surveillance nécessaire sera bientôt exercée.
Au cours de la dernière législature, ce projet de loi a reçu l'appui de tous les partis à la Chambre parce qu'il est concret et qu'il vise à maintenir l'intégrité de nos services frontaliers et à rassurer les Canadiens sur le fait que leurs plaintes seront entendues de manière indépendante et transparente. Bien que ce projet de loi ait été appuyé à l'unanimité à l'étape de la troisième lecture, il n'avait malheureusement pas reçu la sanction royale lorsque la dernière législature a pris fin.
De nombreux députés ont exprimé des préoccupations au sujet de la date du dépôt et nous présentons maintenant de nouveau ce projet de loi à la première occasion qui nous est donnée au cours de la 43e législature. Cette mesure législative visant à créer un organisme de surveillance pour l'Agence des services frontaliers aura été étudiée durant trois législatures consécutives. Il était plus que temps.
Pour toutes ces raisons, je suis fier de présenter le projet de loi C-3. Je répondrai volontiers aux questions de mes collègues.
View Jack Harris Profile
NDP (NL)
View Jack Harris Profile
2020-01-29 17:03 [p.651]
Madam Speaker, I am pleased to have an opportunity to speak to Bill C-3, an act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and the Canada Border Services Agency Act and to make consequential amendments to other acts. I appreciate the introduction by the minister responsible.
I would like to say, first of all, that the Canada Border Services Agency carries on very important work for the safety of Canada and its citizens, and it enforces some 70 different regulations and pieces of legislation that have been passed by Parliament or enacted through proper processes. It is an important piece of work that the agency does. There are at least 7,000 agents, and they operate at 130 different border points, so the work they do is very important.
They also, in conducting this work, have pretty extraordinary powers, probably greater than many police and law enforcement agencies. They can arrest and detain people who they believe are in Canada illegally. They can arrest with or without warrant. They can arrest people who they suspect are in violation of the act and detain them for, in some cases, indefinite periods.
As has been pointed out, with 96 million travellers in and out of the country, we do not have 96 million complaints, obviously, so it is pretty clear that the work that they are doing is, for the most part, not subject to complaint.
I appreciate that when we talk about the complaints that are made, we are talking about exceptions to proper behaviour, potentially. The complaints may not end up being found to be valid in some cases, but we know that there are sufficient numbers of valid complaints to have a cause for concern that this enforcement agency is not immune to bad behaviour and improper conduct. We know that this has happened, because complaints have been founded by investigations conducted by the CBSA itself.
There has, for a long period of time, been cause for concern that there was a lack of oversight of this body. Justice O'Connor in 2010 recommended that this oversight take place, but it did not take place. We raised this issue as a party in the Conservative years, in 2010, after Justice O'Connor and before, and up until we joined the last Parliament as well. I was not here, but I know my colleagues have done so, and they were not the only ones. Recognized and respected public bodies, such as the Canadian Bar Association, Amnesty International, the B.C. Civil Liberties Association and others, have recognized and pointed out significant deficiencies in the activities and behaviour of the CBSA in the enforcement of its legislation.
It is kind of a given that this should happen. “Long overdue” are the words that have been used by the minister himself, recognizing that this legislation, or something like it, should have been brought forward a lot sooner than it was. It is unfortunate that this gap has not been addressed before this date, but we are heartened by the fact that it is here today.
I must say it was a half-hearted attempt by the Liberal government in the last Parliament to bring this legislation forward in the dying days of Parliament, several weeks before Parliament was to rise. It was passed over to the Senate on the 19th of June, the day before they were to rise, with no hope of any particular consideration there. The Liberal government deserves some blame for not bringing this legislation forward earlier to provide an opportunity for full discussion and debate.
There are some changes that have now been made. I did not get the sense from the minister's remarks, when he was asked about consultations, that any significant consultation has taken place with the union that was involved. Its members appeared before the committee. The customs and immigration union does have something to say about this. I think the union is generally supportive of the idea that there ought to be accountability, because it also provides an opportunity for officers who may be the subject of a complaint to be exonerated if the complaint is not founded, and it can be done in a public way.
All that being said, we do have to look carefully at some of the provisions of this legislation. Is it going to simply be a review of internal complaints or internal investigations that have been made? To what extent is it going to provide for an independent investigation? The power exists there. The practice is something that we have to be concerned about.
Are we going to be in a backlog situation, as we have seen with the RCMP civilian review system? Additional monies have been provided, and I see provisions for standards of performance in terms of dealing with complaints. Whether those standards can be met by just establishing standards of performance and whether the government is committed to being responsive to requests by the agency for sufficient funds or more staff as needed to meet those standards is the problem sometimes with agencies that have this kind of oversight. We want to have a good look at that to see what is going on when these things take place.
The NDP supports this legislation in principle and we will certainly be supporting it at second reading. We will look to see whether the minister is willing to consider amendments during consideration in committee. I am not proposing any here today, but I do want to see that the minister is prepared to consider arguments that may be made to bring about changes that would enhance the legislation and make it more effective.
We have heard specific concerns as well from the legal community in terms of how the practices of the agency have affected solicitor-client privilege, and there are concerns about solicitor-client privilege. We want to make sure that these concerns are addressed if they have not been addressed already, and I am not sure they have been addressed.
We would also want to see the opportunity, and I raised this with the member for Saint-Jean, to be involved in the policy and practices side of it. I note that in the legislation there is an opportunity for the committee itself to initiate reviews of specific practices. Whether it is going to be a robust effort on the part of the committee interests me. I suspect it may depend on who the committee members are.
I would want to see an opportunity for those kinds of reviews to take place through the initiative of someone else. For example, the Canadian Bar Association might want to see a review of a particular practice as it might affect a problem area, whether having to do with solicitor-client privilege or having to do with incidents that have come forward on a number of occasions. Other outside bodies as well might come to this body and ask it to conduct a review. I note that reviews can be done at the direction of the minister as well. That is something that may answer some of the concerns.
I am pretty sure this is not a perfect instrument, and I do not think it has been suggested that it is. It is a way forward, though, and NDP members supported it in the last Parliament because it was a step forward from what was in existence up until right now. There is no form of civilian oversight of this organization, and the lack of that kind of oversight has been noted for many years.
Enforcement officers have enormous powers, and they are a necessity. Officers deal in many cases with people in vulnerable circumstances, people who are refugees. Forty-one thousand refugees crossed into Canada during the last Parliament. These people are vulnerable. They are susceptible to being unable to complain or to feeling that complaining would potentially cause them problems, so vigorous oversight is needed there. It is important for us to ensure that this oversight takes place. There may be a need for third parties to approach the committee to make sure that the policies and practices that are in place adequately meet the required standards when enforcement officers are dealing with civilians whom they are entrusted to look after while also ensuring that the law is enforced.
Those are some of the concerns that New Democrats will be looking at carefully in committee. I am disturbed to hear that the examination of what happens in detention is excluded from this bill, but I am going to be looking very carefully at that. We do note, as was noted before in one of the speeches, that since the year 2000 there have been at least 14 deaths of people while in detention. I am not suggesting that these deaths were the result of negligence or improper behaviour, but the question remains. These were not able to be investigated by any outside agency specifically in relation to the behaviour toward and treatment of individuals who may have had ill-treatment in custody. Whether or not there was in these individual cases, I am obviously not in a position to say.
However, the public must have confidence, ultimately, that there is a sufficient degree of transparency and oversight in order to believe that CBSA officers are acting not only in the public interest and for the safety of Canada, but also in a proper way when they are dealing with individuals, and that they are not abusing their position of power and trust. People must know they have recourse with a proper, independent, robust and accessible process that will make sure justice is done following any violation of proper and appropriate behaviour.
As was mentioned earlier, this is not something the union of the employees involved rejects. This is something it regards as proper and appropriate as well.
Having said all of that, New Democrats support this legislation being brought forward at second reading. We look forward to having an appropriate period of time to consider it and bring forward witnesses who can help with the analysis of it and offer their recommendations and opinions.
Madame la présidente, je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion de prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi C-3, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et la Loi sur l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres lois. J'ai bien aimé le préambule du ministre responsable.
Je tiens à dire, tout d'abord, que l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada effectue un travail très important pour garantir la sécurité du Canada et de ses habitants, et qu'elle applique quelque 70 règlements et lois qui ont été adoptés par le Parlement ou qui ont été mis en vigueur grâce à d'autres processus adéquats. L'Agence accomplit un travail important. Elle est responsable de plus de 7 000 agents qui gèrent 130 postes frontaliers, et elle joue donc un rôle essentiel.
Dans le cadre de leurs fonctions, les agents des services frontaliers détiennent aussi des pouvoirs assez extraordinaires, qui dépassent probablement ceux de beaucoup d'agences policières et d'application de la loi. Ils peuvent arrêter et détenir des personnes qu'ils soupçonnent de se trouver au Canada de façon illégale. Ils peuvent procéder à une arrestation avec ou sans mandat. Ils peuvent arrêter des gens qu'ils soupçonnent d'avoir contrevenu à la loi et les détenir, dans certains cas, pendant une période indéterminée.
Comme il a été souligné, 96 millions de voyageurs quittent le Canada et y entrent chaque année, et nous ne recevons pas 96 millions de plaintes. Il est donc assez clair que la majeure partie du travail accompli ne fait pas l'objet de plaintes.
Il va sans dire que, quand on parle de plaintes, on parle de possibles manquements à la conduite appropriée. Les plaintes ne s'avèrent pas toujours fondées, mais il y en a assez qui le sont pour qu'on puisse être préoccupé par le risque d'inconduite au sein de cet organisme d'application de la loi. D'ailleurs, des enquêtes menées par l'Agence même ont permis de confirmer que certaines plaintes étaient justifiées.
Cet organisme est resté sans surveillance pendant longtemps, ce qui était préoccupant. En 2010, le juge O'Connor avait recommandé qu'une surveillance soit mise en place, mais cela n'a pas été fait. Le NPD avait soulevé la question cette année-là, à l'époque du gouvernement conservateur, après et avant la recommandation du juge O'Connor, puis jusqu'à la dernière législature. Je n'étais pas ici, mais je sais que mes collègues l'ont fait. Ils n'ont pas été les seuls. Des organismes publics bien connus et respectés, comme l'Association du Barreau canadien, Amnistie internationale et l'Association des libertés civiles de la Colombie-Britannique, pour n'en nommer que quelques-uns, ont constaté et signalé d'importantes failles dans les activités et le comportement de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada dans le cadre de l'application de la loi.
Il est plutôt évident que des changements doivent être apportés. Le ministre a lui-même dit qu'ils sont attendus depuis longtemps et il a reconnu que le projet de loi ou une mesure législative semblable aurait dû être présenté beaucoup plus tôt. Il est regrettable que cette lacune n'ait pas été comblée avant aujourd'hui, mais nous sommes encouragés par le fait que nous sommes maintenant saisis du projet de loi.
Le gouvernement libéral a bien présenté un projet de loi à la fin de la dernière législature, mais c'était à peine quelques semaines avant que la session parlementaire prenne fin, alors disons qu'il s'agissait d'un effort timide. Le projet de loi a été renvoyé au Sénat le 19 juin, la veille de la fin de la session parlementaire, sans espoir que les sénateurs lui accordent une attention particulière. Le gouvernement libéral mérite des reproches pour ne pas avoir présenté de projet de loi plus tôt afin qu'une discussion et un débat complets puissent avoir lieu.
Quelques changements ont maintenant été apportés. Les réponses du ministre lorsqu'on lui a posé des questions sur les consultations ne me donnent pas l'impression que des consultations sérieuses ont été menées auprès du syndicat concerné. Des membres du syndicat ont comparu devant le comité. Le Syndicat des douanes et de l'immigration a son mot à dire. Je pense que le syndicat est généralement favorable à l'idée de la reddition de comptes, car elle donne également aux agents pouvant faire l'objet d'une plainte l'occasion d'être innocentés si la plainte n'est pas fondée et ce processus peut se faire de manière publique.
Cela dit, nous devons examiner soigneusement certaines des dispositions du projet de loi. Est-ce que la Commission examinera simplement les plaintes et les enquêtes qui ont été faites à l'interne? Dans quelle mesure le projet de loi prévoira-t-il la tenue d'enquêtes indépendantes? Le pouvoir de mener de telles enquêtes est prévu. Reste à voir comment il sera mis en pratique.
Serons-nous aux prises avec un arriéré, comme nous l'avons observé avec le système de la Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC? Des fonds supplémentaires ont été accordés, et je constate que le projet de loi contient des dispositions qui portent sur des normes de rendement en matière de traitement des plaintes. Le problème, avec les organismes de surveillance comme celui-ci, c'est qu'on ne sait pas vraiment si le simple fait d'établir des normes de rendement est suffisant et si le gouvernement est déterminé à répondre à ses besoins de financement ou d'effectifs. Nous devons nous pencher sur ces questions pour mieux prévoir ce qui va se passer.
Le NPD souscrit au principe du projet de loi, et nous allons certainement l'appuyer à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Nous verrons si le ministre est prêt à considérer des amendements pendant l'étude au comité. Je ne vais pas en proposer à la Chambre aujourd'hui, mais j'aimerais que le ministre soit prêt à prendre en considération les arguments de ceux qui pourraient proposer des amendements visant à améliorer le projet de loi et à le rendre plus efficace.
Nous avons entendu certaines préoccupations du milieu juridique par rapport à l'incidence des pratiques de l'organisme sur le secret professionnel, car il y a bel et bien des aspects préoccupants à cet égard. Il faut répondre à ces préoccupations, si ce n'est déjà fait. Je ne suis pas sûr qu'on y a répondu jusqu'à présent.
De plus, comme je l'ai déjà indiqué à la députée de Saint-Jean, nous aimerions pouvoir examiner les politiques et les pratiques. D'ailleurs, le projet de loi donne au comité l'occasion de se pencher sur certaines pratiques. J'aimerais voir le comité mener une étude rigoureuse. Je suppose que cela dépendra de sa composition.
J'aimerais que ce type d'examen puisse être mené sur l'initiative d'un autre organisme. Par exemple, l'Association du Barreau canadien pourrait vouloir que le comité se penche sur une pratique potentiellement problématique, qu'elle se rapporte au secret professionnel ou à des incidents récurrents. D'autres organismes extérieurs pourraient également demander au comité de mener un examen. Je note que des examens peuvent être aussi faits à la demande du ministre compétent. Cela pourrait apaiser certaines inquiétudes.
La présente mesure n'est sans doute pas un outil parfait — et je pense que personne n'a soutenu le contraire —, mais c'est malgré tout une façon d'avancer. Le NPD avait appuyé cette mesure lors de la législature précédente parce qu'elle représentait une amélioration par rapport au système existant. En effet, à l'heure actuelle, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne fait l'objet d'aucune surveillance civile. Cela fait des années qu'on signale ce problème.
Les agents de la paix possèdent d'énormes pouvoirs, et ils jouent un rôle indispensable. Dans bien des cas, ils ont affaire à des personnes vulnérables, à des réfugiés. Durant la dernière législature, 41 000 réfugiés sont entrés au Canada. Ces gens sont vulnérables. Il est possible qu'ils ne puissent pas se plaindre ou qu'ils estiment que le faire pourrait leur causer des problèmes. Une surveillance rigoureuse s'impose donc. Nous devons nous assurer que des mécanismes de surveillance sont en place. Il pourrait être nécessaire pour des tiers de s'adresser au comité pour vérifier que les politiques et les pratiques en vigueur respectent les normes requises quand on confie aux agents de la paix la tâche de s'occuper de civils, tout en veillant à l'application de la loi.
Ce sont là quelques-unes des préoccupations que les néo-démocrates examineront attentivement au comité. Je suis troublé d'entendre que le projet de loi ne prévoit aucun examen relativement à ce qui se passe dans les centres de détention, mais je compte étudier cette question de très près. Soulignons un fait qui a été mentionné dans une autre intervention: depuis 2000, au moins 14 personnes sont mortes en détention. Je ne veux pas laisser entendre que ces décès sont attribuables à la négligence ou à un comportement inapproprié, mais la question demeure. Ces cas n'ont pas pu faire l'objet d'une enquête de la part d'un organisme externe, plus précisément en ce qui concerne les comportements à l'égard des détenus et le traitement de personnes qui ont peut-être été maltraitées pendant leur détention. Évidemment, je ne suis pas en mesure de dire s'il en a été ainsi dans ces cas précis.
Toutefois, les citoyens doivent, au bout du compte, avoir la certitude qu'il existe un degré suffisant de transparence et de surveillance pour en arriver à croire non seulement que les agents de l'ASFC agissent dans l'intérêt public et pour la sécurité du Canada, mais aussi qu'ils traitent les personnes de manière appropriée, sans abuser de leur position de pouvoir et de confiance. Il faut que les gens sachent qu'ils peuvent avoir recours à un processus approprié, indépendant, solide et accessible qui garantira que justice soit faite en cas de comportement inadéquat et inacceptable.
Je le répète, le syndicat des employés concernés ne rejette pas ce constat. Il trouve, lui aussi, que c'est adéquat et juste.
Bref, les néo-démocrates appuient cette mesure législative à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Nous avons hâte d'y consacrer suffisamment de temps pour l'examiner et inviter des témoins qui pourront nous aider à l'analyser et nous faire part de leurs recommandations et opinions.
View Pam Damoff Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to rise today to speak to Bill C-3, which seeks to establish a new, independent public complaints and review body for the Canada Border Services Agency, or CBSA. This represents another step forward in the government's commitment to ensuring that all of its agencies and departments are accountable to Canadians.
As a member of the public safety committee during the last Parliament, I am quite proud to have participated in legislation that made remarkable change and took the number of measures we took to ensure greater accountability of our security agencies and departments.
Two years ago, our Bill C-22 received royal assent, establishing the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. That addressed a long-standing need for parliamentarians to review the Government of Canada's activities and operations in regard to national security and intelligence. It has been in operation for some time now and is a strong addition to our system of national security review and accountability. As members will know, the committee has the power to review activities across government, including the CBSA.
To complement that, our committee studied our national security framework, as well as Bill C-59, which allowed for the creation of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency, or NSIRA. NSIRA is also authorized to conduct reviews of any national security or intelligence activity carried out by federal departments and agencies, including the CBSA. All of this is on top of existing review and oversight mechanisms in the public safety portfolio.
The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP investigates complaints from the public about the conduct of members in the RCMP, for example, and does so in an open, independent and objective manner. The Office of the Correctional Investigator conducts independent, thorough and timely investigations about issues related to Correctional Service Canada.
Bill C-3 would fill a gap in the review of the activities of our public safety agencies. The existing Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, which is responsible for complaints against members of the RCMP, would see its name change to the public complaints and review commission and its mandate expanded to include the CBSA. It would be able to consider complaints against CBSA employee conduct or service, from foreign nationals, permanent residents and Canadian citizens, regardless of whether they are within or outside of Canada. Reviews of national security activities would be carried out by NSIRA.
Here is how it would work in practice. If an individual has a complaint unrelated to national security, she or he would be able to direct it either to the commission or to the CBSA. Both bodies would notify the other of any complaint made. The CBSA would be required to investigate any complaint, except those disposed of informally. The commission would be able to conduct its own investigation of the complaint in situations where the chairperson is of the opinion that doing so would be in the public interest. If an individual is not satisfied with the CBSA's response, the commission would be able to follow up as it sees fit.
The new PCRC would also be able to produce findings on the CBSA's policies, procedures and guidelines. It would also be able to review CBSA's activities, including making findings on CBSA's compliance with the law and the reasonableness and necessity of the exercise of its powers. Indeed, the commission's findings on each review would be published in a mandatory annual public report.
Bill C-3 not only fills a gap in our review system. It answers calls from the public and Parliament for independent review of CBSA. Most significantly, the Senate Standing Committee on National Security and Defence, in its 2015 report, encouraged the creation of an oversight body. I would like to acknowledge Bill S-205 from our last Parliament, introduced in the other place not long after the government took office, which proposed a CBSA review body as well.
Certainly we have heard from academics, experts and other stakeholders of the need to create a body with the authority to review CBSA. During testimony at the public safety committee on December 5, 2017, Alex Neve, secretary general of Amnesty International, said, “how crucial it is for the government to move rapidly to institute full, independent review of CBSA.” This was reflective of much of the testimony we heard, and I am pleased the government is acting on this advice. I would also like to acknowledge my colleague from Toronto—Danforth for her efforts and advocacy for the establishment of a CBSA review body.
The CBSA has a long and rich history of providing border services in an exemplary fashion. It does so through the collective contribution of over 14,000 dedicated professional women and men, women like Tamara Lopez from my community, who is a role model for young women looking for a career in the CBSA.
The CBSA already has robust internal and external mechanisms in place to address many of its activities. For example, certain immigration-related decisions are subject to review by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, and its customs role can be appealed all the way up to the Federal Court.
That said, when it comes to the public, the CBSA should not be the only body receiving and following up on complaints about its own activities. Indeed, some Canadians might not be inclined to say a word if they do not have the confidence that their complaint will be treated independently, objectively and thoroughly. Bill C-3 would inspire that confidence.
The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring that all of its agencies and departments are accountable to Canadians. Bill C-3 would move the yardstick forward on that commitment. It would bring Canada more closely in line with the accountability bodies of border agencies in other countries, including those of our Five Eyes allies.
The accountability and transparency of our national security framework has improved greatly since we were elected in 2015. This bill would continue these efforts by providing border services that keep Canadians safe and by improving public trust and confidence. Bill C-3 would ensure that the public continues to expect consistent, fair and equal treatment by CBSA employees. That is why I am proud to stand behind Bill C-3 today.
In the last Parliament, the House of Commons unanimously passed Bill C-98, which was a bill to bring oversight to CBSA. Although that bill died in the Senate, it is my hope that all parties will again come together to pass this bill.
I listened to the member for Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner speak earlier in this debate. He spoke at length about firearms and his petition opposing our promise to make Canadians safer by enhancing gun control. I would remind him that almost 80% of Canadians support a ban on military-style assault rifles according to an independent Angus Reid survey.
I know he and his party supported oversight of the CBSA in the last Parliament. I hope he and all members will join me in supporting oversight in this Parliament under Bill C-3 and assure the bill's passage this session.
Monsieur le Président, c'est un honneur de prendre la parole au sujet du projet de loi C-3, qui vise à créer un nouvel organisme d'examen indépendant chargé des plaintes du public à l'endroit de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, ou ASFC. Avec ce projet de loi, le gouvernement concrétise un peu plus sa promesse visant à faire en sorte que tous ses organismes et ministères rendent des comptes aux Canadiens.
Au cours de la dernière législature, j'ai siégé avec fierté au comité de la sécurité publique, lequel a contribué à des projets de loi qui ont modifié considérablement les choses et a pris des mesures qui assurent une meilleure reddition de comptes de la part des organismes et des ministères chargés de la sécurité.
Il y a deux ans, le projet de loi C-22 a reçu la sanction royale. Le projet de loi consistait à créer le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, qui permet aux parlementaires d'examiner les activités et les opérations du gouvernement du Canada en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, un besoin qui se faisait sentir depuis longtemps. Le Comité mène ses activités depuis un certain temps et vient étoffer considérablement le régime de responsabilisation et d'examen en matière de sécurité nationale. Comme les députés le savent, le Comité a le pouvoir d'examiner les activités de tous les organismes gouvernementaux, y compris l'ASFC.
Par ailleurs, le comité de la sécurité publique a étudié le cadre de sécurité nationale, ainsi que le projet de loi C-59, qui a permis de créer l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Cet office a aussi le pouvoir d'examiner toute activité liée à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement menée par les ministères et agences fédéraux, notamment l'ASFC. Tout cela vient s'ajouter aux mécanismes d'examen et de surveillance existants dans le portefeuille de la sécurité publique.
La Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC enquête notamment sur les plaintes du public concernant la conduite des agents de la GRC, de manière ouverte, indépendante et objective. Le Bureau de l'enquêteur correctionnel mène en temps opportun des enquêtes approfondies indépendantes des questions touchant Service correctionnel Canada.
Le projet de loi C-3 comblerait une lacune dans l'examen des activités des agences de la sécurité publique du Canada. La Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes actuelle, qui est responsable des plaintes concernant les agents de la GRC, serait dorénavant connue sous le nom de Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. Son mandat serait élargi pour inclure l'ASFC. Elle pourrait examiner des plaintes portées contre le service ou la conduite des agents de l'ASFC par des ressortissants étrangers, des résidents permanents et des citoyens canadiens, peu importe s'ils se trouvent au Canada ou à l'étranger. L'examen des activités liées à la sécurité nationale serait mené par l'Office de surveillance des activités et matière de sécurité nationale.
Voici comment cela fonctionnerait dans la pratique. Si une personne souhaite déposer une plainte sans lien avec la sécurité nationale, elle pourrait la déposer auprès de la Commission ou de l'ASFC. Les deux organismes s'informeraient mutuellement de toute plainte déposée. L'ASFC serait tenue d'enquêter sur toutes les plaintes, à l'exception de celles réglées de manière informelle. Si le président estimait que cela est dans l'intérêt du public, la Commission pourrait mener sa propre enquête. Si une personne juge insatisfaisante la réponse de l'ASFC, la Commission pourrait en faire le suivi, si elle le juge bon.
La nouvelle Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public pourrait aussi produire des rapports sur les politiques, les procédures et les directives de l'ASFC. Elle serait aussi en mesure de passer en revue les activités de l'Agence, et notamment de formuler des conclusions quant à son respect de la loi et au caractère raisonnable et nécessaire de ses interventions. Les conclusions de chaque examen de la Commission feraient obligatoirement l'objet d'un rapport officiel annuel.
Le projet de loi C-3 ne comble pas seulement une lacune dans notre système d'examen. Il répond à une demande du public et du Parlement en faveur d'un examen indépendant de l'ASFC. Plus important encore, le Comité sénatorial permanent de la sécurité nationale et de la défense a appelé de ses vœux la création d'un organisme de surveillance dans son rapport de 2015. Je tiens à rappeler aux députés le projet de loi S-205, qui a été proposé à l'autre endroit, au cours de la législature précédente, peu de temps après l'arrivée au pouvoir du gouvernement et qui prévoyait la création d'un organisme d'examen de l'ASFC aussi.
Des universitaires, des experts et d'autres intervenants nous ont parlé de la nécessité de mettre sur pied un organisme ayant le pouvoir de passer en revue les activités de l'ASFC. Au comité de la sécurité publique et nationale, le 5 décembre 2017, Alex Neve, le secrétaire général d'Amnistie internationale a dit, dans son témoignage, « à quel point il est crucial que le gouvernement agisse rapidement pour assurer un examen complet et indépendant de l'ASFC ». Cela reflète une grande partie des témoignages que nous avons entendus, et je suis heureuse que le gouvernement suive ce conseil. J'aimerais également remercier ma collègue de Toronto—Danforth pour ses efforts et son plaidoyer en faveur de la création d'un organe d'examen de l'ASFC.
L'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada fournit depuis longtemps et de manière exemplaire d'excellents services frontaliers. Elle le fait grâce à l'apport collectif de plus de 14 000 hommes et femmes, qui sont dévoués et professionnels. C'est le cas de Tamara Lopez, de ma région, qui est un modèle pour les jeunes femmes qui pensent faire carrière au sein de cette organisation.
L'Agence s'appuie déjà sur de robustes mécanismes internes et externes visant un grand nombre de ses activités. Par exemple, certaines décisions en matière d'immigration peuvent faire l'objet d'un examen par la Commission de l'immigration et du statut de réfugié du Canada, et les mesures qu'elle prend dans le cadre de ses fonctions douanières peuvent même faire l'objet d'un appel jusqu'en Cour fédérale.
Cela dit, en ce qui concerne le public, l'Agence ne devrait pas être le seul organisme à recevoir et à traiter les plaintes sur ses propres activités. En fait, des Canadiens pourraient hésiter à se faire entendre s'ils ne sont pas convaincus que leur plainte sera traitée de façon indépendante, objective et exhaustive. Le projet de loi C-3 inspirerait cette confiance.
Le gouvernement du Canada est déterminé à faire en sorte que tous ses organismes et ministères rendent des comptes à la population. Le projet de loi C-3 ferait avancer les choses vers l'atteinte de cet objectif. Il permettrait au Canada de se doter d'un organisme de surveillance des services frontaliers qui s'approcherait de ce qui se fait ailleurs dans le monde, y compris chez ses alliés du Groupe des cinq.
Notre cadre de sécurité nationale a largement gagné en transparence depuis que nous avons été élus en 2015. Ce projet de loi poursuivrait ces efforts en assurant que les services frontaliers protègent les Canadiens et en améliorant la confiance du public. Grâce au projet de loi C-3, le public pourra continuer de s'attendre à un traitement uniforme, juste et équitable de la part des employés de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Voilà pourquoi je suis fière d'appuyer le projet de loi C-3 aujourd'hui.
Au cours de la législature précédente, la Chambre des communes a adopté à l'unanimité le projet de loi C-98, qui visait à soumettre l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada à une surveillance. Bien que ce projet de loi soit mort au Feuilleton du Sénat, j'ai bon espoir que tous les partis se rallieront de nouveau pour en adopter la présente version.
J'ai écouté le discours du député de Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, plus tôt dans ce débat. Il a beaucoup parlé des armes à feu et de sa pétition s'opposant à notre promesse de faire du Canada un pays plus sûr grâce au resserrement du contrôle des armes à feu. Je lui rappelle que, selon un sondage indépendant d'Angus Reid, près de 80 % des Canadiens appuient l'interdiction des fusils d'assaut de type militaire.
Je sais que le député et son parti ont appuyé l'idée de soumettre l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada à une surveillance, au cours de la dernière législature. J'espère que tous les députés et lui se joindront à moi pour faire de même cette fois-ci en appuyant le projet de loi C-3 afin qu'il soit adopté au cours de la présente session.
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2020-01-29 17:50 [p.658]
Mr. Speaker, I stand today in this chamber and am pleased to speak for the first time as a re-elected member of Parliament for Yorkton—Melville. I and my fellow Saskatchewan caucus colleagues thank all our constituents for painting the province of Saskatchewan completely blue.
Bill C-3 actually mirrors Bill C-98, an act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and the Canada Border Services Agency Act and to make consequential amendments to other acts. As we all know, the bill took so long to introduce that it was not passed prior to the 2019 federal election.
This legislation proposes to repurpose and rename the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to the “public complaints and review commission”. Under its new name, the commission will also be responsible for reviewing civilian complaints against the Canadian Border Services Agency. The bill would ensure that all Canadians law enforcement agencies would have an oversight body.
Canadians expect effective oversight of federal law enforcement agencies. The Liberals made a promise to do this in 2015.
During its previous mandate, the Liberal government took so long to act on this issue that Bill C-98 failed to be passed prior to the 2019 election.
The former Privy Council Office chief, Mel Cappe, had been hired to conduct an independent report and provide his recommendations in June 2017, which he did. However, it was only because of an access to information request by CBC News that Parliament even became aware of this report. For two years, the government and the then, and now no longer, public safety minister from Saskatchewan sat on that report.
We, who served in the previous Parliament, were counting down the days and nights until the session came to a close. Then, at the last possible moment, this rather straightforward and simple but essential legislation was finally introduced. Why did it take the previous majority Liberal government three and a half years to draft and introduce Bill C-98 to the House? In the eleventh hour, it was too late to deal with such a critical promise that impacted public safety.
The Liberals' poor management and bad decision-making impacted RCMP officers, who had to be deployed and dedicated to dealing with illegal border crossings. They were pulled from other details, from monitoring returned ISIS fighters, tackling organized crime. They were pulled from rural detachments, where the RCMP is already short-staffed and dealing with an increase in rural crime. The claim that there are more police available in rural Canada is not true, a statement made and not followed through on.
When the Liberal majority government was ineptly unable to keep an election promise at the eleventh hour, so as to not appear to have broken even more promises, it meant an even longer wait, through the whole election process, through the weeks of delay before the House was finally called back by the Prime Minister to sit just before Christmas for a short time only to go into the winter break. Here we finally are today in a second attempt to get the job done of Bill C-3.
The government has been plagued by inefficiency and lack of foresight since the beginning of its first mandate, further hamstrung by one ethical breach after another, through brazen attitudes of entitlement, to the foolish boldness of demanding and coercing our independent justice system and principled people to bow to executive power.
Just this past week we have seen the frightening fallout of the government putting their friends ahead of good governance: A violent man sentenced to life in prison in 2006 for viciously murdering his wife was granted day parole in the fall of 2019. His case manager indicated a moderate risk of reoffending and he was to avoid relationships but could have encounters with women, as long as it was strictly sexual. As a result, a young woman lost her life.
Who in their right mind would create the environment for any woman to be put in harm's way like this? Ex-Parole Board commissioner Dave Blackburn stated that such a condition is “unbelievable”.
The Liberal government has to take responsibility for a foolish decision it made in 2015 to not renew any Parole Board appointees, purely a political decision that removed all historical experience from the board and replaced them all, through the Privy Council, with Liberal appointees.
I believe the desk will be pleased, Mr. Speaker, to hear I will be splitting my time with the member for Kootenay—Columbia.
Since then, there has been a more than 25% increase in the awarding of day parole in Canada. This is ridiculous. Canadians have no faith that an internal inquiry will get to the bottom of the incompetence that falls on the Liberal government. An external inquiry of the national Parole Board must take place. The government does not have credibility when it comes to dealing with its own self-serving, intentional mistakes.
As well, we know the delay in bringing forward this legislation was not due in any way to so many consultations. As a matter of fact, again and again, we have heard from stakeholders that they were not consulted. From what I have heard today on the floor, that has not changed.
This legislation proposes changes to the Canada Border Services Agency, yet the Customs and Immigration Union was never contacted. This is another blatant inconsistency by the government. On one end, there was no consultation. On the other, there was the virtue signalling of setting up advisory councils for our veterans but doing nothing other than giving a platform for photo ops and the appearance of consultation before the reveal.
The fact that the Liberal government could not be bothered to consult the biggest stakeholders, the union representatives of the CBSA front-line workers, says it is not about the workers. It appears the Liberals feel they can pick and choose which unions they are going to give special treatment to while others are totally ignored.
Conservative members will work with the government in the interests of the principles of the bill, but rest assured we want to make sure that the people impacted are part of the committee review process. We want to ensure that proper committee time is taken to look at the changes to the RCMP Act and the CBSA Act, and make sure we are doing a service to the people who will be impacted by them, whether it is on a public complaints process or other elements.
As good as this policy is, it needs good government to implement it, not a government consistently mired in scandal that loses track of its responsibilities and then, concerned about its re-election, attempts to rush this legislation through irresponsibly. It does not need a government that is so out of touch that it fails to consult with the Canadians who would be impacted.
The government's approach demonstrates a complete lack of accountability, care and respect for Canadians. There is unrest across western Canada that must not be ignored. I would warn that we must no longer be fuelled by intentional actions that encourage that unrest instead of building consensus and recognizing and celebrating healthy interdependence across our amazing country.
Our nation, and all people of Canada, deserve a government that legislates responsibly, respectfully and with the best interests of all Canadians in mind. I look forward to the day we form that government.
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureuse de prendre la parole pour la première fois en tant que députée réélue de Yorkton—Melville. Les députés du caucus de la Saskatchewan et moi-même remercions les électeurs de notre circonscription respective d'avoir permis au Parti conservateur de tout rafler dans la province lors des dernières élections.
Le projet de loi C-3 reprend en fait les points du projet de loi C-98, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et la Loi sur l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres lois. Comme nous le savons tous, les libéraux ont tardé si longtemps à présenter le projet de loi que ce dernier n'a pu être adopté avant les élections fédérales de 2019.
Cette mesure législative propose de modifier le nom de la Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, qui sera dorénavant connue sous le nom de Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, et de lui conférer de nouvelles attributions. Celle-ci sera aussi responsable d'enquêter sur les plaintes du public contre l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Ce projet de loi fait en sorte que tous les organismes canadiens d'application de la loi disposeront d'un organe de surveillance.
Les Canadiens s'attendent à une surveillance efficace des organismes fédéraux d'application de la loi. Les libéraux l'avaient promis en 2015.
Pendant son dernier mandat, le gouvernement libéral a tellement tardé à agir dans ce dossier que le projet de loi C-98 est mort au Feuilleton avant les élections de 2019.
L'ancien greffier du Conseil privé, Mel Cappe, avait été engagé pour produire un rapport indépendant et fournir ses recommandations, ce qu'il a fait en juin 2017. Cependant, ce n'est que grâce à une demande d'accès à l'information de CBC News que le Parlement a pu même prendre connaissance de ce rapport. Le gouvernement et le député de la Saskatchewan qui était alors ministre de la Sécurité publique, mais qui ne l'est plus aujourd'hui, n'ont donné aucune suite à ce rapport pendant deux ans.
Ceux d'entre nous qui étaient présents pendant la dernière législature comptaient les jours et les nuits avant la fin de la session. Ensuite, au tout dernier moment, on a enfin présenté un projet de loi plutôt simple, mais essentiel. Pourquoi le gouvernement libéral, qui était alors majoritaire, a-t-il attendu trois ans et demi pour rédiger le projet de loi C-98 et le présenter à la Chambre? Comme le projet de loi a été présenté à la dernière minute, il était trop tard pour remplir une promesse aussi cruciale pour la sécurité publique.
L'incurie et les mauvaises décisions des libéraux ont eu un effet sur les agents de la GRC. Certains d'entre eux ont dû être réaffectés à la lutte contre les passages illégaux à la frontière. Ils ont été retirés d'autres unités et services chargés de surveiller les combattants du groupe État islamique de retour au pays et de lutter contre le crime organisé. Ils ont été retirés de détachements situés en milieu rural, où la GRC connaît déjà une pénurie de personnel et doit composer avec une hausse de la criminalité. Il est faux de prétendre qu'il y a plus de policiers en fonction dans les régions rurales du Canada. Le gouvernement n'a pas rempli cette promesse.
Alors qu'ils formaient un gouvernement majoritaire, les libéraux n'ont pas été en mesure de tenir une promesse électorale à la dernière minute. Pour ne pas avoir l'air d'avoir rompu encore plus de promesses, il a fallu encore de longues semaines, au-delà de la campagne électorale, avant que le premier ministre se décide enfin à rappeler la Chambre pour qu'elle ne siège que pendant quelques jours avant Noël, ce qui a été suivi par le long congé d'hiver. Nous sommes enfin réunis ici aujourd'hui pour tenter une deuxième fois de faire le travail nécessaire en adoptant le projet de loi C-3.
Depuis le début de son premier mandat, le gouvernement est aux prises avec des problèmes attribuables à son inefficacité et à son manque de prévoyance. Il est de surcroît paralysé par ses multiples manquements à l'éthique et par sa culture éhontée du tout m'est dû. Qui plus est, il a le culot d'exiger que le système de justice indépendant et des gens de principe s'inclinent devant le pouvoir exécutif et même de les y contraindre.
La semaine dernière, nous avons été témoins des conséquences effroyables d'un gouvernement qui fait passer les intérêts de ses amis avant la bonne gouvernance. En effet, un homme violent, condamné à la prison à vie en 2006 pour le meurtre sauvage de sa conjointe, a obtenu une libération conditionnelle de jour à l'automne 2019. La personne responsable de son dossier a signalé un risque modéré de récidive. L'homme était tenu d'éviter toute relation durable, mais il pouvait avoir des rencontres avec des femmes, à condition que ce soit strictement sexuel. Résultat: une jeune femme a trouvé la mort.
Comment une personne sensée peut-elle créer des conditions aussi susceptibles de mettre en danger une femme? Dave Blackburn, un ancien commissaire de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, a déclaré que « de telles conditions sont “inconcevables” ».
Le gouvernement libéral doit assumer la responsabilité de la décision irréfléchie qu'il a prise en 2015 en ne renouvelant pas le mandat des commissaires de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles et en les remplaçant, par l'entremise du Bureau du Conseil privé, par des personnes proches des libéraux. Cette décision purement politique a eu pour effet d'écarter toutes les personnes d'expérience de la commission.
Monsieur le Président, je crois que la présidence sera heureuse d'apprendre que je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député de Kootenay—Columbia.
Depuis, le nombre de demandes de semi-liberté approuvées a augmenté de plus de 25 % au Canada. C'est ridicule. Les Canadiens ne sont pas convaincus qu'une enquête interne permettra de faire la lumière sur l'incompétence du gouvernement libéral. La Commission nationale des libérations conditionnelles doit faire l'objet d'une enquête externe. Lorsqu'il s'agit de corriger ses propres erreurs, surtout lorsqu'elles sont commises de manière égoïste et intentionnelle, le gouvernement n'a aucune crédibilité.
Nous savons de plus que ce n'est pas parce qu'il y a eu trop de consultations que ce projet de loi a autant tardé. Les parties concernées nous ont d'ailleurs dit à maintes reprises qu'elles n'ont jamais été consultées. D'après ce que j'ai entendu aujourd'hui, cela n'a pas changé.
La mesure législative propose des changements à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Pourtant, on n'a jamais communiqué avec le Syndicat des douanes et de l'immigration. Il s'agit encore une fois d'une autre incohérence flagrante de la part du gouvernement. D'une part, il ne fait aucune consultation. De l'autre, il se donne une image vertueuse en établissant des comités consultatifs pour les anciens combattants qui, en réalité, ne servent qu'à faire des séances de photos et à donner l'impression que des consultations ont eu lieu avant la présentation du projet de loi.
Le fait que le gouvernement libéral n'ait pas pris la peine de consulter les intervenants les plus importants, à savoir les représentants syndicaux des travailleurs de première ligne de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, indique qu'il ne se soucie pas du sort des travailleurs. J'ai l'impression que les libéraux se donnent la permission de choisir quels syndicats jouiront d'un traitement spécial et lesquels seront totalement ignorés.
Les députés conservateurs collaboreront avec le gouvernement en vue d'appuyer les principes du projet de loi. Cependant, nous voulons que les personnes touchées aient l'occasion de participer au processus d'étude en comité. Nous devons garantir que le comité aura suffisamment de temps pour étudier les modifications proposées à la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et à la Loi sur l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada afin de vérifier si ces modifications profiteront aux personnes concernées, qu'il s'agisse du traitement des plaintes du public ou d'autres éléments.
Aussi bonne soit cette politique, il faut un bon gouvernement pour la mettre en œuvre, pas un gouvernement qui oublie ses responsabilités parce qu'il est constamment empêtré dans les scandales, puis qui tente de faire adopter à la va-vite cette mesure législative parce qu'il craint de ne pas être réélu. Le gouvernement ne doit pas être si déconnecté de la réalité qu'il ne mène aucune consultation auprès des Canadiens qui seraient touchés par ce projet de loi.
L'approche adoptée par le gouvernement montre qu'il estime n'avoir aucun compte à rendre aux Canadiens, qu'il ne se soucie aucunement de ce qu'ils pensent et qu'il n'éprouve aucun respect pour eux. Un climat d'agitation règne dans l'Ouest canadien, et il ne faut pas l'ignorer. Je crois que nous ne devons plus poser des gestes visant intentionnellement à encourager cette agitation. Nous devons plutôt chercher à trouver des terrains d'entente, de même qu'à reconnaître et à favoriser une interdépendance saine à l'échelle de notre merveilleux pays.
Le Canada et tous ses habitants méritent un gouvernement qui légifère de façon responsable et respectueuse, en ayant à cœur l'intérêt de tous les Canadiens. J'attends avec impatience le jour où nous pourrons former ce genre de gouvernement.
View Rob Morrison Profile
CPC (BC)
View Rob Morrison Profile
2020-01-29 18:04 [p.660]
Mr. Speaker, as this is my first speech, I want to take the opportunity to thank the great people in the Kootenay—Columbia riding for putting their trust and faith in me to represent them in Ottawa. The support from my family and friends was incredible and from my wife, Heather and our five children, Ryan, Rob, Kassidy, Chelsea and Kendall.
With 80,000 square kilometres, it was very challenging to travel and meet residents from all corners of the riding. The campaign team and volunteers did an outstanding job, working long hours every day.
I listened to the concerns, the priorities for softwood lumber and priorities with the firearms legislation. I also want to talk about supporting the mining industry, tourism, the energy sector, Alberta, as it is neighbouring our riding, and health.
I am pleased to speak to Bill C-3, an act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and the Canada Border Services Agency Act. I do so today on behalf of many border officials in ports of Kingsgate, Nelway, Porthill, Roosville and Rykerts, all within the riding of Kootenay—Columbia.
I thank them for their service and I thank the CBSA Kootenay area chief of operations for leadership and dedication in ensuring the safety and security of our area. I also support the RCMP, which provides municipal, rural, provincial and federal policing throughout the Kootenay—Columbia riding.
I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the hard work and dedication of all the men and women who serve to protect this great nation from coast to coast.
One issue I heard when travelling throughout the riding was the word “accountability”, which is really interesting because that is exactly what we are talking about today.
I support internal investigations. In fact, I have been involved in many internal investigations in the RCMP in a 35-year career. I support independence. I believe we need independent investigations. It would be great to hear how this is going to work. I have not heard yet, with the delays in investigations. I know right now with the RCMP, which has an independent review, it is two, three or four years at least. We have some members on the old RCMP act and some members on the new act, and now we are going to change it again to have a new accountability process with this review committee.
I have heard some concerns about the consultation of CBSA with its union. I am also wondering about the consultation with the RCMP, as they are now working toward a union as well. Have we looked at the consultation there and have people come in? I look forward to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security having people come in so we can talk to them and see how they feel about what is happening.
One of the most important things that has not been brought up is training and service standards. What are the service standards of CBSA? What are the service standards of the RCMP? What exactly is the role of an RCMP member? The review committee can then understand what that person is going to do, what they should be doing and what they should not be doing, so they do not, because they have no experience in law enforcement, for example, think that behaviour is inappropriate when maybe it is or vice versa.
Developing service standards is a requirement before we can move forward with the bill, so that the review committee has a clear understanding of the role for CBSA and the role for the RCMP.
One thing that came up at one of the last meetings of the public safety committee was administrative issues that were not expected. I would be interested to hear from the government what those administrative issues were. Was it the hiring of new people? Was it the service standards or was it a union? I do not understand what administrative issues would have popped up in December.
The RCMP and CBSA are very reputable organizations. I want to be up front. They would welcome a well-thought-out, well-trained independent review, but not something where someone is appointed and we would run into the same issues we are having right now with the Parole Board.
I request that the government and the public safety minister answer some of these questions so that we can move forward in supporting this bill and the changes proposed in it.
Monsieur le Président, comme c'est ma première allocution, je tiens à profiter de l'occasion pour remercier les formidables habitants de Kootenay—Columbia de m'avoir fait confiance pour les représenter à Ottawa. J'ai eu droit à un soutien incroyable de la part de ma famille et de mes amis, de mon épouse, Heather, et de nos cinq enfants, Ryan, Rob, Kassidy, Chelsea et Kendall.
Avec une circonscription de 80 000 kilomètres carrés, il n'a pas été facile de parcourir tout le territoire pour rencontrer les citoyens. L'équipe et les bénévoles de la campagne ont fait un excellent travail, ils n'ont pas ménagé leurs efforts.
Les gens m'ont parlé de leurs préoccupations et de leurs priorités, de bois d'œuvre et de loi relative aux armes à feu. Le soutien de l'industrie minière, du tourisme, du secteur de l'énergie et de l'Alberta — puisqu'elle est notre voisine —, de même que la santé sont des sujets que je veux aborder.
Je suis heureux de prendre la parole à propos du projet de loi C-3, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et la Loi sur l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Je le fais au nom de nombreux agents des services frontaliers des points d'entrée de Kingsgate, de Nelway, de Porthill, de Roosville et de Rykerts, qui se trouvent tous dans la circonscription de Kootenay—Columbia.
Je les remercie de leur travail et je remercie le chef des opérations de l'ASFC pour la région de Kootenay de son leadership et de tous les efforts qu'il déploie pour assurer la sécurité de notre région. J'appuie également la GRC, qui fournit les services de police municipaux, ruraux, provinciaux et fédéraux dans toute ma circonscription.
J'aimerais profiter de cette occasion pour saluer le travail acharné et le dévouement de tous les hommes et de toutes les femmes qui servent et protègent ce grand pays d'un océan à l'autre.
Lors de mes déplacements dans ma circonscription, j'ai entendu un thème revenir, celui de la « responsabilisation », ce qui est vraiment intéressant puisque c'est ce dont nous parlons aujourd'hui.
Je suis pour les enquêtes internes. De fait, j'ai participé à de nombreuses enquêtes internes au cours de mes 35 ans de carrière à la GRC. Je suis en faveur de l'indépendance. Je pense que nous avons besoin d'enquêtes indépendantes. Il serait bon de savoir comment cela va fonctionner. Je n'ai pas encore pu l'apprendre, cependant, en raison du retard dans les enquêtes. Actuellement, à la GRC, qui a un mécanisme d'examen indépendant, cela peut prendre au moins deux, trois ou quatre ans. Certains agents relèvent de l'ancienne loi sur la GRC et d'autres, de la nouvelle. Maintenant, on va la changer une nouvelle fois pour intégrer un nouveau processus de responsabilisation en lien avec cette commission d'examen.
J'ai entendu certaines inquiétudes au sujet du fait que le syndicat de l'ASFC n'aurait pas été consulté. Je me demande s'il en a été de même avec la GRC, dont les membres souhaitent se syndiquer. Les membres de la GRC ont-ils été consultés et ont-ils témoigné? J'ai hâte que le Comité permanent de la Sécurité publique et nationale convoque des témoins afin qu'ils puissent nous dire ce qu'ils pensent de tout cela.
Il n'a pas été question des normes de formation et de service, des éléments très importants. Quelles sont les normes de service de l'ASFC? Quelles sont les normes de service de la GRC? En quoi exactement consiste le rôle d'un agent de la GRC? Le comité d'examen pourra alors comprendre ce que cet agent est censé faire, ce qu'il doit faire et ne pas faire. Dans le cas contraire, comme ses membres n'ont aucune expérience en matière d'application de la loi, ils pourraient penser qu'un comportement est adéquat alors qu'il ne l'est pas, ou vice-versa.
Il est essentiel d'élaborer des normes de service avant d'aller de l'avant avec ce projet de loi afin que le comité d'examen comprenne bien les rôles de l'ASFC et de la GRC.
Au cours d'une des dernières réunions du comité de la sécurité publique, il a été question d'enjeux d'ordre administratif qu'on ne s'attendait pas à devoir traiter. J'aimerais que le gouvernement nous dise en quoi consistaient ces questions d'ordre administratif. S'agissait-il de l'embauche de nouveaux employés? S'agissait-il de normes de service ou de questions syndicales? Je ne comprends pas quelles questions d'ordre administratif auraient pu être soulevées en décembre.
La GRC et l'ASFC ont toutes deux très bonne réputation. Je serai franc. Elles sont ouvertes à l'idée d'un organisme indépendant bien pensé et bien formé, mais pas à l'idée d'un processus de nomination qui donnera un résultat semblable à celui qu'on voit actuellement à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles.
Avant que nous puissions appuyer ce projet de loi et les changements qu'il propose, je demande que le gouvernement et le ministre de la Sécurité publique répondent à certaines de ces questions.
View Ruby Sahota Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Ruby Sahota Profile
2020-01-29 18:14 [p.662]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to start off by saying that I will be sharing my time today with the member for Bonavista—Burin—Trinity.
I am grateful for the opportunity to add my voice to today's debate on Bill C-3, which proposes to establish an arm's-length review body for the Canada Border Services Agency.
The CBSA is already reviewed by several different independent boards, tribunals and courts. They scrutinize such things as the agency's customs and immigration decisions. However, there is no existing external review body for some of its other functions and activities.
For example, there is a gap when it comes to public complaints related to CBSA employee conduct and service. With the way things currently stand, there is also no independent review mechanism for the CBSA's non-national security activities. That makes the CBSA something of an outlier, both at home and abroad.
Other public safety organizations in Canada are subject to independent review, as are border agencies in a number of peer countries including the U.K., Australia, New Zealand and France. Addressing these accountability gaps through Bill C-3 would improve the CBSA's strength and would strengthen public confidence in the agency. It would ensure that the public could continue to expect consistent, fair and equal treatment by CBSA employees, and it would lead to opportunities for ongoing improvement in the CBSA's interactions and service delivery.
For an organization that deals with tens of millions of people each year, that is extremely important. Public complaints about the conduct of, and the service provided by, CBSA employees are currently dealt with only internally at the agency. I am sure all of my hon. colleagues would agree that this is no longer a tenable situation.
Under Bill C-3, these complaints would instead be handled by a new arm's-length public complaints and review commission, or PCRC. The new PCRC would build on and strengthen the existing Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, CRCC for short, which is currently the review agency for the RCMP. The CRCC would thus be given an expanded role under this bill and a new name to go along with its new responsibilities for the CBSA.
The PCRC would be able to receive and investigate complaints from the public regarding the conduct of the CBSA officials and the service provided by the CBSA. Service-related complaints could be about a number of issues. They could include border wait times and processing delays; lost or damaged postal items; the level of service provided; the examination process, including damage to goods or electronic devices during a search or examination; and CBSA infrastructure, including sufficient space, poor signage or the lack of available parking.
Service-related complaints do not include enforcement actions, such as fines for failing to pay duties, nor do they include trade decisions, such as tariff classification. Those types of decisions can already be considered by existing review mechanisms.
In addition to its complaints function, the PCRC would also review non-national security activities conducted by the RCMP and the CBSA. The PCRC reports would include findings and recommendations on the adequacy, appropriateness, sufficiency or clarity of CBSA policies, procedures and guidelines; the CBSA's compliance with the law and ministerial directions; and the reasonableness and necessity of the CBSA's use of its powers. The CBSA would be required to provide a response to those findings and recommendations for all complaints.
The creation of the PCRC is overdue. It would answer long-standing calls for an independent review of public complaints involving the CBSA.
According to former parliamentarian and chair of the NATO Association of Canada at Massey College, Hugh Segal, the lack of oversight for the CBSA is not appropriate and is unacceptable.
Former CBSA president Luc Portelance also said that when a Canadian citizen or a foreign national engages with a border officer and has a negative interaction, the entire review mechanism is not public. It is internal, and it is not seen as independent. In Mr. Portelance's view, that creates a significant problem in terms of public trust.
The Government of Canada has committed to rectifying this situation by addressing gaps in the CBSA's framework for external accountability.
With the introduction of Bill C-3, the government is delivering on that commitment. It builds on recent action taken by the government to strengthen accountability on national security matters. That includes passing legislation to establish the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. It also includes the creation, through Bill C-59, of the new expert review body, the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency. These two bodies are now in operation and they are doing extremely important work in terms of reviewing the national security activities of all departments and agencies, including the CBSA.
Bill C-3 would go further by establishing a review and complaints function for CBSA's other activities. In doing so, it would fill the gap in the architecture of public safety accountability in this country. It would allow for independent review of public complaints related to CBSA employee conduct, issues regarding CBSA services, and the conditions and treatment of immigration detainees. With respect to these detainees specifically, Bill C-3 would offer additional safeguards to ensure that they are treated humanely and are provided with necessary resources and services while detained.
The introduction of this bill demonstrates a commitment to keeping Canadians safe and secure while treating people fairly and respecting human rights. It is a major step forward in ensuring that Canadians are confident in the accountability system for the agencies that work so hard to keep them safe.
For all the reasons I have outlined today, I will be voting in favour of Bill C-3 at second reading. I urge all of my hon. colleagues to join me in supporting the bill.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens tout d'abord à dire que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Bonavista—Burin—Trinity.
Je suis heureuse d'avoir l'occasion de prendre part au débat d'aujourd'hui sur le projet de loi C-3, qui propose d'établir un organisme de surveillance indépendant pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.
L'ASFC est déjà assujettie à un examen de la part de plusieurs commissions et tribunaux indépendants. Ces organismes scrutent, entre autres, les décisions de l'ASFC en matière de douanes et d'immigration. Cependant, il n'existe aucun organisme de surveillance externe pour certaines de ses autres fonctions et activités.
Par exemple, rien n'est en place pour les plaintes du public touchant la conduite et les services des employés de l'ASFC. Dans l'état actuel des choses, il n'y a pas de mécanisme d'examen indépendant pour les activités de l'ASFC qui ne sont pas liées à la sécurité nationale. Cela fait de l'ASFC un cas particulier, tant au pays qu'à l'étranger.
Les autres organismes de sécurité publique au Canada font l'objet d'un examen indépendant, et il en va de même pour les agences frontalières dans un certain nombre de pays comparables, dont le Royaume-Uni, l'Australie, la Nouvelle-Zélande et la France. Combler ces lacunes en matière de reddition de comptes grâce au projet de loi C-3 permettrait d'améliorer la force de l'ASFC et de renforcer la confiance de la population à son égard. Les citoyens pourraient ainsi continuer de s'attendre à un traitement uniforme, juste et équitable de la part des employés de l'ASFC, et le tout donnerait lieu à des possibilités d'amélioration continue des interactions et des services de l'ASFC.
Pour un organisme qui s'occupe de dizaines de millions de personnes chaque année, c'est un aspect extrêmement important. À l'heure actuelle, les plaintes du public au sujet de la conduite des employés de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et des services qu'ils dispensent sont seulement traitées à l'interne. Je suis certaine que tous mes collègues trouvent que cette situation n'est plus acceptable.
Le projet de loi C-3 prévoit que ces plaintes soient plutôt traitées par une nouvelle commission, soit la commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. Cette nouvelle commission viendrait renforcer les efforts de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes, qui est la commission d'examen de la GRC, en s'intégrant à celle-ci. Le projet de loi prévoit élargir les rôles de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes et lui donner un nouveau nom qui cadrera avec ses nouvelles responsabilités auprès de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.
La commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public pourrait recevoir les plaintes du public à l'égard de la conduite des agents de l'ASFC et du service offert par l'ASFC et faire enquête sur ces plaintes. Les plaintes liées au service pourraient porter sur une foule de problèmes. Elles pourraient viser notamment: le temps d'attente à la frontière et le temps de traitement; les envois postaux perdus ou endommagés; le niveau de service offert; le processus d'examen, y compris les biens ou les appareils électroniques endommagés pendant une fouille ou un examen; les infrastructures de l'ASFC, y compris l'espace de stationnement insuffisant, la signalisation inadéquate ou l'absence d'espace de stationnement.
Les plaintes liées au service n'incluent pas les mesures d'application de la loi comme les amendes pour ceux qui n'acquittent pas les droits de douane, et elles ne comprennent pas non plus les décisions d'ordre commercial comme la classification douanière. Ces décisions sont déjà visées par d'autres mécanismes d'examen.
En plus de se pencher sur les plaintes, cette commission examinerait des activités de la GRC et de l'ASFC non liées à la sécurité nationale. Les rapports de la commission incluraient des conclusions et des recommandations concernant: le bien-fondé, la pertinence, le caractère adéquat ou la clarté de toute politique, procédure ou ligne directrice régissant les opérations de l’ASFC; la conformité des activités de l'ASFC à la loi et aux instructions du ministre; le caractère raisonnable et nécessaire du recours aux pouvoirs conférés à l'ASFC. L'ASFC serait tenue de fournir une réponse à ces conclusions et à ces recommandations pour toutes les plaintes.
La création de la commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public se fait attendre depuis trop longtemps. On répondrait ainsi à ceux qui réclament depuis longtemps un processus d'examen indépendant pour les plaintes du public concernant l'ASFC.
Selon Hugh Segal, ancien parlementaire et président de l'Association canadienne pour l'OTAN du Massey College, l'absence de mécanismes de surveillance pour l'ASFC est injustifiée et inacceptable.
Par ailleurs, selon Luc Portelance, ancien président de l'ASFC, tous les mécanismes d'examen ne sont pas publics lorsqu'on traite les plaintes de citoyens canadiens ou de ressortissants étrangers qui ont eu des échanges négatifs avec un agent frontalier. C'est un processus interne qui n'est pas considéré comme indépendant. D'après M. Portelance, cette situation nuit considérablement à la confiance du public.
Le gouvernement du Canada s'est engagé à rectifier la situation en comblant les lacunes du cadre régissant la responsabilité externe de l'ASFC.
En présentant le projet de loi C-3, il respecte cet engagement. Le projet de loi fait fond sur des mesures que le gouvernement a récemment prises pour renforcer l'obligation de rendre des comptes quant aux questions de sécurité nationale. Ces mesures comprennent l'adoption d'une loi visant à constituer le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement ainsi que la création, au moyen du projet de loi C-59, du nouvel organisme de surveillance composé d'experts, c'est-à-dire l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Ces deux organismes sont maintenant en activité et ils font un travail extrêmement important en examinant les activités de sécurité nationale de tous les ministères et organismes, y compris l'ASFC.
Le projet de loi C-3 ira plus loin en établissant une fonction d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour les autres activités de l'ASFC. Ce faisant, il comblera le vide dans l'architecture de la responsabilité en matière de sécurité publique dans ce pays. Il permettra l'examen indépendant des plaintes du public concernant la conduite des employés de l'ASFC, les services de l'ASFC ainsi que les conditions et le traitement des détenus de l'immigration. En ce qui concerne ces détenus particuliers, le projet de loi C-3 comprend des garanties supplémentaires pour garantir leur traitement humain et la prestation des ressources et des services nécessaires pendant leur détention.
La présentation de ce projet de loi démontre un engagement à assurer la sécurité des Canadiens tout en traitant les gens équitablement et en respectant les droits de la personne. Il s'agit d'un grand pas en avant quant aux mesures visant à ce que les Canadiens aient confiance dans le système de responsabilisation des organismes qui travaillent si dur pour assurer leur sécurité.
Pour toutes les raisons que j'ai données aujourd'hui, je voterai en faveur du projet de loi C-3 à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. J'exhorte tous mes collègues à se joindre à moi pour appuyer le projet de loi.
View Churence Rogers Profile
Lib. (NL)
Mr. Speaker, I am grateful for the opportunity to rise in this House and add my voice to the debate on Bill C-3 which proposes to establish an arm's-length review and complaints function for the CBSA.
The bill before us builds on an action that our government had recently taken to strengthen accountability and transparency in the public safety and national security sphere. As members know, we passed legislation to create the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, and that committee has now been established. Following the passage of Bill C-59, we also created a new National Security and Intelligence Review Agency. The goal of both of these bodies is to provide accountability for the national security work of all Government of Canada departments and agencies, including the CBSA.
Strong internal and external mechanisms are in place to address many of the CBSA's other activities. For example, certain decisions in the immigration context are subject to review by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada. Its customs decisions can be appealed to the Canadian International Trade Tribunal as well as to the Federal Court. However, the glaring gap that remains has to do with the public complaints related to the conduct of, and service provided by, CBSA employees.
There is simply no independent place to which people can turn when they have a grievance about the way they were treated by someone representing the CBSA. Without an independent body specifically tasked to hear complaints, it is easy to see how people can feel uncomfortable voicing any concerns. Bill C-3 would change that by establishing an independent review and complaints function for the CBSA. That new tool would be incorporated into, and benefit from the expertise and experience of, the existing Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, or CRCC, for the RCMP.
To reflect its new CBSA responsibilities, the CRCC would be renamed the “public complaints and review commission”, or PCRC. Members of the public who deal with the CBSA would be able to submit a complaint to any officer or employee of the agency or to the PCRC. The CBSA would conduct the initial investigation into a complaint, whether it is submitted to the CBSA or to the PCRC. However, the PCRC would have the ability to investigate any complaint that is considered to be in the public interest. It could also initiate a complaint proactively. In the event that a complainant was not satisfied with the CBSA's response to a complaint, he or she could ask the PCRC to review the CBSA's response. The PCRC would also have a mandate to conduct overarching reviews of specified activities of the CBSA. All of this would bring the CBSA in line with Canada's other public safety organizations, which are currently subject to independent review, and it would allow Canada to join the ranks of peer countries with respect to adding accountability functions for their border agencies.
Recourse through the PCRC would be available to anyone who interacts with CBSA or RCMP employees. This includes Canadian citizens, permanent residents and foreign nationals, including immigration detainees. Most of these detainees are held in CBSA-managed immigration holding centres. When that is not possible, CBSA detainees are placed in other facilities, including provincial correctional facilities. The CBSA has established agreements with B.C., Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia for detention purposes.
Monsieur le Président, je suis reconnaissant de pouvoir prendre la parole à la Chambre aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi C-3, qui propose d'établir une entité indépendante d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.
Le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis fait fond sur les mesures prises récemment par le gouvernement pour renforcer la reddition de comptes et la transparence dans le domaine de la sécurité publique et nationale. Comme les députés le savent, nous avons adopté une loi pour créer le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, qui a été mis sur pied depuis. À la suite de l'adoption du projet de loi C-59, nous avons également créé l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. L'objectif de ces deux organismes est de rendre compte des activités liées à la sécurité nationale de tous les ministères et organismes du gouvernement du Canada, y compris l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.
De robustes mécanismes internes et externes sont en place pour encadrer une bonne partie des autres activités de l'Agence. Par exemple, certaines décisions en matière d'immigration peuvent faire l'objet d'un examen par la Commission de l'immigration et du statut de réfugié du Canada. Les décisions douanières peuvent être portées en appel devant le Tribunal canadien du commerce extérieur et la Cour fédérale. Il reste cependant une lacune flagrante: la question liée aux plaintes du public en ce qui concerne le comportement des employés de l'Agence et les services qu'ils offrent.
Il n'existe tout simplement pas d'autorité indépendante à laquelle les personnes peuvent s'adresser lorsqu'elles ont une plainte à déposer concernant la façon dont elles ont été traitées par des représentants de l'Agence. Sans un organe indépendant ayant pour mandat précis de recevoir les plaintes, on comprend aisément que des gens peuvent se sentir mal à l'aise d'exprimer leurs récriminations. Le projet de loi C-3 changerait cette situation en établissant une fonction indépendante d'examen et de traitement des plaintes liées à l'Agence. Ce nouvel organe serait intégré à la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada; il pourrait ainsi tirer profit de son expertise et de son expérience.
Pour tenir compte des nouvelles attributions à l’égard de l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, la Commission civile d’examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada sera dorénavant connue sous le nom de « Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public ». Les membres du public qui ont affaire à l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada pourront maintenant présenter une plainte à tout agent ou employé de l'Agence ou à la commission. L'Agence se chargera de l'enquête initiale sur une plainte, que celle-ci ait été présentée auprès d'elle ou de la commission. Cependant, la commission aura le pouvoir d'effectuer une enquête sur toute plainte jugée comme étant dans l'intérêt du public. Elle pourra également déposer une plainte de manière proactive. Dans le cas où un plaignant n'est pas satisfait de la réponse de l'Agence à une plainte, il peut demander à la commission de l'examiner. La commission aura également pour mandat d'effectuer des examens complets d'activités précises de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Ces changements arrimeront l'Agence aux autres organismes de sécurité publique du Canada, qui sont actuellement assujettis à un examen indépendant. Ils permettront aussi au Canada de joindre les rangs de pays comparables en ce qui concerne l'ajout de fonctions de reddition de comptes pour ses agences de services frontaliers.
Quiconque a affaire à un employé de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ou de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada pourra se prévaloir d'un tel recours auprès de la commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, aussi bien les citoyens canadiens que les résidents permanents et les ressortissants étrangers, y compris les détenus de l'immigration. La plupart de ces détenus sont gardés dans des centres de surveillance de l'Immigration gérés par l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Lorsque ce n'est pas possible, ils sont placés dans d'autres établissements, notamment des établissements correctionnels provinciaux. L'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada a conclu des ententes en matière de détention avec la Colombie-Britannique, l'Alberta, l'Ontario, le Québec et la Nouvelle-Écosse.
Results: 1 - 13 of 13

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data